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You searched for ‘Still’, which matched 246 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
"tenderness of wolves"  performed by coil  1984
Recommended by kohl [profile]

this is a nightmare in song form. the demo version (without vocals) is significantly less creepy, but still brilliant.


available on CD - scatology


(don’t worry) If there is hell below we’re all going to go  performed by Curtis Mayfield  1970
Recommended by ninjos [profile]

Bid band with violins, wind instruments (? i mean saxofons or trumpets), Curtis on guitar and everything with good arrangements.

I just try NOT to spoil this one of a kind artist with my bad english. Songs in this album pour essence from racial discrimination, political and drug problems. I think this was one of those songs that made black men to organize and to gain self-respect to reclaim their human rights.

I like the thing that you really can feel that Curtis has something on his mind, something important to tell about, not just telling how to make love and have good time. This places this song above others.

People are fucked and politicians say: "don't worry" - and still there is hope. Let's hope so.

from Curtis (Curtom records CRS 8005)
available on CD - Curtis Reissue


(Want You) Back In My Life Again  performed by The Carpenters  1981
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

One of the last Carpenters singles from their final studio album. I find this sweet 'n perky song strangely compelling, since it shows Richard and Karen Carpenter awkwardly trying to adjust their wholesome image to an early '80s synth pop template. Karen's voice is so processed and overdubbed that she blends in seamlessly with the synth-heavy backup -- still, the effect isn't cheezy but full and lucious. Knowing that Karen was slowly dying during this time makes this tune odder still.

from Made In America, available on CD (A&M)


6060-842  performed by The B-52s  1979
Recommended by rum [profile]

The lyrical theme of ‘6060-842’ seems pretty mundane for the B-52s. Tina goes to the ladies room, sees a phone number scrawled on the wall, and so decides to ring it. Hmm… doesn’t sound like it’s gonna be a tale the measure of “the time our car was hijacked by the devil” and the like. Still this IS the B-52s, and recognisably so, “if you’d like a very nice time, just give this number a call” reads the unlikely graffiti. So something must happen. The band are optimistic too, bouncing along excitedly on a jumpy new wave rhythm. Tina, we reckon, is much like the band. She lives for wild parties and crazy adventures. This 6060-842 could be just the ticket. “Oh my gawd! I’m gonna give that there number a ring. You see if I don’t!” So she drops a dime in the phone slot and, “prays she gets the line.” She’s biting her lip, stabbing her nails into her finger tips, “come on… come ON!!!”

But pause a moment. Is she really so naïve? Does she really think a “really nice time” awaits her? In the gnarled and weather beaten hands of a social realist singer-songwriter, the number 6060-842 would lead to abuse, to prostitution, and ultimately, to death. In the hands of the B-52s? I don’t know, you tell me. A debauched toga party in a 1950s vision of the future…? Well, it’s neither. It’s just a brilliant anti-climax. You see Tina and the B-52a might be deranged, but the world they live in is not. It’s bloody typical. She dials 6060-842, and can’t get through! “The number’s been disconnected…” monotones the operator. But Tina won’t accept this, no, and neither will the band. They can’t end the track with Tina accepting the disappointment with a sigh of weary resignation, “ah well, nevermind… maybe next time.” No, no, this anti-climax has worked them up into an angry frenzy. Ricky Wilson vents his frustration with viscious slashes of electric guitar whilst Tina just keeps dialing and dialing, and getting rebuffed and rebuffed, “HELLO!!!” “sorry…” The track probably ends with them all smashing up the phone box. A superb, and much over-looked track.

from The B-52s, available on CD


A Fairy Tale of New York (live version)  performed by Christy Moore  199?
Recommended by mattypenny [profile]

Thought I might see if I can type in some Christmas favorites...

This is the Pogues song, sung by Christy Moore, the great Irish balladeer, folk singer and all round good bloke.

There's a studio version on his 'Smoke and Strong Whiskey LP'. The LPs great, but the version of 'A Fairy Tale' is not half as good as the live version from (I think) Live at the Point.

Christy's shows at the time were just him and an acoustic guitar. It was still a cracking show. He's now accompanied by another acoustic guitar (hey - lets rock!! :) ).

Anyhow he seems to get a big sound out of just guitar and voice.

Coming to the point...

This version is just Christy and his guitar. It preceded by a long story about how he 'stumbled into a fairy ring and bejasus I couldnt get out'. He's eventually helped out by a stranger who takes him by the hand and takes him to a pub. They sing each other songs and tell each poems. Then the stranger starts to sing 'It was Christmas Eve, babe...' .... and you know the rest. It finshes with Christy kissing the stanger on the lips and declaring Shane MacGowan 'I love you baby too'

Other Christmas songs:
Cajun Christmas
Il est Ne le Devine Enfant - Siouxsie and the Banshees
All I really want for Christmas - Ini Kamoze (maybe?)
Christmas Lullaby - Shane MacGowan
White Christmas - The Drifters

from Live at the Point


A320  performed by Foo Fighters  1997
Recommended by dillill [profile]

This is a great song from the Godzilla soundtrack, that me as a 'longtime' Foo Fighters fan still can't believe more people don't know about. The sound has one of my favorite unique sounding solos in it. Great underrated song!

from Godzilla Original Soundtrack (Epic)


Abbandonati Amore  performed by Paul Anka
Recommended by roberto [profile]

Paul Anka sings esperanto? No, it`s just his italian version of "Put your head on my shoulder". I don`t know the year it was recorded, but I think it were in the late 60`s. Although his italian articulation sounds queer to me (it feels like he red the lyrics from a board) "Abbandonati Amore" is a very nice song and the "Hawaiian" melody is still the same as in the original recording!


available on CD - Italiano (Continental Records)


After An Afternoon  performed by Jason Mraz
Recommended by Silly Goose [profile]

Jason's guitar wraps around you caresses you, making you feel like it's carrying you down a river on a warm summer day, sun shining on your face. His lyrics are true poetry, and he can communicate so many emtions. Only Jason could sing a song where all he does is read the intrument panels on his car and still sound great. Although this guy is still unsigned, his website (jasonmraz.com) has an short CD you can order and mp3's you can download. If this guys does not make it big one day then I'll....I'lll....I don't know what, but I'll do something.





All My Friends Who Play Guitar  performed by Starflyer 59
Recommended by Kilbey1 [profile]

Melancholy jangle tune with sweet, haunting melody; discussed the trials and tribulations of those little bands that slip under our musical radar, however worthy. Reminiscent of garage band struggles, all who picked up a guitar in school in hopes of making it big. For those who make it big, hundreds - no, thousands - of bands are still waiting to be heard.

"And never thought it'd go this far / We never thought that / We'd ever go far / Like all my friends who play guitar / Know who we are? / We never go far / Like all my friends who play guitar"

(btw, I had no idea these guys were Christian; never sounded like any Christian music I heard!)

from Leave Here a Stranger


All My Little Words  performed by The Magnetic Fields  1999
Recommended by brightdayler [profile]

"Unboyfriendable?" You've got to be kidding me. "You are a splendid butterfly." Seriously? Even still this song is completely awesome. You've got to hear it, because then you'll see!

from 69 Love Songs (Merge Records)


Alleys of your Mind  performed by Cybotron  1981
Recommended by geezer [profile]

A Detroit take on Kraftwerk,Depeche Mode and European Disco,sparse remote synthetic drums and bass lines,and squelching fat melody lines that you can still hear in todays pop and R and b (Justin Timberlake,Timbaland ,Lady Ga Ga ),lends heavily from Trans European Express but is also looser and a tad more joyous .

from Clear
available on CD - Clear or Best of


Almost Arms  performed by The Minders  1996
Recommended by two-headed boy [profile]

'Back to the Almost Arms again.' One minute, 29 seconds of pure heaven. Clapping hands, sugary-sweet bass, warm acoustic guitar, and perfectly stylized harmony demonstrate the greatness of this band. The Minders' ability to streamline their brit-pop sound into short cuts such as this says volumes of their talent. They have grasped the art of the rock strip-tease as we sit and drool and demand more of their form. A thousand and a half listens later 'I am hungry but still smiling' rings truer than ever, this is but the appetizer for their more developed works; taste this and you too will be The Minders' biggest fan!

from Cul-de-Sacs & Dead Ends (spinART / Elephant 6 spart 76 / E6-021)



Alone again or  performed by Love & Arthur Lee  196?
Recommended by AndreasNystrom [profile]

Very different sounding song for me. It sounds like a mix of late 60ies pop with arabic/turkish influences. A bit sad sounding, but still there is hope :)
I love it cause its got great harmonies, and a mix of guitars, violins, and spanish guitars.





  callgirlscene: Most of Loves material for me is not that great. I don't choose to listen to it - except for this song. It has this 'Summer of Love' dreamy hippie wistful feel. And, yes, wonderful harmonies. In it's way, it captures the mood of that time.
  john_l: Great song from a great LP, which naturally I hated when I first bought it and didn't re-discover until 1980, after hearing the (very good) UFO cover of "Alone Again Or" from their "Lights Out" LP!
  leonthedog: My first experience with this song was a cover version by The Damned ... it's actually very true to the original in my opinion - bold acoustic guitars, trumpets and all. Give it a listen!
American Jesus  performed by Bad Religion  1993
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

The lyrics to this song, even though they were written years ago still hold up today. Nothing has changed, which is kind of sad. This song hits you hard with it's political message with very little subtlety, but it doesn't need it because the message is so strong and so frustrated. Bad Religion's best work.

from Recipe For Hate (Epitaph)



Amori Finiti  performed by Giancarlo Gazzani  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

To me, this track is a perfect distillation of all that is wonderful about bossa nova and the various hybrids which it inspired. Bossa nova was taken up all over the world after its rise in the late 50s and early 60s, but Italian musicians seem to have done an especially good job of absorbing its charms.

A simple instrumental, this opens with a plucked guitar and simply builds up and down, adding piano and strings and then taking them out so beautifully that it makes you shiver. Alas, the rest of the compilation this is taken from suffers from poor sound quality. If anyone comes across the original Giancarlo Gazzani album, I'd be very keen to hear it, although I fear this track may be an isolated gem.

from Musica per commenti sonori
available on CD - Metti una bossa a cena (Schema)




  Swinging London: Really nice. Reminds me of a 1966 movie soundtrack. Now I've got to search for the song.
Another Girl, Another Planet  performed by The Only Ones  1977
Recommended by Ricard [profile]

This manages to have a late seventies punk spirit, yet still be a really well crafted guitar pop song. Always great to hear on the dancefloor.


available on CD - Darkness & Light (BBC)



  kohl: yes. good to see this one here.
Anything At All  performed by Crosby, Stills & Nash  1977
Recommended by G400 Custom [profile]

Could this be the most self-aware song ever written? 'I'm the world's most opinionated man,' sings sweet-voiced David Crosby in a tone of utter resignation. Bear in mind he'd already dealt with fame, failure, bereavement, heroin, booze and yachting by this point. It's a very stripped-down arrangement, with even CSN's trademark harmony kept to a minimum. And Crosby's rueful laugh towards the end is a real killer. Should I die soon, stop by my funeral and you'll hear this song... From a very underrated album, recorded after that toerag Neil Young had come and gone.

from CSN, available on CD (Warner Brothers)


Anything, Anything (I'll Give You)  performed by Dramarama  1985
Recommended by Vagina Man [profile]

Dramarama never hit it as big as they should have but they still managed to stay around for more or less twelve years. Anything, Anything is one of those skater songs that gets you pumped. Not just because the song is great but becaus eyou can relate to it. It was well known mostly for its appearence in the movie Nightmare on Elm Street 4. It is on during the part when the kid is doing karate. The song is excellent and if you grew up in the eighties and took a liking to skateboarding and things of that nature then you can definitely appreciate this. The words as well as the music has a certain type of familiar energy that hits the spot in each of us, that is if you like metal.

from Cinema Verite (Elektra)


Anyway that you want me  performed by Spiritualized  1990
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A great version of this Troggs song, which formed one side of Spiritualized's first single. It's a pretty straight cover version, but with a richer production and that probably soon to become hip again early 90s dance/indie crossover sound (wah wah guitars, funky drums). Actually, it has aged pretty well, and I still can't listen to it without singing out loud when I hear it 'I've been watchin' you; and a lovin' you in vain...'

from the single Anyway that you want me (Dedicated)




  tinks: does that mean that it's almost time for a soup dragons revival?? hahahaha...
  shaka_klaus: i heard another version of this one recently in a commercial on tv. don't remember which at the moment. spiritualized gives me goosespots. i saw them in 98 at a festival and they opened up with 'cop shoot cop', what can i say? amazing. this version is also a fav of mine.
  delicado: I've been listening to the original Troggs version a lot recently. The Spiritualized version is a great cover - the same in many ways but also very different and intense. I think they're a good band; not everything they do is spot-on, but when a song by them is good, it's normally pretty mind-blowing.
  shaka_klaus: i forgot to write that the version of the song in the commercial is sung by a female singer.
  artlongjr: The female singer may have been Evie Sands, she sang the original, which was written by Chip Taylor. Chip is famous actor John Voight's brother. My favorite version of this tune is by the band American Breed from about 1967. Haven't heard the Troggs version yet.
Apple Of My Eye  performed by Ed Harcourt
Recommended by LawrenceM [profile]

Ed Harcourt has now committed this song to tape three times in three years. Firstly on the excellent debut mini-LP "Maplewood" in 2000. It was fleshed out and re-recorded for his full-length debut LP, "Here Be Monsters", in 2001, and now surfaces again in 2002 as the a-side of his most recent single. This time it's even better still, and comes accompanied with a great video. This is classic, piano led pop which could have been recorded at any time in the last 30 years. Comparisons to Randy Newman, Nick Drake andTom Waits have been forthcoming, and not unjustified. A great song which just gets better with each trip to the studio.

from Here Be Monsters, available on CD (Heavenly)



are you gonna be my girl  performed by jet
Recommended by eggplantia5 [profile]

yes, this is one of the songs in the commercials for itunes. yes, it is probably going to be overplayed and annoy you to death. but until then, it's a damned rocking good song. i have had to listen to it a few times a day, and i still can't get it out of my head, not that i want to. makes me want to dance, puts me in a good mood. is it a really great song? maybe not. but for now, it completely rocks.




Are you happy ?  performed by Microdisney  1985
Recommended by whoops [profile]

During the summer of 1985 Microdisney had already lost all illusions about their potential commercially speaking. This second album was not what people would called a long awaited one. Recorded in a chaotic way (the drum part was the last thing to be put on the tape), this is a true masterpiece from track 1 to track 10 and "Are you happy ?" is its epicenter.
Cathal Coughlan (who at the time renamed himself Blah Blah and claimed to play keyboards and plastic pubis)is now a solo artist and still one of the most beautiful voice in england. Sean O'Hagan have finally achieved success through the High Llamas and Stereolab.

from The clock comes down the stairs, available on CD (Virgin)



  felonius: I have to agree. This is one of the most poignant, plaintive tracks I have ever heard, O'Hagan's soaring Telecaster solo launching it into orbit far above the mire of other 80's indie rock. (I think it might have been influenced by Stephen Stills' solo on 'Bound to Lose' from the Manassas album - another guitar solo to make you weep).
Ask Yourself Why  performed by Michel LeGrand  1969
Recommended by konsu [profile]

A really nice cinema-pop gem from the team that brought us The Windmills of your Mind. Sung by Sally Stevens, one of Hollywoods great voices. Such a charming little song. It's one of those things you instantly play again after the first time you hear it. It's more or less a song about freedom, with lyrics that still sound fresh today:"...Bullets fly like popcorn on the screen, recommended wholesome nice & clean, making love's the thing that can't be seen... Why?"

Found it on this sort of cash-in LP for LeGrand's UA soundtrack work from 1970. Originally from the soundtrack for "La Piscine", which is harder than hell to find on it's own. The LP is awsome for fans of LeGrand for it has 3 tunes from "The Thomas Crown Affair" , "La Piscine" , "The Young Girls Of Rochefort" & the jazz theme from "Play Dirty".

from The Windmills of your Mind (United Artists UAS 6715)


Ball of Confusion (That’s What the World Is)  performed by Temptations  1970
Recommended by nuthings [profile]

Great funk/soul track with a healthy dose of political and social commentary circa 1970 set to a killer bass line - it's scary how much of it is still relevant today. "A ball of confusion, that's what the world is today..."

from Temptations Greatest Hits Vol 2 (Gordy)
available on CD - My Girl: The Very Best of the Temptations (Motown)


Ballad of Billy the Kid  performed by Ricky Fitzpatrick  2007
Recommended by jmalthew [profile]

Ricky Fitzpatrick's song "Ballad of Billy the Kid" is a 3 minute class in songwriting.

A compelling story filled with unexpected references, internal rhymes, interesting characters...not to mention his beautiful voice. His single acoustic guitar is the perfect backdrop for this tragic and beautiful story. A couple of four-letter words, but nothing that doesn't fit appropriately into the song as a whole.

Ricky's comment on the mystery of the song has always been "Never judge a man til you've walked a mile in his shoes".

I am a fan and always will be. I suggest checking Ricky out while he's still available as a "local" artist at www.rickyfitzpatrick.com.

from The Same Only Different, available on CD (RFM Music)


Beautiful night  performed by The Burden Brothers  2004
Recommended by Reck [profile]

Ex toadies lead singer Todd (Vaden) Lewis, one of the best voices in rock today. Don't know if you get this goodness yet outside of texas, but the tour is upcoming, and I actually heard it on the radio (gasp) something the Toadies 2nd album didn't even get (a great sophmore release from a platinum selling band... hmmmm) anyway its uplifting and real, but does has a little of that Tv sheen on it that instills hope in you, even if life is never really as good as it promises.

from Buried in Your Black Heart


Brassneck  performed by The Wedding Present  1989
Recommended by lingereffect [profile]

I'm a complete sucker for jangly guitar, and thus The Wedding Present's back catalogue is a treasure trove for me. A great breakup song from a band with more than their fair share, "Brassneck" is available in two versions on the reissue of _Bizarro_ - the LP version and the single version (the latter of which was recorded by Steve Albini and is many people's favourite, but not mine). It isn't their fastest song, but the speedy, tendonitis-inducing guitar strum still leaves me slack-jawed.

from Bizarro, available on CD (RCA)



  delicado: I also prefer the album version. Oddly enough I was playing the guitar in that fast-strummed jangly style this very evening... I think the George Best album is my favorite.
Breathe Out  performed by Nothingface  1998
Recommended by Vagina Man [profile]

Breathe Out is one of those songs that no matter how many times you listen to it it still rocks. If you a metal head then you will appreciate the quality of music Nothingface throws at you. They are very heavy but melodic. The lead singer has a unique talent in which he can reach high notes as well as growl so deep he will make you shit yourself. Every time I hear this song all I can do is bang my head and scream along to the insanity that flows within my head.

from An Audio Guide to Everday Atrocity (Mayhem Records)


Bridge Over Troubled Water  performed by Simon and Garfunkel  1970
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

What a beautiful song from one of the most influential duos of the 1960's. Paul Simon has written some of the best songs of this past century and this is among his finest. The moving orchestration featuring piano, violins, and the booming kettle drums convey the emotions of this song in a way that transcends time. It is still as moving as it was 32 years ago at the time it was released!

from Bridge Over Troubled Water, available on CD (Columbia)


Bumblebee  performed by Roman Andren  2008
Recommended by Festy [profile]

You'd be forgiven for thinking this one of Sergio Mendes' hipper tracks from his Brasil '66 or '77 period. It has that old sound to it and is really warm. It starts off breezy and builds with energy whilst Roman Andren, a young Swedish musician, composer and DJ, plays some beautiful electric piano over the top. Although it starts off with vocals over a sparse bass and electric piano combo, the vocals don't come in again until a while into the track. By the end of the track, the energy is at its most, yet still breezy, with brass, vocals and hand-claps providing a sense of a party. It's the perfect song for a summer's day or, close your eyes on a dreary winter's day and be transported.

from Juanita & Beyond : Live Studio Sessions, available on CD (P-Vine)



Bye Bye Blackbird  performed by Joe Cocker  1969
Recommended by sixstringman [profile]

Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin played on 3 tracks of Joe Cocker's 1st album. This is an old song which has been slowed down and Page's guitar work is really decent on this track. Cocker's voice (he was touted as the best blues singer in UK at that time by Eric Clapton)is pristine. Also check out "Sandpaper Cadillac" and "Do I Still Figure in Your Life" as well!




Can't wait too long  performed by The Beach Boys  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A superb, achingly beautiful song which, to my knowledge, never appeared on a Beach Boys album, and was merely a studio outtake. The track opens with an incredible dense wall of harmonized vocals, and emotive lyrics ("I miss you darlin, I miss you so hard"). Later, the rhythm changes, and it becomes (to my taste) slightly cheesily rocky, but not so much as to ruin the song, which still rates as one of the Beach Boys' finest.


available on CD - Smiley Smile/Wild Honey (EMI/Capitol)




  catfish: also check the different version on the box set. fantastic tune, and recorded after smile was shelved - proof that brian's genius endure a sea of troubles...
Cavaleiro Andante  performed by Abilio Manoel  1970
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

This song is simply unreal. It starts out in a kind of 4/4 samba groove with a highly prominent cuica and a funky strummed acoustic guitar chord progression before the super-catchy pizzicato-violins riff comes in, and Abilio's mellow voice singing the melody. It's sunshiney and catchy, with a bit of a haunting aftertaste, very Brazilian. I can never hear this song enough times!! Abilio Manoel is a Sao Paulo-based singer-songwriter from the late-60s-70s (still active) who wrote a few moderate hits without attaining even a Marcos Valle level of popularity. Good for Marcos, since Abilio's work would have caused me a few sleepless nights if I were him. And both on the same label, too! Abilio's stuff is hard to find, but very worth the effort.....I've already given Dusty Groove the heads-up about the CD....

from Pena Verde (Odeon)
available on CD - 20 Sucessos (EMI Brazil)




  delicado: sounds great; I look forward to checking it out!
Change  performed by Blind Melon  1992
Recommended by Tetsuo [profile]

One of the better known Blind Melon songs of of their self-titled debut, yet still fairly unknown. This song is a personal favorite of mine and preceeds No Rain on the album tracklist. Lead singer Shannon Hoon's voice plays off the acoustic guitar beautifully and his simple message is clear, change is okay. My favorite lines in the song plead with us clear and simply that,

"When you feel your life ain't worth living you've got to stand up and take a look around you then a look way up to the sky.
And when your deepest thoughts are broken,
keep on dreaming boy, cause when you stop dreamin' it's time to die. "

Some may not like this song, but others will fall in love with it. I've grown up listening to this song and i have continued to love it.

Fun Fact:

Lead singer Shannon Hoon donned a question mark on his head and performed this song live on The late show with David Letterman shortly after Kurt Cobain's suicide, in his own way dedicating the song to him.

from Blind Melon, available on CD


Charlotte Anne  performed by Julian Cope  1988
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I heard this again today for the first time in a while; I still think it's one of the best pop songs written in the 80s. The production is smooth and slightly spooky, and the repetitive tune which continues in the background throughout the song makes it even more catchy. The words are rather stirring, and Julian is as enchanting a vocalist as ever.

from My Nation Underground (Island)
available on CD - Floored Genius (Island)



Close to Me   performed by The Cure  1985
Recommended by geezer [profile]

The Cure meets Tamlla Motown ,well sort of, the ideas in Robert Smiths head celebrated the sound of black America yet still kept their fledgling gothic credentials intact.A syncopated bass line and drum pattern is supported by a persistant but low fi organ ,the song goes from sinister and unerving to joyous and euphoric in just a couple of minutes thanks to some well timed horns and hand claps whilst the original rhythym never misses a beat.A time when any band could try any thing and occasionally meet with a happy accident.

from Head on the Door, available on CD


CLOWN  performed by THE HOLLIES  1966
Recommended by norfy [profile]

FROM THE 1966 'LP-FOR CERTAIN BECAUSE'-A HYBRID OF RUBBER SOUL AND THE BYRDS-COMPLETE BLURRED POP PERFECTION IN THE TIME IT TAKES TO MAKE A CUP OF TEA-SAD AND BEAUTIFUL AND A MILLION MILES AWAY FROM THE USUAL BEAT OF THE HOLLIES,IT SHIMMERS IN A SLOW MOTION 12 STRING DAYDREAM AND MAKES ME REALISE WHY I LOVE MUSIC AND WHY I AM STILL AWAKE WHEN I AM AT WORK IN 4 HOURS TIME-SEARCH FOR THIS AND WALLOW IN IT'S SPLENDOUR...........

from FOR CERTAIN BECAUSE, available on CD ()


Come in my mouth  performed by Earl Wilson  1974
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

"I wanna make you the happiest man alive". This one has to be heard to be believed, taken from a new compilation by "Crippled Dick Records" called "Les Chansons Des Perverts", described as "a collection of dirty gems". Rich, loungy sounding production with lyrics which still would qualify for the "parental advisory:explicit lyrics" label even today.

from Les Chansons Des Perverts, available on CD



Come On Let's Go  performed by Broadcast  2000
Recommended by Mr Steal [profile]

The Midlands-based retro-futurists put this out as a single and it should have been a massive hit but, of course, it wasn't. Still, it's one of the sweetest songs I've heard in recent years, abetted by Trish Keenans's insouciant yet heartwarming vocals – and a lovely tune.

from The Noise Made By People (Warp CD65)




  tinks: i love this entire album! and they put on a great live show, to boot!
Come Rain or Come Shine  performed by Judy Garland  1963
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

For those of you out there who are still perplexed by the cult of Judy, may I suggest hardily this amazing DVD? Culled from her now legendary CBS TV series in the early 1960’s, this collection features a selection of solo performances, and “Come Rain or Come Shine” sums up things here perfectly. It is a frenzied, riveting, almost frightening reading of the song. Nick Cave or Polly Harvey wish they were this intense – or perhaps (wisely) they don’t. Judy at this point is a woman ravaged by both her life - alcohol, pills, suicide attempts, catastrophic illness and innumerable career failures and comebacks - and to a certain extent her own astonishing, almost vampryric talent. To see this frail little creature – she was in her early 40’s, but looks about 60 – totter onto this empty stage and become possessed by a song - her voice soaring, her talent surging through her like high voltage electricity - is almost too much to watch. But one has to watch her – even if only to see whether see she spontaneously combusts during the performance. (And those old time Judy-queens still amongst us – God bless them – swear this footage only hints at what it was like to see her live.) Must be seen/heard to be believed.

from The Judy Garland Show: Just Judy DVD (Pioneer Artists PA-11577)


Cordeiro De Nanã  performed by João Gilberto  1980
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Just one minute and twenty seconds long, this a perfectly distilled piece of Brazilian pop/mood music. The song consists of a simple, beautiful chord progression, which is repeated over and over. João sings a simple vocal over his guitar, and then some brass and strings come in to join him. The arrangement is stunning: sweeping and beautiful, with a delicate, sparkly sound at the beginning and end. It sounds very like the work of Claus Ogerman (who arranged the tracks on 'Amoroso', which appears on the same CD), but in fact, it's arranged by Johnny Mandel. Although this was recorded in 1980, it has a timeless feel. The entire Amoroso/Brasil CD is quite incredible. It took a few listens to really hit home, but has now become one of my 'desert island discs'.

from Brasil
available on CD - Amoroso/Brasil (Warner Brothers)



  barry_c: I agree, a beautiful, beautiful tune. You should check out the original version of this tunes, by Os Tincoãs: http://www.luizamerico.com.br/fundamentais-tincoas.php
  kfigaro: I really love very much this song with these subtile orchestration of Johnny Mandel me two, and I also know the original version of Os Tincoãs (1977) which is very different and with verses that J.Gilberto don't sing... Thalma de Freitas also sing this dreamy tunes in her album (2004) _______________________ http://chantsetheres.over-blog.com/
  delicado: Just listening to this again a few years after my initial recommendation. It really does encapsulate a lot of the mysterious, seductive elements of Brazilian music for me.
Country Boy  performed by The Associates  1988
Recommended by geezer [profile]

The genius of Billy McKenzie is distilled in this largely unheard epic.Tribal drums introduce a synth pop backing which allows a bit more floorspace for what sounds like a barber shop quartet before McKenzie,s yerning vocals commence the song proper.
Both chaotic and cohesive ,this really shouldnt work but a maverick self belief produces a truly fantastic odd,unforgetable moment.This remained unreleased for nearly twenty years by a short sighted record company looking for a uqick repetitive return.Some things never change .

from The Glamour Chase, available on CD


Crazy Dreams  performed by Paul Brady  1983
Recommended by Stian______ [profile]

Singer\songwriter Paul Brady deals with Folk music . This song is in my opinion up to the level of Bob Dylan \Neil Young . Its melancholic but still up-beat .I like the lyrics a lot : " Tonight were gonna paint this town, were gonna drink champagne till we both fall down ,we'll find some other crazy dream -tomorrow" . Its hard to explain ,but the song moves me very much, the song is pretentious in some ways , but Bradys simple(but not dull) singing makes it not sum up as such.

from Hard Station, available on CD (Polydor)


Creep  performed by Radiohead
Recommended by mattycobby [profile]

Just a great song. Musically it builds beautifully to the finale. A little depressing, but still, real life.

from Pablo Honey



  texjernigan: To bad its melody was copied off of the Hollies - The Air that I breathe. That'd be a good lawsuit
  brooksyinc: One of the only songs I'm aware of which identify with possibly millions of people
Crime of Passion  performed by Mike Oldfield  1983
Recommended by Mike [profile]

For those who admit (to themselves, if not others) to admiring the song "Moonlight Shadow" - here is a similar but perhaps slightly better song which is much less well-known. This one has a male vocalist and, like "Moonlight Shadow", features a good guitar solo from Oldfield. Not an album track, nor one which appears on most of Oldfield compilations.

Yet another track modelled on "Moonlight Shadow" appears on Oldfield's album "Tubular Bells 3" of 1999. This one is called "Man in the Rain" and again sounds very, very similar, as though time had stood still for 16 years. Never let it be said that Oldfield is short of ideas!


available on CD - The Complete Mike Oldfield



Dancing For Rain  performed by Rise Against
Recommended by alanajo [profile]

"this drought bleeds on and we're dancing for rain. drink the air but its still not the same."




Detroit 442  performed by Blondie  1977
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

In some ways an obvious pop-punk classic, but still one that's generally overlooked in favour of their singles. One of the greatest nights between my best friend and I was the time that not only did we discover this was both of our favourite Blondie song, but we found out that, rather shamefully, each of us harboured a secret crush on Rimmer from Red Dwarf.

The song is the best among some real class on Plastic Letters. The noises made by a band on the brink of the mainstream super-success they were so worthy of. Deborah Harry never sounded tougher (except perhaps on Rifle Range), a persona that fits her like the ripped catsuit she famously sported on Top Of The Pops.

from Plastic Letters, available on CD



Didn’t Know The Time  performed by The Staccatos  1968
Recommended by john_l [profile]

From Ottawa, the Staccatos were Canada's best pop band of the 1960s and, with the possible exception of Strange Advance, still their best ever. This song is a bit of a clone of their biggest hit, 1967's "Half Past Midnight", right down to the lyrical preoccupation with time, but it's still worth a listen if you like that late-'60s "summer pop" sound, because its production is pretty tight and it has several neat little tricks like the best pop songs do. The flip side is called "We Go Together Well" and it's pretty good too, with its fuzzy guitars (or is it the bass?) ...

All of these tracks mentioned here were found on a 1969 LP called "Five Man Electrical Band", which is what the Staccatos had changed their name to. The LP contains both sides of the "It Never Rains On Maple Lane" / "Private Train" release which was the first under that name, but subsequent material followed a musical change of direction to what I would call "swamp rock" after that ghastly "Joy To The World" by Three Dog Night (ugh!), although "Signs" and "I'm A Stranger Here" at least had some lyrical smarts ... a CD of this stuff has been released but unfortunately the Staccatos material has not, apart from "Half Past Midnight" which showed up on a best-of-Canadian compilation.

from Five Man Electrical Band (Capitol)


Dismantle Me  performed by The Distillers
Recommended by inbloom44 [profile]

Fast,dark,disturbing




Distant Shores  performed by Chad and Jeremy  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A beautiful piece of soft pop. Ok, it's corny - the chord sequence is kind of soppy and the lyrics are kind of obvious, but the arrangement and singing are so lovely that I can listen to this song again and again. Opening with a catchy picked acoustic guitar riff, the arrangement soon thickens with with a full orchestra. The singing is deadly serious and amusingly precious throughout the song, and the orchestral arrangement, heavy on oboes and flutes as well as strings, is anything but hip. Still, the song’s simplicity and innocence are really quite charming. I never really got into any of Chad and Jeremy's other songs nearly so much as this one, so any recommendations for similar songs would be welcome. Do me a favor and listen to this and tell me if I’m crazy to love it so much.

from Distant Shores, available on CD




  tempted: Oh yes, it is pure gold. I can recommend anything by The Left Banke, Scott Walker, Margo Guryan, New Colony Six, Sagittarius, The Millennium... Gary Usher from the last two mentioned was the producer on many of C & J's songs.
Do You Love Me?  performed by The Contours
Recommended by ajhorse21 [profile]

Disco, dance, superficial, but SO fun! Who hasn't heard this song a million times? It's still great!




Do Your Own Thing  performed by Brook Benton  1968
Recommended by Arthur [profile]

Leiber and Stoller give Brook a Bacharach/ David feel on Brooks debut single for Cotillion and indeed it is the flip side of an unremarkable version of thier "I Just Don't Know What To Do With Myself". Brook just does nothing with the song. (Cissy Houston's, for my money is still the best version )
"Do You Own Thing" is a little gem however, with a sympathetic arrangement a long way from the R'n'B sound Leiber and Stoller are famous for. It starts with the trademark trumpet found on all the best Dionne Warwick sides and a wonderful string arrangement and a bitter/sweet lyric.




Don’t Make Waves  performed by Vic Mizzy & Orchestra  1967
Recommended by singjohn [profile]

A swingin' 60's soundtrack gem for the 1967 movie of the same name. Mizzy is probably most famous for his theme for the Addam's Family (snap, snap). "Waves" just cooks from start to finish! A freakbeat bass and blaring horn section do a wild frug while swirling strings hover above. I can't sit still when I hear this song!

from Don't Make Waves (MGM MGM E-4483 )
available on CD - Vic Mizzy Suites and Themes (Percepto Records)


Don’t Talk to Me About Love  performed by Altered Images  1983
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

By late 1983, when Altered Images' third and final album, Bite, was released, Altered Images were already dead in the water. The group had never made any particular headway in the US, where their blend of Siouxsie and the Banshees and the Monkees (not to mention Claire Grogan's bizarre, baby-talk hiccup of a singing voice) was just a little too weird for mainstream tastes, and in their native UK, their colorful look and bubblegummy 1982 singles "I Could Be Happy" and "See Those Eyes" had forever typecast them as a kiddie-pop band. Grogan was already branching off in her second career as an actress (she played the title role in Bill Forsyth's 1982 cult classic Gregory's Girl), and Bite seemed like a mere contractual obligation. For the most part, it sounds like it, too, but the brilliant single "Don't Talk To Me About Love," which led off side two, was a welcome surprise, and possibly the best song they ever did. Mike Chapman's production recalls his work with Blondie, while the disco-tinged electronic beat, chicken-scratch electric guitar part and rubbery, melodic bass part all sound closer to New Order's "Blue Monday" than Bananarama's "Cruel Summer." Grogan herself is in an entirely different mood than usual, with her newly-lowered singing voice (and slightly improved enunciation) displaying a rueful, almost petulant edge that suits the cranky lyrics. Only at the very end does she shoot into her usual helium-pitched unintelligibility, with an air of "See, I can still do this, I just choose not to anymore." Coupled with the most indelible chorus of the band's entire career, it all adds up to a minor masterpiece. Sadly, however, nobody wanted to know.
(AMG)

from Bite (Portrait 25413)
available on CD - Bite...Plus (Edsel)


Dream On Dreamer  performed by Brand New Heavies  1994
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

The Brand New Heavies were one of the significant groups of the then popular "Acid Jazz" sound in the early 90s. "Dream On Dreamer" still strikes me with it's precisely executed funk rhythm and lush production: Tight rhythm section with funky drums, guitar and bass combined with jazzy piano chords, swirling strings and a crisp brass section. On top of that some flutes, fluegelhorn, percussion and organ with a very pleasant vocal performance by N'Dea Davenport.

from Brother Sister, available on CD



Drops of Jupiter  performed by Train  20??
Recommended by kayteecat [profile]

I love how upbeat but still soft this song is! The lyrics are incredible!

from Drops of Jupiter


Drugs  performed by This Mortal Coil  1986
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

Perhaps the least typical track from the 4AD house band – and, ironically, one of the project’s great triumphs. Abandoning for a moment their gorgeous’ prototype - beautifully dreamy soundscapes and/or readings of songs by Tim Buckley, Alex Chilton, etc. – this Talking Heads cover is little more that a series of grinding, funky sample loops w/Alison Limerick’s soulful vocals drifting in and out. A brilliant rethink of the song, that anticipates (perhaps influenced?) the Bristol/trip-hop mob - Portishead, Tricky, Massive Attack, et al. (Can still be found as a vinyl 10” single, if you look hard.)

from Filigree & Shadow (4AD)
available on CD - Filigree and Shadow (4AD)



  kohl: great band.
  konsu: Sort of ironic too, considering an interview with Ivo I once read with a short list of groups he wished he'd signed to 4AD, which included Portishead. TMC was such an ifluential project that completely escaped the 80's indie mainstream indeed.
Du e för fin för mig  performed by dungen  2004
Recommended by olli [profile]

Outstanding Swedish psychpop, sounds like the aural lovechild of an orgy between sigur ros, hansson & karlsson and radiohead's karma police. gorgeous stringwork. ends in a psychedelic freakout.
the whole album is pretty good (imo the best swedish record of 2004), don't hesitate to buy the swedish import if you come across it..






  tempted: This is indeed great! Dungen deserve 100% of the attention he has received stateside recently. Ta Det Lugnt reminds me of another one of the great psych-pop albums of all time which is S.F. Sorrow by The Pretty Things. Although Dungen perhaps comes from a sunnier place and definitely from the Swedish woods. I don't think Radiohead and Dungen have much in common, though. There are so many colours to psychedelia...
  olli: don't get me wrong, i'm not saying dungen sounds like radiohead...just that this particular song shares some musical texture with karma police
Duchess  performed by Scott Walker
Recommended by camus [profile]

I don't think there is any middle ground with old Scott. Love him/hate him

I originally started to listen to him because of recommendations from Julian Cope, not personally, from his book, Head on/Repossessed, a great rock'n'roll read.

To me This is Scott at his best, balancing well his mesmerising voice, with his world weary poetic lyrics, not too over produced, a beatiful ballad.

sample Lyric " You shed your names with the seasons, still they all return with their last remains, and they lay them before you... like reasons...."


available on CD - Kaza the Ultimate Scott


Easter Parade  performed by The Faith Brothers
Recommended by tonyharte [profile]

During the early days of 1982, I was as a 'wet behind the ears' 19 year old suddenly sent to a faraway war in the (previously unheard of) Falkland Islands. This deeply haunting, passionate and heart-rendering track by the much missed Faith Brothers, encapsulates much of the mood, confusion, passion, patriotic pride and dark bitter reality of that horrific time. Now no longer naive at 42, my mind still screams and my heart still aches ... as I listen .. and remember.

Along with 'And The Band Played Waltzing Matilda' (Eric Bogle, The Pogues et al), I believe 'Easter Parade' to be the finest song ever written about the utter desperation of war ... and life after the tea and medals have been dished out.

Would love to know if any Faith Brothers music is available on CD. (Tapes worn out and faded in the sun - a bit like me!). Can anyone help?

from Eventide



  Mr Greedy: I have some Faith Brothers tracks on MP3 format (Easter Parade, Fulham Court, A Stranger On Homeground, Eventide). How can I get them to you? Mr G.
  tonyharte: Many thanks - your not so Greedy at all! However, since my original post, the very kind Faith Bros frontman Billy Franks has sorted me out with a CD. He's a top lad - check out his solo stuff too. Regards and keep on keeping on! TonyH
  watford7: How can I get my hands on a DVD copy of Eventide? Does anyone have In The Country of the Blind on CD? Recommendation: Welcome To Comboland (collection of great songs from Raleigh/Greensboro/Athens area of US, some genius songs. Watford7
  TDQ: LOVED the Faith Brothers, saw them in Dublin many years ago with the Alarm and was bowled over. AM DESPERATE to get MP3s or CD`s of any of their work, happy to pay too. So if anyone can help, please please mail me on [email protected] Oh and Fulham Court was wasted as a Bside, my fave FB track, would love to hear it again... sniff sniff... Have vinyls but no way of playing them! Glenn
  tonyharte: TDQ - I went to billyfranks.com and then emailed him directly. He was happy to send CDs. I responded with a donation, but really, he does it out of kindness. Dead right about Fulham Court!
  eddie: I am dying to get hold of the album, eventide I think its called, the one with the burning broken statue on the front. My dad used to play this album all the time when I was his little tom boy! Wanted to get it for Fathers Day. Know he would be really surprised!! Does anyone have it on CD/MP3? Have checked out ebay and amazon to no avail :(
  eddie: Hoorah!!!! I went to billyfranks.com and downloaded it!! Brilliant!!!! :)
  tonyharte: Well done young Eddie! Your dad is clearly a man of good taste. You've make me feel mighty old now though. T'Internet is a wonderful thing ... sometimes.
  eddie: Indeed! We danced to it for hours when i was a little girl back in the 80's, and the look on his face was priceless when i started playing it! Brilliant again!!!! :)
Esta Noite Serenou  performed by Fernanda  1977
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

Just one of many gems on the wonderful "Simplesmente" LP. A fairly stripped-down arrangement and recording, but which still allows for the song's bright verse and chorus melodies to shine forth. The track is built from acoustic guitar, bass, drums and a hint of (what else?) percussion, which pulse gently along on the verses in a rhythm that reminds me of dancehall reggae somehow, while still being obviously a branch of the bossa nova tree. Fernanda's sweet croon and instinctive sense of swing navigate this terrain effortlessly. Who is Fernanda? Where has she gone? On the strength of this LP, she definitely had quite a bit to offer. But it was tough, back then, being Elis Regina's competition.......

from Simplesmente...Fernanda (Copacabana)



  n-jeff: Thats funny, I was talking only recently abou the similarity of the Baion rhythm to the pulse of the ragga beat. Along with "Its not unusual" having a Baion rhythm, its a neat way of tying up Tom Jones, Shabba and Marcos Valle.
Eurpe After The Rain  performed by John Foxx  1981
Recommended by geezer [profile]

The magical Mr Foxx begins to allow some warmth into his sound after the detached ,sometimes clinical feel of his early Ultravox records and alienated classic "Metamatic".The voice is still remote and the lyrics open to a vaugue interpretation but this sublime piece of post punk pop benefits from Spanish guitar and an almost Abba-esque piano motif .This new found warmth adds a feel of hope and optimism to a previously bleak musical landscape .

from The Garden, available on CD


Even If You Dont  performed by Ween  2000
Recommended by Gwendolyn [profile]

This is such a fun song.. the lyrics outline this crazy relationship "I was happy this mornin/ you finally got yourself dressed/ eating raw bacon/ it's okay I was still impressed" It's got a happy beat w/ piano in the background. Love it.

from White Pepper


Falling Free  performed by Bert Kaempfert  1971
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This is one of those odd discoveries: a track on a CD I've owned for about 8 years, but which I had somehow overlooked. I buy a lot of CDs, and I guess is one of the later tracks on a long compilation cd. Still, that's not much of an excuse, is it!

This is a slow, groovy instrumental (well, with wordless vocals) with funky drums, some fine fuzz guitar work, nice spiky brass and some very pleasing chord changes. It is strongly reminiscent of similar work of the time by people like Johnny Harris. I have a few tracks by completely different artists with a very similar feel/orchestration and closely related chord sequences. It's simultaneously very hip sounding yet quite square with the choir and strings. I love it, obviously.

from Now! (Polydor)
available on CD - Easy Loungin' (Polydor Germany)



Fantasia tragica  performed by Stelvio Cipriani  1971
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

This is one of these sensationally sensual, wonderful instrumental tracks only the italians could pull off in late sixties/early seventies. This is the title theme to "La morte cammina con i tacchi alti/Death walks on High Heels", one of the numerous gialli (thriller movies with that special italian touch) to come out of italy in heavy doses from the late sixties up to the mid seventies. Wonderful scores have been one of the constitutive elements of these films and while the scores that Ennio Morricone did for these movies (e.g. "L'ucello dalle piume di cristallo/Bird with the crystal plumage, "Cosa avete fatto a Solange/What have they done to Solange", Una lucertola con la pelle di donna/Lizard on a womans skin" or "Le foto proibite di una signora per bene/ Forbidden fotos of a lady above suspicion") have been long released, a lot of excellent music is still locked up in the vaults of CAM, Cinevox and other italian soundtrack labels. Thanks to the hard work of the guys at DigitMovies a lot of these scores now successively get a proper, remastered release (often for the first time ever), music otherwise would have been lost in oblivion forever. Stelvio Cipriani may not be remotely as well known as Morricone (who, naturally, overshines just every other italian composer), but he was very prolific in the heyday of italian cinema, scoring an equally wide range of different genres from westerns to gialli and from romantic movies to italain police (so called "poliziotteschi") and crime movies. This title track of "La morte cammina con i tacchi alti" doesn't have to hide behind the best of themes Morricone did, in fact the orchestration does sound very Morricone itself with an uptempo-ish bossa nova beat, lush strings, wonderful harpsicord and a female voice carrying the main melody with a bitterweet tone. The voice is delivered by Nora Orlandi, one of the very few female soundtrack composers and she could easily be mixed up with Edda Dell'Orso here. Wonderful stuff, recommended for anyone who enjoys the "Mondo Morricone" comps.

from La morte cammina con i tacchi alti, available on CD



Feed the Birds (Tuppence a Bag)  performed by Julie Andrews  1964
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Most people probably prefer 'Super-cali-fragil-istic-expi-ali-docious' or 'Spoonful of Sugar', but this is my favorite song from the classic film. It can still make me cry whenever I hear it.

from 'Mary Poppins' Original Soundtrack, available on CD


flickorna i småland  performed by delta rythm boys  195?
Recommended by olli [profile]

apparently the delta rythm boys were quite big in sweden in the late fifties, something wich eventually led to them recording this quirky little song. it's a jazzy take on an old swedish folk song, including the swedish lyrics. however, the vocalists didn't speak the language at the time of the recording, so the result turned out to be remarkably strange. still, it´s a fantastic song, and even if you don't understand swedish (well, most people don't) i think you'll appreciate this. it's pretty tough to come by unless you happen live next to a swedish thrift store, but it´s well worth hunting down. i first heard it on the in-film soundtrack to the film "kitchen stories"(salmer fra kjøkkenet) by bent hamer.
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0323872/
i don´t think there's a soundtrack cd out, but the complete song plays during the end credits, and can easily be ripped. (the film is well worth seeing too, if you can stand subtitles, i recommend ordering it)






  bloozshooz: This tune was recorded Aug. 1, 1951, according to a Swedish discography found via Google
  bloozshooz: This tune was recorded Aug. 1, 1951, according to a Swedish discography found via Google
  mettemaj: CDon.com has a compilation of Swedish evergreens from concerts in folkparkerna (the public/folk parks) - and Delta Rythm Boys' Flickorna i Småland is on it alongside tunes sung by e.g. Lill-Babs, Siw Malmkvist and Cornelis Vreeswijk (Search for "Guldkorn Från Folkparkerna 100 År" at http://www.cdon.com/main.phtml?navroot=903&session=1).
  Timpsi: Delta Rythm Boys also had a CD in the Finnish "20 suosikkia" ('20 favourites') series, and "Flickorna i Småland" can be found on it too. Other interesting songs on the album are a couple of Finnish language songs, and rare English versions of Finnish classics, such as "Rosvo-Roope" ('Raunchy Ropey'), and "Isoisän olkihattu" ('Grandpa's Strawhat'). At the time of recording the CD, the Boys received some Finnish language schooling from a Harmony Sisters member. The CD is most definitely out of print already, but is available at several Finnish public libraries. Some more information at http://www.fono.fi/Dokumentti.aspx?kappale=flickorna+i+sm%c3%a5land&ID=21a6f890-e470-4992-a847-31a5d67ae46d
Flight 643  performed by Tiesto  2004
Recommended by Wynnde [profile]

One of the most influential and awesome dance tracks of '04..and still bears playing today. Rumored to have been written during a flight from Amsterdam to the US, the title certainly supports the idea.
Rolling bassline, tight and hard kick and an amazing array of drumwork compliment a very simple and yet gracefully full-on melody (Tiesto's signature in my opinion). As with most of Tiesto's production work, an excellent track and well put together, displaying an awesome talent for a wonderful genre...Trance.




Flowers And Beads  performed by Iron Butterfly  1968
Recommended by john_l [profile]

Not everybody remembers this, but the "other" side of the famous "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida" album featured five rather terrific songs. And this one has "cool passion" written all over it, because the lyrics are straight-ahead I'm-in-love-and-I'm-almost-tongue-tied-about-it but within a medium-paced 6/8 framework rather than a frantic groove. Meanwhile the organ and the choir-like backing vocals give it a lot of warmth. So it sounds like what I'm saying is that it manages to be both cool and warm at the same time. That may not make sense, but it's a great song off a classic LP.

Incidentally, rock writer Dave Marsh in one of his reviews said "It's now garbage" about this LP. Bullfeathers! It's still a classic. It makes me wonder what Marsh thinks is not garbage these days -- misogynous rubbish about ho's and bitches perhaps?

from In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida, available on CD


For my lover  performed by Tracy Chapman  1987
Recommended by alexr [profile]

The song is one of those songs you hear and hear and you can still hear after all these years without getting tired of it.

Why I like it so much? Hmm the question I should ask is, who doesn't like it so much???
When you are tired, you go home, light a candle, close your eyes, and listen to Chapman's song. It will take you to another dimension, Chapman's dimension. -a.

from Tracy Chapman, available on CD



  danko: is this a joke?
  tinks: I think Chapman's dimension is located somewhere off Exit 73 of the Jersey Turnpike.
For The Dead  performed by Gene  1994
Recommended by LawrenceM [profile]

Gene could be seen as everything that was risible about indie circa 1995. A four peice guitar band, with a Smiths obsessed frontman and a Weller obsessed guitarist. However, despite all this, plus unkind words from the press, gene have released a clutch of excellent, stirring singles full of bedsit miserabilism and gritty optimism. This single, their first, still sends shivers down my spine, 7 years on .....

from the single For The Dead (Costermonger)
available on CD - To See The Lights (Costermonger)



Fun and Games  performed by The Connells  1989
Recommended by Silly Goose [profile]

This is just a great example of the Connells, a band you can either kick back and listen to, or jump around and go crazy. This band from North Carolina never made it big, but they still keep playing their music for anyone who will listen. A great college band, only they stick with you long after college, as witnessed by the mix of frat baseball caps and balding heads at a recent concert.

from Fun and Games, available on CD


Girl called rock’n’roll  performed by The Huges  2005
Recommended by tarjalumilla [profile]

There may be some jerky glam rock in it, but it still makes you feel more than a music whore:)

from Size does matter


Golden Brown  performed by The Stranglers  198?
Recommended by jcb3 [profile]

We got (still get) very little British music here in the States, even the top of the pops - I'm continually discovering great stuff that is decades old...

One of my all time faves is this Strangler's tune - beautiful imagery, some etherial background vocals, altogether a wonderful "mellow" tune from a band best known over here for punk.





  n-jeff: Lovely, surprisingly, considering what boorish herberts the stranglers could be. Nice video too, 20's Cairo chic, grubby whie suits, rubber plants, faded sepia hotel splendour. I've always wanted that sort of white suit, maybe it was watching Casablanca at an early age.
  audioadventures: I was into the band before they broke as they were based in our town. Golden Brown is from La Folie album (1982).
Gone...Like the Swallows  performed by And Also The Trees  1986
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

The exquisite standout of the Virus Meadow album and easily And Also the Trees's best song from its early years, "Gone…Like the Swallows" steers away from the sometimes frenetic vocal intensity found elsewhere on the record it comes from for a more reflective but still passionate approach. Simon Jones delivers his lyric with all the deep-voiced intensity of a student of Wordsworth and Shelley reciting on the hillside to nature (which in some respects is pretty much the point of the song). But Jones isn't explicitly anti-modern — consider the mention of the aeroplane in the sky at various points — while the music is equally ancient and up-to-date in feel. Digital delay on the guitars turns them into rolling, darkly chiming flows and waves of sound, dramatically crashing behind the steady rhythm section and Jones' increasingly intense words. Bass and drums alone wrap everything up on a brief, spare note.
(AMG)

from Virus Meadow, available on CD


Good Old Owl  performed by Niobe  2004
Recommended by respiro [profile]

With lightly strummed acoustic guitar, vaguely castanetish rhythm and Yvonne Cornelius filtered and far away singing, this wistful and melancholic song transcends the experimentation of the other songs on the album Voodooluba, with its straightforwardness while still keeping the air of mystery present in the other tracks.

from Voodooluba


Goodnight  performed by GreyMarket  2012
Recommended by BonzoMoon2002 [profile]

Modern electro rock and roll, still obscure, not for long.

Entire record available for free download here:

http://www.greymarketband.com/p/free.html

from Dark Matter & Love Stories


Grey Day  performed by Madness  1981
Recommended by geezer [profile]

After two years of insatiable and irresistable clowning around Madness slowed down.Grey Day is an ode to urban drudgery and the terrors of city living distilled into three minutes of downbeat melancholy but with all the Madness trademarks ,melody,humour and acute social observation .Such was their appeal at this time that the public simply moved with them into their new maturity and made this a top 5 hit in 1981

from 7/Seven (Stiff)
available on CD - 7 or Greatest Hits


Groovin With Mr. Bloe  performed by Mr. Bloe  1970
Recommended by tempted [profile]

With the likes of Buzzsaw by The Turtles and Dance With The Devil by Cozy Powell, Groovin' With Mr. Bloe is one of my favourite late 60's-early 70's groovy "novelty" pop instrumentals.
Beginning with a tight drum beat that carries on throughout the song and followed by one of the fattest basslines ever, this is a real dancefloor gem for hip crowds. Best of all is the harmonica lead by Mr. Bloe himself, a session musician by the name of Harry Pitch. Groovin'...became a surprise top ten hit but the best credit to the song is that it allegedly still enjoys club play by Richard Searling, the legendary northern soul deejay.

from Groovin' With Mr. Bloe (DJM)



  n-jeff: I take the opportunity to play it out whenever I can, it's a belter of a record, and still relatively easy to find in UK charity shops. Good choice!
Guilty of Love  performed by Mylo  2004
Recommended by Mike [profile]

Bedroom electro-dance music by some Scottish guy. Genius it certainly isn't, but there is a certain kind of intrinsic lyricism about some of his ideas that appeals. His album samples Judie Tzuke's "Stay with me still dawn" and Kim Carnes's "Bette Davis Eyes" as well as, famously, Gloria Estefan/Miami Sound Machine's "Doctor Beat".

from Destroy Rock and Roll, available on CD


Gypsy Rose Lee  performed by The Distillers
Recommended by ladyfelicity [profile]

Hardcore, with Brodie's raspy voice, but she's singing, not yelling in this song. I especially like the phrase "you were Marilyn Monroe."




He Used To Be A Lovely Boy  performed by Keane
Recommended by daniela_por [profile]

Perfect combination between a piano and Tom Chaplin's voice. Very simple song, but still wonderful.




Heaven Up Here  performed by Echo & the Bunnymen  1981
Recommended by Fig Alert [profile]

I'm glad that I get the opportunity to be the first to recommend a Bunnymen track, especially since their early work, which I feel is far stronger than anything after "Porcupine," is unknown, primarily Stateside, to many.

"Heaven Up Here" is a car losing it's wheels at full speed while cornering on a high mountain pass. Will Sargeant's opening chick-chick-chicking on guitar gives way to a straight bassdrop, headlong into Pete DeFreitas' insistent pounding on drums, while Ian McColluch's yelps sound utterly desperate, claustrophobic, pleading and angry simultaneously. There's a pause in the careening during the bridge, just long enough for Ian to remind us that "We're all groovy, groovy people...we're okay, we're okay," before it all plunges straight down the cliffside, banging, exploding, scraping and finally, ending succinctly.

I don't ever recall hearing back then, and rarely today, such a beautifully cacophonic melding of swirling psychedelia and assaultive punk/pop. The guitars are cascades of shimmering shards of sound. Les Pattinson's coy, but effective bassline floats beneath the furious energy DeFreitas unleashes on his drumkit. "Mac the Mouth" may be the frontman, but I think this gem is DeFreitas' piece all the way.

After 20+ years of living with this album, and this song in particular, the pump, pump, pump of the bass drum still sends shivers up my spine. Don't overlook this album as a whole either!

from Heaven Up Here (Sire/Warner 3569-2)



Highway 101  performed by social distortion
Recommended by inbloom44 [profile]

Catchy but still hard and edgy. What a grown up Punk kid should sound like.




Hobart Paving  performed by St Etienne  1993
Recommended by geezer [profile]

A lesson in how to make despair sound appealing and seductive. An under played female vocal relays the vision of an unhappy soul to surreal lyrics and lush orchestration and all distilled and inspired into the name of a building firm seen on the side of a van "Hobart Paving" ,a real building firm still in existence .
Reminiscent of Brian Wilson and The Zombies at their most reflective and a french horn solo that will give you a lump in the throat .

from the single Hobart Paving
available on CD - Smash The System



  delicado: Alright geezer? Yes - a really lovely track. It took me several years to be converted to the band but I'm hooked now.
  psansom: Hi - I have been seeking the Hobart Paving track, specifically as you mention, the one with the lovely french horn solo. I bought the St Etienne \"So Tough\" CD but the version of Hobart Paving on that has a different solo, a really wishy washy harmonica type event. Are you able to let me know please on what specific St Etienne CD is that best version of Hobart Paving with that french horn solo? Many thanks - Peter (email: [email protected])
Hold On  performed by John Lennon  1970
Recommended by meganann [profile]

The beginning guitar can stand alone any day. And then Lennon's voice joining it just so simple. A little drums and the message is there. Simple. This recording was produced by John Lennon, Yoko Ono, and Phil Spector. You can kind of still hear the "wall of sound" idea from Spector's past.




Hurricane Fighter Plane  performed by The Red Crayola  1978
Recommended by Sem Sinatra [profile]

When I hear the opening bars of this song, I can still remember the utter bewilderment I felt as a 16 year old hearing it in 1978 for the first time. It came on a 2 track flexi (the other track being 'Reverberation' by the 13th Foor Elevators) with Zigzag, a UK music magazine. Up to this point I had been listening to mainly melodic pop like Blondie. This completely blew my mind. When Mayo Thompson sang "On the shelf I have six buckets and they are for you. They're full of little things that we can do", I was genuinely scared. This is the song that proves beyond all reasonable doubt that singing in tune is overrated. For me this tops the version on their 1966 'Parable of the Arable Land' version.





hvis du bare ville  performed by ranveig kvello  1970
Recommended by olli [profile]

a norwegian language version of the song "if i thought you'd ever change your mind". the instrumental part is pretty similar to the original, only a bit more stripped.
it's the vocals that really shine here. the singer, rannveig kvello, isn't all that good a singer, but her voice has an interesting quality wich adds an incredible sense of quiet desperation to the lyrics (they are pretty different from the english language version. still pretty cheesy, but with far darker overtones than the original. they remind me of glenn close's bunny boiling character in fatal attraction)
not really a fantastic recording by any means, but there's something in it that seems to tickle nerve in me.
the chances of finding this are probably pretty slim, as far as i know it's only on vinyl and was probably only available in scandinavia.(i found it while pillaging a danish flea market. )

from norsk pop '70



I drove all night  performed by Roy Orbison
Recommended by Edgar [profile]

If I hear this song a thousand times more, maybe, and just maybe, I may start to find it tiresome. But from now on I still love it.




i still believe in tomarrow  performed by john & anne ryder  1970
Recommended by SMACMAMMA [profile]




I Still Believe In Tomorrow  performed by John & Anne Ryder  1969
Recommended by john_l [profile]

This is a breakup song with rather anguished male-female vocal harmonies and a great horn arrangement.

from I Still Believe In Tomorrow (Decca)



  mhalb: Wow. I had otherwise never heard of this couple except my parents had/have the "I still believe in Tomorrow" LP. I think it's great. I like this song, but like "It's getting better" even more
I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For  performed by U2  1987
Recommended by Sulku [profile]

from The Joshua Tree


I Walk on Guilded Splinters  performed by Dr. John  1968
Recommended by plasticsun [profile]

The other night I could not listen to this song - it scared the hell out of me. Maybe it was the wine. Still, it is a very strange song.

from Gris Gris



  n-jeff: A well scary song, I have seen a funk version (it must have made the UK charts it was on an early 70's top of the pops) that is fantastic, plus Chers slowed down version almost a rock monster with horns instead of metal guitars. And a great 80's synthesizer version by the Flowerport Men, with Doctor John on Hoodoo growl. Every one of them a great way to give tripping hippies the frights.
i want you, but i don't need you  performed by Momus  1997
Recommended by king8egg [profile]

i'm more familiar with momus because of the songs he has written for kahimi karie, but upon hearing this song i knew i had to own the album it came from. the music is sort of whimsical reminding me of fairgrounds for some reason. but the lyrics are what hooked me. with lines like "i lick you, i like you to like me to lick you. but i don't need you. if your pleasure turned into pain i'd still lick for my personal gain. la la la." i knew i had to hear more.

from ping pong, available on CD



I’m Wishing  performed by Lorez Alexandria  1968
Recommended by Festy [profile]

This track is for the heart-broken and the lonely. It's mournful and the lyrics are sad - yet it's still a pleasure to listen to. Originally released in 1968, I was introduced to it through a Gilles Peterson compilation on Luv N Haight titled "Gilles Peterson Digs America 2".

from Didn't We (Pzazz)
available on CD - Gilles Peterson Digs America 2 - Searching At The End Of An Era (Luv N' Haight)



Im in Love with a German Filmstar   performed by The Passions  1980
Recommended by geezer [profile]

The finer elements of post -punk ,guitar effects ,hypnotic melody and the depth of a REAL song still provoking cover versions 30 years later.
Inhabiting that small territory betwen post punk and new romantic not unlike "Drowning in Berlin" by the Mobiles .its quality is in the song refusal to date

from 30,000 feet over China
available on CD - 30000 over China


In The White (Urban Dub Mix)  performed by Katatonia  2006
Recommended by devorzhum [profile]

from Deliberation (EP) (Snapper)


In The Year 2525  performed by Visage  1978
Recommended by geezer [profile]

This songs flower power origins always seemed at odds with its retro future predictions for mankind,so when it was re recorded amidst the static buzz of late seventies synths it suddenly made more sense ,a mildly treated vocal from Steve Strange still retains the melody but the backing track transports its sentiments to a more appropriate time line a gives a great song a bigger and better home .

from best of
available on CD - best of /Singles


Inside a Dream  performed by Jane Wiedlin  1988
Recommended by Genza [profile]

I never liked the Go-Gos. And I think Belinda Carlise's music is naff. But Jane Wiedlin has a certain something.

I remember first seeing the video to 'Rush Hour' on UK TV as a teenager. I thought that song was bloody great. My parents bought me her debut album 'Fur' for Christmas and we used to listen to it in the car. Listening to this always brings the memories flooding back.

Some of 'Fur' is a bit dodgy - but I can forgive Wiedlin. The high points still seem very high today. And 'Inside a Dream' is a beautifully crafted, Stephen Hague produced pop song. This three minute stunner moves and warps around a simple spine. Dubstar sounded a lot like this half a decade later.

from Fur (EMI CDP-7-48683-2)



  Mike: I too was bowled over by the catchiness of "Rush Hour" and also ended up acquiring the album "Fur" at the time. It wasn't her first album, but I don't think she'd previously had any solo exposure in the UK. About half the songs are simple but undoubtably effective, but several others I have always found to be very ineffective! I agree that Dubstar (who I also liked) sounded a bit like this at times - Stephen Hague's production style is quite distinctive. Did any of the members of Dubstar release anything since the band split up?
It’s Cool Not To Care  performed by Mark and the No-Marks  1988
Recommended by rum [profile]

The late eighties wasn’t the ideal time for Mark & The No-Marks’ deranged hybrid of English folk, free jazz and ghost puppetry, but there never has been an ideal time. Exclamation Mark, dressed up in his ridiculous David Crosby-esque green cape, refused to pander to contemporary fashions and trends, and even seem to resent any acclaim or approval, as if it was a sign that he was doing something wrong. This may explain why he hated this live favourite, scornfully introducing it at shows as “our sell-out”.

I chose the track not only because it’s the only thing that was ever officially released (along with its b-side, an utterly spastic reworking of the Monkees’ Theme called ‘March of the No-Marks’ replete with Tube station announcements- “this is the Bakerloo line service to Elephant & Castle”- and girls yelling, “Mark NO! No MARK!!!” at the singer) but it is also by far the best thing they ever did. And it was still far, far from sell-out material (it barely sold any). It is the only No-Mark record you need to hear. All of their less grating eccentricities are here, the schizophrenic dialogues, the lyrical obsessions with pylons and German bunkers, the shoddy jazz drumming, the demonic chanting, the cackling, the mewing (!), but this time it’s all held together by an ace nagging riff, and a supremely warped and swashbuckling chorus where an increasingly unhinged mark sneers, “it’s cooool not to care, sooo cooool not to care…” before he eventually loses all sense entirely and barks breathlessly, “NOT NOT, it’s not sooo care! COOL!!!”

Mark of course was incensed that their label released it as a single and vowed never to “bow to the pound” again. And as a result retired to his studio cave, muttering that their forthcoming album, “a didactic concept album about animal reincarnation” would be their most progressive work yet. And disastrous. If the rumours are true ‘My Family Are Other Animals’ was abandoned after a record company executive visited the studio, described the tapes as “utter utter shit”, and then tried to throttle Mark with a microphone cable.





  n-jeff: This would be your band perhaps?
I think I recognise the attempt to write about ones own music.

  rum: good guess, but not my band no. i'm much too young. just used know a couple of No-Marks. local heroes/weirdos about town. they were very resentful of the whole experience, so i thought i'd give them their small dues.
  Gnasher: Was this the same Mark from 'Mark and the Monsters' infamy? I saw them once, in a mirror. Their sound made me want to pull my brain out through my ears and beat myself about the head with it. Shame, really, they looked really mad.
  rum: No, Gnasher, what you see in a mirror is a very troubled and confused soul, who needs alot of care and attention. Unfortunately musicaltaste.com is not the place.
  gnasher: Be nice!
It’s For You  performed by Cilla Black  1964
Recommended by Doctor Mod [profile]

I'm no Cilla fan. While I've enjoyed many of her recordings, she was no match as an artist for such contemporaries as Dusty Springfield, Dionne Warwick, Lulu, or even Pet Clark, Sandie Shaw, and Jackie DeShannon, all who did very similar material. Still, Cilla had one advantage the others didn't, Lennon-McCartney tunes written with her in mind. I think the Beatles, who knew her well, understood her vocal limitations and provided songs that would show her to best advantage.
"It's For You" is certainly one of the finest recordings she ever made. Its jazzy arrangement, the edgy key changes, and the tempo shifts are as sophisticated as they were unique in 1960s Britpop. The music contributes to a sense of intrigue to the clever, ironic lyrics that pretend to dismiss love only to give it. Cilla rises to the occasion, giving what might well be her best performance ever--stunning!




It’s My Life  performed by Talk Talk
Recommended by Mister C [profile]

There are tracks you really like but you dont always know why, I remember the first time I heard this and I couldnt get it our of my head. Here I am many years later still loving it. If you get a chance get a 'best of Talk Talk' and you will be well rewarded.





  FlyingDutchman1971: Great track! The 12" remix is excellent, and I was happily surprised by Gwen Stefani's recent rendition of this great song. Why didn't I think of recommending this one???!!! Stupid Dutchman... stupid stupid stupid...
It’s Still Rock and Roll To Me  performed by Billy Joel  1995
Recommended by ajhorse21 [profile]

A little similar to Only the Good Die Young, but still fun and still quite good.


available on CD - The Essential Billy Joel


I’m The Man Who Loves You  performed by Wilco  2002
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

The brief respite from all of the wild experimentation on the rest of the album, this track is Wilco gettting back to their country roots, while still exploring country's boundaries. Fun and joyful, filled with some rocking electric guitar not found on the rest of the album, this song is an much needed uptempo break on an album full of beautiful introspective ballads and acoustic sing-alongs.

from Yankee Hotel Foxtrot (Sundazed)


Janela De Ouro  performed by Egberto Gismonti  1970
Recommended by bobbyspacetroup [profile]

I first heard this one on one of the radio mixes on Stereolab's website, and found a copy for relatively cheap on eBay shorty thereafter.

Anyway, it's great.

The sound reminds me of Gary McFarland's "Latin Lounge" stuff but with a bigger sound and an extra element of subtle funkiness. Gismonti's arrangement here is adventurous, unpredictable and totally engrossing.

The whole album is wonderful -- "Pendulo" and "Parque Laje" are equally as good -- but I'm still most partial to this, the first track that I heard.

from Sonho 70 (Fontana (Brazil) 6470572)


Jesus Calling  performed by The Triffids  1984
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

For a start we need more in the Australia section than Nick Cave and his assorted Combo's. Although I think the bass player from the Triffids now plays with him. And then I can't believe I've not recommended the Triffids before. This is quite an early one from when they were still playing London pubs. I don't know what its about (blood on my thighs and milk on my knees the sign outside says vacancies), theres lots of violin without it being folky or too countrified, and the chorus is insanely catchy with lines alternated between the late David McComb and Jill Birt the keybboard player. They were a big part of my musical life in the eighties, and 'In the pines' is still a great LP 15 years on.

from Raining Pleasure



Joanne  performed by Michael Nesmith & the First National Band  1970
Recommended by artlongjr [profile]

This is one of the songs that first got me started as a music fan when I heard it back in the summer of 1970 in Yosemite Park. I still like it just as much today...I am a huge Michael Nesmith fan, and this is my favorite song by him. Beautiful pastoral-sounding lyrics and Mike's delightful falsetto at the end of each verse make this song a wonderful gem of a ballad. Also key to the beauty of this track is the pedal steel playing of the great Red Rhodes, who was
involved in all of Mike's early 70's albums.

from Magnetic South (RCA)


Juneau  performed by Funeral for a Friend  2002
Recommended by izumi [profile]

I think this song has an unusual and interesting melody. The verses are particularly memorable, and the guitar/bass line are really great. The lyrics are actually quite repetitive but it still manages to sound very innovative and thought provoking.

from Casually Dressed and Deep in Conversation (East West 2564609472)


Kid Charlemagne  performed by Steely Dan  1976
Recommended by thewilyfilipino [profile]

"Kid Charlemagne" sounds like it's starting in the middle -- a little instrumental passage between stanzas, or the middle of a drug bust. Whatever it is, it works: the song drops you right into a seedy, sun-soaked, coke-fueled, sour-tasting hangover of a scene, populated by "Day-Glo freaks" and "low-rent friends."

What makes the song most memorable for me are the two all-too-brief soaring guitar solos unleashed by Larry Carlton (and drums by Bernard Purdie!), particularly the one that still echoes in the ears of the listener on the way out. That and the unforgettable couplet, bracketed in the last verse (and sung by Donald Fagen with a half-faltering note that makes it sound like undisguised joy) for maximum effect:

"Is there gas in the car?
Yes, there's gas in the car."

Sometimes it's just the slightest detail that turns a song into a masterpiece.

from A Decade of Steely Dan, available on CD



  tinks: i've never thought much of steely dan. and i still don't. but reading this review set off a frenzy of activity in my little brain trying to figure out where i knew "kid charlemagne" from as a pop-culture reference. at first i thought..."was it the name of a boxer on the simpsons?" was it from mr. show? no...it was the college radio handle of the dad on "malcolm in the middle".
  Latimer: Chuck Rainey's bass work on this track is absolutely great. It's the epitome of his style, a veritable thesaurus of syncopation. - Kid Charlemagne supposedly refers to Augustus Owsley Stanley III, sometime purveyor of high-grade acid to the hippie elite, and raided in 1967.
King of the Carrot Flowers Prt. 1,2 & 3.  performed by Neutral Milk Hotel  1997
Recommended by two-headed boy [profile]

A perfect segue into a perfect album, King of the Carrot Flowers is a masterpiece. This is the way songs should be written, performed, and produced. Jeff Mangum strums the catchiest 3 chords on his acoustic guitar while his piercing vocals spill lyrics of psychedelic sophistication. I can still remember the first time I heard him sing the lyric - 'and your mom would drink until she was no longer speaking, and dad would dream of all the different ways to die, each one a little more than he would dare to try' - in a rising climax. The energy and power is then sustained into a C drone from an organ, followed by an amped acoustic guitar being plucked clumsily. And like a street preacher we again hear Jeff, he belts 'I love you Jesus Christ' while the rest of the band hit fuzzed-out power chords F and C until a storm swells with cymbals, horn, bass, guitar, Jeff's voice and another rising movement to yet another climax. Propelled by an electric frequency that chops like a helicopter blade inches over-head we are lead into Part 3, often referred to as 'Up and Over'. This last part explodes into fuzz rock in all it's garage-roots glory with lyrics like - 'I will shout until they know what I mean, I mean the marriage of a dead dog sing, in a synthetic flying machine'. As the fuzz is sustained heavily the song ends with 1 last climax; the one-note piano brings us to a close.

King of the Carrot Flowers Part 1 introduces the theme of 'loss of innocence'. The narrator, addressing his lover nostalgically, compares the emotional deterioration of the older parents with the emotional and sexual discovery of their youth - 'your mom would stick a fork right into daddy's shoulder, and dad would throw the garbage all across the floor, as we would lay and learn what each other's bodies were for.' This motive returns later in the album, as does his 'Jesus Christ' theme. Jeff Mangum alerts the listener in his lyric sheet that he believes what he sings, and that this 'Christ' theme is but the spiritual light he finds within everything. The album further treats themes like the Holocaust, death of loved ones, visions of ghosts, and all the horrors of man with this light. It is a beautiful and terrifying experience unlike any rock record to date. Personally, my favorite song of all time.

from In the Aeroplane Over the Sea (Elephant 6)


La Lucertola  performed by Ennio Morricone  1970
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This is an extremely atmospheric soundtrack piece, with a wordless vocal melody from Edda Del Orso. Strings, electric harpsichord and some subtle electronic effects set the scene. There are also some beautiful Bacharach-style twists with brass. Overall it's a deadly serious and delicate number, incredibly intense, while still sounding very 'cool' (whatever that means...).

from La Lucertola (Soundtrack)
available on CD - Mondo Morricone (Coliseum)




  eftimihn: Perfect description, delicado. This track is firmly in my Morricone Top 10, though it would be impossible for me to actually write down a top 10, maybe top 20, no, a top 50 would be possible...maybe...damn, one man - so many terrific tunes!
  dominb: I got the first Mondo Morricone cd on its original release nearly 10 years ago now,I was familiar with Morricone's stuff but when I heard this it totally changed me.I became a Morricone devotee and this first track along with "Metti..." blew me away.The version on Mondo is actually about a minute shorter than the original version,so is "Metti" and some of the other "Mondo" tracks,they've abridged them no doubt to fit the cd...I found this out gradually from hearing the complete versions,they're not different versions,they've just been cut down....This is one of Ennio's all time great themes.
Laughter Ever After  performed by Andy Lewis featuring Bettye Lavette  2004
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Normally I'd steer well clear of anything on the Acid Jazz label - the early 90's bad music debts have a long way to go to be paid off - but the presence of one of my soul idols just tipped me into buying this natty little blue vinyl 45.

Everything that made me love Etta James' Fire (see recommendation elsewhere on site) is amplified through this brilliant, brilliant song. Bettye's vocals are super-harsh, matching the song's acid sentiment and grasping rock-funk.

It's a tribute to how well this single is done that I thought it was a new vocal performace from Bettye instead of a reworked version of an old song. Bravo!

from the single Laughter Ever After (Acid Jazz AJX159S)


Let Me Be  performed by Xavier Rudd
Recommended by mellocello [profile]

Xavier Rudd is Australian, or well, Canadian but raised in Australia, or something, when first hearing him and all his Aboriginee instruments, we all thought he had to be aboriginal himself, even his accent was convincing, we were sorely mistaken. even still, all his songs have a good solid beat and he is essentially a one man band, amazing stuff. this song is nice and bouncy and great stuff, especially as an introductory song to all his other creations.




Letter From an Occupant  performed by the New Pornographers  2000
Recommended by mitchiavelli [profile]

OK, so the buzz around this song and band is a bit old and stale...I still can't get enough of them.

Neko Case puts her punk chops to work on this composition by Dan Bejar (also of Destroyer).

Great music, production, vocals and lyrics (check out Kurt Dahle behind the drum kit...the man has huge talent!) combine to create one of the great alt rock anthems of the last decade.

Rumour has it that the Pornographers will be back in the studio this fall!



from Mass Romantic, available on CD


Liebestod  performed by Leontyne Price
Recommended by cryofthecelt [profile]

This song, as heard at the death scene of "William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet", is a piece from Richard Wagner's famous "Tristan und Isolde."
I don't know exactly how to describe it, but I can tell you this:
A few years ago, after studying Shakespeare's tragedy "Romeo and Juliet" and watching Baz Luhrmann's version of the film, young student Kip Kinkel became obsessed with what is often called "the greatest love story ever told." Kip believed that "Romeo and Juliet" was exceptionally relevant to his own life. He had recently been a victim of unrequieted love and he felt his parents' constnat pull over him. One day, Kip had a psychotic break. He carried a gun to school and shot several of his classmates, killing them or leaving them seriously injured. He ran. As his parents arrived back at home, Kip blasted "Liebestod" on his stereo, took up his gun, and shot and killed both of them. The music was still playing loud and clear when the police arrived at his home to arrest him.
Scarily enough, that is how moving this music really is.

from Prima Donna Collection Highlights (BMG Classica/RCA Victor Red Seal)
available on CD - William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet Volume 2 (Capitol)



  weaveroffates: Actually, Kip Kinkel came home the night before the school shootings, shot his parents (who were very upset because he was expelled from school for having a gun in his locker) and then the next day went to school and killed/injured his peers. The soundtrack to the 1996 version was playing on repeat when the police found the bodies of his parents...but when he killed his parents.
Light My Fire  performed by Shirley Bassey  1970
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

Prior to hearing her "Something" LP, I always referred to Dame Shirley as "The Godzilla of Song". By this I meant I always felt she treated a tune the way Rodan treated Tokyo, like something to be smashed underfoot. While I lived/died by her Bond themes, and such like, I never thought she was capable of nuance, restraint, and/or sexiness. Then I heard this god-like album, brilliantly produced and arranged by Johnny Harris. This cover of The Doors' song perfectly sums up the record's strengths. It's jazzy, sexy, incredibly funky, yet still totally Dame Shirley in all her over-the-top-glory. Probably the best Doors cover ever (though Nico's toxic reading of "The End", and Siouxsie and The Banshees' strangely Motown-esque version of "You're Lost Little Girl" come awfully close.)

from Something, available on CD


Light Years  performed by Pearl Jam  2000
Recommended by Edgar [profile]

I amit it. I am a closeted Pearl Jam fan. PJ are my favorite band, but for some reason there's always someone wishing to tell me hoow much they suck, or how much they hate Eddie Vedder's voice.

Anyway, here's one of their greatest songs. Included in the "Binaural" album, it's a sow, though energic song, with a great crescendo in mr. Vedder's voice that still gives me goosebumps. "Every inch between us becomes light years now... no need to be void... or save up on live..."

from Binaural, available on CD


Lost  performed by Morrissey  1997
Recommended by MickeyPeas [profile]

"Jet trails in the sky, leave one word behind". This amazing Morrissey track is the "b" side of his "Roy's Keen" single (along with another wonderful track "The Edges Are No Longer Parallel"). Co-written this time with Morrissey's drummer Spencer Cobrin, it's so strong lyrically, and has a wonderful melody it could have been a single in its own right. The only gripe I have about it is the use of a synth rather than real strings to provide the widescreen backdrop, but it's not terribly important. A wonderful torch song from one of the only British singer/songwriters still worth listening to.


available on CD - Roy's Keen (single) (Island)


Love and Pride   performed by KING  1985
Recommended by geezer [profile]

A huge hit in the U.K in 1985 and the debut single from a band with global potential still retaing elements of the quick fire genres that happened in those times edgy punk sentiments ,white boy funk and even the two tone /mod revival appeal ,all things to all people ,all the ingredients to make the perfect contemporary pop song,.Its rousing anthemic chorus should have been the springboard to stadium size success which somehow slipped away within a year or two,perhaps its catch all ambitions recalled the adage that you cant please all the people all the time .This one piece of brilliance still remains as a monument to all the should have beens and great white hopes.

from Best of
available on CD - Best of Love and Pride


Love Me Still  performed by Louise Setara  2006
Recommended by chipster [profile]

Originally done by Chaka Khan, this song is one of the breakthrough tracks from new artist Louise Setara and her new CD, "Still Waters," Available in stores on September 12, 2006.

from Still Waters (Manhattan/Blue Note)


Love Theme  performed by Vangelis  1982
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

A classic, congenial, groundbreaking electronica score to Ridley Scott's movie "Blade Runner". While the most significant cues like "Love Theme" and "Memories of Green" were included on numerous compilations before, it took 12 years for the soundtrack to get released officially. Since Vangelis "recompiled" the music for the soundtrack, adding new music, reworked cues and left out parts of it, it's the best sounding but far from complete version of the soundtrack. Due to this fact there have been a huge amount of unofficial bootleg releases over the years, mostly private releases put out in small quantities. Even after over 20 years since the soundtrack has been recorded it still sounds fresh and highly evocative as ever before. The feeling throughout the soundtrack is a neo-retro, future-noir mood with grand soundscapes created with a mass array of various analogue synths. Especially the wonderful use of the Yamaha CS-80, with it's somewhat organic, sweeping, harmonica-style polyphonic sound gives the music such a remarkable feel. On "Love Theme" though Vangelis prominently features pretty much the only "real" instrument on the whole soundtrack, a saxophone played by Dick Morrisey.

from Blade Runner, available on CD




  nighteye: This is one of the best instrumental synth soundtrack track ever made, Vangelis is a genius! The pads / strings and the saxophone are so incredibly relaxed it feels like you are floating in space. My other favourite song from the Blade Runner soundtrack is 'Blade Runner Blues', it's also amazing!
  nighteye: Forgot to mention there is a variation of this song on the Blade Runner Bootleg by Esper called 'Thinking of Rachel', which is a muffled warm analog synth piece.
Love Vigilantes  performed by New Order  1985
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I heard this track again recently and it had an almost chemical effect on me. Why? It's hard to say. I can't claim to be especially moved by the lyrics, but the song captures a certain mood which makes me want to shake around. The track has a nice balance of instrumentation - New Order trademarks like strong, crisp drums and prominent bass, and a melody played on the melodica.

The other highlight of the song for me is the manically strummed guitar break near the end - a great moment. Maybe it's just nostalgia, but this track still has a lot of power for me.

from Low Life, available on CD



Manon  performed by Serge Gainsbourg
Recommended by Davidthesaint [profile]

This song has one of those melodys that I've listened to a lot of times and still I can't really say that I've figured it out... The string arrangement is stunning also... works perfectly with Serge's voice... Everybody should be able to recognize the french word for hate... he sings it very hateful...




Maria  performed by Blondie  1999
Recommended by Scuffcakes [profile]

This newer outing by Blondie is really a great listen. I think this track especially defines the album. It's a beautiful showcase for the great vocal range that Debbie Harry can perform. Blondie was fun to listen to in the early 80's and this just shows that they still have a fresh and fun approach to pop.

from No Exit (Beyond)


Me About You  performed by The Mojo Men  1967
Recommended by john_l [profile]

A dramatic arrangement of a often-covered song by a couple of guys whose names I see elsewhere on this site in several places. Lenny Waronker was the producer.

The band, from San Fran, was best known for its hit cover of Stephen Stills "Sit Down I Think I Love You", which is described as "a whirring music box" in the CD liner notes and indeed it blew away the dull original. "Me About You" meanwhile was covered by the Lovin' Spoonful among others.


available on CD - Sit Down It's The Mojo Men (Sundazed)


Mecca  performed by Gene Pitney  1963
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

Middle-Eastern '60s teenpop! Wild backup singers and a groovy guitar/flute solo add a distinctive, exotic touch to this lovers-from-different-cultures song. Still, it's Gene Pitney's incredible, dramatic singing that pushes this over into the "so weird it's wonderful" arena.


available on CD - 25 All-Time Greatest Hits (Varese Vintage)



Mi Querido Amor (My Cherie Amour)  performed by Cristian Castro  1994
Recommended by RCA76 [profile]

I love this Spanish version of the Stevie Wonder classic because it the new instrumentation. It is still very Stevie Wonder with a new, latin flair. The vocals are absolutely amazing, this guy can really sing.

from El Camino Del Alma, available on CD


Minha Gente  performed by Erasmo Carlos  1972
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

Virtually every song on the utterly incredible parent LP is worthy of a separate entry, but I'll just go with this folksy-cum-spaced-out rumination on the way he identifies with the people he surrounds himself with, musically reminiscent of Pink Floyd in the best possible way. Great playing by various Azymuth and Som Imaginario members.
The dateline in the album's title, by the way, is a reference to the time period Erasmo had experienced from birth up to the album's release, he's fortunately still with us!

from Sonhos e Memorias 1941-1972 (Polydor)


Minitoka  performed by DJ Food  2000
Recommended by bobbyspacetroup [profile]

DJ Food's Kaleidoscope was a mind-blowing record for me when I first heard it, and I'm still very fond of it after countless listens. I guess I liked it for many of the same reasons I initially liked Tipsy's Trip Tease; they both took samples I was familiar with, or at least some of which I was familiar with, and pushed them in totally unexpected directions. DJ Food's samples are perhaps more varied and less dense than Tipsy's but still just as finely and imaginatively put together. It's hard for me to single out favorite tracks on this record, but this one is a great piece of modern Exotica. The primary sample here is "By The Waters of Minnetonka" from Stanley Black's "Exotic Percussion" record on London's Phase 4 label. There are some other nice touches including harp, slide guitar, bird sounds, and even a little Ravel ("Daphnis et Chloe"). Highly recommended.

from Kaleidoscope, available on CD




  delicado: I'm also a fan of the album, and I adore this track. The way the thick synth sound merges with the 40-year old sample is quite brilliant.
Mirage  performed by Siouxsie & The Banshees  1978
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

"Mirage" was the first single taken from Siouxsie & the Banshees' first album, 1978's The Scream, and while it's not as uncharacteristically poppy as the group's debut 7", "Hong Kong Garden," it's still about as close to accessible as the group got in the early days. A tightly wound song built on John McKay's slashing, distorted guitar and a pounding, prominent drumbeat (the sort of near-tribal galloping beat that Kenny Morris' replacement, Budgie, would do much better on later singles like "Spellbound" and "Fireworks"; Morris simply wasn't good enough a drummer to impart the kind of urgency this song requires), "Mirage" builds a forward momentum underneath Siouxsie Sioux's yowling vocals, which obscure bassist Steve Severin's lyrics to the point that only occasional words and phrases are decipherable.
(AMG)

from The Scream, available on CD


Misty Canyon  performed by Sven Libaek  1970
Recommended by mr_klenster [profile]

What can one say that hasn't already been said about this much sought after library track by Norwegian composer Sven Libaek? It's elegant, replete with cool tones, beautiful arrangement, and the feeling of longing. I've listened to this song countless times, and the mist still gives me the chills.






  delicado: Yes, it's a really lovely track with a delicious arrangment - love those vibes and the relentless beat. I had been wondering why the lower-register melody sounded so familiar to me (the one played by what sounds like a distorted horn section, and then by a saxophone). I figured it out today - it's very similar to the tune in the bridge of Bacharach's 'What the World Needs Now' ("Lord, we don't need another mountain"), except that it's played over a very different chord sequence.
  mr_klenster: The two songs definitely do share similar tonal shadings. I was at a loss, trying to describe the Libaek song, it's quite a strange, haunting tune, but you've made a great observation.
Mowgli  performed by Nino Nardini & Roger Roger  1971
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An unusual sounding piece from a recently reissued Library LP, the overall sound here reminds me of the lush tropical easy listening/rock hybrid which Les Baxter achieves on his superb 'Que Mango' LP from 1970. However, on this track the strings and guitar sound very slightly out of tune in a way which our man Les would never have tolerated. Still, it’s a very pleasant sound, which takes some unexpected turns (e.g. the wild guitar solo in the middle).

from Jungle Obsession, available on CD



Mr James Bond  performed by jean jacques perrey  196?
Recommended by AndreasNystrom [profile]

Wow, never heard of him until recently.
He plays popmusic on Moog-synthesizers, and was one of the early pioneers.
Another fun thing about him, was that he made songs about different IanFleming bondbooks, before the Bond movies were even made. This is probably of later date still very fun sound.

Its sounds like 60ies popmusic with Commodore64 mixed into it.




My Colouring Book  performed by Arthur Lyman  1965
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

I'll assume the english spelling.

Not the most obvious song by the late Athur Lyman for a favourite, but I was given the LP 'Blowing in the wind' when I'd never heard of Exotic music, let alone Denny or Lyman. This track was the one taht got me hooked, its a song I can remember from my childhood (god knows who by), and Lyman performs it beautifully, I can't remember if theres any accompaniment, but I doubt it (there isn't I checked). all I can remember is the vibes.

Theres a great dynamic spectrum on this track from still to speaker crackling and back to still again.
And all at about 2 minutes long.

from Blowin' in the wind (HiFi L014)


my dad (not a song)  performed by substantial evedence
Recommended by jumphigher [profile]

hi this is to luna. pat gill still lives on the coast and no he did not marry carol h owns a smoke shop in the mall




My Other Voice  performed by Sparks
Recommended by cccb [profile]

Very moving early electronic anthem. Moroder involved. My all time number one song (still) after 20 years.




My Weakness  performed by Moby  1999
Recommended by lionson76 [profile]

Instruments are piano and strings (I think). The music is hypnotic; it overwhelms me with a profound sadness yet simultaneously instills a sense of complete joy and satisfaction. The track is entirely too short, which justifies the execution of Moby for such an act of cruelty.

from Play, available on CD




  javaviolet: I love this song. Though I could never explain to anyone to what full extent. The music speaks volumes to me, and makes my heart just melt away.
mykonos  performed by fleet foxes
Recommended by joysoph89 [profile]

wonderful harmonies, gentle sound,lyrics really make you think about them and reminds me of crosby stills nash and young particularly on the chorus.




Mystery Girl  performed by The Yeah Yeah Yeahs  2001
Recommended by lpeditor [profile]

Amazing stripped down rock and roll. With just guitar, drums and vocals they manage to build some great dynamics into this tune. The Link Wray style reverby guitar and handclaps work a treat too. They recorded a session for Radio 1 in the UK which is still available from Steve Lamaq's page on the BBC Radio 1 website.


available on CD - The Yeah Yeah Yeahs EP (Wichita)



  Stian______: Very very nice , thx for the recomendation , it totally rocks ,very much energy and enthusiasm , and simple but clever arrangement ,what more can one want from a rock tune eh .
Nice Folks  performed by Fifth Avenue Band  1969
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

Two and a half minutes of infectious, sunny folk-rock with extra added jazziness in the changes. The FAB were a Lovin' Spoonful spinoff of sorts, produced and overseen by the troika of Jerry Yester, Zal Yanovsky (RIP) and Eric Jacobsen. Bassist Kenny Altman, who wrote this gem, later wrote "Feelin' Blue" which was memorably recorded by Earth, Wind & Fire and today apparently is in the restaurant business. Too bad he's not still cooking up delicious tunes like these!

from The Fifth Avenue Band (Reprise RS 6369)



  JoNZ: I totally agree. Hands down, one of the hottest tracks ever put to wax. It sends me.
Night Game  performed by Paul Simon  1975
Recommended by G400 Custom [profile]

One of the most mysterious, beautiful, and above all *quiet* songs you'll ever hear. It comes at the end of the first half of the album 'Still Crazy After All These Years' and is nominally about baseball, but don't let that put you off. Worth a listen if you like subtle 70s singer-songwriters like Joni Mitchell or James Taylor, or if (like me) you're a fan of Red House Painters, upon whom Paul Simon's earlier work was a great influence.

from Still Crazy After All These Years, available on CD



Niki  performed by The Third Wave  1970
Recommended by Festy [profile]

It took me a while to get a copy of this album as even the out-of-print re-issue on Crippled Dick Hot Wax (that's the name of the label, folks. Promise!) sells for a bit these days. I'm glad I got it as it's a fantastic album - the only LP released by the 5 Filipino/American sister vocal group, although I think they released at least one 45". Discovered by George Duke, he wrote the arrangements and his trio of the time provides backing. The album was recorded in Germany (released by MPS) and is a little bit poppy, a little bit jazzy, a little bit funky. There are a number of songs which could be recommended (a number of them jazz standards, such as 'Maiden Voyage' and 'Cantaloupe Island'), but the one I've chosen is 'Niki'. I hadn't come across this track before getting the album, unlike a few of the other tracks which have turned up on compilations over the years.

'Niki' is a song that builds. It starts off fairly casually and builds up to a swinging chorus, accented by some very hip playing by George Duke, still on an acoustic piano during this stage of his career.

Another commendable and notable track on the album, and which I discovered through a compilation created by 'mine host' of Musical Taste, Senhor Delicado, is "Waves Lament". Absolutely fantastic.

from Here & Now, available on CD



nimrod`s son  performed by pixies  1987
Recommended by olli [profile]

i`m on a pixies high now. thank your favourite fictional deity that they`ve still got it:) it`s always a relief when reunions actually work..
this track from their debut ep is freaky and wonderful, like most pixies tracks. the lyrics are among their best (and most coherent!)
you-are-the-son of incestuous union!


available on CD - come on pilgrim


Not the girl you think you are  performed by Crowded House  1996
Recommended by Mike [profile]

A slow waltz which is almost a Lennon pastiche but still a great example of Neil Finn's trademark combination of clever lyric and lyrical melody.

from Recurring Dream, available on CD


Off Night Backstreet  performed by Joni Mitchell  1977
Recommended by mojoto [profile]

If someone would have asked me say ten years ago what artist's oeuvre I would take with me to a desert island, I would with dead certainty have answered: everything by Joni Mitchell, please. I'm not so sure anymore, although it could well be that I, when push comes to shove, would still make that choice. So it may not come as a surprise now that for a long time my all time best album was one of Joni's, Don Juan's Reckless daughter, where her cooperation with Jaco Pastorius really took off, for instance on this song where she's questioning her love for a man who's new sweety has already moved in while still keeping poor Joni (assuming the song is sort of autobiographical) on the side as his Off Night Backstreet. Jaco's warm bass carries the whole song and is almost like a second voice to Joni's singing, it blends marvelously with her cold metal guitar, some nice echoey and spacy flageolets too, great additional vocals - "Backstreeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeet!"- by JD Souther and Glenn Frey, drums by John Guerrin, subtle and tight. PS Be warned that the soundfile is quite big (500 Kb).

from Don Juan's Reckless Daughter (Asylum 701-2)



On a clear day you can see forever  performed by The Peddlers  1968
Recommended by mojoto [profile]

I recently (March 2002) went through my Peddlers albums and made a selection of my faves, which was exactly enough to fill an 80 minute CD. I could probably recommend any song that's on it, so why "On a clear day?" Because it never failed to cheer me up, I guess, and after 30 years it still hasn't managed to induce the slightest sign of boredom in me, because I just love Roy Phillips's singing, his characteristic smokey, velvety voice, and his fabulously stuttering hammond solo, and because of the lush stringy orchestration and Trevor Morais's typical drumbreaks. The song itself is a blast in itself too, of course, I know of a version from the same period by Cleo Laine that I also really like.

from Three in a Cell (CBS S63411)



One Mint Julep  performed by Ray Charles  1960
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

While he is known as a great singer, Ray Charles is also a master at the keyboards and this is an excellent example of his ability. The usual jazz trio is joined by an impressive horn section that really brings the house down!! You can't sit still while listening to this song! God bless Ray Charles!!

from Genius+Soul=Jazz (Impulse! #2)
available on CD - Ray Charles: Genius and Soul (Box Set) (Rhino R2/R4 72859)


One,Two,Three  performed by Tony Scotti  1968
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Ah yes.... You know him alright, the tragic lounge singer from "The Valley Of The Dolls"! And the schmaltz is transmitted directly into this version of the top 10 smash with deft precision! This track absolutely kicks ass, and is worth the 25 cents you'll probably have to pay for this work of art! The rest of the record is pretty hum-drum,nothing to sniff at though,especially for fans of swingin' supper-club jazz. Fans of the movie will dig it as well,if not just for the cover,which looks like a still from the film with him in a tuxedo,gripping the microphone with a devilish sneer!

from Starring Tony Scotti (Liberty LST-7544)



Out Of Our Tree  performed by The Wailers  1965
Recommended by rum [profile]

Up fer listening to some snotty American teens brag about how utterly monged they all are?!... Lord, just writing that there sentence makes me want to clutch my head and groan… “well exactly, so how does no strike you?” Fair, it strikes me as fair. But hear me out. You see, these drug-addled Wailers set their braggings against a backdrop of the crankiest, mankiest rock’n’roll the wrong side of the Sonics. “Is that the tape disintegrating?”, “Do I hear the wallpaper of heaven being torn down?” No, you don’t, that’s the music. “And is that the ‘Satisfaction’ riff honk-honking like an ocean liner in a storm?” Aye yes captain, like the truest garage rockers they filch their riffs from the big leaguers (listen to that other meisterwerk ‘Psychotic Reaction’). It’s a genre that favours execution over original ideas, and man the Wailers execute that ‘Satisfaction’ riff alright. Yes, sir, by the end there’s black smoke billowing out like burning plastic. “…And I can hear a…a wicked organ swirling around in the cacophony. It sounds really big, like it was recorded in a church, you know like that Belle & Sebastian track… ‘Lazy Line Painter Jane’?” …well, yeah… I suppose…

“Still these lyrics though…? I cannae bear kids, ANYONE, recounting their drunken, drugged, whatever, adventures out on the town. ESPECIALLY when every other word is ‘crazy’. I thought psychedelic drugs were meant to expand your mind?” Well, yeah, I agree, but like when you listen to any other drug-addled teen, your brain just switches them off after a time, “out runnin’ around/seein’ every crazy sight… ma na na na ma na ma ma!” At least until the chorus, when the kids notice you drifting, and jolt your slumbering brain by bellowing in your ear, “HEY! We gotta be… OUT OF OUR TREE!!! OUT OF OUR TREE!”… Yes, yes, it certainly sounds like it.





  n-jeff: I really, really must get this. Just on this recommendation.
  Gnasher: Yeah, this really is great. I'd think of something more imaginative to say but I just pulled my brain out through my ears and beat myself about the head with it.
Parabens  performed by Marcos Valle
Recommended by moondog [profile]

Well, you know the man. But how long is it going to take for rock journalism to acknowledge the genius of Marcos Valles music in the sixties and seventies and give him the rightful respect he so justly earns ? Ok, no harsh words about Caeatano, Milton, Mutantes and the other ones but no one i think could combine the brazilian sound with valles sense of pop melody. Perhaps it is as one reviewer at amazon expressed it while reviewing the essential marcos vol 2 ; A bit too much cheese. Marcos Valle is perhaps a little bit too fun to listen to, not authentic enough. And he´s still got it going. Especially on this fine track where he recycles his wanda vidal track from the seventies

from contrasts (far out)


Pavane for a Dead Princess  performed by Eumir Deodato  1973
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This stunning instrumental is a reasonably straight version of a classical piece by Maurice Ravel, originally written in 1899. Eumir plays piano over a dense string background, adding a tiny bit of jazz phrasing. The texture of the layered strings and piano is remarkably intense and beautiful, and the piece is quite exquisite. I expect this recording would offend classical purists, but I must admit that having heard this version first, I still like it the best. Perhaps this is down to the sheer richness of the string recording, which may be endowed by studio wizardry rarely used in classical recordings. Either way, it's really quite incredible, and I urge you to check it out.

from Deodato 2, available on CD




  Mike: While I find Deodato to be a stimulating and interesting artist (and am far from being a "classical purist" of any sort), I can't really muster any great enthusiasm for this recording. Too close to being a kind of synthesis of Ravel's original for solo piano (1899) and version for full orchestra (1910), I find Deodato's funky adaptations of Stauss's "Also Sprach Zarathustra" and, particularly Debussy's "Prelude to the afternoon of a faun" somewhat more worthwhile. Maybe I should listen again to the Ravel adaptation, but in the past I have found its blandness a little irritating...
  G400 Custom: What I like about this track is the fact that it's a very black, funky take on a piece with questionable Aryan overtones. It can be heard to great affect in Hal Ashby's 'Being There', which I think was Peter Sellers' last film.
  G400 Custom: Re the above comment: I was talking about 'Also Sprach Zarathrustra', not the Ravel piece. Sorry for any confusion.
  G400 Custom: As far as the Ravel adaptation goes, I find it pleasant if a little bit chocolate-boxey, reminiscent of the 60s soundtracks of Francis Lai. I can't argue with Delicado's comments about the string sound though, which is astonishing.
  sodapop650: Bore - Ring! If you are going to listen to Deodato. Listen to the early Equipe LPs. When his sound was so hip, hipper than hip, the bastard brazilian son of Henry Mancini hip. Get a copy of "Tremendao" grab a beer and try to find a nice warm spot of sunshine.
  delicado: Well, you have to remember that I'm someone who is obsessed with string sounds. I listen fanatically to late 50s and 60s mood music records, and am a fan of both Percy Faith and Jackie Gleason's records. Yes, I love Brazilian music, and enjoy all of Deodato's 60s Equipe LPs, but I also have a very real and intense love of what my pal G400 defines as 'chocolate-boxy' easy listening music. Deodato's 1972 LP 'Percepcao' (recently reissued on CD in Brazil) also falls into this category, and I adore it!
  [email protected]: One of the purist fusion jazz artists of his time. Listen to the music, don't try to interpret it or rationalize it. Your missing the point. Eumir is unmistakeably one of the pioneers in this gendre.
Pe  performed by Silvia Machete
Recommended by MRadix [profile]

really good brazillian singer, even though nobody really enjoys her in brazil, still an amazing talent. Her band is pretty cool too. Sounds like a mix between Os mutantes with a some samba in it.

from Extravaganza


Perdita  performed by Angelo Badalamenti  1990
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A perfectly distilled instrumental which seems to capture everything poignant and affecting about Badalamenti's soundtrack work. 'Perdita' opens with a faint piano, being played seemingly with one finger, which gets louder and is joined gradually by a rich string section. Rather like some of Ennio Morricone's best themes, this is very simple, but so beautiful that it doesn't end up sounding obvious or clichéd. On the other hand, perhaps I'm just being nostalgic about being 16 again.

from Wild at Heart (Soundtrack), available on CD



Piano  performed by Glassjaw  2000
Recommended by Vagina Man [profile]

Glassjaw to me is by far the best emo band I have ever heard. Forget about live performances, just album music, they are phenomenal. I'll be honest with you emo is basically a required taste, not all people like it, let alone all metal heads but if you can dig Piano then you wil dig the rest of the album. Piano is by far the most melodic song on the album but don't let it fool you, it can still rock. It may take a few times for Glassjaw music to sink in but once it does it never leaves.

from Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Silence (Roadrunner)


Praise You  performed by Fat Boy Slim  1993
Recommended by falicon [profile]

It's just pure fun baby, pure fun! Yes, the music itself isn't anything special, and the lyrics are very repetative and lame, but it's still a hit. Anytime you're feeling a little drained of energy, pop this baby in and watch yourself go!

from You've come a long way, baby, available on CD



public image  performed by public image limited  1979
Recommended by callgirlscene [profile]

PiL's first single (from 1979, just after the Sex Pistols broke up) has this big drum sound, new for it's time as far as I know. It still kills today. Same for the bass. And ecstatic lead guitar makes this one of those punk rock anthems. One amazing trio of instrumentalists back up a sneering Lydon, who sure hadn't used up all his ideas & talent in the Sex Pistols.

from Are you Ready for Public Image, available on CD



  penelope_66: i love that song--the bass line!...but am not fortunate enough to have the 1st record. i'm also a big fan of "poptones" off their second edition lp.
Quiet Friend  performed by Steve Roach  1984
Recommended by MoeShinola [profile]

One of the most beautiful things I've ever heard, This new age/ambient track begins with an evolving synth pad that sings like angels' longing. Gradually, a slow sequence takes over, evoking the stillness and peace of the grave. This song might be described as going to the light - and arriving there.

from Structures From Silence (Atlantic/Projekt)


Radio Orchid  performed by Fury in the Slaughterhouse  1993
Recommended by Vagina Man [profile]

The music itself is sort of like a darker Live, the group Live. Fury.. really didn't catch on to the alternative scene but that doesn't take away from its amazing music. Radio Orchid is by far their best song, melodic and serene. This song will make you want to buy their album. The voclas are a soothing mix to its already unique sound. It both relaxes and invigorates the soul. Hey if the song can't get to your soul then its just not that good. Also the lyrics play a big part in the song, not only are they good but they make you think. This was their second and last album, and eventhough they are relativley unknown, they are still alternative kings in my eyes.

from Mono (RCA)



  meatball: that is fuckin gay! damn!
Rainin thru my Sunshine  performed by The Real Thing  1978
Recommended by geezer [profile]

All the lavishness of Bil Withers "Lovely Day" but with the sentiments turned upside down,the sun is still there but clouded wiith tears .This beautiful soul/funk ballad is for some strange reason,almost unheard but rates along side their biggest hit "You to me Are Everything".This is what you find if you keep digging and delving.

from Best of
available on CD - Best of or Late Night Tales_jamiriquai


Red Rain  performed by The White Stripes  2005
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

God damn, I love Jack White. This song blows my mind... it absolutely blows my mind. I can't believe that any rock and roll band is doing something so incredibly original and startling and at the same time so basic and so primitive. The White Stripes make me believe that rock and roll, real bluesy wild rock, still lives and breathes.

from Get Behind Me Satan



  Gwendolyn: ahh! the lyrics are so good
Reinstated  performed by Shack  1999
Recommended by moondog [profile]

Fame and fortune seems to elude Michael Head but perhaps we should be grateful for it since it leaves him making superb music still in a career that spans over 20 years. On "reinstated" from 99s splendid "Hms Fable" you get the best sides of his songwriting talents. Both the bacharach/lai pop of Pale Fountains pacific Street era coupled with his later merseybeat/love styling´s of shack.

from Hms Fable


Right as Rain  performed by The Minders  2001
Recommended by two-headed boy [profile]

So far the best thing I've heard all year! The Minders return, this time they invite us into their neighborhood by way of Golden Street. We still feel the quaint influence of Britain's great pop secrets, the Kinks, but we also hear another side of this band that has been long overdue, themselves. The Minders have discovered their voice only glimpsed at in earlier recordings. And 'Right As Rain' is as good as it gets. There is no avoiding the contagions found in the head-bopping performance, you will be infected with a fever you may never wish to recover from. Put plainly, you will love this song, guaranteed! The drumsticks click, the bass rolls in, the electric guitars whir, the beat throbs and then, in a moment of pure expectation, we hear Martyn's vocals like honey dripping from heaven. It is Martyn's voice that carries us through this song and we are disappointed when he pauses to breath. The longest pause comes during the backwards guitar solo, complete with screaming feedback and enriched by keyboards and bass. The refrain is just as exciting when Martyn returns to refill our ears with his perfect British accent. By golly, I wish you could hear it now.

from Golden Street (SpinArt)




  tinks: I should hope his British accent is perfect...being that he's British and all! It always amazes me when I hear praise come in for the Minders from places far & near...those cats live in my neighborhood!
  tinks: Oh, and to clarify...I love the Minders, too! What I meant was that I still think of them as a local band!
Ring Worm  performed by Van Morrison  1968
Recommended by agnamaracs [profile]

Okay, I'm going to summarize the story as best as I can.

Van Morrison's first recording contract as a solo artist was with a small label called Bang, owned by a man named Bert Berns. Among Bang's hits were "I Want Candy" by the Strangeloves, "Hang On Sloopy" by the McCoys, "Cherry Cherry" by Neil Diamond, and of course "Brown Eyed Girl" by Van Morrison.

Bang released Morrison's first album, "Blowin' Your Mind," in 1967. The thing is, Morrison had nothing to do with it. He wanted out of his contract. Berns died in December of that year, but Bang (now run by Berns's wife Ilene) still wanted ten songs from Van. He gave 'em 31.

The Bang Contractuals, as these sessions have come to be known, can be split into three categories: throwaways ("Twist and Shake," "Stomp and Scream"), cynical commentary ("The Big Royalty Check," "Blow in Your Nose" [a play on "Blowin' Your Mind]), and the just plain bizarre.

"Ring Worm" is a member of the third group. First of all, Morrison doesn't sing the lyrics, he speaks them. Second, the lyrics are:

I can see by the look on your face... that you've got ring worm.
I'm very sorry, but... I have to tell you that... you've got... ring worm...
It's a very common disease...
Actually, you're very lucky to have... ring worm, because you may have... had something else.


Finally, after the lyrics comes the most bizarre "singing" I've ever heard. I can't even describe it. You'll have to hear it for yourself. I will say this: if you're familiar with Van's more commercial works, you will be dumbfounded.

Of course, we all know the rest of the story: later in 1968, Morrison signed to Warner Bros., recorded "Astral Weeks," and became a legend. I have friends, however, that believe the Bang Contractuals to be his best album.

The material shouldn't be too hard to find: since its first release (apparently, by a small Portuguese label in 1992), the Bang Contractuals have been released over and over, always as a two-disc set with the more "legitimate" Bang material ("Brown Eyed Girl," etc.) Look for titles such as "The Complete Bang Sessions," "Payin' Dues," and (ugh) "Brown Eyed Beginnings."

from The Lost Tapes (Movie Play Gold)
available on CD - ah, thousands of 'em (take yer pick)




  eftimihn: I already knew this weird story, but being a fan of Van for 15 years or so it wasn't until these 2 tracks (together with "You Say France And I Whistle") were featured on Otis Fodder's 365 Days Project that i eventually heard them. Hilarious stuff. It's pretty much a precedence that shows what happens when record companies force artists to be creative and deliver what they want...
Riverman  performed by Nick Drake  1969
Recommended by geezer [profile]

The most beautiful song ever recorded ,hard to qualify,hard to measure,i know ,but one listen of this gentle folk infused languid samba will convince and convert.
Everything on this is right,the apologetic vocal,the crying strings and a portentous forboding lyric,everything seems to move along at a rivers pace.it could last for two minutes or two hours,its effect on your senses would still be divine

from Five Leave Left
available on CD - Five Leaves Left


Road ode  performed by The Carpenters  1972
Recommended by delicado [profile]

The Carpenters have become like Abba were for me about 15 years ago - I can lose hours at a time just listening to their best songs with the volume up high. I actually never really dared to venture beyond my favorites from Abba's hits, but with the Carpenters I have a few LPs and recently picked up a 5-CD reader's digest set, allowing me to hear some less famous tracks by them.

This track is a bit of a revelation for me. Highly produced, early 70s. Piano-led, with strings, guitar, bass etc, and Richard providing some backing vocals. Karen's singing is beautiful as ever, although her voice sounds a bit funny - she over-pronounces words like 'goes'. The verse is plaintive and moody, while the brief chorus is funky in that glorious way tracks from the early 70s can be funky. This section is reprised with pretty sick flute playing!

In all, a really beautiful track that for me showcases all the best things the Carpenters have to offer. The band are still stigmatized by many, for reasons I'm not exactly clear on. I understand that this kind of highly produced, clean sounding music might not be for everyone, but if you've just been put off listening to them because they're not very cool, maybe give this track a try!

from A song for you (A song for you)
available on CD - Magical Memories of the Carpenters (Reader's Digest)



  FlyingDutchman1971: You are not alone in you love of the Carpenters! I am proud to say that I have every studio album produced by Richard and Karen and still play them all the time. I need to pull them off the shelves and post a few songs on here... thanks for bringing it to my attention!
  callgirlscene: I like the Carpenters too. They have a pristine flawless and happy quality that is slightly unreal. It's fascinating and yet there's a kind of tragic undercurrent in some of their music too.
rock’n’roll  performed by motörhead  1987
Recommended by angelica [profile]

pared-down gritty rock'n'roll, this song hammers away from start to finish in classic motörhead style. the lyrics are what really distinguish this track for me, however... lemmy rasps "i've got rock'n'roll / to save me from the cold / and if that's all there is / it ain't so bad", making this song a paean to his love of rock and roll above all else. no woman, no bed will tie him down... only rock'n'roll will comfort him in his old age. and at 58, he's still rockin' hard. even though he's a dirty old man and i'm slightly afraid of him... well, it still fills me with hope.

from Rock'N'Roll, available on CD


Rose Petals, Incense, and a Kitten  performed by The Association  1968
Recommended by artlongjr [profile]

This song has been a favorite of mine ever since I first heard it on the album "Birthday" back in the 80's. It reminds me of walking along the beach with my girlfriend, looking at a gorgeous sunset. The song was written by Jim Yester, who also sings lead...the string arrangement, great vocal harmonies, lush melody and delicate guitar solo by Tommy Tedesco make this a sunshine pop classic. Jim Yester also contributed two other equally great tunes on this album, "Birthday Morning" and the stunning, majestic "Barefoot Gentleman". I recommend the entire album to fans of 1960s harmony pop-it is their most psychedelic record, hands down, and my favorite by them,although I still haven't heard their first LP yet, which others have recommended to me as their best.

from Birthday, available on CD



  delicado: This is a truly exquisite track. I've been listening to this album a lot recently actually.
  eftimihn: A track so great it abolutely deserves to be recommended twice, here is my entry: http://www.musicaltaste.com/filter.php?songtitle=Rose%20Petals%2C%20Incense%20and%20a%20Kitten
  artlongjr: I'm glad so many people like this song...you can't go wrong with this album, in addition to "Rose Petals", there is "Everything That Touches You", "Toymaker", "Hear in Here", and "The Time it is Today", all great tunes. I just wonder what the results would have been if the Association had recorded "MacArthur Park" like they were requested to at that time!
  Major Minor: Seconded! Birthday is my favorite Association album containing some of the finest Sunshine Pop tracks ever!
Rye Bread  performed by Edd Kalehoff  197?
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

The name and artist may not be familiar, but I defy anyone not to smile in recognition at "Rye Bread". It was a composition that Edd Kalehoff conceived in the '70s as background music for the game show classic "The Price Is Right". It's not surprising why some of Kalehoff's cues are still in use today - they're much more imaginative and groovy than mere background music needs to be. "Rye Bread"'s peppy arrangement is fantastic (dig those drum fills!), and it never fails to put me in a goofy, "avocado pant suit" kinda mood.





Samba Blim  performed by Tamba 4  1968
Recommended by sambablim [profile]

This 1968 LP out on CTI/A&M records was a big leap fpr the group formerly known as Tamba Trio. It spawned big bossa hits like the title track Samba Blim, my absolute favorite for hip acid jazz(nu-jazz/ Rare Groove)dancefloors from London to Tokyo to even Phoenix,AZ. It's fusion of traditional Bossa Nova, Samba, and 60's Jazz melodies are delectibale to the ears. Nice songs that will get you groovin' are "Samba Blim", Reza", "Tristeza de no dois", and "Baiano". A big LP in my DJ box. A pretty heavy cost for a mint copy, but mine is only VG condition full of pops and crackles. I STILL LOVE IT!!!

from Samba Blim


Scent of a Woman  performed by Cheap Trick  2003
Recommended by elfslut [profile]

Just heard this fantastic song from their new album Special One. Robin Zander is still rocking!


available on CD - Special One



  angelica: ooh, i'm gonna check that out. i'm ever increasingly obsessed with this band...
Seasick yet still Docked(live)  performed by Morrissey
Recommended by giant [profile]

I could have chosen any Morrissey/Smiths song as a good recomendation, Morrissey is simply our greatest living lyricist. He also happens to have a rare throat that sings with so much emotion one is left speechless. When I hear the sound of his voice I find my own soul. There is no better example of this ethereal angel than in the live version of "Seasick yet still Docked." Mozzer is a rare creature and when you hear this song you will understand that perhaps what your hearing, may not be altogether "human".

from Beethoven was deaf
available on CD - Beethoven was Deaf


She touched me  performed by Love Generation  1967
Recommended by Ron1967-1970 [profile]

A song that moved and still moves me deeply... like a breath of fresh air... a feel-good song with a lot of tenderness... I would say a typical exponent of the Summer of Love ... a great
underrated song...which moves me to tears (mind you I am a straight male, but music can
play your emotions to the fullest... this is such a song).

from The Love Generation


Sleepwalk  performed by The Supremes  1965
Recommended by delicado [profile]

What can I say! I always imagined there would be a vocal version of this classic Santo and Johnny instrumental, but I had never located one until I found this recording. This track remained unreleased until the mid-1980s, was recorded in March 1965.

I can't deny that much of the appeal of this song for me lies in the novelty factor of hearing lyrics sung to this classic tune. If you're interested, the lyrics go something like this:

Sleep walk, instead of dreaming I
Sleep walk, cause I lost you and
Now what I am I to do;
Can't believe that we're through
(I don't care how much you tell me)

Sleep talk, cause I miss you I
Sleep talk, while the memory of you lingers like a song;
Darling I was so wrong
(but I'll be right some day)

Night
Fills me my lonelyness;
I see your face
Spinning through my brain

I know
I miss you so
I still love you
And it drives me insane

Sleep walk, every night I just
Sleep walk; and when
You walk inside the door,
I will sleepwalk no more

If you're having trouble imagining how these words would fit to the tune, I think the Supremes did too; this may explain why the track remained unreleased. Don't get me wrong - the overall sound is very cool, and the verses work quite well. But I think the tune is so well-known that they didn't feel they could change a note, and so some of the vocals are a bit laboured.

Still, a great track, which seems to hold up to repeated listens!

from 25th Anniversary (Motown 5381ML3)
available on CD - 25th Anniversary Volume 2 (Motown)



Slowly Surely (Theo Parrish Remix)  performed by Jill Scott + Theo Parrish  2001
Recommended by lil_ze [profile]

Unreal.
First of all, there's Jill Scott. With as much respect I have for her songwriting and singing abilities, I've never thought of her as a musical genius. Her music was, and stays, consistently the best soul music being released. And I'm sure that in twenty years I'll still have great fondness listening to her tunes. Yet, I don't hesitate to state that she is not a genius.

"Slowly Surely" is a great track off Jill Scott's "Who is Jill Scott: Words and Sounds, Vol. 1" album. The track, itself, is a departure from the rest of the album in composition. It is lyrically and melodically experimental, and deosn't perform as a very commercially radio friendly tune. Having said that, this is probably my favorite track on this sublime album.

Theo Parrish is a genius, however. There are no two ways about it. His music is difficult to understand. His path to fame and stardom seems as intentional as Donald Trump's efforts at staying unnoticed. He has a tendency to compose electronic dance music with beats so slow, they'd make Big Daddy Kane half step. This isn't a salmon swimming upstream. This fish is out of the water wondering why he can't fly.

The remix, in the commercial music industry, has been tainted ever since the digital age. Starting off as a tool for DJs in night clubs, a track would have been remixed to have extended beats in the beginning and the end of the track. Thus, early remixes were plainly titled, "Extended Version". However, remixes on commercial radio are merely an effort to milk the popularity of whatever is popular at the moment. These remixes usually include a guest vocalist singing, or rapping, along the original track. Another version of the remix is the time filler. When albums were made with consideration to program times for opposing sides (as well as cassette tapes), remixes were often added when material was scarce. This practice would eventually wipe out the addition of the "Reprise" track. These remix tracks were usually the chosen radio friendly track with extra production on top of the original track.

The remix for "Slowly Surely" is none of the above. It is very unique as it's own being. It pulsates to it's own heartbeat. It moves on it's own, in no predictable direction, as if Theo Parrish had little control over his artistic output. That's his genius. That's his art.

from not available, available on CD


Some of your lovin'  performed by Dusty Springfield  1965
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This song is a little more....soulful.. than lots of the stuff I listen to. I find it utterly charming though. Dusty was a goddess, and singing this lovely, simple Goffin/King song she completely slays me. It's a slow arrangement in which Dusty is accompanied by piano, light, gospel-style backing vocals and unobtrusive strings. There's nothing complex or especially clever here; just beautifully executed and perfectly distilled pop.

from the single Some of your lovin'
available on CD - Silver Collection (Philips)




  Mike: Nice pun on "slays" and "executed" there.
  Swinging London: Dusty said that this was the only song she sang that she actually took home after recording it and played it over & over.
Some Red-Handed Slight of Hand  performed by Cursive
Recommended by jvspeck [profile]

Extremely catchy, while still unique and instrumentally experimental, with a definite heavy moodiness to it

from Ugly Organ


Some Sing, Some Dance  performed by Michel Pagliaro  1971
Recommended by prufrock68 [profile]

One of a handful of Quebec artist Michel Pagliaro's (unsuccessful) stabs at the American charts, "Some Sing, Some Dance" is a breezy, acoustic-led pop trifle, lighter than air, with rudimentary lyrics apparently provided by William Finkelberg. A sample:

Ooh you
How would I know just to hold you
How could I show that I want to
'Cause I do wanna hold you
Yes I do

And the following verses expand ever so slightly on that very simplistic base, except by the 3rd terse verse, Michel has sped along from desiring the girl to doubting she could be true, to realizing she, in fact, WAS untrue. Nothing profound here lyrically (and one wonders how comfortable Pagliaro was in 1971 with the English language to keep things this simple), but no matter: The whole package is wrapped in an upbeat, spare but energetic arrangement featuring Pagliaro's acoustic guitar chording, and nice little touches sprinkled throughout, like castanets, shaken tambourine, echoey hand claps, an elegant string arrangement (by Ben McPeak)providing a wonderful counterpoint, and a flamenco-like guitar figure finishing out the brief chorus:

Some sing, some dance
Some like-a romance
I love lovin'

So, even though Michel's been chastened by his lover, he's still coming back for more and longing to still hold this woman...and he loves lovin'...obviously, the magic's in the music here, instead of the lyrics, and it's a little gem of a song. Listen and see if you aren't charmed as well.

from Pagliaro (OOP) (Much)
available on CD - Hit Parade (D.E.P.)


Someone you love  performed by Popguns  1990
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A super-simple, super-charming innocent indie pop song from the hazy summer of 1990. The popguns were a nice jangly guitar band with a female singer and the old drummer from the Wedding Present. Their best songs really are excellent; I'm slightly surprised to find myself still enjoying them after all these years.

from Eugenie (Midnight Music)



Something Bad on my Mind  performed by Timi Yuro  1968
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

This gets my vote as a lost classic, one of the best "fake Phil Spector" records ever. The tremendous production is matched by Timi Yuro's booming, soulful voice. Still not sure about the lyrics; we just know that Timi's hurtin', and has something bad on her mind.

from Something Bad on my Mind (Liberty records)
available on CD - Best of Timi Yuro (EMI/Capitol)




  delicado: yeah, totally dig the production! As for the words, it sounds like a very similar story to that told in Glenda Collins's Something I've got to tell you.
Spanish Grease  performed by Willie Bobo  1965
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Although it's simple and rather well known, I never seem to tire of hearing this track. The blend of percussion, vocals and instrumentation is so delicious that people always stop to listen when I put it on. It's also a perfect distillation of what I think Latin Jazz should be - the horns, percussion and vocals are relentless and full of energy, but always tasteful.

from Spanish Grease (Verve V 8631)
available on CD - Uno, Dos, Tres/Spanish Grease (Verve)



Starsign  performed by Teenage Fanclub  1991
Recommended by MoeShinola [profile]

This song helped turn me on to Alt-Rock. There was a homemade-looking video that MTV aired a few times. It was kinda grainy and unfocused, which suited this song well as it sounds like it's coming from far away. Still rocking, though. There are moments of shimmery clean guitar that compliment the grunge perfectly. The intro is also shimmery & cool. It takes it's time washing over you before the drums come in. A classic. This whole album is a classic. Only one misfire on it, Bandwagonesque was Spin Magazines record of the year for 1991, eclipsing Nevermind and a host of others in that magical year.

from Bandwagonesque (Geffen)


Steal Yo Sixes  performed by Avocado Baby  1997
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Back in the mid 90's, my booty was real far into the UK underground indie scene. For a short time, I was buying virtually all the 45's from a small coterie of labels and, of course, making sure I kept the inserts intact.

The Slampt Underground Organisation were, for a time, the UK's most uncompromisingly independent label. Their hearts were in the right place and their principles tight - against 'selling out', and for 'making music in your bedroom'. There was a real affinity with the riot grrrl / Olympia scene in the US, and Slampt had a way of looking at things not unlike Calvin Johnson and K records.

Avocado Baby were Pete and Rachel, the founders and organisers of Slampt. They released a handful of tapes and 45s on their own and other tiny record labels.

Steal Yo Sixes is about playing ludo. It's pretty daft, and the lowest lo-fi imaginable with a toy horn, xylophone and tape hiss being the only instruments. Still, it has an undeniable childlike charm, and due to its obscurity and short length, makes perfect mix tape / CD-r fodder.

There a line, "When we play ludo, why do I always lose-o?" that gets across the feel perfectly.

from Foolish And Punk single (Beekeeper-Shakedown Bee21-Step01)



Steppin’ Out  performed by Joe Jackson  1982
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

I grew up listening to Joe Jackson and i still find his venturing into all sorts of musical styles and the eclecticism surrounding his musical work very interesting. Starting as a post-punk, new wave singer/songwriter he released three great albums from 79-81 with his "Joe Jackson Band" before going solo with a string of fine albums in the 80s (musically ranging from jazz, R&B, rock to latin-tinged sophisticated pop) and later writing and arranging soundtracks and even doing classical music. He recently regrouped with his band, produced another album and toured with the original line-up consisting of Gary Sanford, Graham Maby and Dave Houghton and surprisingly it worked as good as in the beginning of his career. "Steppin' Out" was released on probably his best solo offering "Night & Day" in 1982, a highly evocative, melancholic, catchy pop song skillfully mixing a synth sequencer beat and keyboards with piano jazz harmonies and xylophones.

from Night & Day, available on CD




  komodo: I'll second your comments regarding Joe Jackson. I'm surprised that with classic albums such as "I'm the Man", "Look Sharp", "Body & Soul" and the aformentioned "Steppin' Out", Joe Jackson doesn't, in my opinion, recieve the credit he deserves. "Steppin' Out" is a great track, but my favourite version is actually from "Live 1980/86" where he takes a dramatic - perhaps even melodramatic - approach to the song. It shimmers then swells into this wonderful sound, evocative of a kind of fantasy 40's New York, but anchored by JJ's usual lyrical poignancy. Somewhat overblown? Perhaps, but wonderful stuff nonetheless, and definately one to check out if you've not heard it before.
Still  performed by Elvis Costello  2003
Recommended by elfslut [profile]

A very short, very beautiful "love" song written by my favorite singer/songwriter/guitarist: Elvis Costello. Clocking in at less than 2.5 minutes..this song packs a punch...and will leave any woman wishing he were singing it about her

from North


still Dre  performed by Dr Dre
Recommended by maverick27 [profile]

Has an awesome bassline and lyrics are really good too.





  eftimihn: Ummm what i always wondered about: At what university did mr. dre graduate to get his dr. degree?!
Still is Still Moving To Me  performed by Toots & The Maytals w/ Willie Nelson
Recommended by Steenie [profile]

I'd actually never heard of this band, but after having heard the song over the speakers in a bookstore I was in I went to one of the cashiers and asked her the name of it. She passed me the CD case...now it is one of my favourite tunes (to listen to and to sing!).

Very catchy reggae, simple but meaningful lyrics. And though Willie Nelson has never been tops on my favourite singers/bands list, I veyr much like the way he sings this song...and surprisingly he doesn't sound so out-of-place doing reggae. I'd like to know what other recordings of this song exist. In the meantime, listen to this version!

The percussion is VERY cool.

"Still Is Still Moving To Me"

Still is still moving to me
And I swim like a fish in the sea all the time
But if that's what it takes to be free I don't mind
Still is still moving to me
Still is still moving to me

And it's hard to explain how I feel
It won't go in words but I know that it's real
I can be moving or I can be still
But still is still moving me
Still is still moving to me

(Repeat)

from True Love, available on CD


Still Searching  performed by Damian "Jr. Gong" Marley
Recommended by Reina [profile]

Bob Marley's most talented son. Reggae with an edge.

"...been there, done that my main squeeze
is natural, simply natural..."




Stormy  performed by Scott Walker  1970
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This is not a typical Scott track in any sense, but is still very enjoyable. Scott's take on the often-covered 'Stormy' is charming, breezy, and (unusually for Scott) funky. The arrangement is very full, but there is a strong rhythm section which prevent the prominent strings from becoming overbearing.

from 'til the band comes in, available on CD



Sugababes On The Run  performed by Sugababes  2000
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Before the Sugababes became just a catalogue of "epic" ballads and stylist errors they were a phenomenally good UK pop band. Not marketing themselves as slappers or party girls, they exhibited an edginess not commonly associated with mainstream chart acts. The whole first album is a miraculous hotbed of beats and songwriting that gels so unbelievably well with the girls' image that you can believe their contribution to the process was more than just the "change a word, take a third" Spice Girls school of songwriting. Overload and Run For Cover are two of my favourite singles of the last ten years.

Equally commendable (and something else, along with member Siobhan and nice clothes, that fell by the wayside come second album time) was their attention to B sides and bonus tracks. Most had a quality that rivalled the album songs and singles - and Sugababes On The Run is even better. I can see why it wouldn't fit on the album - too novelty-ish, few people can pull off a track with their own name in it - but it works perfectly as a flitty ditty about the best teen subject: being pissed off at your parents.

Nevertheless, it does has a depth to it. In its own pop way, it's examining the precipice between youth and cynicism - does getting older always mean losing your ideals?

Probably....

The sweetness of the vocals (particularly Keisha's) and the general kid sister affection of the 'Babes mean that, however much crap they release I'll still be there every new release Monday hoping for another B-side of this quality - and getting a god-awful remix instead.

from New Year CD Single, available on CD



Summer  performed by Buffalo Tom  1995
Recommended by MoeShinola [profile]

This is Buffalo Tom's best single, off their last 90s studio album Sleepy Eyed(Big Red Letter Day was a better album). It opens with an unorthodox chord progression played on an alternate-tuned guitar that desperately wants to resolve but makes you wait for the cathartic chorus. The insistent nature of the chord progression in the verses is what hooked me and it still does just as much as the first time I heard it.

from Sleepy Eyed (Beggars Banquet)


Summertime Rolls  performed by Jane’s Addiction  1988
Recommended by rooftop_holler [profile]

a major theme song during one of the first summers in which i got to experience pure slivers of life on my own terms. reminds me of billy kaiser, and still-warm, oceany air in the drive home from the beach late at night. and lying on my back looking at stars. don't know if you'll feel it to or if it's context for me...lemme know. ; )

from Nothing's Shocking, available on CD



  rooftop_holler: ok, that shoulda been "too" with 2 "o"'s...whaddya want at 3 am?
Swamp Thing  performed by Chameleons  1986
Recommended by lil_ze [profile]

Johnny Marr once said that he wanted to write a song with an unforgettable guitar intro, like Eric Clapton's "Layla". He was, at the time, talking about the penning of the Smiths' "How Soon is Now?" The Chameleons' "Swamp Thing" does everything still that "How Soon is Now?" did for me when I was 16. Difference is, I haven't popped in a Smiths mixtape since I was 20.

There's somthing very romantic about this song. I've never really paid too much attention to the lyrics of this particular Chameleons track, although Mark Burgess' oddly peotic songwriting skills on other tracks have haunted my mind years after I had heard them. This tune is led and driven by the chord structure more than just the delayed, jangly guitar, or the powerfully precise drumming. Midway into the tune, the song goes from minor chord structure to major chord structure, even though the lyrics remain as bleak as a Manchester weather report.

Whenever I hear this song, one word always pops into my head, "pretty". That's what this song is. Pretty.

from Strange Times, available on CD



  kohl: yes. excellent.
Sweet Lips  performed by MONACO  1997
Recommended by beautifulmutant [profile]

The best New Order song New Order never recorded (bt which features Peter Hook).
Excellent lyrics, sing-along chant / chorus...
I would've though I'd've outgrown this song after 7+ years, but I still get emotional for some reason when I hear this song. It struck a nerve I cannot explain. Beautiful song.

from Music For Pleasure (Polydor)



  eftimihn: Yeah, i still remember this really hooked (kinda lame pun, i know) me when it came out. At the time the prospect of New Order ever coming together again was very unlikely, so this was a welcome substitute at least for me. The first single off "Music For Pleasure", "What Do You Want From Me", was equally New Order-esque with Potts' voice sounding strikingly similar to Sumners'.
Swing, Swing  performed by The All-American Rejects  2003
Recommended by izumi [profile]

I love the organ used in this song's intro, and Tyson Ritter has really yummy vocals. :D Okay, well, besides that, it's a soppy, lovey-dovey song about loneliness and heartbreak and losing your girlfriend (I guess). The lyrics may seem a bit tacky but it's still a cool melodic song with lots of catchy hooks and a great sing-along!

from The All-American Rejects (Polydor 4504606)


Take Off Your Sunglasses  performed by Ezra Furman & The Harpoons
Recommended by TimCat [profile]

Lyrics aren't tightly bound by any pattern, but it's still catchy and fresh like the air on a cool summer night.




Te Quiero Tal Cómo Eres (Just The Way You Are)  performed by Jose Jose  1977
Recommended by RCA76 [profile]

This is an "excelente" version of Billy Joel's version of "Just The Way You Are". This album was recorded in 1977, beginning his era with BMG/ Ariola records. The executives, happy to have a performer like JOSE JOSE, provided him with the best musicians, numbers and producers of the time. Included in this album are 2 numbers by Mexico's greatest: Juan Gabriel ("Ya lo pasado, pasado" & "Ahora No !"). Among others credited are Napoleon ("Lo que no fue, no sera"), Adan Torres("Almohada"). Of the 10 numbers included, 7 were top ten hits in Mexico, Colombia and the U.S. Leaving disco to other performers that needed to launch their productions to the international market, Jose Jose's album is just pure old-fashioned latin love songs, songs still heared today.

from Lo Pasado, Pasado, available on CD


Tear It All Away  performed by The Church  1981
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Following shortly on the heels of Of Skins and Heart, "Tear It All Away" still was the picture of a developing band, but one already more comfortable with the studio, able to use subtlety and quiet drama to inform its cool, soothing yet tense take on post-punk filtered through psychedelic touches. The familiar Byrds-derived guitar and Bowie-tinged lyrical regret and sighing crop up as they so often would in the earliest days, but there's a clean, blue tinge to the whole performance, something that feels inexpressively like an eighties recording rather than a sixties throwback. Call it the space in the mix, the gentle keyboards here and there, or the substituting of folk and country roots for something more urban and faster-paced. The lovely mid-song solos show the Marty Willson-Piper/ Peter Koppes team still well within its element, and the whole composition has a rich, lush feeling to it that's most attractive.
(AMG)

from Of Skins and Heart, available on CD


Temptation  performed by New Order  1982
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Although far less well known than the 12" version and the 1987 'substance' rerecording, I'm utterly in love with this 7" version. I think perhaps the band hate it, since it doesn't seem ever to have appeared on CD, and was not even on the recent 'Retro' box set. At a little over 5 minutes long, it just seems much more focused and affecting to me than the overlong 12" version and the scrappy 1987 version.

It opens with that hypnotic beat/synth sound that has become famous since the song was used in various film soundtracks (most famously, Trainspotting, and most recently, 24 hour party people. Both used the later, rubbish version though). On this version, there's a twangy guitar sound added over the top of the introduction. The other main difference from other versions is vastly improved vocals (particularly over the 1987 version), and that wonderful early New Order guitar sound, as witnessed on other classic tracks like 'Ceremony' and 'Procession'. Like a handful of other tracks I've recommended, it's hard for me to be completely objective about this one, because I've adored it since my mid-teens. But having just bought an extra copy of the single, I'm happy to report that it sounds as brilliant as ever.

This recording showcases a raw and under-appreciated New Order/Joy Division sound that mixes early synth sounds and beats with punky guitars in a really beautiful and affecting way. I still enjoy their later stuff, but it's tracks like this that really attract me to the band.

from the single Temptation (Factory fac63)




  n-jeff: I've not heard the 7 since I was at college in 82, but there is also a version about 15-20 minutes long on one of the first "Touch" cassettes, where they have cut it with an interview. The whole thing seems to have been a lengthy Jam, edited differently for different releases. So the 7 would give you the most focused version. Compare the 7 and 12 edits of the KLF's "3am Eternal" for the enhancing effect of a great edit.
  Genza: I totally agree with everything delicado says. Early New Order rocks. Everything after and including Blue Monday is more poppy - and I can live with that. But most of their albums are very patchy - with half the tracks good and the other half almost unlistenable. But Temptation is an utter, utter classic. And I just love Dreams Never End, Cries and Whispers and In a Lonely Place. Well, any early New Order - it all that has tinny dance-music quality but still holds that desolate Joy Division sound.
The Awakening  performed by Pizzicato Five  1995
Recommended by Erik [profile]

Considering the number of songs P5 recorded, they have made very few ballads. It's a shame, because Maki's voice is so beautiful in slow, dramatic songs. 'The Awakening' is the first song on 'Romantique '96' (after a short opening-collage) and it still amazes me because it's such a strange way to start an album. I think it's the most beautiful melody Konishi has ever written.

from Romantique '96 (Triad Nippon Columbia COCA 12889)




  johannp: The song is on "great white wonder" as well, but sung by a male singer (Konishi or Takanami perhaps?). It's a beautiful song, though not a typical Pizzicato Five tune :)
The Charles C. Leary  performed by Devendra Banhart  2002
Recommended by umbrellasfollowrain [profile]

There's something about Devendra Banhart you can't put your finger on. Becuase your finger's turned into a talon or a claw or a hoof and the song you were trying to pin down has squirmed away under the table, or has turned into a gaseous dream vapour and floated out the window. He's got a scattered, witchy, completely original voice that whispers little kid secrets, then belts passionately with a heart been done-wronged, then tries to put on the withered seduction of a wrinkled hag lost on an island for years. Then comes the workaday little chorus. La dee da dee AH! How does this song still remain so allusive, so cooool, after so many listens? I got no clue. Do you?


available on CD - Oh Me Oh My How the Days Go By



  executiveslacks: I know exactly what you're talking about. I have that album as well and there's something - although I don't know what - that makes me keep putting it back on. It must be that voice. For the longest time, I couldn't even tell if Devendra was a guy or girl.
The Cutter  performed by Echo & The Bunnymen  1983
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

On ”The Cutter” fellow Liverpool natives, Echo and The Bunnymen successfully wed the Eastern influenced psychedelic sounds made famous by hometown heroes, The Beatles. Crafting Eastern influences into a new post-punk hybrid that was sweeping England in the Early 80’s. It was songs like ”The Cutter” that would help define the newly coined Neo-psychedelic sub-genre, practiced by such group’s of the period as The Chameleons U.K., Psychedelic Furs and Simple Minds amongst others. The track opens with a keyboard approximation of Indian strings, whirring briefly before the band kicks into a percolating groove of popping bass, driving straight drums and chinking guitar accents. Ian McCulloch adds another layer of ’60 nostalgia, employing his expressive, slack-jawed vocal delivery that conjures aural images of the late Jim Morrison as he unfurls lines that drip with apprehension “Who’s on the seventh floor? / Brewing alternatives / What’s in the bottom drawer? / Waiting for things to give”. The Eastern strings re-enter at strategic points, filling in space between verses and McCulloch’s esoteric pleas to “spare us the cutter!”, which sounds like a good idea in any case. The arrangement also veers into epic territory quite unexpectedly in the second half, signaled by a sweeping wave of keyboard and McCulloch’s more subdued delivery as poses a string of rhetorically poignant questions, “Am I the happy loss? / Will I still recoil? / When the skin is lost / Am I the worthy cross? / Will I still be soiled? / When the dirt is off” -as the music swell behind him. Like any good single, the track never looses steam, cruising through each section with power and grace. A nod is in order for Ian Broudie, who’s smooth production helped The Cutter become Echo and The Bunnymen’s first top ten single in Britain and a linchpin track for the Neo-psychedelic movement.
(AMG)

from Porcupine, available on CD


The Dark of the Matinee  performed by Franz Ferdinand  2004
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

This song is so sinister sounding, and so dark, but at the same time you can dance to it. It's uptempo, but somehow still vaguely depressing. Plus, "It's better in the matinee, the dark of the matinee" is just such a cool lyric.

from Franz Ferdinand (Sony)



The day the earth stood still  performed by David Essex  1969
Recommended by Ron1967-1970 [profile]

THE perfect popsong ? Not sure, but it comes close to it. The tune has that typical late 60s "sound". Bombastically orchestrated in the "Barry Ryan style"... it's a melodrama with lots of
catchy hooks... IF you can find it, you will love it ... I usually rate a song not higher than
8/10, but this one... well, what can I say... 11/10 !!!




the lady is a tramp  performed by della reese
Recommended by king8egg [profile]

before della reese was touched by an angel she was a singer. it seems that some songs own their singers and other songs the vocalist owns the song. in della's case she definately owns the song. this song rocks and swings with blaring horns and percussion that makes it hard to sit still. and then della's voice comes in with all its unique style letting you know exactly who is boss. after della's version any other version just pales in comparison.

from della, available on CD




  tinks: I've always really loved Buddy Greco's version of this song. Late 50s Vegas mob-pop at it's finest.
The Moon  performed by The Microphones  2001
Recommended by ispoketofoxes [profile]

The Glow Pt. 2 was on so many "best of 2001" lists that it pretty much had to be true. The biggest Microphones fans even state The Glow Pt. 2 as being their favorite. That has to show something.
From the opening track you are immediately hooked. The first two tracks build up for my personal favorite, "The Moon." The moon has such a beautiful beginning that that alone makes it my favorite. The lyrics tell a little romance but still remain to keep the weird feeling when listening to The Microphones. Fuzz, drums, piano, and horns make up the pretty sounds that carry the song along. Of all the great songs this album contains, "The Moon" contains Phil Elvrum at his best.

from The Glow Pt. 2, available on CD


The music played  performed by Matt Monro  1968
Recommended by mattias [profile]

Woe, these string arrangements is way too much wich make this song lovely song amazing, very close to pathetic and still great. The sentimental lyrics "when I lost you love the music playd..." sung with Monros deep sinatra-like voice is thrilling, and again, the strings, the strings...




The night is still young  performed by Billy Joel  1985
Recommended by falicon [profile]

inspirational, and thought provoking. Makes me want to evaluate life. If I'm going to list main-stream music, I have to get at least on Bill Joel in here right? This is one of my favorites, so here it is. ;)

from Billy Joel Greatest Hits 1978-1985, available on CD



The Promise  performed by Girls Aloud  2008
Recommended by geezer [profile]

A calculated stab at cool retro pop and all the better for its contrived polish, a great pop song with a great pop chorus ,remeniscent of Northern Soul ,The Three Degrees and even the Spice Girls ,hear it once and be struck, there is no antidote, you will just have to sweat it out of your system.I think this will still sound good in 10years time . Wait and see!

from out of control
available on CD - Out of Control


The Stalker  performed by Green Velvet
Recommended by timbotones [profile]

this is a twisted sort of house/techno number that will appeal to non-lovers of house. Its heavy enough, tweaked enough, etc. and the vocals are nice and twisted. dark, but still humorous "im losing my mind"


available on CD - the nineties


The Unguarded Moment  performed by The Church  1981
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

That the Church's initial breakthrough song would yet become a millstone around its neck might not have been clear at the time, but one understands pretty easily why the band was anxious to escape its shadow after subsequent efforts clearly showed the tune as the building block it was. But "The Unguarded Moment" isn't a disaster at all - indeed, for a young band to come up with such a great effort early on and get some airplay and attention for it was as clear a sign as any that something really special could yet result. Marty Willson-Piper's flat out lovely introductory guitar and the sinewy blend of his and Peter Koppes' instrument on the main melody sets the tone, while the stripped down verses and quiet rhythm changes throughout give a great taste of the band's incipient ambitions and tweaking of an established formula. Steve Kilbey's quietly rueful but still clear and strong lead vocal adds a nice air of calm melancholia, while coming up with some fun lyrical images here and there ("Tell those friends with cameras for eyes…").
(AMG)

from Of Skins And Heart, available on CD


The Wind In My Face  performed by Nico Fidenco & Stephen Boyd  1973
Recommended by bobbyspacetroup [profile]

A very enjoyable spaghetti western theme sung by American actor Stephen Boyd who also wrote the lyrics and starred in the film.

Fidenco's music recalls some of best spaghetti western themes but still has it's own personality. The lyrics are overblown and more than a little ridiculous, but Boyd delivers them in a fitting way. He's a pretty good singer too.

A lot of fun.

from Campa carogna... la taglia cresce



Things Behind The Sun  performed by Nick Drake  1971
Recommended by Swinging London [profile]

Well, Nick Drake seems to be finally enjoying his place in the sun, fame & success-wise, even if: 'Fame is but a fruit tree, so very unsound'.

I first heard Nick Drake being played in a record shop in London. I thought it was '60's Donovan. Anyway, it wasn't & I bought the record and haven't looked back since.

Part of his non-success was due to his inabilty to come up with a hit single, or a single at all and this was still, to a large degree, a singles era.

I've often thought that this song, of all of his, could have been a single, given a slightly different treatment.

Anyway, it wasn't, but I love it very much and do think it's one of his catchiest, even though that's probably not the right word for anything by Nick Drake.

from Pink Moon (Island)
available on CD - Yes (Island)



This is Hardcore  performed by Pulp  1998
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I was never a Pulp fan, and I'm still not exactly a huge one. I never quite got why songs like 'Do you remember the first time' and 'Common People' were so great. I don't mind those songs now, but they never hit me in the way that 'This is Hardcore' did.

It's hard to explain why the dramatic, slightly ridiculous tone of the song appeals to me so much. The song is built around a sample from 'Bolero on the moon rocks' by Peter Thomas, the German film composer, and I think it's used very well - the sample adds texture and atmosphere, but doesn't dictate the song. I enjoy the way things develop at a slow pace, with new musical sections still being introduced late in the song. I'm very fond of all of these, but the slow, dreamy section that comes in at around 4:15 is particularly appealing, with its lush and strangely 80s sounding backgrounds.

Utter, utter genius!

from This is Hardcore, available on CD



  scrubbles: Totally agree ... I remember that the video for this song was equally fantastic - a tribute to '50s technicolor melodramas, but with an added dose of sleaze.
  olli: dammit. just rediscovered this myself and was about to rcommend it. didn't appeal to me the first time around, but then again i probably have a slightly better/ more diverse taste in music now. besides, the years have been kind to it. you're spot on about the use of the peter thomas sample, i have to agree that it's pretty tastefully done.
  olli: if you can use the word "tasteful" about this song, that is:)
Through The Sky  performed by Swing Out Sister  2001
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

When mentioning Swing Out Sister casual listeners often dismiss them as forgettable, mere 80s martini pop kitsch. Or worse, one hit wonders due to the fact that their 1987 offering Breakout is still, by far, their biggest single hit. But this is completely wrong. In fact, they're enjoying an ongoing career for almost 20 years, recording 8 studio albums. Nowadays they’re fitting a niche no other group fits in so comfortably: escapist, late 60s oriented sophisticated glamorous easy listening pop music with all the right influences that spring to mind of that era: Burt Bacharach, Jimmy Webb, John Barry, late 60s european soundtracks in general, Ennio Morricone specifically and sunshine pop. Since these guys aren't necessarily household names in mainstream pop culture today, Swing Out Sister were practically invisible from the mid 90s on in Europe and the USA, releasing their records primarily in Japan, where easy listening music still gets the biggest exposure. The Sisters’ 2001 album “Somewhere deep in the night” is their most cinematic, most elegant and visually evocative album to date, where the Bacharach/Barry/Morricone spirit is prevailing the most: 60s arrangements with Bacharach-oriented songwriting, Barry-esque lush strings, Morricone-style harpsicord, saxophone, harps, jazzy guitars, muted trumpets, fluegelhorn, wordless vocals, blending vocal songs with atmospheric instrumentals, creating an imaginary soundtrack. The whole album is a truly underrated gem.

from Somewhere Deep In The Night, available on CD




  jeanette: I have to say I am thoroughly delighted at learning of the continued career of SOS. I always had time for them, and thought Breakout was actually the weakest of the singles I heard. I particularly remember liking 'Fooled By A Smile' and 'You On My Mind'. Hearing the snippets of these songs here, I can say I'm intrigued enough to try and seek out some of this later work. It reminds me of the more produced end of Siesta records' (Spanish easy-pop label) output.
  eftimihn: You probably should try "Shapes and Patterns" from 1997 first, it's pretty much in the vein of 1989's "Kaleidoscope World" and thus a good starting point to rediscover SOS. This and the aforementioned "Somewhere Deep In The Night" (2001) as well.
Through the Yard of Blonde Girls  performed by Jeff Buckley
Recommended by two-headed boy [profile]

I'm into blonde women, always have been. Perhaps I share a kindship with the late great Jeff Buckley. I can just imagine where he's coming from, standing on stage, electric guitar amped to rock, all that power in his hands, peering out through the crowd into a yard of blonde girls. How wonderfully empowering! Just think of it? A young man in his prime slashing power chords in front of a legion of women, and leaving this song to remind us of what it's like to live this mythical life. I sing along, dreaming of what it would have been like as a rock star, what kind of pleasure could I derive from the world?

Jeff has certainly proven and disproven his own stylings from the seminal album, Grace, to the somewhat obscure and fragile My Sweetheart the Drunk. What could have been still reverberates through my mind when listening to this song in particular. Its compelling simplicity and catchy chorus, "very sexy, very sexy, okay, okay" beckons my blonde girlfriend to break out into song. The slow thrust of crunching guitars, standard rock 4/4 time, heavy drums sitting on every beat - it's almost glam, almost British invasion, almost cock-rock, but Buckley style. And yes, very sexy, very sexy. Trust me guys, girls will love this song!

from My Sweetheart the Drunk, available on CD




  amyliner: Hi, Just to say that Jeff Buckley didn't write Yard of Blonde Girls (not that you'd ever know from the way he performs it. *sigh*) It was written by A.Clark - L.Kramer - I.Lorre. But yes, girls do love this song. Espencially we blonde ones!!!!
  elision: 'yard of blonde girls' seems to be a somewhat pejorative term (the middle-upper class socialites, the 'gold sharks') so while Jeff Buckley may have stood rock god-like and looked upon legions of blonde girls (somehow I doubt that was his main audience) with a sexually approving eye, if the song spoke anything about his truth, he would probably have been looking out for the different one, the pure one who rises above social politicking in her innocence, the Lola.
  ultra-violent romantic: eloquently said elison; i have to agree with you, especially in reference to the "gold sharks glittering." in david browne's dual biography on tim and jeff buckley titled "dream brother," he points out that when jeff recorded this song he made it very apparent that he didn't want any Sony reps to get a hold of it...
Time Out From The World  performed by Goldfrapp  2005
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Am i the only one disappointed Goldfrapp by now almost completely abandoned their "Felt Mountain"-style and are now solely winding down on the glam-electro route? Anyway, "Time Out From The World" could easily have been on the first album, it sounds like a follow up to "Pilots": Gently flowing, nocturnal in texture, floating through a vast open space with delicate electronica and synths building up to a lush finale with an orchestral armada of strings. Despite the electronics it still has this late-60s-John-Barry feeling all over it.

from Supernature, available on CD




  robert[o]: I doubt you're "only one" who wishes Goldfrapp lingered a tad longer on the slopes of Felt Mountain, but I really feel they made the right choice. "Felt Mountain II - The Sequel" would have been really anticlimactic. The Thin White Duchess, @ his height in the 1970's, had the right impulse - once you've got a trope right; move onwards! A great song tip though, and I would give a shout towards "Let It Take You" likewise. It sounds like John Barry arranging a weird Prince song circa "Purple Rain".
  Mike: You're definitely not the only one, Efti ,and there is one more just here. To me, each successive album has contained fewer magically beautiful tracks than the last, the jump "onwards" into material I find uninteresting being accelerated hugely with the new disc. Robert, the evidence suggests that the choice appears to have been the right one when assessed on the basis of commercial success, but artistically I personally think it a shame they chose to concentrate so much on the "T-Rex with synths material". However I'll return to the new record again in a while and see if it grates less on me...
  eftimihn: Thanks for the song recommendation, Robert. Well, i wouldn't have asked for just another Felt Mountain, but maybe for a slower transition towards their new sound, for keeping that magical feel of such stellar song such as "Pilots" or "Utopia". And "Supernature" feels rather "Black Cherry II" to me, so to me they really haven't moved on from there now either. But i know it's always a topic of debate, the "sticking to their style" vs. "changing/progressing from album to album" thing basically. I mean, did anyone complain The Smiths didn't move on to, say, synth pop? Did anyone complain Kraftwerk using electronics for 30 years? I don't know, i like electronic music a lot, but with Goldfrapp i just feel it's a loss such a gifted arranger like Will Gregory with all the right influences, carrying a Morricone/Barry style into a new contemporary sound, is now so firmly into synths and electronics...
  robert[o]: You have some very valid points - I just don't agree that they apply here. A band/artist need not radically change styles release to release, but I stand by my previous statement when you get it right, move on. "Felt Mountain" got it really, really right. In retrospect, I see the shift for that group as correct move artistically. Likewise, I see "Supernature" not so much as "Black Cherry II", but as the logical fulfillment of the shift that that record, now clearly a transitional LP, suggested. I would also say that "Supernature" is a stronger record than "Black Cherry" on pretty much every front (save perhaps the lack of anything as utterly exquisite "Black Cherry's" title track - which I believe is the group's best song to date.) Now I happen to like the obvious points of reference for "Supernature" - glam rock and electro - as much as I do Italian soundtracks. (All three genres do much the same for me - create their own sonic environments, that play with the contents of my skull.) And if Goldfrapp's next LP is "Supernature II", I will complain loudly - (but I hope/suspect Allison and Will are smarter than that.) And @ the risk of fueling further controversy, many a great band/artist has run a great sound/trope/idea/etc. into the floorboards. (See: The Pixies, The Ramones, The Cocteau Twins, (my beloved) T. Rex and, sadly, The Smiths (post "The Queen is Dead") and Kraftwerk (post "Computer World").) Many of the artists I love best - Bowie, Gainsbourg, Joni Mitchell, Kate Bush, Siouxsie, Wire, The Fall, Broadcast - all remake/remodel themselves every so often. Sometimes said exercise fails - but seem, to me, to create a sense of artistic vitality within the work of said bands/artists. (And "Supernature" feels, to me, thick with that very vitality.) Also let's not fall prey to the reverse snobbery that the commercial success of this LP means it is therefore an inferior piece of work artistically. Remember so much of what this forum champions - Bacharach, Nancy and Lee, Serge, Dusty, etc. - was squarely middle of the road pop music. It makes me very, very happy that people are actually hearing/buying sexy, smart, pop music w/more that a little sense of darkness to it, rather than bland, processed, obvious crap that dominates the charts.
Time Out From The World  performed by Goldfrapp  2005
Recommended by komodo [profile]

Ethereal, cinematic soundscape, which builds to a predictable, but still thrilling climax.

A friend suggested that it sounds a bit like a classic James Bond theme, and I can see what they mean - it has got those gorgeous Barry-esque strings that come sweeping in at the 3 minute mark that just carry you away, shaken AND stirred!

from Supernature, available on CD



  eftimihn: Great song, i recommended this track a while back actually, seems we got a similar impression from it...
Totally Wired  performed by The Fall  1980
Recommended by lingereffect [profile]

I was shocked to see that no one had recommended anything by these Mancunian legends. The Fall could never be called proponents of over-production and this brittle recording is no exception. This song features basically one chord and a mostly one-note bassline, but still manages to be as propulsive as hell. The wry, wound up lyrics from vocalist Mark E. Smith are augmented by great backing shouts of "totally wired!" This is a complete classic from one of the most original and influential bands of the post-punk era.

This was originally released as a single in 1980 and is available on several different compilations.

from The Collection, available on CD



  jeanette: There's also a cover version by God Is My Co-Pilot, available on their best of. However, it falls into the 'interesting' rather than 'good' category. Not many people could cover The Fall with appropriate justice.
True  performed by Spandau Ballet  1983
Recommended by thewilyfilipino [profile]

The great NYFD firefighter and actor Steve Buscemi immortalizes this song in the otherwise forgettable Adam Sandler vehicle "The Wedding Singer:" he winces, he exhales extra H's, he emotes. Spandau Ballet's lead singer, Tony Hadley, would never have done that; dressed in all his Bryan Ferry finery and sporting his New Romantic do, he stood with the mike pinched in the fingers of his hand... and emoted. "Oh I want the truth to be SAIIIIID [then his voice breaks]. [Pregnant pause.] [And then the Uh-huh-huh-huh-hi comes in again.]

Yes, "True." Performed by a band with one of the most stupid band names imaginable, "True" invaded Philippine airwaves, spawned a silly Spandau Ballet - Duran Duran showdown on DWLS 97.1, and jumpstarted the dead-end careers of a million amateur singers. (A good friend of mine, who actually could sing, once performed this during some high school party, and had it choreographed so that the lights would go out during the "pregnant pause." The women screamed.)

But darn it, the song still gets to me -- not every time, God no, but only when I'm in a semi-nostalgic mood regarding the worst years of my life (high school). That cheesy sax instrumental break that still haunts my dreams! The harmonizing Kemp brothers! "Always in time / But never in line for dreams!" The sound of my soul indeed.

from The Collection, available on CD


Tugboat  performed by Galaxie 500  1988
Recommended by Stian______ [profile]

Guess u can call this a love-song , it manages to be pretty sad and still come through as pretty light-hearted. It doesnt take many hearings before its a classic in your ears. The instrumentalisation (is that even a word lol) is pretty simple ,and yet so very effective.

from Today, available on CD



Turkish Bath  performed by The Don Ellis Orchestra  1968
Recommended by Festy [profile]

When my musical tastes changed nearly 20 years ago, it was a drastic shift. This track, and the album it's from, was definitely significant in this change. It was a completely new sound for me and even now, all this time later, I still love it. Don Ellis was a trumpet player and band leader. He was renowned for composing and arranging tunes in really unusual time signatures (this track, in 7/8, is an example). In fact, it's said that the only song he played in 4/4 was Take Five (a little joke for the musos out there ;)...). It was 1968 that this was recorded, so at the peak of experimentation Western/Eastern music fusion. This track starts off with sitar providing the rhythm which is then picked up by the rhythm section. Ellis comes in with his personally created quarter-tone trumpet. For some, the sound is dissonant and unpleasant. Stick with it - you get used to it. From then on in, it's an energy roller-coaster, as hip as it is cool. After numerous solos, the track subsides and seems to end as the lone sitar returns. But then it picks up the riff again and *BAM* - back into the track with even more energy than before. I'm spent!

from Electric Bath, available on CD



Two-Headed Boy  performed by Neutral Milk Hotel  1998
Recommended by ispoketofoxes [profile]

Displaying the most scary and imaginitive lyrics of Neutral Milk Hotel's, Two-Headed Boy is played with so much force it is practically undescribable. Both Jeff Mangum's singing and strumming is so intense that when one listens to it, he/she is instantly moved. Jeff is a little off key but still it is felt.
I'm sure everyone reading this has probably heard it. If not, do so. NOW!!!

from In The Aeroplane Over The Sea (Merge)


Under Control  performed by The Strokes  2003
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

The timing and the rhythms on this song always blow my mind. Julian Casablanca's slurred, lazy voice drips of heartache and underneath him are these incredible layers of guitar and drums. Dense and slow and sloppy, but somehow still precise. This song is very urban. It is grime, and hopelessness and laziness, all at once. The best track on an amazing album, and proof that they deserved all the hype.

from Room on Fire



Underdog  performed by Kasabian  2009
Recommended by dehoqu [profile]

A great song, used in the sony bravia ad.
a poppy feel but still guitar driven with a great riff. Great feel to it, good new stuff.

#1 on UK charts

from West Ryder Pauper Lunatic Asylum (Columbia)


Underwater Love   performed by Smoke City  1997
Recommended by geezer [profile]

Possibly the most peculiar song to ever hit the top 5,surreal in the extreme but oh ,so beautiful,like a little piece of music from every corner of the globe distilled through a trip hop filter,it has the funk foundations of acid jazz ,the majesty of the samba and the exotic mystery of Asia .Part spoken,oddly sung and complimented by an incessant tropical ambience thats hard to pin down.A real pearl from an oyster as suggested by the songs sublime watery brilliance .Initially used to sell L--I jeans ,a perfect example of why beauty and commerce should never be in the same room .

from Flying Away
available on CD - Flying Awaay


Unprepared  performed by Superdrag  2000
Recommended by popgoestheculture [profile]

A wonderful song you will be unprepared to handle. A peice of pure glam rock meets Beatle like madness, from one of the last (if not the very last) true rock n' roll bands still alive and kicking. *note: 1:39, how beautiful yes?*


Would recommend from this entire album! Other highlighted selections "Gimmie Animosity", "Baby's Waiting", "Bright Pavillions".

from In the Valley of Dying Stars, available on CD


Until I Believe in my Soul  performed by Dexys Midnight Runners  1982
Recommended by geezer [profile]

All the elements that made Dexys so interesting are distilled into this spritual eoic,passion ,commitment and the awkward genius of Kevin Rowland from the album that gave the world "Come on Eileen" this is ifve minutes of beauty,sweat and belief.Commencing with a pastoral flute and quickly growing into that familiar dexys blend of brass and strings ,a rousing chorus and a lonely whistled finale .Not immediately accesible but if you're a "bit" interested you could be converted for ever.

from Too Rye Ay, available on CD


uptown top ranking  performed by althea and donna  1978
Recommended by olli [profile]

the exellent title track from reggae ladies althea and donna's 1978 effort, uptown top ranking. don't know too much about them, except that this is a nigh-on perfect album. short and sweet (about 35 minutes), but without a single skippable track. great arrangements and vocals, though the lyrics seem to borderline between daft and genius in places. still, this is top class, and absolutely essential party music.

from uptown top ranking, available on CD


Vapour Trail  performed by Ride  1991
Recommended by delicado [profile]

However you look at it, this song is simply too good to have not yet been recommended by me on this site. The final track on Ride's 1991 debut, this is simple, formulaic even, but very nicely executed. It opens with the same nice chord sequence that makes up most of the song, played on a solo guitar. Mark Gardner's vocals are wavering and delicate (ok, they're a little out of tune as well), but charming. The drum beat hints at the indie-dance sensibility of the time, and is extremely catchy without being ridiculous.

The real hook of the song for me lies in the harmonies introduced by the string parts which periodically underlay the chords. As the song builds, these string arrangements become more full. The rest of the band fades away and leaves them at the end. I'm surprised at how much I still enjoy this.

from Nowhere, available on CD




  shaka_klaus: ye-ye! nice one!
  andrew76: first you look so strong then you fade away the sunlight blinds my eyes i love you anyway - pure genius - and then one of them joined Oasis. Bugger.
Velouria  performed by The Pixies  1990
Recommended by wendyloohoo [profile]

This song is a great sing-a-long song while still really rocking!! Kim Deal's contrasting vocals really pop! I love this song!

from Bossa Nova, available on CD


VJC  performed by Clifford Coulter  1972
Recommended by Festy [profile]

This is one of my all-time favourite tracks - most probably in my top-5 - and is a perfect example of what I understand "jazz-funk" to be. I came across it many years ago on a compilation put out by French label "Big Cheese Records". I hunted down the album it was from (not sure if it's been re-issued - or if it has, it hadn't been then) and was pleased to find that the whole album was strong with most songs carrying a similar vibe to VJC. Those that were different, were still great.

I'm not sure what VJC stands for. I wonder if it's the initials of someone close - his mother or another familiar member perhaps? Throughout many of the tracks, he seems to be playing a character with chatter between the tracks leading one into the other leaving.

from Do It Now - Worry About It Later (Impulse AS-9216)
available on CD - The Meltdown (Big Cheese Records)



Wake and Kill  performed by Ennio Morricone  1966
Recommended by texjernigan [profile]

From the Soundtrack to the movie, "Svegliati e Uccidi," which I think means wake and kill, this has a typical spy thriller sound. That's something taht I couldn't really tell you, having not grown up in the era, but when I was showing my dad a lot of the music that I've searched out, he certainly laughed a quite a few of the tracks. Still, I find the melody haunting and cool, especially that highly distorted yet delicate guitar work.





We All Fall In Love Sometimes  performed by Jeff Buckley  199?
Recommended by cdarville [profile]

This song is circulating on Limewire and is incomplete in any version that is downloaded, but is still incredibly representative of what was lost when Jeff Buckley died.

Mr. Buckley had a knack for a great cover song and wasn't afraid of the schmaltzy stuff, either. Jeff's version was performed solo with guitar as a live-on-air track in the mid-90s and includes a long jam-y intro with commentary. It's one of his most perfect performances, in my opinion. What a shame that it has not been released officially.

from bootleg



  hollygo13: I actually have the complete recording, I have to agree with you I think it's fantastic and it's swiftly becoming my favorite bootleg of his (of so many that carry his legacy). I believe it was recorded in 1992, but I'm not certain.
  cdarville: Hey hollygo13, I'd really like to arrange, if at all possible, to get a copy of your complete bootleg. Please email me at [email protected] if you'd like to help me out.
We're Still Free  performed by Skeleton Crew  1983
Recommended by havadonut [profile]

The best political song ever written, "We're Still Free" concerns the famous tragedy of a Korean passenger jet shot down by fighter planes when it strayed into Soviet airspace. Yet in recounting this act of barbarism on the part of the Soviets, it also implicates the righteousness of the American side of the Cold War ("We're still free here in America"). The song sets up a chilling contrast in the singing of the two performers, with Frith crying out almost desperately against believing what the media tell us, while Tom Cora gently croons the part of the Soviet air controllers as they decide to destroy the plane. Skeleton Crew was a two-man band with both performers playing drums with their feet along with electronics and strings. Here they set a contrast between the grand, arcing lines of the cello and a homey picking of the violin that's almost shockingly sweet and funny. Critical of anti-democratic trends in the West, Skeleton Crew was criticized by fans in Eastern Europe for taking freedom for granted.

from Learn to Talk (Rift (US)/RecRec (Switz) Rift/RecRec 08/05)
available on CD - Learn to Talk/Country of Blinds (RecRec (ReCDec 512))


What Color Is Love  performed by Terry Callier  1972
Recommended by konsu [profile]

I know the buzz is burned on his return but I still need to give this song props. The first time I heard this album was indesribable. It sort of places you in a zone where so many sounds you love coexist in poingant harmony. This one, the title track, is a mix of torchy iceman elegance, and rootsy baroque impressionisim. And the mix of talents is undeniable. Charles Stepney and his incredible group of session men, and one, singular, unique songwriting talent. Done at a time when they could do no wrong...

It goes in and out of print, so snap it up if you can.

from What Color Is Love (Cadet MSM 37190)


Where is my mind?  performed by Pixies  1988
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I still find this song as compelling as I did ten years ago. It's simple, crisp, and beautiful, opening with an other-worldly high-pitched vocal hum which is soon joined by a picked electric guitar sound and some tight drums. It's really nothing like anything else I like, but somehow the shouted vocals and indie-rock setting really appeal to me on this track. One of 20 or 30 songs which transport me back to my late teens amazingly vividly.

from Surfer Rosa, available on CD



Whirl  performed by High Rise
Recommended by Damian Vegas [profile]

Totally overdriven, psych-noise power trio rawk. (There, that should satisfy your need for critical cliche.) Seriously, though, this is one of my favorite tracks by High Rise. The band just seems totally in sync here while still going nuts. Especially potent (as always) is Munehiro Narita's guitar soloing. The band puts so much in the song that it really feels longer than it is, and it's still not nearly long enough. Recommended for people who love great guitar solos and just plain fierce rock and roll.


available on CD - Disallow (Squealer Music)


White Car in Germany  performed by The Associates  1981
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

Post-punk "pop" at its most gorgeous/baroque/bewilderingly extreme - and the perfect introduction to the God-like genius of Alan Rankine and the late/great singer Billy Mackenzie. A four car-pile-up between Roxy Music (circa "For Your Pleasure"), Bowie (circa "Heroes"), Scott Walker's "Scott 3" and Kraftwerk's "The Man Machine", (with King Tubby and Shirley Bassey acting as ambulance attendants), this song is both empty and lush, creepy and hilarious, ice-cold and almost embarrassingly emotional. I have loved/lived/died by this song for almost two decades, and I still can't begin to tell you what its about. It's like something from outer space - like so many of the greatest pop songs are.

from The Fourth Drawer Down (Situation Two)
available on CD - From The Fourth Drawer Down (V2)


Will I still be her big man  performed by The Brigands  1966
Recommended by Mirko [profile]

This is a classic garage tune from New York mid sixties band.The rythm is catching and it treats the problems of lower class folks with their classy dates.
The sixties garage at it's best.




Windmills Of Your Mind  performed by Dorothy Ashby  1969
Recommended by brendan [profile]

I've got 5 or 6 Dot Ashby albums, and this is by far my favorite song of hers.

It's breathtaking, no mistake. The bass and drums are steeped in funk, yet keep it mellow. A flute (?) section keeps it nice and light. Its all held together by 'Dorothy's harp' her playing is perfect, sprwaling rich deep soundscapes.

I can't emphisise how perfect this song is. If you've hard any version of 'Windmills...' I'm sure you can imagine a harp suitung it well.

I belive Cadet have recently reissued the 3 albums Ashby did with them (Afro Harping, The Rubiayat of Dorothy Ashby, and Dorothy's Harp), but they can still be hard to get hold of. An excellent quality copy from an original LP can be found on Dusty Fingers Vol.1, also on vynil.

I'm not sure if this is available on CD.

from Dorothy's Harp (Cadet)


Xtal  performed by Aphex Twin
Recommended by Synthetrix [profile]

Still a favorite seminal ambient electronica track after all these years.

from Selected Ambient Works 85-92 (R & S Records (Belgium))



Xtal  performed by Aphex Twin  2002
Recommended by JerMan [profile]

Relaxingbut yet still hypnotic. An electronic-ambient classic.

from Selected Ambient Works 85-92 (Pias America)



You Fucked Up  performed by Ween
Recommended by Kilbey1 [profile]

A funny breakup song, done in a very juvenile style, but everything you ever want to scream to your ex right after they dumped you. Sung to a woman, but applicable in all such nasty situations - the feeling is still there. Even when I'm angry, this song has me laughing. Backed by a funky rhythm that just barely turns it into a melody.

from God Ween Satan, available on CD


you will  performed by lia ices
Recommended by maria7 [profile]

perfect voice in the tradition of joni mitchell or kate bush but still something outstanding and new




You’re Still The One  performed by Shania Twain  1997
Recommended by acidburn [profile]

from Come On Over


Young Americans  performed by David Bowie
Recommended by Reina [profile]

Okay, I know this is kind of a well known, outplayed song...still, it is a classic...and so much fun to listen to.

"We live for just these twenty years to have to die for the fifty more..."





  FlyingDutchman1971: Great song! The 'Best of Bowie' DVD set features a great live performance of this song from the Dick Cavett show.
  VichyFrance: The best part of the song is the nonsensical ranting that precedes the "ain't there one damn song..." line. Coke-era Bowie was great at that fast paced mumbo jumbo.

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