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List songs by Song title | Performer | Year

You searched for ‘Sing’, which matched 826 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
Botho Zigarillo  performed by Botho Lucas Singers und die Sound Masters  1972
Recommended by uporo [profile]


available on CD - Pop Shopping 2 (Crippled Dick Hot Wax!)


"sing little bird sing"  performed by the left banke  1968
Recommended by association [profile]

the only thing that could make "too" from the left bake any better would to have "walk away renee" and "pretty ballerina" on this album!
this is the best album better then the debut one even though most people don't think so and another thing the left bankes recording of desiree is a billion times better then the montage version!!
anyone who sayes different can not be trusted :)
one of my fav soft/sunshine albums dear god i love 'em :)

from too (smash 67113)
available on CD - yes (omly japanese import which is perfect with all o)



  konsu: I like this one too. The whole second album is near perfect. Nice to see it by itself on CD too, the way it was intended!
  artlongjr: Good to hear that someone else likes the Left Banke's second album as much as the first...they both are great! I first heard the second LP as part of the Rhino comp "There's Gonna Be a Storm". I just love the whole album, especially "Goodbye Holly" and "Nice to See You".
"The Glow" pt. 2  performed by Microphones  2001
Recommended by Open Book [profile]

I call it "THE - concept album." It's almost as if Phil Elvrum nearly single-handedly did what all others before him had tried to accomplish in attempting a thematically based musical piece of artwork. The title track from his stunning masterpiece digs deep into the thoughts of the main character as he battles life, struggles with suicide, and breaks down entirely. Besides the heart-wrenching lyrics, musically, the song is equally brilliant- utilizing both channels of the stereo to spin the listener around, sweeping organs, and a drop-dead gorgeous vocal performance all beginning with a kick ass fuzz-drone rock out featuring blazing drum fills. This songs brings me to tears every time I hear it.

from "The Glow" pt. 2 (K Records)
available on CD - "The Glow" pt.2 (K Records)


"glorious"  performed by goya dress  1996
Recommended by kohl [profile]

i love this song. the music is just right, the singer's voice is melodic and not too shrill. good lyrics, nice mood.


available on CD - rooms


"hotel room"  performed by richard hawley  2005
Recommended by kohl [profile]

his voice is almost gloomy, but in a striking and haunting way. it does fit the mood of the song--it sounds earnest and intense without being too singer-songwriter-y.


available on CD - coles corner


"Lazy Calm"  performed by Cocteau Twins  1986
Recommended by pleasepleaseme [profile]

Rather than single out any song on this record, i'll recommend the album as a whole. A journey to Paradise in sound. Robin Guthrie & Elisabeth Fraser have moved beyond their post punk/goth beginnings to forge a style i would call ambient -rock. This record & the following record "The Moon and the Melodies", with the addition of Harold Budd & Simon Raymonde is also pure heaven.

from "Victorialand", available on CD (4AD)


"Love of My Life"  performed by Queen
Recommended by sixstringman [profile]

Live version is best....when Freddie Mercury died, he left his entire fortune to her even though she had broken up with him because of his homosexuality.
When I hear the song, I always wish he could have grown older; lost him too early. Greatest pure "rock" singer in history! I saw them live!




"pretty girls make graves"  performed by the smiths  1984
Recommended by kohl [profile]

quite ironic, the rhyming pattern makes the lyrics sound light and amusing. it really is a clever song, and lyrics and music come together quite nicely.


available on CD - the smiths


"remnants"  performed by spahn ranch  1998
Recommended by kohl [profile]

in my opinion one of the best (or more original) techno/industrial bands of the 90s.
this song combines the force of the music style itself with surprisingly good vocals and interesting lyrics.


available on CD - beat noir


"Sarah Lee"  performed by Foghat
Recommended by sixstringman [profile]

From their 1st album; anyone can relate to the feelings inherent in the song...."you've been double-crossing me". Also check out "Trouble, Trouble" (song about drinking). 2 fantastic songs that were never played on the radio. If I was a DJ they would have been!




"she's everywhere"  performed by strangelove
Recommended by kohl [profile]

slightly haunting, not just the intro but the lyrics as well. the singer's voice is just right for this track and the music is fitting.




(Quicksilver Daydreams of) Maria  performed by Townes Van Zandt  1970
Recommended by andrew76 [profile]

This is (for me) one of the greatest songs of love ever written. The song describes the appearance of a goddess among women and is pure (if at times naive) poetry. The arrangement is simple lead and rhythm guitars and bass with an organ giving a more filled out feeling from the second verse and violin in the fourth. The tone is melancholy but happy, as if the singer is basking in the light of this most beautiful woman. It must have been written for someone, someone lucky to be thought so beautiful. But there is sadness in that the singer may be singing of his unrequited love. Some of the alliteration is fantastic too.

from Townes Van Zandt, available on CD (Pppy Records)



  booblikon: there is a great story in the documentary film "Be Here To Love Me", as told by Guy Clark: this song apparently came to Van Zandt in a particularly peak morning of inspiration, when Clark describes finding Townes uncharacteristically fit and alert. after making his bed to military specification, he played Clark a new song (this one), which he intended to perform at an appearance that same evening. i may have rendered parts of this story incorrectly, so i definitely recommend the movie if you are a fan; even if not, as it is sad but quite revelatory.
(Want You) Back In My Life Again  performed by The Carpenters  1981
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

One of the last Carpenters singles from their final studio album. I find this sweet 'n perky song strangely compelling, since it shows Richard and Karen Carpenter awkwardly trying to adjust their wholesome image to an early '80s synth pop template. Karen's voice is so processed and overdubbed that she blends in seamlessly with the synth-heavy backup -- still, the effect isn't cheezy but full and lucious. Knowing that Karen was slowly dying during this time makes this tune odder still.

from Made In America, available on CD (A&M)


...The Collapse of Detective Dullight  performed by Of Montreal  2001
Recommended by two-headed boy [profile]

'The Events Leading up to the Collapse of Detective Dullight' is not a song but a narrative story, and it’s funny as hell. The off-kilter character voices of the already brilliant stream-of-consciousness plot are cartoonish enough for their own Saturday morning series. When the detectives start their investigation nothing makes sense. There’s Jell-O, serenading butterflies, file cabinets, murder, catacombs, and all the seasonings for a hilarious dream. I am usually brought to tears when Detective Slots reads from his revered exercise in free verse titled ‘The Cause of Gauze’. I will supply you with a sample:
"Oh, the cause of gauze. The Manuels have fondled many memories from my lap though each memory has its own lap and swimmers swim laps. Even swimmers have laps however and while in that condition many require a delicate gauze."
If you hear this without purchasing the actual album, 'Coquelicot Asleep in the Poppies: A Variety of Whimisical Verse,' then you are being cheated. The dreams of this band are as colorful as the illustrations they provide us in their album sleeves. The 'Where's Waldo' pictorial representations enrich the listening experience by engaging us in a journey deep into the frying-pan brains of these madmen. In fact, this is a perfect introduction into a very strange world of psychedelicado. Think the Beach Boy's 'Smile.' The reaction of my friends after hearing this have been harmoniously the same, 'they have to be on drugs.' The truth is Of Montreal are not on drugs, they are drugs.

from Coquelicot Asleep in the Poppies: A Variety of Whimsical Verse (Kindercore KC064)


16 Toneladas (Sixteen Tons)  performed by Noriel Vilela  1971
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

This, friends, is the swingingest and most bizarre version of this chestnut you will ever hear. Having recently left the Cantores De Ebano (Ebony Singers), sort of a 60s Brazilian version of Sounds Of Blackness, Noriel Vilela, possessor of an impossibly deep, rumbling basso profundo capable of blowing your speakers, embarked on a brief yet fondly-remembered solo career. This witty reworking of the Tennessee Ernie Ford original replaces the country-western-pop of the original with a rollicking samba-rock rhythm and Portuguese lyrics extolling how much fun samba is, sung by a voice from deep in the crypt that swings like crazy. It stops everybody who hears it dead in their tracks and is the guaranteed highlight of any party. What Messrs. Ford and Travis would have made of it is anybody's guess, but this version refuses to die, having recently become a hit in Brazil all over again, 30 years after its first release. I've heard many, many versions of "Sixteen Tons," but believe me, this one truly runs away with the prize!!

from 7 (Copacabana)
available on CD - Samba Rock (Compilation)




  konsu: I stand corrected. It's just a matter of getting in line for some of this stuff , ya'know? Soo much music, so little time...sigh...
  Festy: São Paulo group "Funk Como Le Gusta" have a wonderful version of this also from their 1999 album "Roda de Funk". It's in the same style that Noriel Vilela did, but tighter.
  sodapop650: If you get a chance - try and track down a copy of Juarez Sant'ana's first LP it has a super-cool version of "Ghost Riders in the Sky" to complete the bizarre brazilian western covers.
1900 Yesterday  performed by Liz Damon’s Orient Express  1970
Recommended by artlongjr [profile]

This song is an intriguing one for me, I can never get enough of it! It's one of the easy listening classics from the early 70's and is one of the most perfect examples of the "Now Sound" genre, recorded by a Hawaiian bar band led by lead singer Liz Damon. Interestingly, it is a cover of a song written by Chicago soul songwriter Johnny Cameron and it was originally recorded by Betty Everett on the Uni label. I was lucky enough to find a copy of Betty's original version, but unfortunately her version has never been put on CD.

This song has a delightfully slow tempo and dreamy, romantic lyrics that somehow seem timeless. To me, the song always seemed to be in an older style than its early 70's release date would suggest. The bridge features great horn playing and a wonderful descending bass run.

The original 45 on White Whale Records had a song called "You're Falling in Love" on the flip side, and that song too is a classic, in my opinion.

from Liz Damon's Orient Express, available on CD (White Whale)



  prufrock68: Yep, this song is definitely of its time. It smacks of 'easy-listening' radio, from the staid brass break, the gentle, on-the-beat marimba strokes, and the whispery thin lead vocals of Liz and her equally restrained backup fellows behind her. Maybe the song just feels slower to you in this version. I don't think the Betty Everett version is any faster--it's just more rhythmic with its slightly funky percussion and string arrangements. Don't get me wrong, I like both versions, this one as much for its that kind of cool 'dated' feel as anything else.
1969  performed by The Stooges  1969
Recommended by schlick [profile]

Iggy sings about, what else, 1969. What an awesome way to kick off one of the greatest debut recordings of that whole decade, with kick-ass wah-wah guitar playing by Ron Asheton and a pulsating drum beat by brother Scott.

from The Stooges, available on CD (Elektra)


2002 - A Hit Song  performed by The Free Design  1969
Recommended by rum [profile]

Despite '2002 - A Hit Song's insistent chorus of "it's gonna be a hit, hit, hit!", by the end you're not convinced, "it's not gonna be a hit is it Free Designers?" "No… I'm afraid not Rum. To be honest it hasn't a hope in hell. Oh yeah we're bitter, of course we are, but, you know, when you're in the idiom of soft rock you can't get away with angst, you've got to maintain this 'pleasing' façade, so that's why we sound so jolly, so 'up' on this song. But yeah, it's hard..." Yes, they may, as they sing, have "sealed it with a kiss" but the cracks show. And it's that that makes this song particularly memorable. It's fascinating to see the rips in their Peter Pan wonderland, a place where they usually spend their time flying kites, blowing bubbles, befriending dolphins. And so this palpable excitement you hear in their heady harmonies is not fuelled by a surefire optimism of success but by an almost delirious desperation, "hit, hit, hit, sure to be a hit, hit, hit, gonna make a hit, hit, hit" they sing, panting, shaking nervously, craving that big fix. The track is a flip-side to the Byrds' 'So You Wanna Be A Rock'N'Roll Star'. Both are bitter recipes for pop success but whereas the Byrds are pissed off that any talentless buffoon can follow their recipe to success get a hit, the Free Design are pissed that "We did all this last time, and it did not work!". I guess you have to suffer for your art, and maybe the Free Design were having too happy a time. Or maybe their hair didn't swing right or their pants weren't tight.

from Heaven/Earth, available on CD (Project 3)



  olli: heh..brilliant commentary.
  konsu: Wow. I never thought of that song as such an exploded schematic. But it does shed light on their own self awareness even if unintentional at the time.
25 minutes to go  performed by Johnny Cash
Recommended by tuktman [profile]

Firstly, John Cash is a god! This is the first song of his that really grabbed me. He has a real sorrow in his voice that rings true when he sings about people being hung for murder and such.

featured on the albumn Folsom Prison Blues which is one of the best things you can buy, regardless of weather you're a country fan or not




25 or 6 to 4  performed by Chicago  19??
Recommended by kaptnunderpnts [profile]

while i don't like much of chicago's music, i like this song a whole lot. their music is often a bit cheesy to me, but this song rocks out. the guitar is awesome in it. it's a fast and furious rock and roll guitar. it single handedly makes this song. the title actually refers to two types of acid available in the 60's(?), 25 or 624. so, to imagine this song, think of a great classic rock guitar on acid.

from Greatest Hits. originally, who knows.



  borgs8: I think you're incorrect about the meaning of the song. The compound for lsd or cocaine is nowhere close to resembling 25 or 6 to 4. The song, written by Robert Lamm, is about staying up all night writing a song. (3:35 am.)
  kaptnunderpnts: You're right. The explanation I gave I heard once and took it as true. Thanks for the correction. I tend to question what I hear but I felt there was no harm in believing the acid explanation.
  allenmurphy: Actually the acid explanation is correct. LSD-25 was a popular type of LSD in the 60's. The drug known as Thorazine was considered to stop the effects of acid trip. Guess what? The number on the pill was 624. The lyrics in every verse suggest the effects of acid, spinning in his room, staring at blurry lights, etc. The question he asks himself is whether to take more LSD(25) and keep tripping or take Thorazine(624) and come down as the day breaks. Your shit has officially been ruined. bestpageever.com
  kaptnunderpnts: Right on allenmurphy. I like the acid idea more anyways. I thought that that was a really stupid way to refer to the time. I mean, artistic and creative freedom aside, 25 or 6 to 4 is a stupid way to refer to an hour of the day. I give Chicago a little more credit than that. Let's see if someone else writes and says that it really is a time of day. I couldn't open bestpageever.com.
  allenmurphy: sorry, try again. www.bestpageever.com nice to hear from ya kaptnunderpnts
5:09  performed by Bobby And I  196?
Recommended by Pal [profile]

When it seems like The Free Design finally have got the attention they so well deserve, I would like to recommend something that is very close in my opinion... Bobby and I! 5:09 fits in perfectly between Love so fine (Roger Nichols & The Small Circle Of Friends) and 2002-A Hit Song (The Free Design). The arrangment is incredible, there's a unique singer-singer magnetism on the top and the drums and bass makes me wanna dance the days away. Jim Gordon play drums (how many records has he done?) and the bass player, Rod Ellicott, is brilliant. Of course they added the song with string, horns & flutes... It's sunshine all over! I don't know anything about them, I only have this fine record, so if you know anything feel free to send me an email.

from Bobby and I (IMPERIAL LP-12420)


6060-842  performed by The B-52s  1979
Recommended by rum [profile]

The lyrical theme of ‘6060-842’ seems pretty mundane for the B-52s. Tina goes to the ladies room, sees a phone number scrawled on the wall, and so decides to ring it. Hmm… doesn’t sound like it’s gonna be a tale the measure of “the time our car was hijacked by the devil” and the like. Still this IS the B-52s, and recognisably so, “if you’d like a very nice time, just give this number a call” reads the unlikely graffiti. So something must happen. The band are optimistic too, bouncing along excitedly on a jumpy new wave rhythm. Tina, we reckon, is much like the band. She lives for wild parties and crazy adventures. This 6060-842 could be just the ticket. “Oh my gawd! I’m gonna give that there number a ring. You see if I don’t!” So she drops a dime in the phone slot and, “prays she gets the line.” She’s biting her lip, stabbing her nails into her finger tips, “come on… come ON!!!”

But pause a moment. Is she really so naïve? Does she really think a “really nice time” awaits her? In the gnarled and weather beaten hands of a social realist singer-songwriter, the number 6060-842 would lead to abuse, to prostitution, and ultimately, to death. In the hands of the B-52s? I don’t know, you tell me. A debauched toga party in a 1950s vision of the future…? Well, it’s neither. It’s just a brilliant anti-climax. You see Tina and the B-52a might be deranged, but the world they live in is not. It’s bloody typical. She dials 6060-842, and can’t get through! “The number’s been disconnected…” monotones the operator. But Tina won’t accept this, no, and neither will the band. They can’t end the track with Tina accepting the disappointment with a sigh of weary resignation, “ah well, nevermind… maybe next time.” No, no, this anti-climax has worked them up into an angry frenzy. Ricky Wilson vents his frustration with viscious slashes of electric guitar whilst Tina just keeps dialing and dialing, and getting rebuffed and rebuffed, “HELLO!!!” “sorry…” The track probably ends with them all smashing up the phone box. A superb, and much over-looked track.

from The B-52s, available on CD


96 Tears  performed by Big Maybelle  1967
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Searing r&b cover of the ? & the Mysterians classic. Maybelle almost sounds like she singing this about somebody else, and like she's amused by the pain she's caused. I know it's been comped a number of times, but I'm not sure of where.

from the single 96 Tears (Rojac 112)




  shaka_klaus: nice one.
A Fairy Tale of New York (live version)  performed by Christy Moore  199?
Recommended by mattypenny [profile]

Thought I might see if I can type in some Christmas favorites...

This is the Pogues song, sung by Christy Moore, the great Irish balladeer, folk singer and all round good bloke.

There's a studio version on his 'Smoke and Strong Whiskey LP'. The LPs great, but the version of 'A Fairy Tale' is not half as good as the live version from (I think) Live at the Point.

Christy's shows at the time were just him and an acoustic guitar. It was still a cracking show. He's now accompanied by another acoustic guitar (hey - lets rock!! :) ).

Anyhow he seems to get a big sound out of just guitar and voice.

Coming to the point...

This version is just Christy and his guitar. It preceded by a long story about how he 'stumbled into a fairy ring and bejasus I couldnt get out'. He's eventually helped out by a stranger who takes him by the hand and takes him to a pub. They sing each other songs and tell each poems. Then the stranger starts to sing 'It was Christmas Eve, babe...' .... and you know the rest. It finshes with Christy kissing the stanger on the lips and declaring Shane MacGowan 'I love you baby too'

Other Christmas songs:
Cajun Christmas
Il est Ne le Devine Enfant - Siouxsie and the Banshees
All I really want for Christmas - Ini Kamoze (maybe?)
Christmas Lullaby - Shane MacGowan
White Christmas - The Drifters

from Live at the Point


A Losing Battle  performed by The Sims Twins  1964
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Killer New Orleans r&b with a great piano line supplied by none other than Mac Rebbenack (Dr. John).

from the single A Losing Battle (Omen)


A moment to share  performed by Charles Fox  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Stunning. Atmospheric, laid back and hip mood instrumental by 'Barbarella' collaborator Charles Fox, featuring strings, picked electric guitar and some surprising chord changes.

from Goodbye Columbus - soundtrack (Warner Brothers)




  audiocarp: well, you know what we do with "collaborators"...
  masayo: Yeah, I agree with you. I do love this tune's chord changes. They are unexpected but dramatic. For me, So Kind To Me is my most favorite track in this soundtrack, especially the last overlapped chorus is terrific. Anyway, Love American Style, Girl, Love Boat...the more I know about Charles Fox's works, the more I think he is a genius.
  Swinging London: This is really, really nice. So typical of late '60's American soundtrack music. There was another film out at the same time called 'April Fools' and it had a very similar sound. Lovely horns!
A Perfect Sonnet  performed by Bright Eyes
Recommended by DearPrudence [profile]

A song from the younger days of Conor Oberst. The lyrics are amazing, and he may not be the greatest singer we've ever heard, but he sings it with such intensity it gives you the chills.




A Song For You  performed by Ray Charles  1993
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Ray Charles makes any song that he sings his own. This song is certainly no exception. I've heard several versions over the years but none of them can compare to Mr. Charles'. Sitting at the piano and backed by an orchestra, Ray sings this song with an intimate feeling that nobody can match! The boxset that Rhino put out in 1997 is a great compilation that features tracks from several labels that Ray Charles has recorded for over the years and is worth every penny!!!

from My World (Warner Bros 26735)
available on CD - Ray Charles: Genius and Soul (Box Set) (Rhino 72859)


A song to sing  performed by Hanson
Recommended by .holly. [profile]




Abbandonati Amore  performed by Paul Anka
Recommended by roberto [profile]

Paul Anka sings esperanto? No, it`s just his italian version of "Put your head on my shoulder". I don`t know the year it was recorded, but I think it were in the late 60`s. Although his italian articulation sounds queer to me (it feels like he red the lyrics from a board) "Abbandonati Amore" is a very nice song and the "Hawaiian" melody is still the same as in the original recording!


available on CD - Italiano (Continental Records)


After An Afternoon  performed by Jason Mraz
Recommended by Silly Goose [profile]

Jason's guitar wraps around you caresses you, making you feel like it's carrying you down a river on a warm summer day, sun shining on your face. His lyrics are true poetry, and he can communicate so many emtions. Only Jason could sing a song where all he does is read the intrument panels on his car and still sound great. Although this guy is still unsigned, his website (jasonmraz.com) has an short CD you can order and mp3's you can download. If this guys does not make it big one day then I'll....I'lll....I don't know what, but I'll do something.





Agitated  performed by Die Electric Eels  1974
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

One of the greatest rock songs ever recorded. Loud, distorted, strangely tuneful and tuneless at the same time. An exhilerating rush of pure energy without being remotely fast.


The superior single version also has the mighty Nick Knox on drums. And I don't think is on the cd. But it is on the LP.

from Its a 7 inch single (Rough Trade)
available on CD - The eyeball of hell (scat)


ai no toubousha  performed by Yoko NAGISA  2003
Recommended by chipple [profile]

Beautifully produced by Garry ASHIYA (part of the unit hige no miboujin (aka La veuve moustachue) with You-ichi KISHINO), this song from the single of the same name sounds a lot like Garry's works with hige no miboujin, creating a sort of classy, elegant 70's atmosphere. Yoko's vocals are fantastic and suit the song perfectly!

from ai no toubousha, available on CD



Ain’t No Mountain High Enough  performed by Diana Ross  1970
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Proving once and for all that she could carry herself as a solo artist and sing a dramatic love song, Ms. Ross slowed down the tempo and sank her emotions into this wonderful tale of unending love and devotion. The original full-length version clocks in at 6:16 but was brutally chopped down to around 3:30 for radio airplay and some of the song's most intimate words are removed. Sadly, the shorter version was featured on her box set a few years back. (what were they thinking???!!!) Get your hands on the 6 minute version and enjoy a true classic american song by a great american artist!

from Diana Ross, available on CD



  Mister C: I agree with you, the full length version of this is wonderful, as is her full length version of Reach Out I'll Be There recorded in 1971.
ain’t got no home  performed by clarence "frogman" henry  195x
Recommended by olli [profile]

nice slice of 50's piano-based novelty rock n' roll. at first this sounded pretty average to me, but when the second verse kicked in, and he started singing like a girl as he'd mentioned earlier in the lyrics, i knew it was a keeper. if you hang in there for the third verse, you'll hear where the man got his nickname, too:). i'm heavily into fifties and early sixties "semi-novelty" records, so this was pretty much like hitting the jackpot.
it's the only song of his i've heard that's done anything for me, though.






  n-jeff: Heh, I put this song on this years holiday tape I did for my 6 year old daughter. Quality, cheered me up whenever it rained. I went to see him perform in the 80's in a little pub in Putney. Can't remember a thing about it though apart from it being an old style Rhythm and Blues session. The only other song of his I know (and it was a big hit IIRC) is a ballad in the style my grandmother would have loved. And I can't remember the name of it, but its not a patch on this one.
"I sing like a girl, and I sing like a frog"

  bmsmithsmith: Good choice. First heard this on the Sounds of Monsterism Island compliation. It's a great feel good rock 'n' roll number guaranteed to put a smile on your face.
Albatross  performed by Slowdive  1991
Recommended by Genza [profile]

Hell, I could have picked almost anything from the back catalogue of this band. Albatross is the stand-out track of an outstanding 4 track EP (entitled Holding our Breath) from early ’90s shoegazers Slowdive. Bemoaned, decried and hated by Britain’s Britpop-loving press, Slowdive’s beautiful multi-layered sound has latterly found a kindred spirit in much lauded post-rockers Sigur Ros. So maybe they were right after all…

Back to Reading – and there is no stronger example of the Thames Valley sound than Albatross. Layer upon layer of minor chords – almost symphonic in their beauty – Albatross swells to a powerful crescendo of highly processed guitars. Non-believers should check out double A-sides Catch the Breeze and Shine. The fourth track on the rather grand EP is a cover of Syd Barrett's (former lead singer of Pink Floyd) Golden Hair. Utterly remarkable.

from Holding our Breath EP (Creation CRE 112)



Alfie  performed by Cilla Black  1966
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

My personal favorite version of this song. Cilla Black has a very rich and powerful voice that is just right! She sings it with much more feeling than Dionne Warwick's more popular version a year later. Burt Bacharach originally wanted to use this recording on the soundtrack to the film 'Alfie', but Ms. Black declined.

from Capital Single #5674 (Capital 5674)
available on CD - the Look Of Love: the Burt Bacharach Collection (Box Set) (Rhino R2 75339)



  Mister C: Cilla's version of this knocks spots off anyone elses, especially as Burt Bacharach conducted the orchestra at the recording session, he made Cilla do 19 takes of this, before George Martin chose take 4! Dionnes version suited the USA market more.
  Flippet: I agree with all of the sentiments above. Fans of Ms Warwicke are generally scathing of Cilla's Bacharach/David recordings - but I have to say that I find Cilla's interpretations generally have lusher backings and definitely have more heart. The 2 artistes voices are in fact very similar. But for me - Cilla's recordings of "Alfie" and "Anyone Who Had A Heart" are the definitive!!
All The Governors  performed by The Evens  2004
Recommended by Durruti [profile]

This Ian's new band is nothing like Fugazi, it's all acoustic now, there is also a female vocalist (who is also the drummer) and lineup is minimal (Only Ian and
Farina). Ian plays barritone guitar, Farina plays drumms. They both sing. This and "You won't feel a thing" are the best songs from their debut album.

from The Evens, available on CD


All I need is the girl  performed by Harry Connick, Jr.  1991
Recommended by jwmoz [profile]

The song is actually a show tune - originally from 'Gypsy'. The only place I know this version exists is off Harry Connick's laser disc - featuring a live performance from '91. Anyway, if you listen to Mel Torme belt out this showtune, it sounds, well, like a showtune. I'm not a big fan. It's kind of dimply cheeked-cheesy. Harry sings it like it's an absolute standard. Slows it down, gets a little soulsy and smooths it out... perfect crooner jazz. Unfortunately there is a good deal of talking and tap dancing breaking up the song.





All I really want for Christmas  performed by Ini Kamoze  199?
Recommended by mattypenny [profile]

This is the man who did 'Here Comes the Hot Stepper'. This is in a fairly similar vein - the payoff is 'all I really want for christmas, is to be a little bit more conscious'. Its kind of serious for a Christmas record (ragga singers always sound really really stressed out to me...), but, well, I llke it a lot


Other Christmas songs:
Cajun Christmas
Il est Ne le Devine Enfant - Siouxsie and the Banshees
All I really want for Christmas - Ini Kamoze (maybe?)
Christmas Lullaby - Shane MacGowan
White Christmas - The Drifters

from Natty and Nice


all the time in sunny beach  performed by Mad Capsule Markets  2002
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

It doesn't have the electronic elements of some of their songs apart from a DnB drum loop, but it is the only release they have on vinyl. (beautiful 7")
A breathless rush of too fast, too loud guitars, beach boy singing, slaughter and the dogs style riffs and terrible kiddie rock rapping.
Its noisy and fast, but desperatly tuneful.
The B-side "Good Good Girl" is also too fabulous. Catch them live if you can. Too young, too loud, too good. J-Rock!

from Osc Dis, available on CD




  ihatethebych: actually i think that song you have there is sunny beach rd.
  n-jeff: actually, rd, I think you'll find that song I have there is "all the time in sunny beach". on my cd. and on my lovely snow white 7. now why don't you quit carping and recommend something yourself?
  pouncyisdead: All the Time in Sunny Beach (noise therapy remix) is one of my personal faves. Great use of traditional Taiko drum as the underpinning for a jangly DnB remix. from the Pulse EP 2001
All The Way  performed by Billie Holiday  1959
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

This is Billie Holiday at her absolute best, or worst, depending on your point of view. I personally consider it her best. She sings this song with a feeling of absolute devotion and love. With only months to live, Billie Holiday made her final recording for MGM records in March 1959. Years of abuse thru drugs and bad relationships had left both her voice and body only shadows of their former selves. However, what she no longer retained vocally, she more than made up for emotionally. Her battered voice and life experience allowed for the feelings to shine thru in a way that she couldn't have possessed in her younger years and for this reason, I fall into the group that prefers her latter recordings over the earlier ones. I am the happy owner of a 10-cd boxset of her complete recordings for the Verve and MGM labels which includes outtakes and incomplete tracks recorded between 1945 and 1959. It's one of the few things I will grab if I have to evacuate my apartment in an emergency...

from Billie Holiday (MGM E 3764)
available on CD - Billie's Best / the Complete Billie Holiday on Verve 1945-1959 (Verve-Polygram 513943 / 314 513 859-2)



  scrubbles: This is one of my favorite Billie Holiday songs as well. Her voice is absolutely haunting here.
All U Can Eat  performed by Ben Folds  2003
Recommended by snoodlededoogans [profile]

"as political a song as I got" - says Ben Folds.
a quieter bouncy jazzy song where Ben sings to his son about how fucked up the world is. they point and laugh at the ignorance and consumption of most of the world. two verses and a solo or two, a short song comes together for his EP, Sunny 16. here's hoping he'll revisit it and flesh it out with another verse for the promised album...

from Sunny 16 (Epic/Sony)


Always  performed by Pet Shop Boys  2003
Recommended by Mike [profile]

For me the best song produced by the Pet Shop Boys for a few years, this mid-tempo number fuses a philosophical yet uplifting lyric with a typically intense, harmonically interesting PSB synth backing. The melody is beautiful and the song and arrangement are considerably more musically daring than much of the contents of their rather disappointing album "Release", which, in its standard single disc form, inexplicably omits this song.

"Always" is available on US limited edition two disc sets of "Release" and on disc one of the "Home and Dry" CD singles.


available on CD - Home and Dry CD1


Always You (Single Version)  performed by The Sundowners  1968
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

To me this is certainly a pinnacle of pure late 60s sunshine pop. Composed by pop genius Roger Nichols the timeless, idealistic lyrics were written by Tony Asher (who wrote most of the lyrics with Brian Wilson on Pet Sounds) not by his regular partner Paul Williams. Sunshine pop hardly gets any sunnier than on this track: great production, strings galore, Beach Boys-esque vocal harmonies, great bassline & trumpet and catchy as hell with it's uplifting chord progressions throughout. While the album version (recently included on the highly recommended "The Get Easy! Sunshine Pop Collection") is good already, the single version is just crisper, lusher, just perfect.

from Captain Nemo (Decca)
available on CD - The Get Easy! Sunshine Pop Collection (Universal)




  delicado: I have to agree. What a beautiful track! Very similar to the Small Circle of Friends record, but perhaps even better! I just have the version from the compilation; I'll try and track down the single.
  eftimihn: Delicado, you have the single version already, it's the one on my Roger Nichols compilation, i just somehow forgot to mark it as the single version. The single is clocking in at 2:18, the album version runs 3 minutes.
  delicado: Cool; I'll listen again. This track is sure to make it onto one of my comps; surely it could make a soft pop fan out of anyone!
  tinks: great album, and a horrendously overlooked group..."dear undecided" is the best beatles song that the beatles never recorded.
  Major Minor: I agree this is the best version... I think it's the same one that's on the "Sunshine days" compilation.... The one on Captain Nemo isn't awful or anything, but the orchestral intro does go on a bit...
America  performed by Bree Sharp  2004
Recommended by ajhorse21 [profile]

This song protests against our media-bombarded American culture and has fantastic vocals. Here is a little-known singer who should be famous.


available on CD - A Cheap and Evil Girl


American English  performed by Idlewild  2002
Recommended by Carrie [profile]

Now I understand,
Why words mean so much to you,
They'll never be about you..


Roddy (singer/writer) says that ‘American English’ is about “how ever single love song ever written is written about the person who wrote it, nobody else”.

from The Remote Part, available on CD


And Our Love  performed by The Buckinghams  1968
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Pure cinematic pop genius.This song was the flip for their single "Don't You Care?" which was a big hit for them lasting 14 weeks in the top 10.And even though I love that song, the B side has always captivated me more.The orchestration is just breath taking. It sounds more like a soundtrack theme than an album track.Like a lost Bond theme or something, really stunning!!

The LP uses the same style for another great one called"You Are Gone"as well. Vinyl copies are almost everywhere in the US for like 5$, Well worth it!

from Time & Charges (Columbia CL 2669 CS 9469)


angels of ashes  performed by Scott Walker
Recommended by tommy [profile]

lamenting passionate and heartwrenching. a ballad of love lost and found. big production , much depth and emotion. Scott lends a special something to this and most every song he sings. I never want to leave.




ano zero  performed by egberto gismonti  1972
Recommended by 77lemming [profile]

astonishingly beautiful, early 70s brazilian masterpiece. a classical piece disguised as a pop song, with a simple piano playing a wistful melody punctuated by an amazing unexpected ascending chord hook. gismonti sings the original version, with a string section and morricone-like wordless vocal backing him. for the final minute the key changes and the vocals and accompaniment stop, and the solo piano veers off into satie territory, before resolving back into the refrain. gismonti re-recorded this a few times, after finding success in europe as an avant/classical composer. this song also inspired the guitar and mandolin trio agua e vinho, who cover it on their self-titled album along with a few other gismonti compositions.

from agua e vinho, available on CD


Anything At All  performed by Crosby, Stills & Nash  1977
Recommended by G400 Custom [profile]

Could this be the most self-aware song ever written? 'I'm the world's most opinionated man,' sings sweet-voiced David Crosby in a tone of utter resignation. Bear in mind he'd already dealt with fame, failure, bereavement, heroin, booze and yachting by this point. It's a very stripped-down arrangement, with even CSN's trademark harmony kept to a minimum. And Crosby's rueful laugh towards the end is a real killer. Should I die soon, stop by my funeral and you'll hear this song... From a very underrated album, recorded after that toerag Neil Young had come and gone.

from CSN, available on CD


Anyway that you want me  performed by Spiritualized  1990
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A great version of this Troggs song, which formed one side of Spiritualized's first single. It's a pretty straight cover version, but with a richer production and that probably soon to become hip again early 90s dance/indie crossover sound (wah wah guitars, funky drums). Actually, it has aged pretty well, and I still can't listen to it without singing out loud when I hear it 'I've been watchin' you; and a lovin' you in vain...'

from the single Anyway that you want me (Dedicated)




  tinks: does that mean that it's almost time for a soup dragons revival?? hahahaha...
  shaka_klaus: i heard another version of this one recently in a commercial on tv. don't remember which at the moment. spiritualized gives me goosespots. i saw them in 98 at a festival and they opened up with 'cop shoot cop', what can i say? amazing. this version is also a fav of mine.
  delicado: I've been listening to the original Troggs version a lot recently. The Spiritualized version is a great cover - the same in many ways but also very different and intense. I think they're a good band; not everything they do is spot-on, but when a song by them is good, it's normally pretty mind-blowing.
  shaka_klaus: i forgot to write that the version of the song in the commercial is sung by a female singer.
  artlongjr: The female singer may have been Evie Sands, she sang the original, which was written by Chip Taylor. Chip is famous actor John Voight's brother. My favorite version of this tune is by the band American Breed from about 1967. Haven't heard the Troggs version yet.
Apistat Commander  performed by Xiu Xiu  2003
Recommended by pandaexplosion [profile]

For anyone unfamiliar with Xiu Xiu, "Apistat Commander" would be the song I'd recommend starting with when checking out this band. It's easily the most accessible thing they've recorded to date, but with that said, there's really not a whole lot about Xiu Xiu's music that screams "accessible," so approach with caution.

The song starts out innocently enough, with singer Jamie Stewart's barely audible moan and minimal synth backing, before ripping into a "cathartic attack mode" that sounds something like Nine Inch Nails raping the Cure. The song's best moment comes when Stewart screams, "oh, this relief/it's the oddest thing/ohmygod/ohmygod/ohmygod."

from A Promise (5 Rue Christine GER024)


Apocalypso  performed by The Monochrome Set  1980
Recommended by whoops [profile]

Come closer and listen carefully, this is the best kept secret of the so called music industry.
The Monochrome Set have changed my life and the ones of thousands (Well..maybe hundreds..ok, maybe 5 or 10). They came out of nowhere in the late seventies with a serie of singles on Rough Trade and were signed by Virgin in 1980 for 2 albums then by Cherry Red for a third one (Eligible bachelors) and by Warner for the last one (The lost week end). It is not an easy task to describe their music, it is always unpredictable, brilliant, clever and funny.

To finish, this is a quote from the cover of their second album :
"Once this record is in the house two's company and four is a party, roll back the carpet, switch out the light and dance in the glow of the firelight as the Monochrome Set provide your very own music far from the maddening crowd of the dancehalls"

Oh by the way, Apocalypso is an exquisite little song with a marimba and percussion break.

from Love zombies (Virgin)


Apple Of My Eye  performed by Ed Harcourt
Recommended by LawrenceM [profile]

Ed Harcourt has now committed this song to tape three times in three years. Firstly on the excellent debut mini-LP "Maplewood" in 2000. It was fleshed out and re-recorded for his full-length debut LP, "Here Be Monsters", in 2001, and now surfaces again in 2002 as the a-side of his most recent single. This time it's even better still, and comes accompanied with a great video. This is classic, piano led pop which could have been recorded at any time in the last 30 years. Comparisons to Randy Newman, Nick Drake andTom Waits have been forthcoming, and not unjustified. A great song which just gets better with each trip to the studio.

from Here Be Monsters, available on CD



Are You There (With Another Girl)  performed by Anita Kerr Singers  1969
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

This is one of my favorite Bacharach-David songs. It would be difficult to top Dionne Warwick's original, but Anita Kerr's jazzy cover comes awfully close. Kerr's arrangement is more muted and pretty - and when the drums kick in between chorus and verse, the results are breathtaking. Real cool!

from Reflect on the Hits of Burt Bacharach and Hal David (Dot)
available on CD - Reflect on the Hits of Burt Bacharach and Hal David/Velvet Voices and Bold Brass



  delicado: I was just about to recommend this. Isn't it a superb version!
Argomenti  performed by Isobel Campbell  2004
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Isobel Campbell was, of course, a member of Belle & Sebastian as well as the lead singer in The Gentle Waves, a disguised solo project backed by members of Belle & Sebastian. Her first "real" solo record "Amorino" was finally released in 2003. This wonderful cover version was only released on her 2004 EP "Time Is Just The Same". And while it's already great to see a Morricone cover version these days, this one is really amazing too. It just suits Mrs. Campbells airy, fairy-like voice perfectly. Compared to the Astrud Gilberto from 1971 this version feels even lighter, calmer, more stripped down since it's not orchestrated with strings.

from Time Is Just The Same, available on CD




  Issie: The singer has a great first name!!!
Art to Zebras  performed by Sy Richardson  1977
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

If you had one of the premium movie channels in the 1980's, you may have happened across a late-night showing of the Softcore-Porn-Musical film "Cinderella". While several of the musical numbers are quite good and rather amusing, the best song (imho) is "Art to Zebras", performed by 'Fairy Godmother' (a stereotypical crossdressing gay black man). This song is basically a list of all of the items he has stolen from the townspeople... and being that the film was made in 1977, yes, it is a disco number. Definitely a relic of it's time but nonetheless a great number from one of the films I keep in my Guilty Pleasure Chest.




As tears go by  performed by Nancy Sinatra  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This song is an interesting case study into the question of 'why do I like this version of the song more than any other'. I have a half-baked theory that for me, I mostly just like the first version of any great song I hear, regardless of whether or not it is the original or 'best' version. But this track is so different to the Rolling Stones's version that I think it would probably divide people pretty clearly. Produced by Lee Hazlewood/Billy Strange, 'as tears go by' is here recast as a crisp pop bossa nova. They even change the chords slightly (adding a new chord as she sings 'by'). To me, this makes the song vastly superior to the original (or any other I've heard). But I'm not sure anyone has ever agreed with me yet on that one...

from Boots, available on CD




  tinks: i had to go back and listen to this album after you mentioned it...and it is an incredible version, i really love that soft bossa sound that it's got going on. the rest of the lp is great, too!
  FlyingDutchman1971: i was lucky enough to find a vg++ copy of this LP at Goodwill several years back and this is definitely the best track on the album!! A great interpretation of the song!!
  n-jeff: I love this version, theres a cello or something under the introduction that adds a lovely melancholy feel. Quite a sophisticated sounding track. well removed from the bludgeoning innuendo I associate (and love) with Nancy and Lee. I had one of the few run-ins over musical policy with my old promoter over this track, he thought it far too downbeat.
  RCA76: I love this version of this song, infact I didn't know for a long time that this is a Rolling Stone's tune, but again because it's a version that is so original it really is incredible. Quite popular in Latin America (not so much w/ the Stone's version).
Ask me no questions  performed by Bridget St John
Recommended by milhouse-paris [profile]

Bridget St John is an english folk singer, whose records were released through Dandelion, DJ John Peel's record label, in the 70's. Her songs remind me of Nico or Nick Drake.
Take notice : surprisingly enough, there are 2 singers called Bridget St John. The 2nd one is an american pop/rock singer

from Ask me no questions (Dandelion)
available on CD - n/a anymore (see for miles)


Autumn Leaves  performed by Grace Jones  1978
Recommended by geezer [profile]

A perrenial sesonal classic given a veneer of French disco sophistication,its appeal lies in retaining the melancholy of the songs intent whilst infusing the proceedings with something more up beat and Parisienne ,so the song runs at am exhaustive 8 minutes but leads you out of a forboding autumn and takes you nearer the optimism of spring. All achieved through the genius of arrangement and Miss Jones empathy with the song

from Fame, available on CD


Babe, I’m Gonna Leave You  performed by Led Zeppelin
Recommended by Killswitch099 [profile]

The song is a slow melancholy song with a hint of vengeance building up in the beginning. The song then switches to a breakdown, including screaming "baby" by Robert Plant the singer, gives you goosebumps.




baked a cake  performed by Mick Thomas and the sure thing  2001
Recommended by phil [profile]

This chap Mick Thomas is extremely sentimental, and if you want to get into him, you have to expect to have your heart strings tugged pretty regular. However, if your make up is unashamedly sentimental as mine is, you can really get into this very plain, open and beautiful style of singing.

This one is one of Mick's best - I haven't quite worked out the genders on it (some people think he is singing as a woman in this one) but he certainly takes the place of a rather downtrodden, unconfident person. The chorus is very delicately judged:
I'd have baked a cake
if I knew you were coming
but now that you're here
it's time we did some talking
who'm I trying to kid?
I knew you'd be coming around


The backing is slow, but expressive hawaiian guitars subordinated to the lyrics. Mick's voice itself is incredibly expressive - he's a big old chap, and his voice has a lot of power but also it seems to have the sound of experience behind it. He also has a brilliant range -I've tried to sing this many a time and it's very hard.

from Dust on my shoes, available on CD


Balada Conducatorolui  performed by Taraf de Haïdouks  199?
Recommended by nrnono [profile]

Romanian gypsy music at its best:
- fast rhythm and chord progressions that make you listen in anticipation
- singer's voice (singing in Romanian/Gypsy?) rough sincerity reminds me of an old black delta bluesman
- the coolest violin riff ever.

from Taraf de Haïdouks (Elektra/Asylum)


Balance of Nature  performed by Burt Bacharach  1973
Recommended by konsu [profile]

What a great song! Burt's a heavy hitter on these pages, as you can tell I'm sure. There is something magical when he sings, maybe it's because he seems to humble the incredible songs he writes, or that he works with the best singers to walk the earth. Here is Burt at his best, in a spare setting with a strolling rhythm and paced piano chords, almost like he's singing to you across a smoky piano bar. The song conveys a simple truth, and almost makes it seem like a gospel, that nature continues unabated despite human trials and tribulations... How true.

A hard LP to get your hands on it seems. But worth the wait!

from Living Together (A&M SP 3527)


Ballad of Billy the Kid  performed by Ricky Fitzpatrick  2007
Recommended by jmalthew [profile]

Ricky Fitzpatrick's song "Ballad of Billy the Kid" is a 3 minute class in songwriting.

A compelling story filled with unexpected references, internal rhymes, interesting characters...not to mention his beautiful voice. His single acoustic guitar is the perfect backdrop for this tragic and beautiful story. A couple of four-letter words, but nothing that doesn't fit appropriately into the song as a whole.

Ricky's comment on the mystery of the song has always been "Never judge a man til you've walked a mile in his shoes".

I am a fan and always will be. I suggest checking Ricky out while he's still available as a "local" artist at www.rickyfitzpatrick.com.

from The Same Only Different, available on CD


Baoba  performed by Claudia  1971
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

Great track. Entirely scat-sung, steady midtempo funky groove, with that distinctive Odeon Studios sound, and the bridge breaks into a waltz-time section, with Claudia's high-pitched vocal effects strongly reminiscent of something off the Vampyros Lesbos soundtrack album. Claudia's a big collector's favorite among Brazilian femme singers, since her stuff's consistently strong, she's got this great strong expressive voice, cool material choices including a number of exclusive Marcos Valle songs, and NONE of her early 70s Odeon sides have been issued on CD.

from Jesus Cristo (Odeon MOFB 3668)




  delicado: Yes! I picked up a Claudia compilation LP recently in Brazil. It was all great stuff, but this was really the standout track.
Barnacles  performed by Ugly Casanova
Recommended by Reina [profile]

Lead singer of Modest Mouse...haunting, intense...

"we clung on like barnacles on a boat...even though the ship sinks, you know you can't let go"




Bat Macumba  performed by Os Mutantes  1968
Recommended by Solo [profile]

•sound and instrumentation:Slightly garage-sounding psych rock with Portuguese lyric- creative use of 1960s sound processing methods to give a somewhat spacy aspect. This is one of the more commercially rocking tracks from a very creative and groundbreaking psychedelic rock group.

from Os Mutantes (Omplatten/Polydor)
available on CD - Everything is Possible: The Best of Os Mutantes (Luaka Bop)


be with me  performed by beach boys
Recommended by stemmer58 [profile]

dramatic orchestral pop noir from the sunshine people.
unexpected dept, maybe because Dennis Wilson sings it

from friends
available on CD - friens/ 20 20


Beasts of No Nation  performed by Fela Anikulapo-Kuti & Egypt 80  1989
Recommended by phillphillphill [profile]

Here is a real music man from Africa who stirred alot of contraversy by forming his own political party and using his music as a weapon against the colonial british government. He wrote Beasts of No Nation in 1986 after spending 3 years in jail without being convicted. Beautiful voice!! Influenced by American jazz and Drum rhythms of west nigeria. Many consider him the African James Brown or Bob Marley, but this is not so. Find out for yourself!


available on CD - Beasts of No Nation/O.D.O.O. (MCA)


Beautiful Goodbye  performed by Cilla Black  2003
Recommended by Mister C [profile]

A track from Cilla's recent album which really should have been a single, excellently sung and produced

from Beginnings (EMI)


Beautiful night  performed by The Burden Brothers  2004
Recommended by Reck [profile]

Ex toadies lead singer Todd (Vaden) Lewis, one of the best voices in rock today. Don't know if you get this goodness yet outside of texas, but the tour is upcoming, and I actually heard it on the radio (gasp) something the Toadies 2nd album didn't even get (a great sophmore release from a platinum selling band... hmmmm) anyway its uplifting and real, but does has a little of that Tv sheen on it that instills hope in you, even if life is never really as good as it promises.

from Buried in Your Black Heart


Beauty and the Beast  performed by David Bowie  1977
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

A nasty/under appreciated gem from David Bowie's Berlin period, "Beauty and The Beast" is sheer perfection/pure malice in musical form. Ominous squibs of sound coalesce around an almost crocodilian groove and Robert Fripp's hissing, poisonous guitar line. Then Bowie makes one his most memorable vocal entrances with a sound somewhere between a croon and a scream. Things just get nastier from there - David playing the hipster, killer android on the lead vocal, while the backgrounds get all down and dirty on chorus. Then, as if he's suddenly come his senses after committing some atrocious act, Bowie howls over the break: "I want you to believe me!/I wanted to be good!/I wanted no distractions!/Like every good boy should!" - before sliding back into the sociopathic sleekness of the last verse. The genius of the tune is that it suggests all manner of violence/bad shit without actually describing any act of mayhem. Therefore the imagination runs riot. A brilliant/evil track.

from "Heroes", available on CD


Bel m’es qu’eu chant   performed by Raimon de Marival  1990
Recommended by flange1515 [profile]

Very strong and old the lady who sings it died a few years ago she was Catallan I think. From the 12th century???




Bend and Break  performed by Dashboard Confesional
Recommended by Litterate&Stylish [profile]

ONe of those emo whispered tracks with romantic words.
Sample: I am fairly agile I can bend and not break or I can break and take it with a smile.
It's soft and sweet and you can just imagine someone singing it to you on a balcony at night. I'm just a big dumb romamtic so sue me


available on CD - A Mark A Mission A Brand A Scar


Besame Mucho  performed by Lila Downs
Recommended by music2go [profile]

I am a collector of songs. Besame Mucho is one of my favorites and my favorite by far is by Lila Downs. The band she is playing with is what makes this song so great. The percussion is awesome. I am amazed that I am the first person to recommend Lila Downs as she was the singer for the movie Frida and has become well known since then. This Amer/Mex woman has several albums and to me is one of the best singers I have ever heard. I could go on and on. If you listen to the clip, it is only 20 -40 seconds and the band plays a long beginning so you may not even get to hear her voice. What a shame!

from Trazos



  FlyingDutchman1971: I will have to find this version and give it a listen. I am rather fond of the version by Cesaria Evora from the sountrack to the film 'Great Expectations' (1997)
Big Saturday  performed by The Jazz Butcher  1985
Recommended by Yammer [profile]

Pat Fish of Northhampton, England, is not a rock star for reasons which might include his naturally reticent and embarassed nature, excessive amounts of Oxford education, and the vagueries of the marketplace, but would not include his songwriting talent, which is massive, if perhaps a wee bit limited in scope (no weird chords, all songs about heartbreak, drunkenness, or cannibalistic fantasies about the Prime Minister). "Big Saturday" is a rousing near-rock number in Pat's heartbreak mode. His singing is liquid, soulful (but not shouty), tender, and helpless in the face of love...a love that MUST remain unrequited for the good of other friendships and sundry considerations of duty and fidelity. At least, I think that is what is going on in this simple, yet devastating tune. For more info, see http://www.jazzbutcher.com/htdb/albums/sex.html

from Sex and Travel (Glass)


Big Time  performed by Peter Gabriel  1986
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

An even funkier hit single than "Sledgehammer" ? which had an epic groove but was too slow to actually dance to ? "Big Time" is a sardonic response to yuppie materialism with the funniest lyrics of Peter Gabriel's entire career. (The ending of the song, stopping just before the obvious punch line to all this discussion of how preternaturally huge everything in Gabriel's charmed life is, is a small moment of brilliance.) But the brilliance of the song is in the way it ties all that Gabriel had been learning about African percussion and Middle Eastern melodies ever since the days of his third solo album and ties them all into the service of a walloping great groove, making plain the connections between North Africa and Stax-Volt once and for all. The combination of talking drum and wah-wah guitar owes as much to Booker T and the MGs as it does to King Sunny Ade, which is both the key to "Big Time" and a clue as to why Gabriel's later, more explicitly world music focused albums just aren't as much fun.
(AMG)

from So, available on CD


Bill Drummond Said  performed by Julian Cope  1984
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

A key track from Julian Cope's fragmentary second solo album, 1984's Fried, "Bill Drummond Said" is the only song on the album that resembles the swirling psych-pop of his old band the Teardrop Explodes. This is no doubt intentional, as the lyrics take aim at the group's former manager, Bill Drummond (later half of the Timelords, the KLF, and the JAMS), albeit in a typically vague way. The lyrics are skeletal enough that several interpretations might be brought to them, but they seem to recount a dream in which Cope witnesses his former manager in the act of strangling an unidentified woman to death. In contrast to the vaguely unpleasant lyrics, this is by far the catchiest and sweetest tune on Fried, with a dreamy folk-rock sound to its ringing 12-string guitar riffs and breathy harmonies. Coming between more disjointed and edgy tracks like the bizarre fairy tale "Reynard the Fox" and the Syd Barrett-like ramble "Laughing Boy," "Bill Drummond Said" sounds downright bubblegummy. Unsurprisingly, the always combative Drummond got in the last word with his answer song, "Julian Cope Is Dead," a sarcastically folky acoustic tune from his odd 1986 solo album The Man in which Drummond claims that in the waning days of the Teardrop Explodes, he had suggested that Cope commit suicide to make the band famous and laments that the singer didn't take him up on it.
(AMG)

from Fried, available on CD


Bird on the Wire  performed by Leonard Cohen  1973
Recommended by eve [profile]

This song is mostly carried by Leonard Cohen's voice, which meshes really well with his "longing/loving/musing on a wasted life" style lyrics. It moves really slowly, but that makes it nice.

from Suzanne


birmingham school of business school  performed by the fall
Recommended by frosch [profile]

starts with bells and a rising lot of sounds; a whole rock orchestra; and the unique letters and voice from mark e. smith, over and over.





  kohl: excellent!
Bitter-Sweet  performed by Roxy Music  1974
Recommended by delicado [profile]

For someone like me, the strangest thing about getting really into Roxy Music is the overt rockiness of a lot of their material. Even on this track, which is one more of their slower, more mournful numbers, there are a lot of very heavy rocky moments. They work pretty well though, and I'm certainly not complaining.

The atmospheric opening is breathtaking, and Bryan Ferry's vocal as he sings 'I've opened up my heart' is incredibly beautiful. The words and music seem to meld together in a very pretty way, but then before long the track mutates into a stomping, carnival like passage that clearly influenced Nick Cave to a considerable extent. Throughout the song there's this interchange between delicate, melodic verses and the rowdy, discordant section. Like another favorite Roxy track, 'Just like you', this song finishes with a clever chord change.

I'm sure many people would find 'Bitter-Sweet' much too dramatic and serious - perhaps some days I would too - but it does have an incredible elegance and style that makes me keep on listening.

from Country Life, available on CD



Black Cherry  performed by Goldfrapp  2003
Recommended by Mike [profile]

Wonderfully lush, yet dark electronica. Alison Goldfrapp's excellent voice shines on a landscape dominated by synthesizers of various vintages. When she stops singing, the synths fizz even more.

from Black Cherry, available on CD


Black Cherry  performed by Goldfrapp  2003
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

The title track from Goldfrapp’s second LP is everything pop music should be – sexy, glamorous, smart and weird - but rarely is these days. If their debut album was all about, in the duo’s own words, “Ennio Morricone and disco”, then the follow-up is all about disco and…Ennio Morricone – only wrapped in a shimmering gown early 1980’s inspired electronic textures. Electro-clash with heart and soul, a Madonna song with 170 I.Q., a tune for Milva to sing on Moonbase Alpha – I could go on and on…

from Black Cherry, available on CD



  eftimihn: Excellent recommendation and great description. Unfortunately the only track off their sophomore effort that can moodwise hold up to such exquisite songs like "Pilots" or "Utopia" from their debut.
  robert[o]: I actually dig the second LP a great deal. Very disco/electro, (as opposed to Ennio), but really high quality disco/electro. (And simply delivering a "Felt Mountain" Part II would have been a bit dull - I think.) "Forever" and "Hairy Trees" are pretty darn exquisite, likewise.
  catfish: a beautiful track that simply melts into your ears. You get the impression that something very naughty is going on but never quite sure exactly what. Has Rachel Stevens ripped this band off or what?
  OneCharmingBastard: A sumptuous moment from one of this decade's most solid slabs of sound.
Black Eyed Dog  performed by Nick Drake  1974
Recommended by two-headed boy [profile]

In order to fully examine the minds of torment and depression, one would need to be familiar with Nick Drake's 'Black Eyed Dog.' With his transcendant ability to translate his demons into song, Nick Drake accounts a supernatural phantasm chasing him through the darkness of his own neurosis. 'Black eyed dog he claws at my door' - sung in his upper register, with the use of heavey falcetto, sounds like he is straining to survive a nightmare. His performance, despite the sparse production of acoustic guitar and vocal, is expansive. Use of harmonics and finger roll on this song proves the mastery of his instrument, as an amateur guitarist I am baffled by the sound he can create. The singular pulse of the guitar string rings-out with a delicate harmonic while the layering of other voices continue subtly underneath. And the result is the tragic embrace of his own psychological deterioration; a horror unlike the Macabre style of the French, it stands as its own haunting style, that of 'Drakesque.'

As we know his depression did finally catch up to him, and as a revisionist I would say that Nick knew it would all along, sooner or later. One would only need to hear this song and some of the pieces are put into place.

from Time of No Reply, available on CD




  Liv: they say he had to have several overdubs of his voice on this track until he got it right, because of his depression his voice was trembling.. so far from the classical orchestrations of his early recordings, the sparse instrumentation and the intense emotion of "Black dog" affects you even more as Nick's haunting voice sounds like he's singing through an abyss of infinite darkness and despair..
  songs-I-love: Actually, the lyrics to this song go "A black-eyed dog, he CALLED at my door...", but with Nick's way of singing (or rather: expressing himself), it's just all too easy to get confused. The line "I'm growing old and I wanna go home" gets through my heart like a bullet every time I hear it. Only few songs can evoke such strong emotions in me.
  kkkerplunkkk: Yes beautiful and chilling, but it's a small comfort to know that this wasn't actually the last song he ever recorded, that sad honour going to the recently discovered Tow The Line.
Black Is Black  performed by Lord Sitar
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

An exciting instrumental version of Los Bravos' hit single, done sitar-style. Playing pop music on the sitar must be difficult, since it never was the most melodic of instruments. Lord Sitar is the best I've heard of the psychsploitation musicians that briefly came into vogue around 1967 or so.





  konsu: The details as to the group on this record are discussed quite often, because it is soo good! Most people believe it's Jim Sullivan, Who did a lot of freakbeat/psych library music during this period. Also check out his "Sitar Beat" LP ,which has great versions of Brighter Shade of Pale & She's Leaving Home!
  shaka_klaus: i dig this one, but i like the b-side of the single better. it's a version of "have you seen your mother..." by the rolling stones.
black room  performed by jun mayuzumi  1968
Recommended by olli [profile]

totally amazing, swinging piece of japanese vocal-centered 60's big band sound. i´m especially fond of the tarzan-esque way her voice bends at about 2:54, and the uh! ah! sounds of the backup singers. this needs to get its own movie scene ala the big dance number in sabu's "monday", if anyone's seen that.

from angel love capitol 7" cp-1027 (capitol)




  Sem Sinatra: I totally agree with the above. It's by far the best song I've heard by Jun Mayuzumi. Her later songs veer dangerously into Enka (Melodramatic and melancholy but largely very dull Japanese popular song)
  sardonicsmile: oh, i own this 7" too! both sides are great, and so are her gutsy and fun vocals.
Blame It On A Monday  performed by Anita Kerr Singers  1972
Recommended by konsu [profile]

This is my favorite these days. Totally cuts into my dull recession-based lifestyle and peppers it with some yellow Nashville sunshine....

The song bounces through a hum-drum monday with the bouyant post-it note poetics of a 9 to 5 cutie... Nothing is going right today, and the song sounds like the antedote :

" ...Gotta' go to work, really gotta per-cu-late... Try to catch the fish that's jumping off your
dish-or-plate...." To "Don't ask for help... from anybody... cause they'll only turn you down-ooo...
na-na-na-na-na, ooooooooooh na-na-na-na-na, Blame it on a mondaaaaayy..... YEAH! ....

The session smokes and the players are astounding! Huge southern brass-blasts counterpoint the bouncing hoe-down groove... It must have been a hoot to play because the track clocks in at over four minutes, but you hardly notice for all the fun....Funky in a very music-city way. Almost Nancy & Lee like, with a little Free Design-like harmonic optimisim in the vocal arrangements, which Anita's well known for.

I recommend the whole record though.It plays straight through, and you play it again & again. A lost gem.

from Grow To Know Me (AMPEX A-10136)



Blood / Brass  performed by Black Lodge  2002
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

The very mysterious DJ Black Lodge, from Manchester. This is a person who played his cards so close to his chest that his first couple of singles didn't even name the tracks.

Blood / Brass combines the music from Dumbo (that 'Pink Elephants' tune) and some heavy dub. And, if that doesn't sound genius to you, well, I do despair.

A pendant's note: this track actually apears on two singles, his first on Acupuncture (where it appeared untitled and without so much dub content), and the remixed version that I am recommending here, a limited-edition release on an unknown label through the Rough Trade shop.

from the single Blood / Brass (Unknown Unknown)



blow him back into my arms  performed by moneybrother  2004
Recommended by shaka_klaus [profile]

moneybrother (anders wendin of former swedish punkband monster fame) delivers his strongest gospel since his first lp, 'blood panic'. this song is among his absolute finest and together with the first single of the album, 'they're building walls around us', a good example of a brilliant song writer.

from to die alone, available on CD


Blowin' Bubbles  performed by Call and Response  2001
Recommended by ronaldo [profile]

Just a perfect, perfect pop song. Makes you wanna dance and groove along, but at the same time it's soo unbelievably sweet and a just a liitle melancholy. It starts with a drum beat, and then there's this bass-and-drums groove for a few seconds. Then a little sweet electric piano line enters, just before the voice begins singing the melody: "I'm drinking stars up in the sky, you know where you are / I'm driving cars around your house, it seems so fun". When it's time for the chorus ("So listen to my bubble go pop / I'm coming in, I'm coming over the top"), the main voice sings over a backing vocal doing an "ooh" harmony, and then there's absolute genius backing vocal, where the word "pop" becomes "papapapa". After that, a little guitar riff/solo, along with a very cool electric piano line. Then it just repeats everything all over again one more time, for infinite happiness. The time for a middle break has arrived. A new funky bass groove with lots of different "papapa"s harmonizing together. Now, go back to the first bass-and-drums groove, with a jazzy, relaxed guitar solo, and then it's just grooves and grooves and heavenly harmonies, "Blowin' bubbles".




Blues for Hari  performed by Emil Richards
Recommended by human-cannonball [profile]

A very tasty and rather 'European-sounding' cover of the 1967's psyche-jazz Tom Scott's original from the well-known session percussionist-vibraphonist Emil Richards. Although it comes in a compilation of Emil's best late 60s latin-jazz recordings (interestingly, not a single horn instrument is used in the whole set!), this is an energetic percussive jazz-rock piece, with great vibraphone and bells(!) solos.


available on CD - Luntana (Afro-Cuban Jazz) (Soundsational (Italy))



  konsu: Kudos for rep'n mister Richards! I love this track! This is from the awsome "New Time Element" LP he did for UNI.The whole record is conceptual versions of contemporary pop tunes done in wild time signatures. Check out his take on "Take 5", he does it in 4/4 time! He also does "Georgy Girl" in 5/4 & "Happy Together" in 15/8 time!Also check out Emil Richard's Journey To Bliss LP... MAD STUFF!!!
Bon-Jour  performed by Ed Lincoln  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

When I heard this album by the Brazilian organist Ed Lincoln, I really wasn't expecting a tune like this. It's a beautiful, tender vocal, sounding like something from a Francis Lai soundtrack, with lovely male-female alternating vocals and an exquisite Morricone style trumpet blending well with the guitar/organ/percussion instrumentation. An absolutely stunning track - playful but slightly sad at the same time, with some spooky laughter/sighing from the female singer towards the end.

from Ed Lincoln, available on CD




  n-jeff: Thats the thing with Lincoln, its not just the cheese, he played alongside the best Jazz musicians in Brazil. He could cut a pretty funk when the occasion demanded, and his "Seu piano eletrico" album ranges from african tinged stompers to mid sixties style vocal cuts. IMHO opinion underrated as a producer as well, he seems to have been active on the cutting edge of Brazilain music from the late fifties right through to the late seventies. I intended to use this track as the payoff for a compilation I did for a cd trading ring, but I don't think I had the space. He was in hospital just before Christmas (2003), not sure how he's doing now.
  delicado: I have to say, I'm pretty blown away by his work. I know you've been harping on about him for years, so I wish I had listened earlier!
  sodapop650: Ed Lincolns best work is the recordings he did with Orlann Divo becasue he is a little more low-key and the arrangements are just plain better. I love O Ganso cause its so damn crazy and his recordings under the name Claudio Marcelo are pretty good too. A rcord seller in Brazil actually got me his autograph as a present because I bought so many of Ed Lincolns LPs. But I gotta tell you, someone like Sergio Carvalho or Eumir Deodato are much more powerful on the Hammond and Ely Arcoverde, Juarez Sant'ana Ze Maria I think are all more mature organists. I put Ed Lincoln with Walter Wanderley a little heavy on the cheese.
Bones  performed by BRANDI IFGRAY  1999
Recommended by beautifulmutant [profile]

Kind of like a drole walk through rainy streets in Europe somewhere. Light, jangley echoy guitar reminds me of Ocean Blue, The Smiths and more but in a more mello mood. No one seems to know who Brandi Ifrgray is... he sang for Shadowplay before releasing two very cool CD's "Le Mutant" and "Stargazer".

from Stargazer (Sahko)
available on CD - STargazer


Borderline  performed by Jane  2003
Recommended by SimonB [profile]

Close Up And Reak is a lovely album but this is my favourite track. It's a bittersweet tale of a person's (possibly Jane's), gradual loss in humankind. The song opens with a wailing violin which then introduces a soft, acoustic blanket of intsrumentation topped with Jane's wistful vocals.

from Close Up And Real, available on CD


Born To Lose  performed by Bouncing Souls
Recommended by inbloom44 [profile]

I hearty Punk rock romp through heart break....Sing along if you want.




Bouncing Babies  performed by The Teardrop Explodes  1980
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Teardrop Explodes’ second single, "Bouncing Babies", was released in July 1979, following the departure of organist Paul Simpson and the arrival of his replacement Gerald Quinn. With those changes, the group's sound, too, would alter dramatically, as Quinn took the band into the crypt-like depths of proto-Goth; in true Phantom of the Opera style, his organ haunts the grooves, while Gary Dwyer pounds his drums like a man who’s just discovered he's been buried alive, and Michael Finkler reenacts the Texas Chainsaw Massacre with his buzzsaw guitar.

Ecstatic reviews greeted the single, but its lifespan was short – before long, ”Bouncing Babies” was so hard to find that the Freshies came close to scoring a hit simply by bemoaning that difficulty – their &"I Can't Get (Bouncing Babies by the Teardrop xplodes)" itself ranks alongside its namesake among the most memorable of the age.
(AMG)

from Kilimanjaro, available on CD


Brassneck  performed by The Wedding Present  1989
Recommended by lingereffect [profile]

I'm a complete sucker for jangly guitar, and thus The Wedding Present's back catalogue is a treasure trove for me. A great breakup song from a band with more than their fair share, "Brassneck" is available in two versions on the reissue of _Bizarro_ - the LP version and the single version (the latter of which was recorded by Steve Albini and is many people's favourite, but not mine). It isn't their fastest song, but the speedy, tendonitis-inducing guitar strum still leaves me slack-jawed.

from Bizarro, available on CD



  delicado: I also prefer the album version. Oddly enough I was playing the guitar in that fast-strummed jangly style this very evening... I think the George Best album is my favorite.
Break Fool  performed by Rah Digga  2000
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

The first lady of the Flipmode Squad. Amazing. Her voice is deep and rasping, tough and hard. She doesn't fall into the traps set for so many other female MCs - "looking pretty in the video", to quote another of her songs - or coming across uber-sexed, or singing any bloody ballads.

She rhymes with precision and with more than a dash of humour. Sounds as fresh as it did 4 years ago, and makes me frustrated for that long overdue second album.

from Dirty Harriet, available on CD



Breakaway  performed by The Beach Boys  1969
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

I can never get tired of this song! The overlapping vocal harmonies are wonderful. A good example of Brian Wilson's genius at creating a crafty, intricate production supported by a simple melody. Why this wasn't a huge hit I don't know (I believe it was their last single at Capitol and wasn't promoted very well).






  johnnyweissmueller: I agree - I have just listened to the song for the first time ever and am entirely "won over" - superb - nothing childish about it; simple but great, humble, never overdoing it. This is imaginative genius at work - in this case it has gotten way, way less credit than it deserves. Thumbs up for a powerful voice in good surroundings.
Breathe Out  performed by Nothingface  1998
Recommended by Vagina Man [profile]

Breathe Out is one of those songs that no matter how many times you listen to it it still rocks. If you a metal head then you will appreciate the quality of music Nothingface throws at you. They are very heavy but melodic. The lead singer has a unique talent in which he can reach high notes as well as growl so deep he will make you shit yourself. Every time I hear this song all I can do is bang my head and scream along to the insanity that flows within my head.

from An Audio Guide to Everday Atrocity (Mayhem Records)


Breve Amore  performed by Mina  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Another great dramatic pop number by Mina, this song is from the comic Alberto Sordi film, 'Fumo di Londra'. The backing track is identical to that used in the film, although Mina's version was released separately as a single. What can I say? This is an other deeply affecting dramatic pop number in which Mina belts out the words in a heartfelt manner. If these are the same words I used to describe her track 'se telefonando', then that's because this song is pretty much in the same vein, with a heavy, brass-laden pop arrangement.
ps. a version of this song exists with none other than ME singing in Italian - reverb-laden vocals belted out karaoke style over the same background track.

from the single Breve Amore
available on CD - Studio Uno 66 (BMG Italy)




  tinks: the 'fumo di londra' soundtrack was recently reissued as a 2lp set, with tons of outtakes. i really, really love it. i'd make a recommendation from it right now, but i can't remember the song title, and the record isn't with me. argh!
  delicado: The one which really bowled me over was 'Mr Dante Fontana'! Like 3 brilliant songs rolled into one!
  tinks: wouldn't you know it? that was the one i was trying to remember! i couldn't recall if that was the title or if they just said "hey, mr. dante fontana" a lot.
  jeanette: Also from that Fumo Di Londra album: that fabulous 'You Never Told Me'. A Brit-girl-sound lost classic!
  delicado: Yes; that's actually an English-language version of this same song
Bring the Boys Home  performed by Freda Payne  1971
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

An antiwar anthem that has even more relevance today than back then. Payne often sounded too girlish to pull off the sophisticated soul Invictus produced for her, but here she's fully in command. Maybe it's the gospel-esque fervor of the arrangement and the backing singers, but this is an awfully passionate song - to a heart-breaking degree. The highlight of Freda's funky, underrated album Contact.

from Contact (Invictus)
available on CD - Unhooked Generation: The Complete Invictus Sessions (Castle Music)


Britney  performed by Bebo Norman  2009
Recommended by hopefully86 [profile]

This is a christian singer telling a story about Britney Spears, but it's about everyone who gets lost in the lights of fame and fortune. It's kinda an apology song, slow and sweet but it flows nicely. This song will make you feel a bit sorry for the girl we love to hate.




Bulletproof Soul  performed by Sade  1992
Recommended by MoeShinola [profile]

Hey - don't knock Sade. This is from the Love Deluxe album, which is a great record by any measure. All the songs are original and heartfelt, not formulaic, and with an awareness of third-world misery that's striking coming from a pop princess like her. But she is from Nigeria and knows what she's singing about. Bulletproof Soul is my favorite on the album, a song very dry and quiet and sparse. The backing vocal works in a very sad, soulful harmony line in the chorus that really makes the song.

from Love Deluxe (Sony)


Burning in the Background of My Mind  performed by Tina Tott  196?
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Great brooding mid-60s melodrama from this obscure British girl singer. A terrific stomping number dealing with the age-old teenage theme of heartbreak. "Burning in the background of my mind/are memories/and they seem to haunt me."


available on CD - Here Come the Girls, Volume 8 (Sequel)




  fullwoof: This song was recorded in 1969. To the best of my knowledge, she recorded only one single. The flip is equally as good: Take Away My Emptiness Too
By Design  performed by Big Sky  2003
Recommended by deese411 [profile]

Guitar-driven original pop-rock single with intellegent lyrics and catchy hooks.

from By Design


Bye Babe  performed by Lee Hazlewood
Recommended by olli [profile]

great piece of whiskey-soaked break up pop from our friend lee, here. it's basically driven by guitar and harpsichord, but a warbling hammond organ pops up in the end. really dig the balance between lee's weary voice and the backup singers' purring wordless hums here.


available on CD - love and other crimes


Bye Bye Blackbird  performed by Joe Cocker  1969
Recommended by sixstringman [profile]

Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin played on 3 tracks of Joe Cocker's 1st album. This is an old song which has been slowed down and Page's guitar work is really decent on this track. Cocker's voice (he was touted as the best blues singer in UK at that time by Eric Clapton)is pristine. Also check out "Sandpaper Cadillac" and "Do I Still Figure in Your Life" as well!




C’mon  performed by Panic!
Recommended by raexie [profile]

-soft at first, has rock-ish bridges and soft ones too!
-melodic voice, really smooth
-male singer




C'est Pas De Ma Faute  performed by Brigitte Fontaine
Recommended by djfreshmoney [profile]

Great loungey beat that's dying to be sampled. This is early Brigitte Fontaine and it reminds the folks at Dusty Groove of early Serge Gainsbourg. I agree. Cool upbeat jazzy beat with emotive singing. Wish I spoke French. The only problem with this song is that it's too short.

from 17 Chansons Décadentes




  jeanette: Ha! If you think this song is too short, you wanna catch the Vous Et Nous album with Areski: millions of songs, most clocking in under 3 mins, many under 1. And they look like primary school teachers on the cover. Good call; brilliant tune.
California Waiting  performed by Kings of Leon  2003
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

This song grabs you and doesn't let go. Catchy, melodic and flowing... It's very hard not to listen to this song without bobbing your head along with it. The slurred southern drawl of the lead singer, and the sparkly melody really put you in a specific place and time. A very cool track, and one that's perfect for drinking to.

from Youth and Young Manhood (RCA)


Call Me Irresponsible  performed by Bobby Darin  1964
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Bobby Darin - truly one of the smoothest singers the US has ever produced, and there's nothing that showcases this pop-cabaret style like his tenure at Capitol. A singer of great versatility, he swings effortlesly on this album, having great technique and even greater rhythmic feel.

Call Me Irresponsible, something of a standard really, is my favourite. Darin's vocals make you fall in love with his irresponsible, unreliable, unpredictable charm. Accompanied by finger clickin' good Richard Wess big-band sounds. Wow. Whatta man.

from From Hello Dolly To Goodbye Charlie (Capitol T2194)
available on CD - Oh! Look At Me Now / From Hello Dolly To Goodbye Charlie (Capitol)



Can’t Help Loving That Man  performed by Trudy Richards  1957
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

I originally came across this recording on the soundtrack to the film 'the Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert' and I have been thanking my lucky stars since! Taken from the rare and out of print LP 'Crazy In Love' (which you should purchase on sight if you ever come across it!) Ms. Richards throws a good swing into this exquisite torch song and brings down the house with the help of Billy May and his orchestra! I am forever indebted to the person or persons who compiled the 'Priscilla' soundtrack and led me to this great song and the original LP from which it was taken!

from Crazy In Love! (Capital T 838 (British pressing))
available on CD - the Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert - Soundtrack (Mother/Island)


Captain Future  performed by Christian Bruhn  1980
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

"Captain Future" was an end-70s Toei Animation science fiction series directed by Leiji Matsumoto (The same team who did all the clips for Daft Punk's singles from the "Discovery" album). For the german release of the series a whole new soundtrack was recorded by Christian Bruhn. The title track is an incredible mixture of funk and disco with sequencers and analogue keyboards galore and very Edda Dell'Orso sounding vocals providing the lead melody (the similarity is striking, but the vocals were performed by Bruhn's wife Erika).

from Captain Future, available on CD



Captain Jack  performed by Ken & Beverly  1968
Recommended by konsu [profile]

One of the far too few originals on this great underrated LP.The duo has a familiar west coast pop-jazz sound,much like their labelmates Bud Shank & Joe Pass.Except where as those two have way too much generally lackluster output,this duo has tons of talent packed into one exciting session! Ken plays an icy alto & soprano not unlike Paul Desmond and Beverly sings with all the grace and soul of ladies like Lena Horne and Dinah Shore. In this track, one of the most energetic on the LP,the group swings in a brisk 5/4,with Ken blowing a soulful line and alternating into creshendos with Beverly paralelling in a sassy vocalese. Wonderfully breezy,and just the kind of peppy bossa-like lounge tune you'll listen to over & over & over...They also do great versions of"A Man & A Woman"(with Ken adding some tasteful vocals himself)and "Eleanor Rigby"! A tough record to find, and no compiled tracks are anywhere to be found.... sad.

from Watch What Happens (World Pacific WP-1862)



Captain of Your Ship  performed by Reparata & the Delrons  1968
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Mind-blowing late-60s girl-group sound with very odd lyrics...words really can't describe it. Suffice to say, it's a strange song. This group started out as a very typical girl group of the early 60s mold, but kept plugging away long after those groups had gone out of style. This cut from '68 is very psych-y and "groovy", as was the fashion at the time. They eventually transformed into Barry Manilow's backup singers, but please don't hold that against them.

from Best From Bell (Bell UK BLLP-111)
available on CD - Magical Musical History Tour (Mo-Banana)




  jeanette: I agree - absolutely fantastic. Even its use in the Muller yoghurt commercial couldn't harm its basic genius. The fact that it's sampled by Betty Boo in Doin' The Do is another plus point!
  shakeahand: I first heard this song on the Muller ad! - which led me to hunt out the original. Great pop!
Carcara  performed by Nancy Ames  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A great track, sung in spanish by Nancy Ames. It opens with pulsating horns, a wall of strings and an insistent latin beat. Everything quietens down in the middle, and Nancy sings accapella before the song explodes into action again. The way the brass, strings, flute, bossa guitar and fiery pop vocals are all crammed into two minutes is pretty cool. The whole thing is extremely catchy and intoxicating.

In 2004 this album, along with Spiced with Brasil, finally made it onto CD.

from Latin Pulse (Epic)
available on CD - Latin Pulse/Spiced With Brasil (Collectables)



Caroline Goodbye  performed by Colin Blunstone  1971
Recommended by Pal [profile]

Terrific pop from former Zombies singer...

from One Year, available on CD


Caroline, No  performed by Nick DeCaro  1969
Recommended by bobbyspacetroup [profile]

Glad to see all of the Nick DeCaro recommendations here. I'm going to jump on the bandwagon and recommend my favorite DeCaro recording.

DeCaro interprets the "Pet Sounds" classic in a jazz style which recalls Chet Baker more readily than Brian Wilson.

A suprisingly emotional track which stands on its own.

Good Beach Boys covers seem to be a rare thing. This is easily the best I've heard. Any recommendations?

from Happy Heart (A&M SP-4176)



  konsu: Claudine Longet did a great version of "God Only Knows" on her Let's Spend The Night Together LP from 1972 (BR-15001). Although her version is not what i'd call jazzy, more like meadow-flower California country? Nick Decaro arranged a lot of her 60's albums.
  bobbyspacetroup: I've actually been looking for that LP. It seems to be one of the less common Claudine records... Thanks for the recommendation!
  konsu: I was recently introduced to Four King Cousins version of "God only Knows", also an A&M product from 1967... It's more faithful vocally to the original arrangement, only it's four girls doing the harmonies!
  Mike: James Warren (of The Korgis and Stackridge) has recorded a version of "Caroline, No" which I'd be very interested to hear.
  artlongjr: I have this 45 by Nick DeCaro. What's weird is I heard it before I heard the Beach Boys original, which I first listened to in 1996.
Casa Bianca  performed by Ornella Vanoni  1968
Recommended by respiro [profile]

Guitar, piano, violins, drums, backing chorus and Ornella Vanoni singing in this gorgeous San Remo hit from 1968. This is one of the type of 'slow burn' italian 60's pop hits that I can't get enough of, sort of mid-tempo with a rich detailed backing arrangement and vocals with a certain weight but which by the end will soar.


available on CD - Nostalgia Italiana 1968


Cast Your Fate To The Wind  performed by the Vince Guaraldi Trio  1962
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Two years before he became the musician responsible for the great music featured in the classic 'Peanuts'animated TV specials, Vince Guaraldi and his trio hit the charts with this great little instrumental that is the epitome of San Fransisco-style jazz. Vince Guaraldi was a master at Jazz piano and the artists who performed with him created truly great performances that any lover of jazz will be glad to have in their collection.

PS: Released as the B-Side of a single to radio stations, disc jockeys preferred it over the A-Side.

from Jazz Impressions of Black Orpheus, available on CD


Cavaleiro Andante  performed by Abilio Manoel  1970
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

This song is simply unreal. It starts out in a kind of 4/4 samba groove with a highly prominent cuica and a funky strummed acoustic guitar chord progression before the super-catchy pizzicato-violins riff comes in, and Abilio's mellow voice singing the melody. It's sunshiney and catchy, with a bit of a haunting aftertaste, very Brazilian. I can never hear this song enough times!! Abilio Manoel is a Sao Paulo-based singer-songwriter from the late-60s-70s (still active) who wrote a few moderate hits without attaining even a Marcos Valle level of popularity. Good for Marcos, since Abilio's work would have caused me a few sleepless nights if I were him. And both on the same label, too! Abilio's stuff is hard to find, but very worth the effort.....I've already given Dusty Groove the heads-up about the CD....

from Pena Verde (Odeon)
available on CD - 20 Sucessos (EMI Brazil)




  delicado: sounds great; I look forward to checking it out!
Cecil Beaton’s Scrapbook  performed by Would Be Goods  1985
Recommended by andyjl [profile]


The finest moment of a legendary 80s UK indie label which fused a post-punk spirit with the best elements of 60s pop style - bossa nova, light psychedelia, girl groups. And pre-empted the lounge/easy listening revival by about 10 years. The Would Be-Goods were two sisters, Jessica and Miranda, who couldn’t sing and did so beautifully. The él catalogue is being re-issued on CD by Cherry Red Records. Well worth checking out.


from The Camera Loves Me, available on CD


Cerraron sus ojos  performed by Kissing Spell  1970
Recommended by chanchoenroca [profile]

This song it's just amazing, psychedelic music from the south of the world (Chile) before the dictatorship of Pinochet. After 73 the band dissapear.
Also, the lyrics are from a poem of Gustavo Adolfo Becquer, some people say, the last romantic one.
I totally recommend this song, it's just amazing please listen to it!

from Los Pájaros


Champagne And Caviar  performed by Elegant Taste  1975
Recommended by DJJimmyBee [profile]

Lush, with strings, mid 70's sweet soul group ballad...Lyrically about the proverbial lunch box/hard hat guy on the job singin' 'bout the love he's gonna bring home to his gyrrrrl

from only on 45



Change  performed by Blind Melon  1992
Recommended by Tetsuo [profile]

One of the better known Blind Melon songs of of their self-titled debut, yet still fairly unknown. This song is a personal favorite of mine and preceeds No Rain on the album tracklist. Lead singer Shannon Hoon's voice plays off the acoustic guitar beautifully and his simple message is clear, change is okay. My favorite lines in the song plead with us clear and simply that,

"When you feel your life ain't worth living you've got to stand up and take a look around you then a look way up to the sky.
And when your deepest thoughts are broken,
keep on dreaming boy, cause when you stop dreamin' it's time to die. "

Some may not like this song, but others will fall in love with it. I've grown up listening to this song and i have continued to love it.

Fun Fact:

Lead singer Shannon Hoon donned a question mark on his head and performed this song live on The late show with David Letterman shortly after Kurt Cobain's suicide, in his own way dedicating the song to him.

from Blind Melon, available on CD


Chanson D'O  performed by Francoise Hardy  1971
Recommended by delicado [profile]

You might be familiar with Francoise's incredible 1971 album La Question, a track from which was recommended by another user almost four years ago (Oui, je dis adieu). I managed to get a friend to copy the album for me at the time, and I recall being very taken by 'Viens', the first song. I put this track on a compilation but somehow never really savoured the album as a whole.

Recently I found I could get the album on CD, so picked it up (along with another interesting Francoise album, 'If you listen').

The difference for me now I have the CD is vast, and I'm now able to appreciate the album in all its glory. The clincher for me is the blend of percussive Brazilian guitar, beautiful strings, and the Melody Nelson-style sparseness of the arrangements.

I chose this track to recommend because of the bizarre extra dimension brought by the fact that Francoise is just scatting - there are no words - and the intermittent moments of complete silence, which are surprising and really hold the attention. Parts of the chord sequence remind me of Henry Mancini (in particular, a track called 'Softly' from the Mr Lucky soundtrack), while the overall effect of the sexy echoey vocal naturally brings to mind Ennio Morricone's work with Edda Dell'Orso.

from La Question, available on CD




  ambassador: this album's a favorite of mine, too. I also really like her album "Soliel" of a couple years earlier. The interesting thing about this album is that the Brazilian female guitarist Tuca (just one name) backed her on this as she did on Nara Leao's gorgeous tribute to Bossa Nova (recorded in France), "Dez Anos Depois." If you listen to these albums side by side you can clearly here the similarities, not to say they sound identical. And doesn't Fracoise look stunning on the b&w album cover?
Chansons Francaises  performed by Notre Dame
Recommended by moondog [profile]

More godlike melody from monsieur Arnaud Fleurent -Didier. This one, the title track, taken from his tribute to the french singers and songs of his youth (serge, polnareff and son).A largely acoustic number with a bit bossanova, chansons, strings, a female voice and that extra magical melody chord that only Arnaud seems to be in possesion of. You need this man in your life, right now.

from Chansons Francaises, available on CD


Chasing The Morning Light  performed by Karima Francis
Recommended by DearPrudence [profile]




Chavinha  performed by Orlann Divo
Recommended by sodapop650 [profile]

Off the LP "Orlan Divo" Orlan Divo's first release on the Musidisc label. A collaboration with Ed Lincoln, Waltel Branco and other Musidisc luminaries. This LP/CD is available as a reissue from whatmusic.com

A laid back bossa/balanco track. Nice easy vocals by Orlan Divo who has a great voice (although I don't speak a word of Portugese so I couldn't say what he's singing about) and some really sweet understated organ licks from the usually over-the-top Ed Lincoln especially durring the vibes break. It's a great track off an even greater LP. I think the only other consistently solid LP like this one is that comes to mind would be Eumir Deodato's "Tremendao" on the equipe label.




Chelsea Girl  performed by Simple Minds  1979
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Simple Mind's second single, "Chelsea Girl", was an apt follow-up to its predecessor "Life in a Day", an epic chant, a shimmering melody, and a sing-along chorus that paid spell-bound homage to Velvet Underground chanteuse Nico, in her role within Warhol’s movie of the same name.

Producer John Leckie gives "Chelsea Girl" a lovely delicate quality, especially across the long, tinkling keyboard intro, an aura that barely dissipates even when drummer Brian McGee and bassist Derek Forbes's kick in with their thumping rhythm. The band were proving to be masters at these juxtaposed styles, creating rock solid bases and overlaying them with much more fragile and elegant melodies and atmospheres. Here, those latter are close to effervescent and, as the band shift down into the long bass-driven, overlapping tag teamed vocal outro (a playful lift from Roxy Music’s ”Mother Of Pearl”, but no matter), absolutely crystalline.

On album and onstage, ”Chelsea Girl” remained fans' favorite, on 45 though, it inexplicably crashed and burned, and didn't even reach the UK chart.
(AMG)

from Life In A Day, available on CD


Chinon/Eleanor’s Arrival  performed by John Barry  1968
Recommended by ronin [profile]

This song comes from the stellar soundtrack to 1968 film "The Lion in Winter," my first outing w/J. Barry. Wow. The whole album edged out all rock music at parties. This song has a lovely rocking boat-on-water undercurrent to it (Queen Eleanor is being rowed upriver in a barge), with soaring turns-taking female /male voices singing in Latin. It has a little, quiet horn bridge to it, but then the waves of sound come back and die out. Gorgeous. Defintely a winter-feel album (the story takes place at Christmas, too).

from The Lion in Winter, available on CD


Chocolate And Strawberries  performed by The Januaries  2000
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

This song really sounds pretty much like the title would suggest : Warm, lush, sweet and sensual due to the 60s retro-ish, Bacharach-esque style of the tune combined with warm, warbling electronic sounds and with a delicately sounding trumpet solo. Very nice seductive vocal delivery by singer Debbie Diamond on top of that. Yummy !

from The Januaries (Foodchain Records)



clair  performed by Singers Unlimited  1975
Recommended by klatu [profile]

A nice a capella version of my favorite Gilbert O'Sullivan song, in a very full arrangement reminiscent of the Swingle Singers, with whom they share a member. Lyrically, the song is an antidote to the sleazy feeling I get from Rod Stewart's "tonight's the night". I used to think they shared a theme of pedophilia until I listened closer. I got this on a Japanese collection put together by Toru Hashimoto, probably the greatest compiler ever. He puts together all the Cafe Apres Midi (perfect!) and Free Soul (quite nice) collections. They can be had for $25 a pop from the Dusty Groove site, which seems high for a single disc, but they are all close to eighty minutes and packed with great songs which have lead me to several thousands of dollars worth of related purchases in the last few years. Gilbert O'Sullivan's stuff is worth looking into if you have an ear for it, and there is a nice cheap two disc collection on JVC Japan.

from A Capella II (MPS)
available on CD - MPS for Apres-midi Grand Cru (MPS/Jasrac (Japan))


Close My Eyes  performed by Matisyahu
Recommended by Reina [profile]

Matisyahu is a hasidic Jew who sings reggae music...really, really well.

"Bob Nesta said it best, everything will be alright...introspect, connect the sects, and let this music make you fly..."





  sinferno: yeah, this guy is badass. i recommend.
  Nesta: Yeah for sure. I find the music of Matisyahu a refreshing blast of inspiring music for any occasion. Im amazed at how well his lyrics flow with his hip-hop/reggae beats. His story is unique too. Check out his website.... matisyahu.org King without a Crown has got to be one of the catchiest tunes I have heard in awhile.
CLOWN  performed by THE HOLLIES  1966
Recommended by norfy [profile]

FROM THE 1966 'LP-FOR CERTAIN BECAUSE'-A HYBRID OF RUBBER SOUL AND THE BYRDS-COMPLETE BLURRED POP PERFECTION IN THE TIME IT TAKES TO MAKE A CUP OF TEA-SAD AND BEAUTIFUL AND A MILLION MILES AWAY FROM THE USUAL BEAT OF THE HOLLIES,IT SHIMMERS IN A SLOW MOTION 12 STRING DAYDREAM AND MAKES ME REALISE WHY I LOVE MUSIC AND WHY I AM STILL AWAKE WHEN I AM AT WORK IN 4 HOURS TIME-SEARCH FOR THIS AND WALLOW IN IT'S SPLENDOUR...........

from FOR CERTAIN BECAUSE, available on CD


Cold Desert  performed by Kings of Leon
Recommended by DearPrudence [profile]

This song was recorded when the singer, Caleb Followill, was really drunk. It was recorded in one take and he made up most of the song as he was going... It's their best song, and one of the best songs I've ever hear.




Cold Water  performed by Tom Waits  1999
Recommended by StAgGeR [profile]

This is a great song to listen to on days when nothing seems to be going right. In my case: when driving my blind sister around in a delapidated taxi, with broken windows, and a gas meter on empty. The best line in my opinion is: "Blind or crippled, Sharp or dull. I'm reading the Bible by a 40 watt bulb. What price freedom. Dirt is my rug.
Well I sleep like a baby with the snakes and the bugs". I love this track! Keith Richards played lead guitar and sings backing vox on this one. Their voices/styles mesh together very well. It's one of the more bluesy tracks on the record, but it's done very well...not like a lame neo-white boy blues revival thing. It's actually believable...after all, IT'S TOM WAITS FOR CHRIST SAKE! I think this is one of the more powerful songs on the record. Well...maybe a toss-up between this one and "Chocolate Jesus"...or "Hold on"...or "Get Behind the Mule" (you can't beat the lyric: "Punctuated birds on the power line. In a Studebaker with the Birdie Joe Joaks. I'm diggin all the way to China with a silver spoon, while the hangman fumbles with the noose..."). Hell...it's just a damn good record.

from Mule Variations (Epitaph Records)
available on CD - yes (yes)


Come Back Suzanne  performed by Bill Wyman  1981
Recommended by geezer [profile]

A surprisingly accurate slice of new wave from Wyman,s solo album which contained his only hit "Je Suis un Rock Star" ,this was the follow up.While the Stones moved towards an increasingly stodgy over produced sound at this time ,Wyman was happy to acknowledge the prevalent new wave sounds ."Suzzane" is an upbeat and catchy vignette not a million miles away from Squeeze,s "Cool for Cats".This confirms a lot of peoples opinions that Wyman was always the most quirky and inventive Stone.

from Stone Alone An Anthology
available on CD - Stone Alone


Come On Let's Go  performed by Broadcast  2000
Recommended by Mr Steal [profile]

The Midlands-based retro-futurists put this out as a single and it should have been a massive hit but, of course, it wasn't. Still, it's one of the sweetest songs I've heard in recent years, abetted by Trish Keenans's insouciant yet heartwarming vocals – and a lovely tune.

from The Noise Made By People (Warp CD65)




  tinks: i love this entire album! and they put on a great live show, to boot!
Coming Clean  performed by Hilary Duff  2004
Recommended by Issie [profile]

A thoughtful and lively song. She is a good singer





  37piecesflair: Isn't it "Coming Clean"?
  37piecesflair: I mean "Come Clean"
Comme  performed by Francoise Hardy  1966
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

Dreamy. One of my favorite F. Hardy songs, if only because I can easily imagine her singing it while strolling through a meadow of sunflowers, breezes gently blowing her hair. Ahem. The light arrangement with subtle strings and harp accompanyment is gorgeous.


available on CD - The Vogue Years (Camdem/BMG)



Consequence of Sound  performed by Regina Spektor
Recommended by karismaklysm [profile]

Minimalist accompaniment paired with singsongy slam poetry lyrics. its different and has a perspective that is not, for once, cliche.




Conservative Christian, Right-Wing Republican...  performed by Todd Snider  2004
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Full Title: Conservative Christian, Right-Wing Republican, Straight, White, American Males

--

Self-described left-leaning liberal hippie pothead troubadour Todd Snider muses about the people he considers the root of the world's problems. He's not a mean-spirited man, the liner notes for this song even mention that he loves everyone, even the conservatives he's singing about in this song.

from East Nashville Skyline, available on CD


Contact  performed by Brigitte Bardot  1967
Recommended by lilly747 [profile]

Fantatic Serge Gainsbourg penned lounge track.... A welcome break from Brigette's more bubblygummy tracks (B-side to the hilorious Harley Davidson single, complete with SFX)

from ORIGINAL RECORDING REMASTERED (Polygram 542596)
available on CD - yes!



  n-jeff: Great song, easily the highlight of the cheesy picture disc compilation I have. I particularly like the way the swirling of the organ reacts with the slapback echo on her voice. It has quite a delerious quality.
Conversations  performed by Cilla Black  1969
Recommended by Mister C [profile]

This was Cilla's longest single, clocking in at over 4 minutes, an oddly paced ballad that gradually builds, it is one of those songs that takes a while to take hold, but once it has you're hooked. This is one of Cilla's best performances on disc, and it deservedly reached No. 7 in the UK in 1969

from The Abbey Road Decade 1963-1973 (EMI 7243 8 57053 2 8)


Cordeiro De Nanã  performed by João Gilberto  1980
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Just one minute and twenty seconds long, this a perfectly distilled piece of Brazilian pop/mood music. The song consists of a simple, beautiful chord progression, which is repeated over and over. João sings a simple vocal over his guitar, and then some brass and strings come in to join him. The arrangement is stunning: sweeping and beautiful, with a delicate, sparkly sound at the beginning and end. It sounds very like the work of Claus Ogerman (who arranged the tracks on 'Amoroso', which appears on the same CD), but in fact, it's arranged by Johnny Mandel. Although this was recorded in 1980, it has a timeless feel. The entire Amoroso/Brasil CD is quite incredible. It took a few listens to really hit home, but has now become one of my 'desert island discs'.

from Brasil
available on CD - Amoroso/Brasil (Warner Brothers)



  barry_c: I agree, a beautiful, beautiful tune. You should check out the original version of this tunes, by Os Tincoãs: http://www.luizamerico.com.br/fundamentais-tincoas.php
  kfigaro: I really love very much this song with these subtile orchestration of Johnny Mandel me two, and I also know the original version of Os Tincoãs (1977) which is very different and with verses that J.Gilberto don't sing... Thalma de Freitas also sing this dreamy tunes in her album (2004) _______________________ http://chantsetheres.over-blog.com/
  delicado: Just listening to this again a few years after my initial recommendation. It really does encapsulate a lot of the mysterious, seductive elements of Brazilian music for me.
Couleur Café  performed by Serge Gainsbourg  1962
Recommended by phil [profile]

I've tried quite a lot to get into African music and have only got into bits and bobs so far. However, what I have very successfully got into is a white frenchman, with an all french choir, based in Paris, singing songs in an african style. Any amount of race-focussed amateur psychoanalysis can be done on the above I know, but I also know that this song is absolutely fantastic. As far as I can tell, Serge's african work seems to be inspired by a genuine love of african music and singing, but it also has a very pop edge - maybe it is this crossover aspect that makes it so accessible. Anyway, in this one the lyrics are pretty seedy ("ce soir la nuit sera blanche"), but the singing and drumming are just so beautiful - it's a brilliant song.

from Gainsbourg Percussions
available on CD - Couleur Café (Mercury)



Coyote  performed by Joni Mitchell  1976
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

The first track from the first of Joni’s “jazz” LPs of the late 1970’s is all about opposition and equilibrium, (as are all her songs from this period). It is both richly melodic and dense/chant-like in structure, empty and lush in arrangement, its propulsive/hypnotic groove studded with Jaco Pastorius’ weird, atonal bass speed bumps. Joni’s words/voice/performance is likewise wildly romantic and knowingly jaded simultaneously. The song is the sound of best singer/songwriter ever elegantly/effortlessly pushing the envelope.

from Hejira, available on CD


Crazy Dreams  performed by Paul Brady  1983
Recommended by Stian______ [profile]

Singer\songwriter Paul Brady deals with Folk music . This song is in my opinion up to the level of Bob Dylan \Neil Young . Its melancholic but still up-beat .I like the lyrics a lot : " Tonight were gonna paint this town, were gonna drink champagne till we both fall down ,we'll find some other crazy dream -tomorrow" . Its hard to explain ,but the song moves me very much, the song is pretentious in some ways , but Bradys simple(but not dull) singing makes it not sum up as such.

from Hard Station, available on CD


crazy world  performed by bryon mack
Recommended by youn109 [profile]

acoustic guitar, soft sounding song but it has very strong vocals performed by Bryon Mack.
I like the song because it has a very pleasing melody and the vocals can really be felt, they aren't just heard.




Creators of Rain  performed by Smokey and his Sister  1967
Recommended by bubblebeat [profile]

Who is Smokey and is that really his sister singing too? A euphonious delight. Oh I'd love to hear the album or even the b-side. Unmissable.





  gregcat: Another cover version was recorded by Ian and Sylvia
  b. toklas: Sadly none of the songs of the album is as good as "Creators of rain". But this is indeed a most wonderful and magical folk-pop tune.
Creep  performed by Radiohead
Recommended by mattycobby [profile]

Just a great song. Musically it builds beautifully to the finale. A little depressing, but still, real life.

from Pablo Honey



  texjernigan: To bad its melody was copied off of the Hollies - The Air that I breathe. That'd be a good lawsuit
  brooksyinc: One of the only songs I'm aware of which identify with possibly millions of people
Creole  performed by Charlie Hunter Quartet featuring Mos Def  2001
Recommended by secularus [profile]

"Easy fantastic, lonely together.." - I have listened to this song at least 100 times since receiving it on Audiogalaxy. Simple yet beautiful. I never knew Mos Def had such a pleasant and sexy voice! I am in heaven when he sings "I just go walking in the rain ... when I feel you passing by..." The back drop is provided by the talented contemporary 8 string jazz guitarist Charlie Hunter (once a member of Disposable Heroes of Hiphoprosy).

from Songs from the Analog Playground (Blue Note)



Cry for the Moon  performed by Epica  2004
Recommended by Pk_JoA [profile]

Symphonic metal. The violins in the background are just great, and the lyrics is (if it can be) even better that the voice of the lead singer.

from We will take you with us


Cuckoo Clock  performed by Rachel Sweet  1978
Recommended by blacktype [profile]

This a wonderful slice of punk-pop quirkiness that just NEEDS to be jumped around to. Rachel's singing voice is wonderfully petulant and even though I have no idea what the lyrics are about the attitude and jadedness come across loud and clear. She's better known for her covers such as B-A-B-Y and New Rose but this is far and away her finest recording,

from Fool Around (Stiff)



  unathanthium: Rachel was my pin-up.A slightly chubby teenager with a voice that could break rocks.So convincing is this song that I have spent many years breaking into cuckoo clocks in order to liberate the toy singer trapped within.I have yet to find her but the search goes on.
Cucumbe  performed by Edda Dell’Orso  1975
Recommended by human-cannonball [profile]

Italian singer Edda dell'Orso is the voice backing many soundtrack scores and lounge-beat tracks by Ennio Morricone, Alessandro Alessandroni, Armando Trovajoli (and his 'Mark 4'). This is a Cinecitta-composer Romolo Grano composition for the cult fantasy-drama TV-series 'La Montagna della Luce'. A very deeply and sensually voiced Edda accompanies the slightly latin-flavoured, percussive funky-jazz piece; the haunting funky bassline and a very gentle tenor present throughout the track complete this exotic, obscure jazzy soundtrack.


available on CD - Up!!! The Second (Schema (Italy))


Curbside Prophet  performed by Jason Mraz  2002
Recommended by Squince [profile]

It has very funny/interesting lyrics. It flows very well and is fun to sing along to :)

from Waiting For My Rocket To Come, available on CD


Daddy  performed by Beyoncé Knowles  2003
Recommended by trixlation [profile]

it's a very beautiful song!! The piano in the background is sooo soulful!
I think, beyoncé sings in this song about her true experiences and feelings.

from Dangerously in Love, available on CD


Dance Girl Dance  performed by Cinerama  1998
Recommended by john_l [profile]

Dave Gedge, main man in long-time British alternative band The Wedding Present, decided to do something a bit different in the latter part of the 1990s, so he enlisted girlfriend Sally Murrell and a number of musical friends and put out some really good material under the name Cinerama. The purpose was to do some less noisy, more classic-pop oriented tunes, and it worked like a charm! This track, their second single, is a sprightly '60s-influenced number, which means it's mega-tightly produced and has the rhythm guitars at the back of the mix where they belong. It also has a nifty string and piano arrangement. Lyrically it's a fantasy about a girl he wants very badly (not in real life presumably). The song is on my '90s top ten list for sure!


available on CD - Va Va Voom (spinART)


Dance Me to the End of Love  performed by Madeleine Peyroux
Recommended by music2go [profile]

I always knew the original version of this song by Leonard Cohen and over the last few years kept hearing this version. She sounds like Billie Holiday in this and makes it her own song. Don't know much about her but she also sings in French and does a great version of En Vie En Rose, another favorite song of mine.

from Careless Love


Dance, Bunny Honey, Dance  performed by Penny McLean  1977
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

From that much maligned genre, eurodisco, comes an amazing story of a young girl moving to the city. She has dreams of dancing and making it under the bright lights, but is confronted only by people who see sexuality in her dancing, not freedom. She is exploited; her ideals ruined.

People think I make too much of the genius of Penny. I can often be heard espousing, at length, her brilliance and analysing her songs (I tend to do the latter in my head - there's only so much friends can take). Penny was pretty famous in Germany and only vaguely so everywhere else, primarily for the disco classic Lady Bump. She is now a sci-fi/fantasy novelist but unfortunately her books have not been translated into English else I'd doubtless find social comment in those as well...

from Penny (Columbia (Canadian) PCC-90446)



Dancer  performed by Gino Soccio  1979
Recommended by geezer [profile]

An electronic collusus,the real joy of repitition ,its influence is 50% Kraftwerk and the same of Giorgio Moroder,a lenghthy epic dance workout ,increasing in intensity as it hurtles ,train like, to its sweaty conclusion ,its one concession to its American origins is the radio friendly vocal style ,imagine Hall and Oates being produced by Moroder and you are some way there .

A small hit at the time which has grown into a genuine dance classic,re mixed and revised several times ,but its always that relentless rhythym which grabs the listener,refusing to let go .

from Dancer
available on CD - Best of


Darby And Joan  performed by Twinkle  1969
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

It's a situation we can all imagine ourselves in - an ex-partner is getting married, we're invited, we get drunk and embarrassing at the reception. Twinkle, aka posh girl Lynn Ripley (who went to school with Camilla Parker-Bowles!) is a lyrical genius and this unbelievably good little number was relegated to the B-side of her final 60's single, Micky.

This song contains one of my favourite song lyrics ever. Pondering why they split up, Twinkle admits it was because she wouldn't have sex with him until they were married and says "it was a woman that he wanted, not a lady". How great is that? I thought she was going to say "...not a girl" first time I heard it and was taken aback by the simple brilliance of that turnaround.

Plus, well an American friend has nicknamed me Twinkle because I'm her favourite Brit-girl and I can live with that.

from B side to 'Micky' 45 (Instant IN 005)
available on CD - Golden Lights (RPM)



  skippedparts: Wow. I really want to find this song now. Great recommendation!
Darn That Dream  performed by Petula Clark  1959
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Many people think that Petula Clark first came to the US when the song 'Downtown' topped the charts in 1965. However, she actually came to Los Angeles in 1959 and recorded an album of Jazz songs. Among the many treasures produced during these sessions is 'Darn That Dream'. She sings this great song with all the innocense and charm of a hopeless romantic whose desired love is just out of reach. Her resignation to unrequited affection for her unavailable romeo is interrupted briefly by a soaring interlude from the orchestra. The sweeping melody almost suggests that she is dreaming of being held in "his" arms as they dance across the floor of a dimly lit ballroom. In the end she must come back down to earth and awake to the reality that she will never have the man of her dreams, however she refuses to give up the hope that one day she will get her happy ending. I know I'm rooting for her!!

from This Is Petula Clark! (Sunset/Liberty SUM 5101)
available on CD - Jumble Sale-Rarities & Obscurities / In Hollywood In Other Words (Sequel-198 / Castle Music NEMCD389 (UK))


Day Without Love  performed by The Love Affair  1968
Recommended by Swinging London [profile]

This is one of the best British pop singles of 1968.

Love Affair had already had a Number One hit with 'Everlasting Love' & a top five hit with 'Rainbow Valley' and went on to have a few more hits, including this one, before changing their lead singer from Steve Ellis in 1970 and slipping into oblivion.

Their sound was quite influenced by 'The Phil Spector Wall Of Sound', but with a 'Swinging London' slant.

Great melody. Great lyric. Tremendous pop orchestral arrangement. Wonderful lead vocals from Steve Ellis, who sounded like a sort of British Len Barry.

I think this song is probably one of the best pop singles I've ever heard.

It never happened in the USA and after it fell from the charts was rather forgotten in the UK, overshadowed by the groups more famous 'Everlasting Love', but, in fact, this was their strongest single.

Very much of its time, but what a tremendous time it was, musically and otherwise.

from Everlasting Love Affair (CBS)



De Cara a la Pared  performed by Lhasa  1997
Recommended by mitchiavelli [profile]

Lhasa is a Mexican-American woman now resident in Montreal, Canada.

She sings in French and Spanish and incorporates elements of Latin, French and Yiddish music into her sound.

She has a stellar back-up band that includes some of the best musicians in Montreal's rich music scene.

'De Cara a la Pared' is a very sexy and romantic number that I'm sure you'll enjoy.

NB: the CD cover art is among the ugliest I've ever seen.

See it here:

http://mapage.noos.fr/weblhasa/v2/discographie/fr_discographie.html

from La Llorona, available on CD


Deep Down  performed by Christy  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I'm surprised to find I haven't recommended this song before. An enchanting piece of futuristic pop written by Ennio Morricone, this great tune was part of the score for the wonderfully stylish Mario Bava movie 'Danger: Diabolik'. Christy, who also sung on some Piero Piccioni scores, was (is?) a heartfelt 'belter', and here she sings the italian lyrics, which are peppered with English phrases, especially passionately. There is a cool echoey effect on her voice, giving the whole affair an other-worldly, underwater feel. Musically, it's a very catchy psych-pop track, with a twangy, rocky guitar. It's quite short, but extremely powerful.

from the single Deep Down
available on CD - Canto Morricone Vol. 1 (Bear Family)




  leonthedog: This "Canto Morricone" volume sent me on a frantic chase for so many things; most rewarding was the "Danger: Diabolik" soundtrack. (The movie is a hoot and quite a bargain, too.) Mina... Spaak... Miranda Martino... Rita Monico... and what about Ken Colman? "Trio Junior"??? This CD will infect you, so you'd better just go get it!
  delicado: I realize it has been almost 10 years since I wrote this - but just to throw it out there - this track really is absolutely amazing!
der hund von baskerville  performed by cindy & bert  1970
Recommended by shaka_klaus [profile]

i heard this song for the first time in spain at the purple weekend. the dj (mike stax) is as rather famous guy in the mod/garage/60's-scene. so i didn't have the guts to mail him about it for a year or so. but eventually i did and he gave me the details and told me that it was his girlfriend ho spun it. the song is a weird version of black sabbath's paranoid. i love this stuff. can be found on some german comps various artists as well as c&b comps. i saw the original cornet single on ebay a couple of months ago for a mere $180.





  eftimihn: This is a hugely bizarre cover version: Cindy & Bert were a somewhat annoying couple in the 60s & 70s doing very light pop tunes (called "Schlager" in Germany). It was recently released on a great compilation series by Bear Family Records called "Pop In Germany", with lots more of german oddities like Dusty Springfields "Son Of A Preacherman" in a hilarious version with ridiculous lyrics sung with bavarian accent...
Destination Unknown  performed by Missing Persons  1982
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

"Destination Unknown" sounds the least dated of all of Missing Persons' hits, most likely because it was their most melodically satisfying song. The fact that it's also Dale Bozzio's least mannered vocal performance, with none of her trademark hiccups, helps considerably as well. Her helium-pitched voice ? Dale Bozzio sang like a new wave Betty Boop ? keeps this song firmly in the Missing Persons tradition, but the low-key backing vocals by her male bandmates on the chorus are a nice touch. The lyrics are typically lightweight, your basic high school-level musings on alienation by someone who has just learned the word "existential" but is unclear about what it actually means, but Ken Scott's light-handed production and nice touches like the staccato programmed drum fills on the chorus make it pleasant on the ear regardless.
(AMG)

from Spring Session M, available on CD


detroit  performed by primal scream  2002
Recommended by olli [profile]

insanely hard, pulsating fascist dance punk piece, easily the best song on primal scream`s uneven last album. features some mean distorted synthezisers, a gigantic bassline and some great, sneering vocals from Jim Reid of the jesus and mary chain. (am i the only one who has a problem with bobby gillespie`s singing voice?)i often find myself jumping around the house while listening to this.

from evil heat


Detroit 442  performed by Blondie  1977
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

In some ways an obvious pop-punk classic, but still one that's generally overlooked in favour of their singles. One of the greatest nights between my best friend and I was the time that not only did we discover this was both of our favourite Blondie song, but we found out that, rather shamefully, each of us harboured a secret crush on Rimmer from Red Dwarf.

The song is the best among some real class on Plastic Letters. The noises made by a band on the brink of the mainstream super-success they were so worthy of. Deborah Harry never sounded tougher (except perhaps on Rifle Range), a persona that fits her like the ripped catsuit she famously sported on Top Of The Pops.

from Plastic Letters, available on CD



Devil, Devil, Go Away  performed by Little Marcy  1973
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Ever felt there was a hole in your life that only a religious ventriloquist's dummy could fill? Then look no further. One of pop's bona-fide eccentrics, Marcy Tigner, voices Little Marcy in a thoroughly winsome way. The song, nay the whole album, encourages all young children to renounce the devil. However, if the devil were to see the scarily-bad drawing of Little Marcy on the cover, he would correctly deduce that no child is likely to listen to the ravings of a freaky end-of-the-pier doll voiced by an even stranger adult woman.

"Marcy wants you all to know how happy she is singing songs about Jesus" relate the sleevenotes. And, gee Marcy, we sure are glad to hear them!

Please don't think I recommended this song simply to mock it. I genuinely think it's a priceless piece of recorded gold and am more than pleased this site, and the world, is big enough to accommodate special talents like that of Marcy Tigner.

Out of Waco, Texas.

from Happy Am I (Word K-721)




  olli: aah, little marcy. i find her oddly touching. i adore the effect where the guitar seems to be meowing on "i love little pussy", it makes the song even more appealing than the questionable lyrics. "guitar festival of gospel songs" by little marcy's guitarist, bob summers is the current downloadable album over at basichip.com right now, by the way. snatch it while you can!
Diabolic Scheme  performed by The Hives  2004
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

The Hives best song of their career thus far. A brilliant ballad in the middle of their most hard rocking album yet. Howlin' Pele Almqvists voice drawls menacingly over guitar and strings that play as though the earth is collapsing. An incredible and beautiful song from an otherwise hard rocking band.

from Tyrranosaurus Hives (Interscope)


Diamonds Are Forever  performed by The Bachelors  1971
Recommended by bobbyspacetroup [profile]

The kind of overlooked track that makes Frank Jastfelder and Stefan Kassel's soundtrack series so great. I find this a very refreshing take on the familiar James Bond theme. Ivor Raymonde's arrangment really sells the composition in the context of the Lettermen-styled vocal harmonies of the Bachelors without losing any of the energy of the John Barry/Shirley Bassey original. I particularly like the way Raymonde implements the steel guitar here.


available on CD - The Mad, Mad World Of Soundtracks, Vol. 2 (Universal/Motor [Germany])



Die Antwort Weiss Ganz Allein Der Wind  performed by Peggy March & Benny Thomas  1966
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Alias Blowin' In The Wind.

I don't really care for Bob Dylan, and it is for one reason only; his whingey voice. It just, for me, undermines all the cleverness of his lyrics since he sounds like a child who's dropped his ice cream.

But there's no denying the man writes cracking songs. Virtually every time I hear someone other than him perform a Dylan tune, I find it a great listening experience. Another favourite is Linda Gayle's version of Maggie's Farm (on one of the Girls In The Garage volumes).

Peggy March is famous (if 'famous' isn't stretching it) for a couple of saccharine hits in the early 60's. Few people realise she had a later dimension to her career - great popularity as a German language singer. Her vocal treatment of this Dylan song adds a shyness and grace to the protest, all accompanied by, naturallment, that slight oompah-ness endemic to a great deal of German pop of the period.

from Memories Of Heidelberg, available on CD



Die herren dieser welt  performed by Hildegard Knef  1970
Recommended by delicado [profile]

From the same album which spawned the mindblowing 'Im 80 Stockwerk' comes this superb track. It opens slowly, with a moody guitar/vocal introduction. Soon the heavy Burt Bacharach influence of 'Stockwerk' returns, as the strings come in and the song develops. The beat is funky in a gentle late-sixties pop kind of way. I have no idea what Hildegard is singing, but it sounds rather positive and uplifting, and I’m a big fan of her smoky voice.

from Knef (Decca)
available on CD - Fur Mich... (box set) (BMG Germany)




  AndreasNystrom: Really great song!, nice rhythm and harmonys.
  bellboy: this song is about "masters of this world" - the text would stir you up rather than just lift you up. It breathes the same air as a song by Alexandra "Mein Freund der Baum". Heavy bittersweet german Weltschmerz. One of the Knef's best songs is "Von nun an ging's bergab" which means "From now it went downhill". She tells us her story: Her birth in cold winter, her film career in the USA, her return to Germany, starting a second career as a singer - and everytime she comments ironically: "From now it went downhill" which is VERY funny! The last words of this song comment herself as a singer: "Es war nicht meine Schuld - ich bitte um Geduld" - "It wasnn't my idea to start singing, please be patient with me"
  heimwehblues: To "bellboy": "Von nun an ging's bergab" is performed by Hildegard Knef as "From Here On It Got Rough" (LP "The World of Hildegard Knef"), last lines: "A change was overdue, from here it's rough on you.".
  eftimihn: Warner Music Germany finally released "Knef" on CD ahead of the celebration of Hildegard Knef's 80th birthday. While it's completely beyond me why people had to wait until 2005 to get this masterpiece in it's entirety, i'm thrilled that it's finally arrived. Also, Hildegard Knef repeatedly expressed "Knef" was her best album.
  n-jeff: "From Here On It Got Rough" is the opening track on teh recent (2005) compilation "the in-kraut". And very witty it is too. But also a very groovy song.
Different From The Rest  performed by Alice Peacock  2006
Recommended by musicman [profile]

New song that comes out on Alice's new CD, "Who I Am" June 13. You can hear it on www.myspace.com/alicepeacock - song sounds like it came out of Carole King's "Tapestry" album...nuff said.

from Who I Am (Peacock Music)


different samples from the LP  performed by Los Brasilios  1967
Recommended by K Pucino [profile]

"Brasilian Beat '67 featuring Alberto on the Marimbas & the Juan Morales Singers"
This record came out on the Budget Label "DESIGN".
Great Record with great Cover which is similar to Sergio Mendes & Brasil '66.
cover is visible on my website: www.easylounge.org

from Brasilian Beat '67 (DESIGN)



Diffrerent Stories  performed by I Am The World Trade Center  2004
Recommended by MoeShinola [profile]

Synth-Pop candy. Starts out with strummed clean-tone electric guitar, then the electronic beats come in w/ Amy singing in her languid way. The chorus brings Dan in answering her back. It's one of the best songs on The Cover Up, which was their break-up record. Really good contrast of drama-laden lyrics and happy pop.

from The Cover Up (Gammon)


Dindi (Jin-Jee)  performed by Chris Montez  1967
Recommended by Swinging London [profile]

Chris Montez had two musical periods. Two shots at the limelight.

It's his second musical era (1966-68) that I like the most.

In 1966, Herb Alpert produced 'The More I see You' & with it, Chris had a huge international smash single. It was a cover of a 1940's tune given a sort of 1966 Beverly Hills treatment & was very nice.

Unfortunately the pairing of Chris & Herb didn't produce anymore hit singles but they went on to make four very nice albums.

This song is from the third album, 'Foolin'Around' and it's one of my favourite Chris Montez songs.

There have been a few retrospective Chris Montez compilations and they always seem to leave this song out, which, frankly, baffles me.

It's sort of Rio meets Beverly Hills 1967 in sound.

It's also my favourite version of the song which was also covered by Astrud Gilberto and I believe, many others.




from Foolin' Around (A & M)



Dirty Harry  performed by Gorillaz
Recommended by sungoddess [profile]

It took me a long, long while to ‘get’ Gorillaz. Oh come on, who didn’t like “Clint Eastwood”? I dunno, having sunshine in a bag is a nice lyric to repeat when people are pissing you and your shit off… yet, “Clint Eastwood” didn’t make me a fan.

No, in fact, no Gorillaz track did more to bring me into the fold than “Dirty Harry”, with its amazing keyboards, bassline and children’s chorale…

It’s just been a while since I’ve come across pop music that was so far off the beaten track, that it redefines what is ‘mainstream’. This is always fun for music lovers, but once again goes to prove that noone with taste thinks the cookie cutter approach to popular music is the right way.

Well I’m a Gorillaz fan now, maybe three or four years late, but I’m a fan for sure. “Demon Days” has quickly jumped up to “Heavy Rotation” status in my last.fm and musicmobs profiles in a heart beat.

It’s weird, because someone brought a pre-release copy of “Demon Days” for me way back in April, but I listened to it a few times and then ignored it, forgot it for the most part (if you ignore the iconic billboards and posters everywhere across London). I’m famous for that though, I tend to err on the side of not believing the hype, a la Public Enemy.

It was only about three or four weeks ago, after my flatmate’s accidental stop on the “Dirty Harry” video one night, while I was in another room working.

Said keyboards, bass line and chorale, made me stop what I was doing, get up and go into the living room, calling incredulously as I went, “What are you listening to?”

That my friends, is all Big Mami wrote on the matter…

from Demon Days


Dirty Paws  performed by Of Monsters and Men  2011
Recommended by Hypnotic33Rocker [profile]

The introduction immediately throws you into knowing this is a different song. The guitar thrums and sings to you. The voices perfectly harmonized. Soulful.

from My Head is an Animal, available on CD


Distant Shores  performed by Chad and Jeremy  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A beautiful piece of soft pop. Ok, it's corny - the chord sequence is kind of soppy and the lyrics are kind of obvious, but the arrangement and singing are so lovely that I can listen to this song again and again. Opening with a catchy picked acoustic guitar riff, the arrangement soon thickens with with a full orchestra. The singing is deadly serious and amusingly precious throughout the song, and the orchestral arrangement, heavy on oboes and flutes as well as strings, is anything but hip. Still, the song’s simplicity and innocence are really quite charming. I never really got into any of Chad and Jeremy's other songs nearly so much as this one, so any recommendations for similar songs would be welcome. Do me a favor and listen to this and tell me if I’m crazy to love it so much.

from Distant Shores, available on CD




  tempted: Oh yes, it is pure gold. I can recommend anything by The Left Banke, Scott Walker, Margo Guryan, New Colony Six, Sagittarius, The Millennium... Gary Usher from the last two mentioned was the producer on many of C & J's songs.
Distortions  performed by Clinic
Recommended by nathanwoolls [profile]

It seems that I'm the only person to recommend Clinic (if I'm using this site properly). Anyway, Clinic are a band from Liverpool with 2 (I think) fantastic albums so far. I chose this song from their first album, Internal Wrangler, for no other reason than it's the first one that sprung to mind. Hard to describe what they sound like, but they remind me of the Velvet Underground, Beach Boys, Dick Dale. That's probably not a very good or accurate description. People in the UK might recognise another song from this album (The Second Line) from a Levi's ad a few years ago. Anyway, if you like Radiohead, Flaming Lips, Mercury Rev, Grandaddy, that kind of thing, find this album, you might like it.

from Internal Wrangle (Domino)


Do Like I Do  performed by Kim Weston  196?
Recommended by BlueEyedYe-Ye [profile]

Quite possibly the most beautiful soul ballad of the late 60s.... despite being a slow song it is incredibly uplifting.... it speaks of holding out for someone you truly love when temptation surrounds you, which fits perfectly with my mindset. "Just remember that lovers have sorrow.... just remember we'll make up tomorrow". Immensely touching, beautiful and timeless.


available on CD - Greatest Hits And Rare Classics (CD) (Spectrum/Universal)


Do You Know The Way To San Jose?  performed by Bossa Rio  1969
Recommended by konsu [profile]

WOW! We all know how much the brazillians love Burt, well, this is a fine example of how well he was interpreted by the south.



They keep the original arrangement but spice it up a bit with snappy side-stick beat and pumped-up organ stabs ala' Wanderley.The singers are (I believe) Gracinha Leporace & Pery Ribeiro,and they harmonize beautifully as Manfredo Fest rythmically taps his organ paired with piano in a sumptuous unison.They carry the song along in gradually ascending stages of bliss,until they drop away only to build "Do-you -know-the-ways"in an rounded refrain to finsh it off...Absolutely gorgeous! Produced by Sergio Mendes in his imitable style!!!Also check out their version of "Up, Up, And Away", from the same LP.

from Bossa Rio, available on CD



Do Your Own Thing  performed by Brook Benton  1968
Recommended by Arthur [profile]

Leiber and Stoller give Brook a Bacharach/ David feel on Brooks debut single for Cotillion and indeed it is the flip side of an unremarkable version of thier "I Just Don't Know What To Do With Myself". Brook just does nothing with the song. (Cissy Houston's, for my money is still the best version )
"Do You Own Thing" is a little gem however, with a sympathetic arrangement a long way from the R'n'B sound Leiber and Stoller are famous for. It starts with the trademark trumpet found on all the best Dionne Warwick sides and a wonderful string arrangement and a bitter/sweet lyric.




Don’t Be Cruel  performed by Cheap Trick  198?
Recommended by sallyfosho [profile]

A delightfully poppy cover of Elvis's Don't Be Cruel. Although it is undeniably an 80s tune, it's not dated at all. Just a fun song to sing along to, and a great cover.




Don’t Talk to Me About Love  performed by Altered Images  1983
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

By late 1983, when Altered Images' third and final album, Bite, was released, Altered Images were already dead in the water. The group had never made any particular headway in the US, where their blend of Siouxsie and the Banshees and the Monkees (not to mention Claire Grogan's bizarre, baby-talk hiccup of a singing voice) was just a little too weird for mainstream tastes, and in their native UK, their colorful look and bubblegummy 1982 singles "I Could Be Happy" and "See Those Eyes" had forever typecast them as a kiddie-pop band. Grogan was already branching off in her second career as an actress (she played the title role in Bill Forsyth's 1982 cult classic Gregory's Girl), and Bite seemed like a mere contractual obligation. For the most part, it sounds like it, too, but the brilliant single "Don't Talk To Me About Love," which led off side two, was a welcome surprise, and possibly the best song they ever did. Mike Chapman's production recalls his work with Blondie, while the disco-tinged electronic beat, chicken-scratch electric guitar part and rubbery, melodic bass part all sound closer to New Order's "Blue Monday" than Bananarama's "Cruel Summer." Grogan herself is in an entirely different mood than usual, with her newly-lowered singing voice (and slightly improved enunciation) displaying a rueful, almost petulant edge that suits the cranky lyrics. Only at the very end does she shoot into her usual helium-pitched unintelligibility, with an air of "See, I can still do this, I just choose not to anymore." Coupled with the most indelible chorus of the band's entire career, it all adds up to a minor masterpiece. Sadly, however, nobody wanted to know.
(AMG)

from Bite (Portrait 25413)
available on CD - Bite...Plus (Edsel)


Don’t Want To Know  performed by John Martyn  1973
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

Starts out quietly, acoustic guitar playing the theme, joined quickly by discreet electric piano and stand-up bass, then Martyn's low, growly-yet-soulful voice starts repeating the chorus ("I don't wanna know about evil/Only want to know about love") like a mantra. Halfway through, the rhythm section kicks in, and you find yourself singing along to said mantra. Highly effective and very memorable.

from Solid Air, available on CD



Doop-Doo-De-Doop (A Doodlin' Song)  performed by Blossom Dearie  1958
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Blossom Dearie is, in my opinion, one of the most underrated jazz vocalists of all time. Dearie's phrasing and piano playing within the small group arrangements on this album of standards are very, very reminiscent of Mose Allison (who just so happens to be another of my all-time favorites). On this track in particular, she delivers a very charming performance, combining the innocent ingenue with the blase urbanite.

from Once Upon a Summertime, available on CD




  delicado: I love Blossom's stuff as well. Haven't yet heard a bad record by her. She did an unusual record in 1970 called 'that's just the way I want to be' on Fontana. It's available (coupled with 'give him the ooh la la) on a japanese CD, 'whisper for you'.
  tempted: Oh, and "London in the Rain". What a fabulous singer!
  egbdf: I have been hearing about a Japan CD which would be a reissue of Blossom Dearie's 1976 American double LP entitled 'My New Celebrity Is You'. No one however can locate it. If you can help please E me. Best Regards, egbdf.
  klatu: Definitely a favorite! I also love to 70 album "that's just the way i want to be" and think the version of "both sides now" blows away the Judy Collins. Also a huge fan of the schoolhouse rocks stuff "unpack your adjectives" and especially "figure eight".
  singjohn: A Doodlin' Song (not to be confused with "Doodlin'") apparently had an effect in it's time. Peggy Lee recorded it. It was even featured in an episode of the Dick Van Dyke Show where Mary Tyler Moore and Dick did a little dance number to it in their living room for their party guests! This song is perfect for the Blossom Touch! Cute simple lyrics and melody make the tune perfect for Blossom's child-like voice and bouncy delivery. She was the voice of several of the old Schoolhouse Rock shorts that used to play in Saturday mornings in the '70's. She is also an accomplished pianist and played on many of her own recordings. Another fave Blossom tune: "Rhode Island Is Famous For You"
  tinks: jesus, any version of "both sides now" that isn't by judy collins blows away the judy collins version. give me dick hyman any day!
  norfy: check out-'both sides now'by the veteran golfer tony jacklyn-from his excrutiating late 60's album-swings into...'-a superb psych-crooning version up [or down there]with william shatner and tony bennett's 'eleanor rigby' and richard harris!! judy collins entire existence is a crime.
  mpanzera: Thank you, Tinks! I *love* Blossom Dearie, but hadn't heard that track yet. I recently bought the eponymous CD (with a great picture of her in glasses at the microphone...), and must have played "Tout Doucement" about a thousand times.
  splurben: can anyone identify the male voice singing behind blossom on this track?
  andy: I believe the male voice is Cy Coleman, the song's composer. I have only another website comment's word for that, but it does sound like him.
Dracula i love you  performed by Tuca
Recommended by moondog [profile]

If anyone ever wondered why Francoise Hardy never did an album as good as La Question this woman might well be the answer. For it was Tuca that was responsible for, well as i have figured out at least, the songs, production and string arrangements on that particular album. Tuca only made three albums herself, all of which is flawed, but at her best shows her influence on the la question album. With a voice somewhere between nara leao and joyce her songs really did come onto her own on her last album Dracula i love you. The title track is a haunting ballad that almost sounds if Kate Bush had been born in Brazil. Well, nearly i must add because i had so high expectations after the la question album so i was a bit disappointed when i heard her albums. But you could only imagine what great music Tuca could have done. This track at least shows her enormous potential and a sense of atmosphere that i haven´t heard from any other brazilian artist. Tuca tragically died in 1978 after trying losing weight to fast. Does anyone know more about her?

from Dracula i love you


Dreams Never End  performed by New Order  1981
Recommended by Genza [profile]

New Order fans always love Technique. So do I. Some prefer Brotherhand, Lowlife - or the substandard Republic. But for me, there's only one Movement.

Slated by critics for sounding like a doomy post Joy Division clone - the album actually benefits from sharp rhythm guitar and sustained synth chords.

Key moment is the awesome Dreams Never End. The song thrashes around like a caged beast. And it's only brought down by bass player Peter Hook's dreary singing - but hey, I can live with that.

from Movement (Factory Fact 50)



  delicado: This track is utterly spine-tingling. I like the Technique album, but it really doesn't have the intensity of the best early tracks. It's worth noting that this track sounds instrumentally exactly like mid-80s Cure.
  zazz: erm.....dreams never end is a masterpiece for the very reason that hookies vocals are in stark contrast ....probably my favourite new order/joy division track...probably an accidental classic.
Dressed In Black  performed by The Shangri-Las  1966
Recommended by m.ace [profile]

"Dressed in black, he walks alone, a shadow in the night." The Shangri-Las death trip reached a powerful climax in this eerie song of loss and lingering. Funereal piano chords balanced by surging choruses and a closing spoken section that leaves you as weak as the sadly wounded narrator. If this one doesn't get to you, you ain't got a heart.

from the single Dressed In Black (Red Bird)
available on CD - The Best Of The Shangri-Las (Mercury)



driver  performed by the damnation of adam blessing  1969
Recommended by shaka_klaus [profile]

one of my fave dj's, michael wink, played this at the 1st sinful swedish mod weekender. i was kind of doped (kids, don't use hard drugs...) up so i really liked it. it's a heavy, "beardy", as my friend ricky rickenbacker would describe it, kind of a tune. late 60's garagerock... i really like it. the cover of the 45 shows the guys bare breasted. mmmm.

from back to the river single (ua 35159)


Drugs  performed by This Mortal Coil  1986
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

Perhaps the least typical track from the 4AD house band – and, ironically, one of the project’s great triumphs. Abandoning for a moment their gorgeous’ prototype - beautifully dreamy soundscapes and/or readings of songs by Tim Buckley, Alex Chilton, etc. – this Talking Heads cover is little more that a series of grinding, funky sample loops w/Alison Limerick’s soulful vocals drifting in and out. A brilliant rethink of the song, that anticipates (perhaps influenced?) the Bristol/trip-hop mob - Portishead, Tricky, Massive Attack, et al. (Can still be found as a vinyl 10” single, if you look hard.)

from Filigree & Shadow (4AD)
available on CD - Filigree and Shadow (4AD)



  kohl: great band.
  konsu: Sort of ironic too, considering an interview with Ivo I once read with a short list of groups he wished he'd signed to 4AD, which included Portishead. TMC was such an ifluential project that completely escaped the 80's indie mainstream indeed.
dry drunk emperor  performed by TV on the Radio  2005
Recommended by stoneworks [profile]

This song makes me want to be a proud american. It's definitely the finest antiwar song I've ever heard. It perfectly sums up my feelings about the bush administration and it conjures up the revolutionary spirit that must have been swirling around before the birth of our country.
That being said, I'm not usually that drawn towards protest songs per se. But this one grabs my attention with its drumcorps-like rhythm and its chanted vocal delivery with many layered voices. The guitar work is incredibly moving dynamic and textural. The meandering flute soloing echoes the lyrical call to "grab your fife and drum!" and then carries the song off into the sunset.
Of course, the lyrics are the most mind-blowing element when you pick them apart. After two poetically scathing verses describing the idiocy of empire, the third verse imagines the unapologetic uprising of the people. I highly recommend downloading the lyrics and getting familiar on that level. Powerful song!!!!

from released as single (Interscope)


Duchess  performed by Scott Walker
Recommended by camus [profile]

I don't think there is any middle ground with old Scott. Love him/hate him

I originally started to listen to him because of recommendations from Julian Cope, not personally, from his book, Head on/Repossessed, a great rock'n'roll read.

To me This is Scott at his best, balancing well his mesmerising voice, with his world weary poetic lyrics, not too over produced, a beatiful ballad.

sample Lyric " You shed your names with the seasons, still they all return with their last remains, and they lay them before you... like reasons...."


available on CD - Kaza the Ultimate Scott


Dying Crapshooter’s Blues  performed by Blind Willie McTell
Recommended by dwmjuk [profile]

Early urban blues from the master of all that is politically incorrect (listen to his lyrics on most tracks regarding women). Recorded as a tribute to a friend, full recording has a 3 minute rant by Blind Willie recounting the story of writing this, andsinging it at a friend's funeral. The finest early urban blues track - playful chord progression and a perfectly sophisticated urban take on his normal country blues output. Sharp lyrics are a joy to listen to.




Earth People  performed by Dr. Octagon  1997
Recommended by jwmoz [profile]

"Dr. Octagon" is actually Kool Keith, who must have had something on the brain when this record was produced. This is my favorite song on the album, and it is a good representation of the the cool, controlled beats and inane, yet infectious lyrics present throughout. Dr. Octagon's words are on the same level as Eminem's in that they are not to be taken literally. Eminem took the gangsta/mysogyny route, Dr. Octagon took the thirteen year old boys immature babble about god-knows-what route. In any case, this song is fresh, and you can't help getting that little bob of your head going when you listen. When you catch yourself singing along, realize you sound like an idiot though.


available on CD - Dr. Octagonecologyst (Uni/Dream Works Records)




  spinspin: I was obbbbbsessed with Blue Flowers off that same-diddly-aim album for forever... he's got the smoothest sinister technobabble ever.
East, West, North, South  performed by Captain  2006
Recommended by Mike [profile]

I'll probably tire of it fairly quickly, but I enjoy this. It fuses something that is very nearly Prefab Sprout with two other influences from the singles charts of the late 80s and early 90s...I haven't quite focussed on what those are yet. The lyric is clever...just a little.


available on CD - This is Hazelville (EMI)


El-Harba Wine  performed by Khaled (feat Amar)  1999
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

I have this on the original CD (or at least a CD-R of it) and a French remix 12, which has 3 good mixes including a fantastic one by Manta 1000. Both are very good. The song itself is a mix of the traditional and the modern (with Production by aging Gong-ster Steve Hillage), Arabic and Indian. Violins, Bollywood style singing from Amar blending with Khaleds' gruffer style - all with an irrisistable rhythm underpinning it. Another one chock full of great hooks, where I can't understand a word, perhaps I should take up the study of languages.

from Khaled, available on CD




  Difool: Hi.. I just want to say that i love that song!!! El-Harba Wine. And as you say, i dont understand a singel word of what they sing. That only makes it more fun. Do you know of any other songs like this one?
  n-jeff: It seems from one site I've found that "El Harba Wine" means "To run but where". That aside, Khaled (aka Cheb or Young Khaled) has quite a few album's out, this track is from "Kenza", and is also on a comp "The King of Rai".
You could also check out another Algerian artist Cheb Mami - The "Prince of Rai" but the album of that name is from the 80's and a little dated. I'm also quite fond of Egyptian star Hakim, who adds Spanish guitar touches and the accordian. My favourite track is possibly called "Habibi" from the LP "Comosuena". His most recent LP "2004" has either big samples or a guest appearance from James Brown.

Eleanor Rigby  performed by Tony Bennett  1968
Recommended by tinks [profile]

What can be said about this? Long before Tony was on MTV Unplugged, he tried this misguided attempt to 'get hip with the kids'. Funny thing is, I love it. He doesn't sing this so much as emote it. It's reminiscent of some of Shatner's finer moments. I should also note that the album is worth seeking out for the uber-psychedelic cover art alone.

from Tony Bennett Sings the Great Hits of Today (Columbia)



ELEANOR RIGBY  performed by KIM WESTON
Recommended by callgirlscene [profile]

Originally sort of a mellow song, here is someone really belting it out. With a swinging big band, Kim, (who I've thought of as a soul singer mainly)
really rocks.

from THIS IS KIM (MGM)



  Arthur: Kim can really belt 'em !
Elijah  performed by Donald Byrd  1963
Recommended by tinks [profile]

One of the few succesful attempts at using a gospel choir on a jazz recording (along with Max Roach's "It's Time" LP from the previous year...which, coincidentally, featured the same chorus), Byrd's "A New Perspective" album was the first time it was really attempted with a small group setting (Roach's was backed by an orchestra). This, the opening track, begins with a vocalese scat by the choir that calls to mind old slave work songs. From there, the incredible band (featuring a very young Herbie Hancock and Kenny Burrell, among others) strikes up, and begins to follow a basic riff with the chorus that takes you through the remaining nine-plus minutes with various tempo changes throughout. An equally impressive edited version appeared as a b-side to the single of "Cristo Redentor", which got to be a minor hit on the pop charts.

from A New Perspective, available on CD



England 2 Columbia 0  performed by Kirsty MacColl  2000
Recommended by komodo [profile]

A superb tale of wronged love and wounded pride performed with a mighty swagger, drenched in latin rhythms and horns, but with that bittersweet humour and English setting that have been hallmark's of Kirsty's whole career.

There are so many songs from Kirsty that I love in so many musical styles, but the "Tropical Brainstorm" album is really the best thing she ever did. She has absorbed the influences from her travels in Latin America, but the album is no pastiche, it is pure MacColl. Whilst occasionally missing its mark, it has so many fine, joyful and wryly funny moments, and, to me, all the signs of an artist entering a new, fiercely creative and joyful stage of her career.

Sadly we will never know where Kirsty's musical journey would have taken her.

from Tropical Brainstorm, available on CD


Enjoy The Silence  performed by Depeche Mode  1990
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

To me, Depeche Mode was primarily a great singles band, with the exception of "Some great reward" (1984) and "Violator" (1990), which were consistently great albums. "Enjoy The Silence" shows Depeche Mode at the top of their game: Gore's songwriting talent, Gahan's vocal performance and Wilder's impeccable arrangement. The newly remixed "Enjoy The Silence 04" clearly shows why the original just can't be improved in any way.

from Violator (Mute)
available on CD - The Singles 86>98 (Mute)




  kohl: absolutely. basically perfect.
Europe Endless  performed by Kraftwerk  1977
Recommended by phil [profile]

This song is absolutely full of class and confidence - over 8 minutes long, and over a minute at the start is without drums or bass, just to get you into the groove. Then, they don't pull out the best tunes straight away - instead, they build up to them gradually with variations on the theme before building into a bigger and bigger climax. The tunes are as simple as you expect from Kraftwerk - the confidence to just hold a single note for 8 beats without changing is just fantastic - but the cumulative effect is brilliant.

The song is both hypnotic and euphoric and I can't recommend it too highly. When I looked at the iTunes stats as to what songs I had listened to the most, it turned out I had listened to this a heroic four times as much as any other song.

This song has clearly been hugely influential on groups like depeche mode and new order, and yet it somehow sounds quite separate from the things it has influenced. For example, just can't get enough by Depeche Mode is clearly influenced by this, but Europe Endless is much less poppy and commercial.

This whole album is fantastic - there is a kind of sister song to this one later on the album called Franz Schubert.

from Trans-Europe Express, available on CD


Everyday Is Like Sunday  performed by Pretenders  1988
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

While I am quite fond of the original version written and recorded by Morrissey, I have to admit that I prefer the cover version that the Pretenders recorded. Chrissie Hynde's voice and style are perfectly suited to the task of singing this movingly sad song about life "in a seaside town that they forgot to close down" and the use of slide-guitar is absolutely perfect on this track.

from Boys On The Side - Soundtrack, available on CD



  mattypenny: I'll have to try to find this. The Pretenders also did a cover of Radiohead's Creep - I think its a B-side (can CD singles have B-sides?) which is cracking - I much prefer it to Radiohead's versh.
  FlyingDutchman1971: The Pretenders cover of 'Creep' is included on the 4-CD/1-DVD box set "Pirate Radio". I couldn't agree more, mattypenny, it is better than the original...
Exodus  performed by Tielman Brothers  1965
Recommended by eleki-san [profile]

Vocal version of the classic 'Exodus' Theme. Reverberated deep 60s stereophonic sound, Andy Tielman's voice, the powerful background choir and the reverberated guitars make this version a true masterpiece.
(there's an incredible story on the listener reviews at Amazon about this band)




Extra Ordinary Thing  performed by Aqualung
Recommended by blindmelon7 [profile]

Almost a clasical piano piece but with amazing vocals




Faith Hope and Charity  performed by Tony Kingston  1973
Recommended by john_l [profile]

An absolutely lovely smooth soul/pop ballad, and I'm someone who usually hates such things (if it's from the last couple of decades anyway). Did I mention it was smooth? His vocal especially. No idea where to find it, but a series called "Vintage Canadian Music" has released his other single "I Am The Preacher" (which I once saw Deep Purple do under the name "Hallelujah" on the tube) on one of their CDs, so I am hopeful ... hint, hint!




Falling Free  performed by Bert Kaempfert  1971
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This is one of those odd discoveries: a track on a CD I've owned for about 8 years, but which I had somehow overlooked. I buy a lot of CDs, and I guess is one of the later tracks on a long compilation cd. Still, that's not much of an excuse, is it!

This is a slow, groovy instrumental (well, with wordless vocals) with funky drums, some fine fuzz guitar work, nice spiky brass and some very pleasing chord changes. It is strongly reminiscent of similar work of the time by people like Johnny Harris. I have a few tracks by completely different artists with a very similar feel/orchestration and closely related chord sequences. It's simultaneously very hip sounding yet quite square with the choir and strings. I love it, obviously.

from Now! (Polydor)
available on CD - Easy Loungin' (Polydor Germany)



false advertising  performed by bright eyes
Recommended by anakinskywalker [profile]

from lifted or the story is in the soil, keep your ear to the ground


False Goodbyes  performed by Echo and the Bunnymen  1990
Recommended by diogenes44 [profile]

From the much maligned (unfairly) non Mc Cullough lp, a slice of dreamy, aggressive psychedelia with some of Will Sergeant's finest moments on guitar and a vocal to match from "the singer who never was". Should be on every compilation of the band but no doubt will remain hard to find. A pity.

from Reverberation (Korova)


Fatal Tragedy  performed by Dream Theater
Recommended by Darke Soul [profile]

This is my favorite song of all time. I think it epitomizes Dream Theater's amazing style and musical prowess. If you listen to this song and it doesn't move you, then you may want to check your pulse because you might be dead.

from Metropolis 2: Scenes From A Memory, available on CD


Fato Consumado  performed by Djavan  1976
Recommended by PappaWheelie [profile]

Samba do Brasil that demonstrates how 3 different lyrical rhythms can make a wonderful tapestry.

from A Voz e o Violão (Gala)
available on CD - Flor de Lis (Warner)



Female of the Species  performed by Meg Myles  1961
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

I can just imagine people sitting in a seedy New York movie theatre on 42nd Street back in 1961 watching a b-movie called "Satan in High Heels". The film is in its last reel and suddenly the main female character comes out on the nightclub stage wearing a leather outfit complete with 6-inch dominitrix boots and a riding crop! The music swells and she starts to sing:
---
i'm the kind of woman, not hard to understand,
i'm the one who cracks the whip and holds the upper hand
I'll beat you, mistreat you, til you quiver and quail,
the female of the species is more deadly than the male.
---
This little film isn't likely to have ever had a soundtrack album which in a way is sad because in addition to this camply little gem there are a couple of other cute vocals by Meg Myles and the other actresses in the film and some great jazz instrumentals sprinkled throughout as well. The fine folks at Something Weird Video have kindly put this little film out on DVD. You can also catch the scene containing this song on their compilation of movie trailers (where I first discovered this film) released to inform people of their DVD catalog.

from from the film "Satan in High Heels" (Something Weird Video www.somethingweird.com)


Fidelity  performed by Regina Spektor  2007
Recommended by bikinisunday346 [profile]

The song has a soft piano/banjo/orchestra backround. The music flows through the heart with a soft melancholic note. Her voice reminds me of a sad cashier and a movie star combined. She isn't like any other singer i've ever heard. The lyrics related to me extremely well and made me truly smile. It truly is a beautiful song

from Begin to Hope



  mattishere: wonderful song. thank you
Fifth Dimension  performed by Arling & Cameron  2001
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

Not quite as easy as I'd expect from A&C, having a more rocky almost Krautrock feel. An insistent bassline, nice harmonising vocals, shiny almost Can-like guitars, with these very, very nice pastoral breakdowns. Vaguely psychedlic almost.

from We are A & C, available on CD



final solution  performed by pere ubu  1976
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

This early single starts off in quite an unpromising way, the sound is quite dry and sparse. Bass and drums, David Thomas muttering teen angst semi audibly in a style that hadn't quite developed into the strange sing song delivery that became his trademark.

"The girls won't touch me cos I got a ". What was that, what?

As it progresses the volume picks up until the final chorus where Thomas is screaming and the guitars start thrashing, then it finishes on a guitar solo that I swear J. Mascis based his entire career on, wah wah squealing on the edge of feedback, while the rest of the band just seem to be lifted into a noisy stratosphere.

I heard for the first time in 10 years last week, and it was breathtaking.

from the single final solution (Rough Trade)


First Contact  performed by Erasure  1997
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Erasure is always guarenteed to get your feet moving and this song is certainly no exception. A surreal dancy story of alien abduction set to a great housy beat with prominent piano work that brings Robert Miles' "Dreamland" album to mind every time I listen to it. A great bassbeat mix of 'In My Arms' also appears among the nine tracks on this single.

from Rain CD Single, available on CD


First Day  performed by The Futureheads  2003
Recommended by agnamaracs [profile]

Has anyone ever seen "The Hudsucker Proxy?" You know the scene where Tim Robbins first comes to work for Hudsucker and he gets an orientation that lasts exactly one minute ("Punch in late and THEY DOCK YA!")? "First Day" is more or less that scene's musical equivalent.

Clocking in at two minutes and not wasting a second, "First Day" describes someone's first day at work that begins optimistically enough ("And they say this is the job that people die for / I hope you're ready for the next stage"). Eventually, the day goes on too long (through dinner!) and his spirits are dampened by a coworker ("And he says like it or not / You have to do what they say / And it is something that you would like to talk about / But it is only your first day"). And then things just go out of hand.

"And they say 'faster, faster!'"
The song speeds up slightly.
"AND THEY SAY 'FASTER! FASTER!!'"
And the song now reaches breakneck speed. Incredible!

I have no doubts that "First Day" could've been one of the greatest, most brilliant post-punk singles ever, had it been released 25 years ago. As it stands, the Futureheads are becoming quite popular in England with the impending release of their first full-length album (for which "First Day" was re-recorded). They are a band worth hearing and I can only hope their album gets an American release.

from First Day, available on CD


Flagpole Sitta  performed by Harvey Danger  1998
Recommended by EarsToHear [profile]

This song is a straight-up rock song with a great verse melody and infectious sing-along chorus.

I am featuring this song on my blog http://www.songfortheday.com this coming week.





  iangray: great song
  Goldtransam: love this song.
Flightless Bird, American Mouth  performed by Iron and Wine
Recommended by hosnapitsizzy [profile]

guitar's part is simply stunning. the tone of the singer's voice is so soothing and relaxing. when i get married, this will be my wedding song, it's perfect.




Floods  performed by Pantera  1996
Recommended by King Charles [profile]

Starting off with the haunting echoing of steel string suspended minor chords, and quickly moving into the feeling of darkness, Floods reigns as one of the greatest metal balladry songs of all time. With a time of 6:59 (minutes and seconds), Floods deals with the internal struggle, elements of corruption, and dissolution of troubles (wash away man/ take him with the floods), that is not dismissed or watered down into a three-minute wad of sound. Pantera's pervasive composing abilities are seen not only in the length of this track, but it its bridges and structured solo set ups. Phil Anselmo delivers this song on the back of Dimebag Darrell's mighty 'steel' guitar effect, and of course the trademark bass drums and top-hat kicks of Vinnie Paul that have made Pantera so famous. The bridge perhaps extracts the greatest meaning from the song; it epitomizes itself on the power chord riff solos and Anselmo's godly muttering of "floods" (in which we can picture a Goliath or force of destruction coming in to obliterate all existence), which echoes throughout the solo. A rather dark song, Floods is characterized by its catchy guitar work (which contains a spectrum of minor and suspended shapes), and staircase wit/reflective backdrop mumbling vocals about the cold, harsh realities of life. Recommended to anyone who doubts this band's ability to do other than scream and wax metallic, Floods will not be a disappointing track. The bleak acceptance of moving onto new horizons or ways of life, leaving the old and dead behind and walking on down the road, is embodied in the ending solo, with the subtle sound of rainfall calming the listener in the end. 5 out of 5 stars for its genre.

from The Great Southern Trendkill



Fly High  performed by Cotton Casino  2004
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

A solo single from a member of Japanese space rock collective Acid Mothers Temple. For them she plays Synthesiser (a nice old Roland) Cigarettes and Beer. On this she also sings.
Its a strange sounding thing, theres no bass or even much lower mid range. Echo'd synthesiser, a very old sounding drum box, and vocals all occupying the same accoustic space to very psychedelic effect. But yet, very poppy, the vocals stay with you for ages.
Lovely stuff.

from its a single
available on CD - we love cotton (silly boy)


Flying Dutchman  performed by Tori Amos  1991
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

As Morrissey would say, “I know very well how I got my name”. This is the track that inspired the name I use here, on my email, on ebay, amazon, etc… A song about loving and accepting yourself despite others’ inability or unwillingness to acknowledge you. This is truly one of the best tracks Tori recorded during the Little Earthquakes phase and promptly buried as a b-side track on a single release. (most of her best tracks end up on b-sides for some reason)

from China - UK CD Single, available on CD



  konsu: Hmmm... I always thought your name was a reference to the great jazz label. They put out some of their best records in the early 70's... I do however acknowledge and accept the origin of your name despite my unwillingness!
Fome Total  performed by Zuco 103  1999
Recommended by Erik [profile]

Everyone is mixing breakbeats with bossa nova and lounge these days, but rarely as good as Zuco 103 on their album 'Outro Lado'. Probably because other bands don't have a singer as sensuous as Lilian Vieira. Surpisingly my favourite track of this record is the one without beats: it could be discribed as 'bass 'n' violins'. If you like Bebel Gilberto, listen to this song.

from Outro Lado (Ziriguiboom/Crammed Discs)


For a Few Dollars More  performed by Al Caiola  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A wickedly funky and twangy take on this classic Morricone theme. The beat is very cool - funky and surprisingly insistent, reminiscent of some of the best tracks on Howard Roberts's albums of the time on capitol. This track is from the interesting LP 'King Guitar', which also yields a Vinnie Bell-esque 'watery guitar' take on 'Sleepwalk' and a version of 'Tiny Bubbles' done in Latin boogaloo style.

from King Guitar (United Artists UAS 6586)



For a short time  performed by Tiddas  1998
Recommended by phil [profile]

Absolutely fantastic, amazing, beautiful singing - it'll really knock your socks off. The tiddas seem to concentrate on singing above everything else - they are three women, two of whom play the acoustic guitar, and that's it, but the result is just sensational harmonies and brilliant interpretations of songs, some of which are aboriginal folk songs, others their own, and others just covers.

This is a cover of a song by the splendidly-named Weddings, Parties, Anything. Both versions are absolutely brilliant but the singing on this tiddas one is just out of this world.

from Lethal by the kilo, available on CD


For All We Know  performed by Donny Hathaway  1972
Recommended by gthomas [profile]

The slightly gospel-inflected interpretation by Hathaway on his eponymously titled recording with Roberta Flack in 1972 (Atlantic Records) is simply transcendent. The string arrangements by Arif Mardin wondrous, flute accompaniment by Hubert Laws, as usual, fluid and moving. And the closing moments by Roberta Flack, angelic.

from Roberta Flack & Donny Hathaway (Atlantic 82794-2)
available on CD - same as album (same as album)


For The Dead  performed by Gene  1994
Recommended by LawrenceM [profile]

Gene could be seen as everything that was risible about indie circa 1995. A four peice guitar band, with a Smiths obsessed frontman and a Weller obsessed guitarist. However, despite all this, plus unkind words from the press, gene have released a clutch of excellent, stirring singles full of bedsit miserabilism and gritty optimism. This single, their first, still sends shivers down my spine, 7 years on .....

from the single For The Dead (Costermonger)
available on CD - To See The Lights (Costermonger)



Ford Capri II  performed by Christian Bruhn  1973
Recommended by heinmukk [profile]

actually, this is a german advertising-song from 1973. i wonder how advertising was in those days, since this track lasts 2:56min.
found on popshopping, a compilation with old funky german advertising-songs issued by the lable crippled hot dick wax, where you can find many of those obscure old recordings. for example shake sauvage. a compilation with old french film soundtracks. great catchy tunes in there, too!
anyway, christian bruhn is rather known here in germany. he wrote a lot of hits and a great soundtrack for the 70s/80s cartoon/anime series captain future.
this one is funky and catchy, with female "aaaaah" singings and great brass hits (which i like more and more....)

from Pop Shopping (Crippled Hot Dick Wax)



  n-jeff: Yeah man! Brash horns on the intro, a nice mellow bit in the middle and out with a bang. Remixed by Ursula1000 on a 12, which although it seems redundant, isn't bad at all. Sounds nice when driving around my own Ford Capri MkII. Lovely!
Frances the Mute  performed by The Mars Volta
Recommended by bigby [profile]

Possibly their best song, this was released as a single, right before the album of the same title came out. This is supposed to be an introduction/decoder for the album.




Freeker By The Speaker  performed by Keller Williams  2002
Recommended by rancidgoat [profile]

Fun song; light hearted.
One guy plays all the instruments and sings. He plays a part, loops it, plays another, loops it and so on. Fun to see live and watch how he does it.

from Laugh, available on CD


Fuel  performed by Ani Difranco
Recommended by Reina [profile]

A smart, funny rant -- half talking, half singing. Political as any of her music, but less angry and more mocking. Very cool. Even if you don't like Ani, this one deserves a listen.



"...all the radios agree with all the tvs, and the magazines agree with all the radios and I keep hearing that same damn song everywhere I go! Maybe I should put a bucket over my head and a marshmallow in each ear, and stumble around for another dumb, numb week for another humdrum hit song to appear."




Fumemos Un Cigarrillo  performed by Piero  1969
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Piero sings in a soothing, breath-y tenor... More italian in tone than latin, although,the best comparison i've found is Luiz Henrique.His phrasing reminds me of Luiz as well,but there is no real relation.The backing has a nice spaghetti -western kind of vibe ala' Moriccone,which gives the whole thing a kind of high planes drifter setting,with plucked electric bass, strummed acoustic guitar,and occasional female chorus with a light string arrangement,Very cool.The whole record is really good,and a lot of the songs have a distinctly latin ballad feel.

from Piero, available on CD




  modette: choose the italian compositers but choose them better: isn't "luiz henrique" , is LUIS ENRIQUEZ. other marvellous song of his: lo scatenato. sorry for my english!!!
  klatu: Pretty sure "Luiz Henrique" is the correct spelling, and that he is Brazilian. Must be a different guy than the similarly named Italian.
  Betto_Colombia: Piero is from Argentina.
Funeral of Hearts  performed by HIM  2003
Recommended by Carrie [profile]

She was the sun, shining upon,
The tomb of your hopes and dreams so frail


Gothic, dark, etc.

from Love Metal, available on CD


Gay  performed by Stephen Lynch  2000
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

I love this song! It is as much of a love song that a straight man can write to his gay friend. Stephen's close friend from childhood is gay so I'm sure he collaborated on this one... This tells the tale of consuming too much alcohol and losing all inhibitions "If I were gay, I would give you my heart. If I were gay, you'd be my work of art. And if I were gay, we would swim in romance, but I'm not gay so get your hand out of my pants".

from A Little Bit Special, available on CD


Genesis 3:23  performed by The Mountain Goats  2009
Recommended by ghosttomost [profile]

The Mountain Goats are an indie alt country band that are a bit of an acquired taste but they are so talented. this song is totally catchy and the lyrics are superb. the lyrics truly paint a vivd picture for the listener and you feel like you are trapped within the sing.

from the life of the world to come


Get a Room  performed by Jim O’Rourke  2001
Recommended by hewtwit [profile]

One of the finest songs to come from o'rourke's bacharachisation. Lovely changes, brilliant lyrics and an epic ending which is as depressing as it is funny.

from insignificance


Get In Line  performed by I’m From Barcelona  2011
Recommended by Livy19 [profile]

Indie Pop feel. More than one singer (big group of people singing this song) fun and upbeat!
- I like this because its good to dance to when your with your friends and the lyrics are quick to learn.
- Electric guitar, keyboards,

from Forever Today
available on CD - Yes (yes)


Get It Up For Love  performed by David Cassidy  1975
Recommended by Flippet [profile]

Cassidy recorded this track as part of a suite of songs for his new record label in 1975. Attempting to redefine his image from teen idol to serious artist, this song was David's first new single. It is a perfect example of the west coast R&B sound popular at the time. A brilliant recording, the song was banned from radio airplay by the BBC as the title was too shocking. More likely was the fact that no-one understood who this "new" David Cassidy was. The banning of the song was solved by flipping the b-side to the a-side with the result that Cassidy's version of "I Write The Songs" became a huge hit for him internationally and later inspired the less sensitive and more commercial rendition of the song produced by Barry Manilow. David Cassidy at his best!

from The Higher They Climb The Harder They Fall, available on CD


Getting Away With It  performed by Electronic  1989
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

The amount of 80s talent was really incredible on Electronic's debut single: Bernard Sumner (New Order) doing vocals and synths, Johnny Marr (Ex-The Smiths) on guitar (pulling off a wonderful solo in the middle of the song), Neil Tennant (Pet Shop Boys) providing background vocals and Anne Dudley (Art Of Noise, arranger on ABC's legendary "Lexicon Of Love") orchestrated a wonderfully lush string arrangement. The outcome is a fluffy, elegant, slightly melancholic and almost timeless piece of british pop music (except for that dated, rather bland sounding electric piano).

from Getting Away With It (Single), available on CD




  delicado: odd - I was thinking about this song just yesterday. The B-side, 'lucky bag', was also quite good as I recall.
  Mike: Electronic could be very good indeed when they started out and I'm a big fan of a number of their songs from this period. Tennant and Marr went on to work together on the last PSB album, but I'd like to hear more collaborative work from Tennant and Sumner.
Girl Don’t Come  performed by Sandie Shaw  1964
Recommended by golden [profile]

From the minor key trombone intro to the teenage angst of the lyrics, this is a classic song of the 60's that totally encapulates the innocent era of the UK beat boom. Sandie Shaw was probably the best selling UK female singer from 64 to 69, slightly outselling her contemporaries Dusty, Cilla and Lulu and although she possessed a weaker voice than the others, what she lacked in volume she made up in style and interpretation. Sweet and slightly soulful with a quasi tuneless ache to her voice which epitomised a teenager stood up by some beatnik no hoper, she was only 17 and showed the ways of a woman several years older. In the UK it was the follow up to the massive UK No 1 ''Always Something There To Remind Me'' and was a massive Top 3 hit that should have gone all the way to the top.
I love this record - it sums up an era, it is the beginning of a suit of girl singers who changed then style of singing, from 50's twee to 60's ''dolly bird'' and it remains a classic pop single from a girl who held the record for the most No 1 hits for a ssolo female for 19 years

from n/a (Pye)



  shakeahand: Quite agree. One of my first LPs as a teen was a greatest hits - and for me she summed up the 60s female vocal. For big, brassy and emotion-laden power pop, see also Long Walk Home.
  Swinging London: It was initially released as the 'B' side of the much weaker: 'I'd Be Far Better Off Without You'. Someone, probably a DJ, flipped it over. I love the arrangement on this. It's full of atmosphere. It seems to completely capture the time. Another of her songs that has a similar effect is 'You've Not Changed', which wasn't as big a hit and seems to have been forgotten and is often excluded from Greatest Hits Comps.
Girl In A Sportscar  performed by Alan Hawkshaw  1973
Recommended by nighteye [profile]

We see the road going by us, close up on a spinning wheel of the car. Close-up on a side-mirror. Close up on the rear-view mirrow. We see a woman putting on her lipstick. Full frame view of the woman; she has trendy sunglasses, a hat and a red scarf blowing in the wind. She smiles. We see the car, it is a sportscar with the top down. It passes by other cars on the open road, as it continues down the road we zoom out using a helicopter. We see the Californian rocky landscape and the crooked road following it. We go further and further back. Fade out.


available on CD - The Sound Gallery (Scamp)




  olli: Oh yeah, i love this song. i play it at least once a week.
Glamorous Glue  performed by Morrissey  1992
Recommended by phil [profile]

I became able to vote about a week after the UK Conservative party had just won a fourth straight election victory. For me, this song just captures those feelings of utter frustration and anger which I was feeling at the time:
 
'3rd week with the jar you find
everything dies
we won't vote conservative
because we never have
everyone lies, everyone lies!'
 
It ends with Morrissey basically giving up on the country, singing 'We look to Los Angeles/ For the language we use/ London is dead, London is dead.' Even listening to it now, it takes me straight back to what was a pretty grim time for me, and - frankly - Britain.

from Your Arsenal (HMV 0777 7 99794 2 4)



  LawrenceM: and of course, not long after that Morrissey moved to Los Angeles, to live the life of a fading rock star in the Hollywood Hills. All of "Your Arsenal" is brilliant ......
Glory Box  performed by Portishead  1994
Recommended by kaptnunderpnts [profile]

the song is one of the most sensual i've heard. it has me singing lyrics that are all too clearly made for a woman to sing. the song has an awesome beat, onto which a great, heavy, solo guitar is thrown. and beth gibbons' voice- always great- is especially great on this track.

from Dummy



  FCS: Hey man... Since you're into Portishead, I think you may also like Goldfrapp, especially "Felt Mountain" album... Try listening to Horse Tears or Deer Stop!
Golden Lights  performed by Twinkle  1965
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This is a simple but rather bitter pop song, although on the surface it sounds quite sweet. If I recall correctly, it was written about the singer that Twinkle was seeing at the time. The gentle arrangement features acoustic guitar and some brass. It's not hard to hear why Morrissey liked this song enough to cover it with The Smiths.

Twinkle has a lovely clear voice, and much as I respect Moz, this version towers above the one done by The Smiths, which suffers from a strange mix of production styles. That said, I have a strange mix of emotions on hearing the song, since I heard the Smiths version at 14, but only got into this one in the last few years.

from the single Golden Lights
available on CD - Twinkle (RPM)



Gone...Like the Swallows  performed by And Also The Trees  1986
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

The exquisite standout of the Virus Meadow album and easily And Also the Trees's best song from its early years, "Gone…Like the Swallows" steers away from the sometimes frenetic vocal intensity found elsewhere on the record it comes from for a more reflective but still passionate approach. Simon Jones delivers his lyric with all the deep-voiced intensity of a student of Wordsworth and Shelley reciting on the hillside to nature (which in some respects is pretty much the point of the song). But Jones isn't explicitly anti-modern — consider the mention of the aeroplane in the sky at various points — while the music is equally ancient and up-to-date in feel. Digital delay on the guitars turns them into rolling, darkly chiming flows and waves of sound, dramatically crashing behind the steady rhythm section and Jones' increasingly intense words. Bass and drums alone wrap everything up on a brief, spare note.
(AMG)

from Virus Meadow, available on CD


Good Fruit  performed by Hefner  2000
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I've come to really like this band, but when I first heard them, I wasn't so keen. Like many great bands, Hefner feature a highly distinctive singer, who can take some time to grow on you. This simple 3 and a half minute pop song has an engaging arrangement, in which the piano, drums and guitar are superbly complemented in the chorus by synth, brass, and some great backing vocals. The chorus is quite glorious, with a chord sequence that somehow reminds me of the group Mercury Rev's very best songs. The words go very well with the emotional music as well: 'Lost feelings of love come flooding back/Every time you cry/ you give me little heart attacks/Love seems strongest when it's new/but that's something I can't prove/I can't prove that I love you...'

The only other reference point that occurs to me is Pulp - as the song builds, lead singer Darren Hayman's delivery becomes ever more exhuberant, like that of Jarvis Cocker in the best Pulp songs. Looking at the CD, I notice that the excellent backing vocals are by Amelia Fletcher, who if I remember correctly did some Wedding Present backing vocals, and was the singer in the Sarah records band 'Heavenly'. Anyway, this is a really infectious track, highly recommended.

from We Love the City, available on CD




  kkkerplunkkk: Good taste my friend! That is one of my favourite Hefner songs. Should have been a huge hit, it only made number 50 in the UK charts for 1 week. It did go straight in at 1 in the indie charts though!
Good Night Sweet Night  performed by Jason Falkner  1999
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A beautiful Brian Wilson-type ballad. "Though I try to understand you/I don't know who you are/because I haven't heard a thing about the boy." Falkner sings lovely multi-tracked harmonies with himself on this, and it's just another reason that I love his solo work a lot more than I ever liked Jellyfish.

from Can You Still Feel?, available on CD



Good Old Owl  performed by Niobe  2004
Recommended by respiro [profile]

With lightly strummed acoustic guitar, vaguely castanetish rhythm and Yvonne Cornelius filtered and far away singing, this wistful and melancholic song transcends the experimentation of the other songs on the album Voodooluba, with its straightforwardness while still keeping the air of mystery present in the other tracks.

from Voodooluba