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search results for “Perfect”
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List songs by Song title | Performer | Year

You searched for ‘Perfect’, which matched 285 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
"sing little bird sing"  performed by the left banke  1968
Recommended by association [profile]

the only thing that could make "too" from the left bake any better would to have "walk away renee" and "pretty ballerina" on this album!
this is the best album better then the debut one even though most people don't think so and another thing the left bankes recording of desiree is a billion times better then the montage version!!
anyone who sayes different can not be trusted :)
one of my fav soft/sunshine albums dear god i love 'em :)

from too (smash 67113)
available on CD - yes (omly japanese import which is perfect with all o)



  konsu: I like this one too. The whole second album is near perfect. Nice to see it by itself on CD too, the way it was intended!
  artlongjr: Good to hear that someone else likes the Left Banke's second album as much as the first...they both are great! I first heard the second LP as part of the Rhino comp "There's Gonna Be a Storm". I just love the whole album, especially "Goodbye Holly" and "Nice to See You".
"estoril à noite"  performed by the durutti column
Recommended by kohl [profile]

this is excellent. i've never been a fan of purely instrumental tracks, but this is just too perfect. sets a great mood. almost makes you feel as if you were alone on the beach at night. melancholic, sad, almost cold. the music has a brittle, yet lingering quality which is hard to achieve and yet it is here. so, so good.




"feels like heaven"  performed by fiction factory  1984
Recommended by kohl [profile]

great song. uplifting and catchy. the intro itself is sheer new wave goodness. makes you happy, makes you dance. one perfect 80s tune.


available on CD - throw the warped wheel out



  Mike: Nice to see this one here - great piece of 80s Scottish pop. It was recently re-used with comically altered lyrics in a UK tv advert.
"I Don’t Know What I Can Save You From"  performed by The Kings of Convenience  2001
Recommended by Alletron [profile]

The Kings of Convenience have often been described as Norway's answer to Nick Drake. They blend lyrics of nature and love with sensational flowing acoustic guitars. Erlend Oye and Erik Glambek Boe have the most hauntingly beautiful voices you may ever hear, and expertly incorporate harmonies that drift perfectly through the notes of their guitars. This is my absolute number one favorite song of all times. Listen closely on the bridge for this incredible arpeggio that just catapults the song into ethereal territory.

from "Quiet Is the New Loud" (Astralwerks)


...The Collapse of Detective Dullight  performed by Of Montreal  2001
Recommended by two-headed boy [profile]

'The Events Leading up to the Collapse of Detective Dullight' is not a song but a narrative story, and it’s funny as hell. The off-kilter character voices of the already brilliant stream-of-consciousness plot are cartoonish enough for their own Saturday morning series. When the detectives start their investigation nothing makes sense. There’s Jell-O, serenading butterflies, file cabinets, murder, catacombs, and all the seasonings for a hilarious dream. I am usually brought to tears when Detective Slots reads from his revered exercise in free verse titled ‘The Cause of Gauze’. I will supply you with a sample:
"Oh, the cause of gauze. The Manuels have fondled many memories from my lap though each memory has its own lap and swimmers swim laps. Even swimmers have laps however and while in that condition many require a delicate gauze."
If you hear this without purchasing the actual album, 'Coquelicot Asleep in the Poppies: A Variety of Whimisical Verse,' then you are being cheated. The dreams of this band are as colorful as the illustrations they provide us in their album sleeves. The 'Where's Waldo' pictorial representations enrich the listening experience by engaging us in a journey deep into the frying-pan brains of these madmen. In fact, this is a perfect introduction into a very strange world of psychedelicado. Think the Beach Boy's 'Smile.' The reaction of my friends after hearing this have been harmoniously the same, 'they have to be on drugs.' The truth is Of Montreal are not on drugs, they are drugs.

from Coquelicot Asleep in the Poppies: A Variety of Whimsical Verse (Kindercore KC064)


1000 Times  performed by Tahiti 80  2002
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

A perfect piece of contemporary pop music: uplifting and sunshiny, yet with the right dose of melancholia. The production is excellent, as well as the instrumentation with a very driving rhythm section, warm electric piano, guitars and horns. What makes this really stand out is the terrific string arrangement by Richard Hewson (A protegee of George Martin and quite busy arranging during the 70s) which is very floating, sweeping and lush.

from Wallpaper For The Soul, available on CD (Minty Fresh)




  texjernigan: Ooh yeah
1900 Yesterday  performed by Liz Damon’s Orient Express  1970
Recommended by artlongjr [profile]

This song is an intriguing one for me, I can never get enough of it! It's one of the easy listening classics from the early 70's and is one of the most perfect examples of the "Now Sound" genre, recorded by a Hawaiian bar band led by lead singer Liz Damon. Interestingly, it is a cover of a song written by Chicago soul songwriter Johnny Cameron and it was originally recorded by Betty Everett on the Uni label. I was lucky enough to find a copy of Betty's original version, but unfortunately her version has never been put on CD.

This song has a delightfully slow tempo and dreamy, romantic lyrics that somehow seem timeless. To me, the song always seemed to be in an older style than its early 70's release date would suggest. The bridge features great horn playing and a wonderful descending bass run.

The original 45 on White Whale Records had a song called "You're Falling in Love" on the flip side, and that song too is a classic, in my opinion.

from Liz Damon's Orient Express, available on CD (White Whale)



  prufrock68: Yep, this song is definitely of its time. It smacks of 'easy-listening' radio, from the staid brass break, the gentle, on-the-beat marimba strokes, and the whispery thin lead vocals of Liz and her equally restrained backup fellows behind her. Maybe the song just feels slower to you in this version. I don't think the Betty Everett version is any faster--it's just more rhythmic with its slightly funky percussion and string arrangements. Don't get me wrong, I like both versions, this one as much for its that kind of cool 'dated' feel as anything else.
2 Minutes To Midnight  performed by Iron Maiden
Recommended by brooksyinc [profile]

Maybe the best Maiden song ever, everything is pitch perfect on this song.

from Powerslave


3 libras  performed by a perfect circle
Recommended by eggplantia5 [profile]

a beautiful, haunting, disturbing song. maynard's voice just does something that twists up my heart every time i hear the song. this is one of the songs i can put on repeat and just completely let swallow me whole. it's perfect for a dark mood.




5:09  performed by Bobby And I  196?
Recommended by Pal [profile]

When it seems like The Free Design finally have got the attention they so well deserve, I would like to recommend something that is very close in my opinion... Bobby and I! 5:09 fits in perfectly between Love so fine (Roger Nichols & The Small Circle Of Friends) and 2002-A Hit Song (The Free Design). The arrangment is incredible, there's a unique singer-singer magnetism on the top and the drums and bass makes me wanna dance the days away. Jim Gordon play drums (how many records has he done?) and the bass player, Rod Ellicott, is brilliant. Of course they added the song with string, horns & flutes... It's sunshine all over! I don't know anything about them, I only have this fine record, so if you know anything feel free to send me an email.

from Bobby and I (IMPERIAL LP-12420)


A Hard Day’s Night  performed by Goldie Hawn  1998
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

A perfect straight-forward jazzy take on the Beatles' classic. Goldie is in peak performance and reminds me of Michelle Pfeiffer in 'Fabulous Baker Boys' on this song.

from George Martin - In My Life, available on CD (MCA/Universal)


a love from outer space  performed by tahiti 80  2000
Recommended by penelope_66 [profile]

just dreamy! the title fully corresponds to the mood of this track. i'm just a sucker for the combination of acoustic guitar and electronic instruments, and tahiti 80 masters that beautifully with this song. um, the perfect make-out song? what else can i say?


available on CD - tahiti 80 - e.p.




  n-jeff: Is this the AR Kane song? 'She loves me, she loves me she loves me, hmm, a love from outer space, its true'. My girlfriends favourite track from the I LP.
  penelope_66: Yes! Though I didn't know it was a cover...I'll have to find the original and hear it!
A Perfect Sonnet  performed by Bright Eyes
Recommended by Shes lost control [profile]





  anakinskywalker: i <3 this song. it's probably evident from my recommendations that i love bright eyes in general but... yeah. i love this one a lot. the only reason i didn't recommend it was because you already have. :)
A Perfect Sonnet  performed by Bright Eyes
Recommended by DearPrudence [profile]

A song from the younger days of Conor Oberst. The lyrics are amazing, and he may not be the greatest singer we've ever heard, but he sings it with such intensity it gives you the chills.




Abaddon  performed by GPKISM  2009
Recommended by shakebear [profile]

Abaddon is just beautiful; the lyrics are pure poetry, GPK's voice is gorgeous and soothing, and all of the instruments fit together perfectly.

from Atheos (Darkest Labyrinth)


ai no toubousha  performed by Yoko NAGISA  2003
Recommended by chipple [profile]

Beautifully produced by Garry ASHIYA (part of the unit hige no miboujin (aka La veuve moustachue) with You-ichi KISHINO), this song from the single of the same name sounds a lot like Garry's works with hige no miboujin, creating a sort of classy, elegant 70's atmosphere. Yoko's vocals are fantastic and suit the song perfectly!

from ai no toubousha, available on CD



Aikea-Guinea  performed by Cocteau Twins  1985
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A perfect song. I love every note. The mood is desolate, yet warm and reassuring as well. The bassline and guitar playing recall some of the great early-period New Order tracks. The track fades in beautifully with bass, drums, and guitar. The drums and bass are steady, while the effects-laden guitar shimmers over the top. Liz Fraser's vocal is at first understated, until the chorus begins. Her voice soars as a simple piano sound joins the mix. The chords are simple, almost inevitable, but the instrumentation and execution are quite stunning.

Happily, you can hear this song and see the original video at the Cocteau Twins official site: http://www.cocteautwins.com/html/media/video.html.

from the single Aikea-Guinea (4AD BAD501)
available on CD - Aikea-Guinea (4AD)



  audioadventures: Another one of my favourites of all time. Gives me goosebumps.
  leonthedog: Yes, I remember playing this EP over and over back when it was only on vinyl... Although "Kookaburra" is, in my opinion, even more heavenly! Like angels comforting you...
All I need is the girl  performed by Harry Connick, Jr.  1991
Recommended by jwmoz [profile]

The song is actually a show tune - originally from 'Gypsy'. The only place I know this version exists is off Harry Connick's laser disc - featuring a live performance from '91. Anyway, if you listen to Mel Torme belt out this showtune, it sounds, well, like a showtune. I'm not a big fan. It's kind of dimply cheeked-cheesy. Harry sings it like it's an absolute standard. Slows it down, gets a little soulsy and smooths it out... perfect crooner jazz. Unfortunately there is a good deal of talking and tap dancing breaking up the song.





Almost Arms  performed by The Minders  1996
Recommended by two-headed boy [profile]

'Back to the Almost Arms again.' One minute, 29 seconds of pure heaven. Clapping hands, sugary-sweet bass, warm acoustic guitar, and perfectly stylized harmony demonstrate the greatness of this band. The Minders' ability to streamline their brit-pop sound into short cuts such as this says volumes of their talent. They have grasped the art of the rock strip-tease as we sit and drool and demand more of their form. A thousand and a half listens later 'I am hungry but still smiling' rings truer than ever, this is but the appetizer for their more developed works; taste this and you too will be The Minders' biggest fan!

from Cul-de-Sacs & Dead Ends (spinART / Elephant 6 spart 76 / E6-021)



Alone Again Or  performed by Love  1967
Recommended by sinister [profile]

the words "i could be in love with almost every one/ and i will be alone again tonight with you" are sung in a very intimate high-register, backed by glorious acoustic guitar plucking and horn bursts. two minutes in, the song erupts into an extended horn solo! probably the most perfectly orchestrated pop song.

from Forever Changes, available on CD



  plasticsun: I agree - unfortunately so did Miller beer, which used the horn part in a commericial aimed at the "Cinco de mayo" crowd. Still an incredible song.
Always You (Single Version)  performed by The Sundowners  1968
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

To me this is certainly a pinnacle of pure late 60s sunshine pop. Composed by pop genius Roger Nichols the timeless, idealistic lyrics were written by Tony Asher (who wrote most of the lyrics with Brian Wilson on Pet Sounds) not by his regular partner Paul Williams. Sunshine pop hardly gets any sunnier than on this track: great production, strings galore, Beach Boys-esque vocal harmonies, great bassline & trumpet and catchy as hell with it's uplifting chord progressions throughout. While the album version (recently included on the highly recommended "The Get Easy! Sunshine Pop Collection") is good already, the single version is just crisper, lusher, just perfect.

from Captain Nemo (Decca)
available on CD - The Get Easy! Sunshine Pop Collection (Universal)




  delicado: I have to agree. What a beautiful track! Very similar to the Small Circle of Friends record, but perhaps even better! I just have the version from the compilation; I'll try and track down the single.
  eftimihn: Delicado, you have the single version already, it's the one on my Roger Nichols compilation, i just somehow forgot to mark it as the single version. The single is clocking in at 2:18, the album version runs 3 minutes.
  delicado: Cool; I'll listen again. This track is sure to make it onto one of my comps; surely it could make a soft pop fan out of anyone!
  tinks: great album, and a horrendously overlooked group..."dear undecided" is the best beatles song that the beatles never recorded.
  Major Minor: I agree this is the best version... I think it's the same one that's on the "Sunshine days" compilation.... The one on Captain Nemo isn't awful or anything, but the orchestral intro does go on a bit...
Amori Finiti  performed by Giancarlo Gazzani  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

To me, this track is a perfect distillation of all that is wonderful about bossa nova and the various hybrids which it inspired. Bossa nova was taken up all over the world after its rise in the late 50s and early 60s, but Italian musicians seem to have done an especially good job of absorbing its charms.

A simple instrumental, this opens with a plucked guitar and simply builds up and down, adding piano and strings and then taking them out so beautifully that it makes you shiver. Alas, the rest of the compilation this is taken from suffers from poor sound quality. If anyone comes across the original Giancarlo Gazzani album, I'd be very keen to hear it, although I fear this track may be an isolated gem.

from Musica per commenti sonori
available on CD - Metti una bossa a cena (Schema)




  Swinging London: Really nice. Reminds me of a 1966 movie soundtrack. Now I've got to search for the song.
Anesthetize  performed by Porcupine Tree  2007
Recommended by puuhaentae [profile]

Basic prog-heavy-rock instrumentation backed up with synth sequencers.
A long track that kind of takes you in a trance.
Perfectly on time and well played instruments and guitar riffs together with the sequencers create a certain kind of "drive" and well constructed drums and genious drum fills keeps it interesting and alive. Steve Wilson's (not so typical for the genre) vocals bring in ghostliness and calm.

from Fear of a blank planet


Anonymus  performed by Focus
Recommended by voshege [profile]

Today on my way out from my favourite store I saw a bargain bin that had the lp 'In and out of Focus' (by Dutch band Focus). Anonymus is the B-side opener with magic interplay between flute and guitar (Jan Akkerman vs Thijs van Leer). Dutch progjazzfunkystuff all the way. For 50cents it's a perfect buy; I never bothered to pick it up along the way during many visiys. Essential listening!




ante up-remix  performed by M.O.P & funkmaster flex feat busta rhymes, remy martin & tephlon
Recommended by olli [profile]

condensed, funked up version of the song with a shitload of guest appearences. It all flows together pretty nicely, with fantastic beats and great, ridiculous larger-than-life aggressive tough guy/girl lyrics. Perfect tunage for sweaty parties with a few good friends and foes.


available on CD - 60 minutes of funk vol.4



Argomenti  performed by Isobel Campbell  2004
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Isobel Campbell was, of course, a member of Belle & Sebastian as well as the lead singer in The Gentle Waves, a disguised solo project backed by members of Belle & Sebastian. Her first "real" solo record "Amorino" was finally released in 2003. This wonderful cover version was only released on her 2004 EP "Time Is Just The Same". And while it's already great to see a Morricone cover version these days, this one is really amazing too. It just suits Mrs. Campbells airy, fairy-like voice perfectly. Compared to the Astrud Gilberto from 1971 this version feels even lighter, calmer, more stripped down since it's not orchestrated with strings.

from Time Is Just The Same, available on CD




  Issie: The singer has a great first name!!!
Ball and chain  performed by social distortion
Recommended by inbloom44 [profile]

Heart breaking yet strong,a tale of reflection and Mike Ness's voice is near perfection.




Ballad of Billy the Kid  performed by Ricky Fitzpatrick  2007
Recommended by jmalthew [profile]

Ricky Fitzpatrick's song "Ballad of Billy the Kid" is a 3 minute class in songwriting.

A compelling story filled with unexpected references, internal rhymes, interesting characters...not to mention his beautiful voice. His single acoustic guitar is the perfect backdrop for this tragic and beautiful story. A couple of four-letter words, but nothing that doesn't fit appropriately into the song as a whole.

Ricky's comment on the mystery of the song has always been "Never judge a man til you've walked a mile in his shoes".

I am a fan and always will be. I suggest checking Ricky out while he's still available as a "local" artist at www.rickyfitzpatrick.com.

from The Same Only Different, available on CD


Batman and Robin Swing  performed by Sun Ra and the Blues Project
Recommended by djfreshmoney [profile]

Sun Ra does a kind of classically themed mambo blues thing here. Great stinging guitar work, mambo (cha cha) beat and then he launches into classical themes on organ. Not as wierd as it soungs - it all works perfectly.

from Batman and Robin, available on CD



Beauty and the Beast  performed by David Bowie  1977
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

A nasty/under appreciated gem from David Bowie's Berlin period, "Beauty and The Beast" is sheer perfection/pure malice in musical form. Ominous squibs of sound coalesce around an almost crocodilian groove and Robert Fripp's hissing, poisonous guitar line. Then Bowie makes one his most memorable vocal entrances with a sound somewhere between a croon and a scream. Things just get nastier from there - David playing the hipster, killer android on the lead vocal, while the backgrounds get all down and dirty on chorus. Then, as if he's suddenly come his senses after committing some atrocious act, Bowie howls over the break: "I want you to believe me!/I wanted to be good!/I wanted no distractions!/Like every good boy should!" - before sliding back into the sociopathic sleekness of the last verse. The genius of the tune is that it suggests all manner of violence/bad shit without actually describing any act of mayhem. Therefore the imagination runs riot. A brilliant/evil track.

from "Heroes", available on CD


Berimbau  performed by Golden Boys  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An addictive and perfect track, which fuses several of my obsessions (vocal groups, Ennio Morricone-style chord sequences, Brazilian pop) with incredible power. The song is a Brazilian standard, written by Baden Powell, but this version is very different to any other I've heard. This recording opens feverishly with brass and strings, maintaining a doomy and very serious mood throughout. All the same, it manages to be extremely groovy, with rock drums and a twangy guitar accompanying the strings and harmonizing vocals. The arrangement is quite brilliant and never sounds crowded, with a stark feel produced by the different parts dropping in and out. The part of the track which to me is pure genius is the instrumental break in the middle, which sounds like it's excerpted from one of the coolest of Morricone's late 60s B-movie soundtracks - honey smooth strings, blended with some excellent drums and a cool trumpet part. The vocals are also rather gripping - always very serious sounding, and often wordlessly chanting the melody.

from Golden Boys (Odeon MOFB 3590)
available on CD - Blue Brazil Vol 3 (EMI)




  Galt: You should check out the 1971 Odeon album 'So Vou Criar Galinha': 'Chuva de verao' starts with the sound of rainfall (always a winner) and 'Com a lembrana apenas' has one of those amazing Brazilian melodies you just can't get out of your head.
big jet plane  performed by angus and julia stone
Recommended by danielaa46 [profile]

a perfect song that makes you love it since the moment you heard it!




Blowin' Bubbles  performed by Call and Response  2001
Recommended by ronaldo [profile]

Just a perfect, perfect pop song. Makes you wanna dance and groove along, but at the same time it's soo unbelievably sweet and a just a liitle melancholy. It starts with a drum beat, and then there's this bass-and-drums groove for a few seconds. Then a little sweet electric piano line enters, just before the voice begins singing the melody: "I'm drinking stars up in the sky, you know where you are / I'm driving cars around your house, it seems so fun". When it's time for the chorus ("So listen to my bubble go pop / I'm coming in, I'm coming over the top"), the main voice sings over a backing vocal doing an "ooh" harmony, and then there's absolute genius backing vocal, where the word "pop" becomes "papapapa". After that, a little guitar riff/solo, along with a very cool electric piano line. Then it just repeats everything all over again one more time, for infinite happiness. The time for a middle break has arrived. A new funky bass groove with lots of different "papapa"s harmonizing together. Now, go back to the first bass-and-drums groove, with a jazzy, relaxed guitar solo, and then it's just grooves and grooves and heavenly harmonies, "Blowin' bubbles".




Blues Party  performed by Gert Wilden
Recommended by GeorgyGirl [profile]

From a career supplying funky/hunky, cheezy/sleazy grooves to a series of late Sixties/early Seventies German soft-core flicks, Gert recently apeared on "Eurotrash"...perfect music for when you're feeling a little "saucy", in the European parlance.

from Schulmaedchen Report, available on CD



Born on the Floor  performed by The Make-Up  1999
Recommended by popgoestheculture [profile]

There have never been drums with as much texture
and style ever recorded as in this song. Nor has
there ever been a song that has capture an energy
like this. Screw INC, Hives, and any talk of garage
rock revival. Eat this. Jon Spencer Blues Explosion
meets Prince and the New Power Generation.

*3:00*
Svenonious' perfect screaming that sets off the
battle between Michelle Mae's bass versus James
Canty's dirty little guitar riff. Oh so perfect.

from I Want Some, available on CD


born slippy  performed by underworld
Recommended by licoricewhipped [profile]

this song is just perfect. normally i dont like music like this, but i cant help it with this song.




Bumblebee  performed by Roman Andren  2008
Recommended by Festy [profile]

You'd be forgiven for thinking this one of Sergio Mendes' hipper tracks from his Brasil '66 or '77 period. It has that old sound to it and is really warm. It starts off breezy and builds with energy whilst Roman Andren, a young Swedish musician, composer and DJ, plays some beautiful electric piano over the top. Although it starts off with vocals over a sparse bass and electric piano combo, the vocals don't come in again until a while into the track. By the end of the track, the energy is at its most, yet still breezy, with brass, vocals and hand-claps providing a sense of a party. It's the perfect song for a summer's day or, close your eyes on a dreary winter's day and be transported.

from Juanita & Beyond : Live Studio Sessions, available on CD



By The Time I Get To Arizona [Whipped Cream Mix]  performed by The Evolution Control Committee  1994
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

This is the record that pretty much kicked off the whole 'bastard pop' genre - where a clever bootlegger would fuse the vocal track of one song with the backing of another. Here we have Public Enemy and Herb Alpert (Bittersweet Samba, from Whipped Cream...).

The reason this record (unlike most of the other mash-ups) works so well is that it sounds like a genuine collaboration - the parps of the Tijuana Brass and Chuck D's rap spits meld perfectly. It's a smart-arse idea that becomes a work of art.

from the single By The Time I Get To Arizona [Whipped Cream Mix] (Pickled Egg Egg 8)


California Waiting  performed by Kings of Leon  2003
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

This song grabs you and doesn't let go. Catchy, melodic and flowing... It's very hard not to listen to this song without bobbing your head along with it. The slurred southern drawl of the lead singer, and the sparkly melody really put you in a specific place and time. A very cool track, and one that's perfect for drinking to.

from Youth and Young Manhood (RCA)


Cavaleiro Andante  performed by Abilio Manoel  1970
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

This song is simply unreal. It starts out in a kind of 4/4 samba groove with a highly prominent cuica and a funky strummed acoustic guitar chord progression before the super-catchy pizzicato-violins riff comes in, and Abilio's mellow voice singing the melody. It's sunshiney and catchy, with a bit of a haunting aftertaste, very Brazilian. I can never hear this song enough times!! Abilio Manoel is a Sao Paulo-based singer-songwriter from the late-60s-70s (still active) who wrote a few moderate hits without attaining even a Marcos Valle level of popularity. Good for Marcos, since Abilio's work would have caused me a few sleepless nights if I were him. And both on the same label, too! Abilio's stuff is hard to find, but very worth the effort.....I've already given Dusty Groove the heads-up about the CD....

from Pena Verde (Odeon)
available on CD - 20 Sucessos (EMI Brazil)




  delicado: sounds great; I look forward to checking it out!
Children (Dream Version)  performed by Robert Miles  1996
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

A great thumping house-groove! Robert Miles flawlessly blends amazing piano work with great techno and produced a great album of very danceable tracks, especially this one. This is perfect for listening to while driving!

from Dreamland, available on CD



Chinese Translation  performed by M. Ward
Recommended by WarPool [profile]

The guitar is simple, yet effective and the melody is easy to get into. This is the perfect summer song for me.




Chinese Translation  performed by M. Ward
Recommended by WarPool [profile]

The guitar is simple, yet effective and the melody is easy to get into. This is the perfect summer song for me.




Chocolate  performed by Fantastic Explosion  2003
Recommended by chipple [profile]

An old Lotte chocolate commercial song turned into an infectious disco-ish club track.
The song starts with a loop of the famous "we like music, we like the disco sound" sample and with social dance instructions in Japanese, and then turns into disco with a groovy bass line and wah-wah guitar, to then apply the commercial song's vocals perfectly.

from Return of Fantastic Explosion (Transonic TRS-22001)



clair  performed by Singers Unlimited  1975
Recommended by klatu [profile]

A nice a capella version of my favorite Gilbert O'Sullivan song, in a very full arrangement reminiscent of the Swingle Singers, with whom they share a member. Lyrically, the song is an antidote to the sleazy feeling I get from Rod Stewart's "tonight's the night". I used to think they shared a theme of pedophilia until I listened closer. I got this on a Japanese collection put together by Toru Hashimoto, probably the greatest compiler ever. He puts together all the Cafe Apres Midi (perfect!) and Free Soul (quite nice) collections. They can be had for $25 a pop from the Dusty Groove site, which seems high for a single disc, but they are all close to eighty minutes and packed with great songs which have lead me to several thousands of dollars worth of related purchases in the last few years. Gilbert O'Sullivan's stuff is worth looking into if you have an ear for it, and there is a nice cheap two disc collection on JVC Japan.

from A Capella II (MPS)
available on CD - MPS for Apres-midi Grand Cru (MPS/Jasrac (Japan))


clip clap  performed by kahimi karie  200x
Recommended by olli [profile]

cute little song about a girl stalking someone she's fallen in love with, listening to the "clip clops" of his shoes. the melody in the song is very similar to "cosmonaute" by stereo total, only more upbeat (it was written by brezel gring from stereo t., so i guess that's excusable). kahimi's ultra-bright voice fits this song perfectly.

(there's WAY too few sweet and uplifting songs about stalking, by the way.)


available on CD - k.k.k.k.k



CLOWN  performed by THE HOLLIES  1966
Recommended by norfy [profile]

FROM THE 1966 'LP-FOR CERTAIN BECAUSE'-A HYBRID OF RUBBER SOUL AND THE BYRDS-COMPLETE BLURRED POP PERFECTION IN THE TIME IT TAKES TO MAKE A CUP OF TEA-SAD AND BEAUTIFUL AND A MILLION MILES AWAY FROM THE USUAL BEAT OF THE HOLLIES,IT SHIMMERS IN A SLOW MOTION 12 STRING DAYDREAM AND MAKES ME REALISE WHY I LOVE MUSIC AND WHY I AM STILL AWAKE WHEN I AM AT WORK IN 4 HOURS TIME-SEARCH FOR THIS AND WALLOW IN IT'S SPLENDOUR...........

from FOR CERTAIN BECAUSE, available on CD


Come Rain or Come Shine  performed by Judy Garland  1963
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

For those of you out there who are still perplexed by the cult of Judy, may I suggest hardily this amazing DVD? Culled from her now legendary CBS TV series in the early 1960s, this collection features a selection of solo performances, and Come Rain or Come Shine sums up things here perfectly. It is a frenzied, riveting, almost frightening reading of the song. Nick Cave or Polly Harvey wish they were this intense or perhaps (wisely) they dont. Judy at this point is a woman ravaged by both her life - alcohol, pills, suicide attempts, catastrophic illness and innumerable career failures and comebacks - and to a certain extent her own astonishing, almost vampryric talent. To see this frail little creature she was in her early 40s, but looks about 60 totter onto this empty stage and become possessed by a song - her voice soaring, her talent surging through her like high voltage electricity - is almost too much to watch. But one has to watch her even if only to see whether see she spontaneously combusts during the performance. (And those old time Judy-queens still amongst us God bless them swear this footage only hints at what it was like to see her live.) Must be seen/heard to be believed.

from The Judy Garland Show: Just Judy DVD (Pioneer Artists PA-11577)


Come Together  performed by Primal Scream  1992
Recommended by claudiag [profile]

Fantastic electro-rock, perfect soundtrack to start a heavy clubbing week-end.

from Screamadelica (Emi)


Concentrate  performed by Willie Tee  197?
Recommended by Festy [profile]

I know next to nothing about Willie Tee, but I became obsessed with this track. The song contains the kind of politically incorrect lyrics that were accepted back in the day without the batting of an eye lid. Willie Tee tells his woman how she should be spending her time ("Concentrate on loving me; activate this fire in me") and suggests a reward ("You've got to place your trust in me; I'll satisfy your fantasy"). These were the days when men were men, and women were letting them believe that they were in control. This track is definitely one for late nights with that special woman who apparently needs to be told what she should be spending her time thinking about.


available on CD - Creative Musicians (Perfect.Toy Records)



Cordeiro De Nanã  performed by João Gilberto  1980
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Just one minute and twenty seconds long, this a perfectly distilled piece of Brazilian pop/mood music. The song consists of a simple, beautiful chord progression, which is repeated over and over. João sings a simple vocal over his guitar, and then some brass and strings come in to join him. The arrangement is stunning: sweeping and beautiful, with a delicate, sparkly sound at the beginning and end. It sounds very like the work of Claus Ogerman (who arranged the tracks on 'Amoroso', which appears on the same CD), but in fact, it's arranged by Johnny Mandel. Although this was recorded in 1980, it has a timeless feel. The entire Amoroso/Brasil CD is quite incredible. It took a few listens to really hit home, but has now become one of my 'desert island discs'.

from Brasil
available on CD - Amoroso/Brasil (Warner Brothers)



  barry_c: I agree, a beautiful, beautiful tune. You should check out the original version of this tunes, by Os Tincos: http://www.luizamerico.com.br/fundamentais-tincoas.php
  kfigaro: I really love very much this song with these subtile orchestration of Johnny Mandel me two, and I also know the original version of Os Tincos (1977) which is very different and with verses that J.Gilberto don't sing... Thalma de Freitas also sing this dreamy tunes in her album (2004) _______________________ http://chantsetheres.over-blog.com/
  delicado: Just listening to this again a few years after my initial recommendation. It really does encapsulate a lot of the mysterious, seductive elements of Brazilian music for me.
Danger! High Voltage!  performed by Electric Six  2003
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

This song is great! "Fire in the Disco/Fire in the Taco Bell" It's so cheesy, but so perfect. Plus, Jack White's vocals are always slightly off-kilter. A great, great track.

from Fire




  spinner303: Haha, this song rocks. Its a really, really fun song. Bass lines are great. Check out the video, its free on their site: http://www.electric6.com/media_video.html
Dansero  performed by Richard Hayman  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

The album that this track is taken from was one of those strange albums that acquired mythical status in my mind. Based on a mixture of rumor and personal imagination (I could never actually find a copy), I convinced myself that this must be the coolest album ever made, a perfect fusion of moog, latin and mod sounds. A few years later I picked up the album very cheaply on ebay. Beautiful and interesting as it is, many of the tracks go slightly over the line for me.

'Dansero' is the only track on the LP that captures the blend that I was looking for. It's nice and short at under 3 minutes, and features a delightfully kooky introduction that sounds like the Jean-Jacques Perrey moog flourishes that the group Stereolab sampled on their 'Transient Random Noise Bursts...' album. The drums and moog then join up for a nice pop instrumental, catchy and bouncy. Different moog effects are piled on, but always quite effectively, making this one of the most enduringly successful moog-pop tracks in my collection.

from Genuine Electric Latin Love Machine (Command)



Deacon Blues  performed by Steely Dan  1977
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

On "Aja", Donald and Walter reached the zenith of their perfection, with an unsurpassed attention to sonic detail and texture. In fact, the recording of these 40 minutes of music took them about a year of studio work. They assembled an incredible array of the finest session musicians around at the time, creating 7 timeless tracks of jazz-rock fusion, impeccably engineered and produced by Roger Nichols (this is the other Roger Nichols!) and Gary Katz. "Deacon Blues" is certainly one of the most heartfelt, mellow tracks they ever created. It never ceases to amaze me how seemingly effortless they create this elegance in the harmonies and chord progressions.

from Aja, available on CD



Dining Alone  performed by Carla Bley
Recommended by mr_klenster [profile]

The balance of beautiful, introspective lyrics (which are mostly spoken rather than sung), and lonely instrumentation combine to create a top-notch stunner. As a whole the album Dinner Music is a very eclectic and interesting assortment of songs. I wish "the lights wouldn't turn low and it wouldn't be time to go", but the way this song captures the feeling of yearning and melancholy is absolutely perfect.





Dirty Paws  performed by Of Monsters and Men  2011
Recommended by Hypnotic33Rocker [profile]

The introduction immediately throws you into knowing this is a different song. The guitar thrums and sings to you. The voices perfectly harmonized. Soulful.

from My Head is an Animal, available on CD


disorder  performed by joy division
Recommended by licoricewhipped [profile]

this song is perfect for late nights.




Do Like I Do  performed by Kim Weston  196?
Recommended by BlueEyedYe-Ye [profile]

Quite possibly the most beautiful soul ballad of the late 60s.... despite being a slow song it is incredibly uplifting.... it speaks of holding out for someone you truly love when temptation surrounds you, which fits perfectly with my mindset. "Just remember that lovers have sorrow.... just remember we'll make up tomorrow". Immensely touching, beautiful and timeless.


available on CD - Greatest Hits And Rare Classics (CD) (Spectrum/Universal)


Downfall of us all  performed by A Day to remember
Recommended by Demory [profile]

The guitar is amazing. It flows so perfectly.




Dream A Little Dream Of Me  performed by Cass Elliot (a.k.a. Mama Cass)  1968
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Does anyone NOT like this song?!! A great nostalgic feel and that glorious voice... A perfect moment in music history!

from Dream A Little Dream (Dunhill DS 50040)
available on CD - Dream A Little Dream: the Cass Elliot Collection (MCAD 11523)



  inbloom44: *sighs* How I adore Mama Cass.
dry drunk emperor  performed by TV on the Radio  2005
Recommended by stoneworks [profile]

This song makes me want to be a proud american. It's definitely the finest antiwar song I've ever heard. It perfectly sums up my feelings about the bush administration and it conjures up the revolutionary spirit that must have been swirling around before the birth of our country.
That being said, I'm not usually that drawn towards protest songs per se. But this one grabs my attention with its drumcorps-like rhythm and its chanted vocal delivery with many layered voices. The guitar work is incredibly moving dynamic and textural. The meandering flute soloing echoes the lyrical call to "grab your fife and drum!" and then carries the song off into the sunset.
Of course, the lyrics are the most mind-blowing element when you pick them apart. After two poetically scathing verses describing the idiocy of empire, the third verse imagines the unapologetic uprising of the people. I highly recommend downloading the lyrics and getting familiar on that level. Powerful song!!!!

from released as single (Interscope)


Dying Crapshooter’s Blues  performed by Blind Willie McTell
Recommended by dwmjuk [profile]

Early urban blues from the master of all that is politically incorrect (listen to his lyrics on most tracks regarding women). Recorded as a tribute to a friend, full recording has a 3 minute rant by Blind Willie recounting the story of writing this, andsinging it at a friend's funeral. The finest early urban blues track - playful chord progression and a perfectly sophisticated urban take on his normal country blues output. Sharp lyrics are a joy to listen to.




Ely Arcoverde Quarteto  performed by Ely Arcoverde  1965
Recommended by sodapop650 [profile]

Ely Arcoverde is a Brazilian organist. His sound is similar to Ze Maria but not as chime-like and almost even a church-organ sound at times. I love this LP because it has a real low meditative sound. It is a quality I find in much of the music from Bahia as opposed to that from the south. The quarteto inludes organ, drums, bass and - a quality that I love alongside the organ - an accoustic guitar. It is mostly instrumental with some vocals similar to the way Jorge Ben would just make repetetive humming and moaning noises in his early LPs. The whole record has a very dark and mysterious feel - sad and lonely the perfect LP for the dark just the light from the stereo tubes flickering. It is available on ebay a lot, it is Ely's most popular LP and it should run you about $50 - 75.

from Ely Arcoverde Quarteto (RGE RXLP-5.279)


Entre e Ouca  performed by Ed Motta  1992
Recommended by ambassador [profile]

I didn't entirely get Ed Motta until I listened to this album. For me this is his perfect mix of sacred and profane styles, his soul and his jazz. Only his third album and his first two employ retro styled instrumentation, it sounds like a 1970s session from Luther Vandross without the glitzy disco production. Ed's voice sounds so great paired with the Fender Rhodes which dominates this album. The arrangements are complicated, unpredicatble but entirely accessible. Entre e Ouca, which means "Enter and Listen," has a mid-tempo disco feel with a bouncing bass line, sharp guitar lines and that rhodes. I like his newer, more challenging albums as well, but this sound immediatly speaks to me like the best crafted pop songs.

from Entre e Ouca (WEA)
available on CD - not that I know of


Esperanca  performed by Trio Mocoto  1971
Recommended by pleasepleaseme [profile]

Ben is one swingin' cat. Mocoto rock his Composition. Infectious piano & tamborine!

Very Perfect LP. Outstanding performing, nicely recorded, nicely paced. And a fine list of composers. Tim Maia, Antonio Carlos & Jocafi, Erasmo Carlos/Roberto Carlos & Jorge Ben.

from Muita Zorra!, available on CD



eternity  performed by paul haig  1983
Recommended by lhoda kblerz [profile]

optimistic synth pop from the early eighties that is the perfect track to play directly after hearing "white car in germany" by the associates.Paul Haig made a few near perfect pop songs that got nowhere ,millions of people can be so wrong

from the warp of pure fun


Everyday Is Like Sunday  performed by Pretenders  1988
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

While I am quite fond of the original version written and recorded by Morrissey, I have to admit that I prefer the cover version that the Pretenders recorded. Chrissie Hynde's voice and style are perfectly suited to the task of singing this movingly sad song about life "in a seaside town that they forgot to close down" and the use of slide-guitar is absolutely perfect on this track.

from Boys On The Side - Soundtrack, available on CD



  mattypenny: I'll have to try to find this. The Pretenders also did a cover of Radiohead's Creep - I think its a B-side (can CD singles have B-sides?) which is cracking - I much prefer it to Radiohead's versh.
  FlyingDutchman1971: The Pretenders cover of 'Creep' is included on the 4-CD/1-DVD box set "Pirate Radio". I couldn't agree more, mattypenny, it is better than the original...
Fadeaway  performed by Laika and the Cosmonauts  1990
Recommended by delicado [profile]

No one talks about this band much. Not in my experience, anyway. It's all instrumental, so I guess they're not for people who are lost without vocals and lyrics. But have a listen - to me they really seem utterly superb. I would love to see them live.

I only have a couple of albums, but they're great. This one was released in 1996 (shit - that was 9 years ago!), but recorded in 1990. Really beautiful twangy surf-pop that fits in perfectly with the whole David Lynch mood that I find so appealing. The album is an intoxicating mix of energetic surf tracks and slower, more atmospheric ones like this. Their recent 'Local Warming' album is great too. Can anyone recommend me any more of their tracks?

from Zero Gravity, available on CD



  olli: Yeah, they're certainly one of the better neo-surf acts out there. See Laika! Se Laika run! Go laika, go!
Feelings  performed by the Grassroots  1968
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Given the recent reevaluation of "mainstream" 60s pop acts such as the Association, the Monkees & Free Design, it seems a shame that more people aren't aware of how great the Grassroots were. Best known for their oldies-radio staples "Midnight Confessions" and "Let's Live for Today", they were purveyors of great well-crafted, country-rock-tinged pop music. This track is a perfect example, deftly combining vibes, mandolin, handclaps, fuzz guitar and terrific lyrics into an inimitable 60s L.A. sound. Check them out, it's high time that they got their due. And a special note for all you trainspotters out there...you can see the band perform this song in the 1968 Doris Day vehicle "With Six You Get Egg Roll".

from Feelings (Dunhill)
available on CD - Anthology: 1965-1975 (Rhino)



  adam12: Right! I can remember most local bands covering this tune in the mid-late 60's. Sounds good coming out of a garage. Kinda like "Nobody But Me" by the Human Beings.
Felt Mountain  performed by Goldfrapp
Recommended by bobbyspacetroup [profile]

Goldfrapp borrows heavily from Ennio Morricone's "Invezione Per John" (from the "Gui La Testa" soundtrack) for this track and pulls it off perfectly I think. Terrific wordless vocals.

from Felt Mountain, available on CD




  bobbyspacetroup: Another track which bears a striking resemblence to Morricone's "Invezione Per John" is the High Llamas cut "Incidentally N.E.O" from Hawaii.
Flightless Bird, American Mouth  performed by Iron and Wine
Recommended by hosnapitsizzy [profile]

guitar's part is simply stunning. the tone of the singer's voice is so soothing and relaxing. when i get married, this will be my wedding song, it's perfect.




Flood  performed by Boris  2000
Recommended by Sandwiches [profile]

This album has been so amazing to listen to lately. From the beginning riff that is looped and over and over and enventually shifted around 360 degrees with a simple delay into a beautiful guitar arrangement and of course Boris' most notable feedback/fuzz perfection. Much like the new album, this arrangement reminds me of the type of music Godspeed You Black Emperor might make if they were a little darker, a little heavier, and a lot more Japanese. From the solos to the repetition of drums and sludge, I can always throw this on riding the train home and forget about all the ugly bullshit I had to put up with during the day.


available on CD - Flood (MIDI Creative)


Flying Up Through The Sky  performed by The Oxfords  1969
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

An underrated, forgotten gem of perfect sunshine pop. Why this is rather little known is completely beyond me, since the song just has it all: breezy, swirling, lush strings, tight rhythm section, sweeping french horns and great male/female vocal harmonies. It's an uplifting uptempo song, pretty much in the vein of the 5th Dimensions' "Up, Up and Away".

from Flying Up Through The Sky, available on CD




  artlongjr: This is gorgeous! Great title, too. I've never heard of this band before.
  Major Minor: YES! The Oxfords have three of my favorite Sunshine Pop tracks: Flying Up through the sky, My world and Lighter than air... all great sunshine pop... however be warned much of the rest of the album seems to my ears to be fairly awkward Blues rock attempts that just don't work to my ears.... but those three tracks are Sunshine Pop perfection!
Footprints on the Moon  performed by Francis Lai  1973
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An incredibly perfect easy listening piece, this opens with an other-worldly, John-Barry-ish synth sound, and then leads into a groovy, lightly funky piano riff, with shimmering strings. Francis Lai's signature organ sound carries the tune as the song builds into a dramatic orchestral pop masterpiece. A standout track, with superb wistful, lazy, summer day feel, rather like some of the best tracks on the 'Sound Gallery' compilation of a few years ago.

from Plays the compositions of... (UA UA-LA095-F)




  scrubbles: Yow! That sound snippet alone is so cool.
  AndreasNystrom: I finally got the version by Francis Lai, and i think its better then Johnny Harris one. Splendid song!. I love the ending part of it.. cant get that part out of my head :)
  standish: I'd have to go for the Johnny Harris original over the Francis Lai version. It's colder and spookier with less obtrusive strings. "Movements" is available on CD (great sleeve - his expression suggests a combined photo shoot/visit to his proctologist) - but the mono single version (w/"Lulu's Theme") is all you need.
  leonthedog: Well, thanks to all of you I had to track down BOTH versions! Amazing what a difference an arrangement makes. I agree with scrubbles: the clip of Lai's version is the most infectious thing around!
Fridays Angels   performed by Generation x  1979
Recommended by geezer [profile]

A punk band that made the progress limited to just a few like the Jam and Killing Joke.This is guitar shaped power pop with a healthy slice of mod swagger and a fantastic chorus .A kind of Bowie esque tribute to wasted cool and what should have been a sure fire top tenner .This came from a buried gem of an album produced by Mott the Hooples Ian Hunter and listening now with hindsight that makes perfect sense ,the group and producer managing to crytalise glams optimism and punks negativity.

from Valley of the Dolls (Chrysalis)
available on CD - Valley of the Dols


friends of mine  performed by adam green  2002
Recommended by olli [profile]

uplifting, string-laden, lyrically abstract modern indie-pop. i think adam green`s strenght as a songwriter lies in his ability to combine bizarre random lines of text and catchy, but sophisticated melodies to something that`s bigger than the sum of its parts. that`s why i prefer his latest work to what he did back in the moldy peaches, the more well-produced sound really helps to balance out things. the strings on this song, for instance, is what makes it a slice of near-perfect sunshine pop. i really need to get around to actually buying this album soon..

from friends of mine


Gates of Babylon  performed by Rainbow  1978
Recommended by Mike [profile]

Sheer joy to listen to - a perfect example of the extended melodic heavy rock song. Superb control of tension and release. Super arrangement and guitar playing. Currently very under-valued...

from Long live rock 'n' roll, available on CD



  Issie: A good choice!
  anotherdodgybassplayer: Fantastic choice, always been my favourite. Loved it since I was 14. (now 39). The instrumental section is just as good as it gets.
Georges V  performed by Les Georges Leningrad  2003
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

A band who specialise in "petrochemical sounds", burning up every musical regulation on their sole album (thus far). Their sound ranges from very off-kilter semi-melodic noise, of which this song is a good example, and, well, a din. I love it all. Although I know not much about them, this is the best new-release album I have bought this year. Enough to make even the most jaded "music offers no surprises anymore" type rush back to the turntable.

from Deux Hot Dogs Moutarde Chou, available on CD



Get It Up For Love  performed by David Cassidy  1975
Recommended by Flippet [profile]

Cassidy recorded this track as part of a suite of songs for his new record label in 1975. Attempting to redefine his image from teen idol to serious artist, this song was David's first new single. It is a perfect example of the west coast R&B sound popular at the time. A brilliant recording, the song was banned from radio airplay by the BBC as the title was too shocking. More likely was the fact that no-one understood who this "new" David Cassidy was. The banning of the song was solved by flipping the b-side to the a-side with the result that Cassidy's version of "I Write The Songs" became a huge hit for him internationally and later inspired the less sensitive and more commercial rendition of the song produced by Barry Manilow. David Cassidy at his best!

from The Higher They Climb The Harder They Fall, available on CD


Girl In A Sportscar  performed by Alan Hawkshaw  1973
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

This track by british session musician and library composer Alan Hawkshaw is the just the perfect soundtrack to cruise along a coast highway and, as the title suggests, you might want to do this in a sportscar (if available) for maximum enjoyment. Featuring incredibly lush strings and an Alpert-esque trumpet playing the melody it's not unlike "Pacific Coast Highway" by Burt Bacharach in mood and feel.

from The Sound Gallery Vol. 1, available on CD



glad tidings  performed by Van Morrisson  1970
Recommended by moondog [profile]

These days van the man seems merely content going down the pub and making up another zzzz soul blues jam that makes him dream of his younger days. But boy did he make music once ! Especially this hidden gem of blue eyed soul with a dash of that brown eyed girl melody he does so well. Perfect for escaping a grey november day .

from Moondance, available on CD


Green Eyes  performed by Coldplay  2002
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

This song is great. It's delicate, and flowing and just beautiful. Chris Martin's voice is so great and perfect on this track. Coldplay at it's best.

from A Rush of Blood to the Head (Capitol)



Halfway Down The Stairs  performed by Jim Henson performing as "Robin"  1977
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

A wonderful little song written by the creator of Winnie the Pooh and perfectly performed by the creator of the Muppets. It has no agenda, doesn't really have a message of any kind, it is just a straightforward sweet little song.

from The Muppet Show (Arista AB 4152)



  FlyingDutchman1971: I recently obtained a copy of the recording, 'Carol Channing sings the Pooh Song Book'. A charming rendition of this song is featured on the recording.
Hard Time Killing Floor Blues  performed by Skip James
Recommended by dwmjuk [profile]

Despite the vocal style of James (not appreciated by myself) this track is a true masterpiece - listful, solemn and mysterious. Numerous good covers inc. Kelly Joe Phelps, & Chris Thomas King (O Brother Where art thou). The original's guitarwork is superior to other versions - sparse and perfectly timed. However Phelps has, in my oppinion, a more appripraite voice for the track.






  dyfl: The Twilight Singers (actually just Greg Dulli, from the Afghan Whigs, and Mark Lanegan from The Screaming Trees) just released a very good cover of this on their album SHE LOVES YOU, which I highly recommend...
Hate Everything About U  performed by Steve Lukather  1997
Recommended by lexicon [profile]

Not to be confused with that Ugly Kid Joe kindergarten rock song.

No, this is a rock/blues song, almost a ballad, with pretty good lyrics and a fabulous melancholic feel. It's catchy, and yet original in it's melody.

Steve Lukather (Toto, numerous sessions) is considered to be one of the best guitar players - ever, actually. This song, however, isn't just a display of guitar virtuosity (although that one solo in the middle of the song does give me shivers each time and again) - it's a display of how perfect and beautiful a simple song can be, and how it sounds if it's sung and played by someone breathing and living music.

from Luke


Hawaiian War Chant  performed by Torrent & Alexander  197?
Recommended by tinks [profile]

The 50s exotica standard performed "au moderne" on just two ARP synths and two Hammond organs, recorded live. And while it pales in comparison to the seminal Leroy Holmes version, it's the perfect background music to your next hip Laurence Welk luau.

from Akaka Falls: Explore Hawaii With Organs and Synthesizers ("R" Own)


He Used To Be A Lovely Boy  performed by Keane
Recommended by daniela_por [profile]

Perfect combination between a piano and Tom Chaplin's voice. Very simple song, but still wonderful.




Head Full of Pills  performed by The Prima Donnas  2001
Recommended by popgoestheculture [profile]

Perfect synthesizer punk rock.

"Baby, just don't, 'cause we can't go back
My baby, hold your tongue 'cause it's worse like that
My baby, it was different 'cause we all did junk
Oh baby, lock those photos back inside of your trunk
My bittersweet memories
Remind me how we used to feel
All damn summer with our head full of pills"

from Drugs, Sex & Discotheques, available on CD


Heaven 90210  performed by Urge Overkill  1993
Recommended by MoeShinola [profile]

The alt/rock cover band I front in my dreams plays this song at the end of every gig. Why? It's the perfect last-gig song; It's slow, it's soulful, and it pretends to the sophistication every college-age hipster does. The whole album Saturation has that feel to it, this song is just the perfect denouement.

from Saturation (Geffen)


Heaven on earth  performed by The Platters  1956
Recommended by fantasticsupremedeluxe [profile]

A song like a perfect evening under starry sky, with rich and keen vocals, full of grace and harmony. A pure love confession! "Heaven on earth
that's what you've made for me since the day we met..."


available on CD - I love you 1000 times (Musicor)


Herbert's Song  performed by Krzysztof Komeda  1967
Recommended by bobbyspacetroup [profile]

There are many memorable cuts on this soundtrack, and I essentially picked this because it's the longest. Anyway, Komeda's score is perfect for the film -- humorous maybe but definetly very, very creepy.





Here Comes The Sun  performed by The Beatles  1969
Recommended by fr0mthepast [profile]

60s classic pop song, perfect sound for a sumemrs day. I like it because it is the song to just make a day fele brighter and happier, it's picnic music.

from Abby Road


Hermes tri  performed by Jorge Ben  1974
Recommended by Vinyldream [profile]

It's a marvelous song coming from a perfect album : " A tbua de esmeralda" . Represents the highest level this artist achieved. It's an example of crossover mixing Samba - Soul - Psichodelia. A must for good music lovers.
A song for sophisticated ears.

from A Tabua de esmeralda (Universal Music)




  pleasepleaseme: I agree! "A Tabua de Esmeralda" & "Africa Brasil" are Jorge Ben at the peak of his powers! "O Bid" from 1967 is a very nice groover as well.
Honeytree  performed by The Wolfgang Press  1991
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

A great track from a truly great LP that I fear might have slipped through the cracks in the floorboards in the decade or so since it's release. TWP's "Queer" remains the band masterpiece, an ungodly amalgam of Can, Talking Heads, Roxy Music, King Tubby and De La Soul. This song perfectly highlights the record's/band's strengths - Mark Cox's cut and paste/dub programming, Andrew Gray's blistering guitar, Mick Allen's brilliant "Tom Waits sings the Mark E. Smith Songbook" voice/words, aided by then Throwing Muses Leslie Langston's sexy bass/backgrounds vocals. The song is both seductive and sinister - the spoonful of sugar being the its' "The Fall Plays The Burt Bacharach Songbook" shambling groove that helps down the medicine that is Mick Allen's venomous lyrics in re: America's inaction/indifference in the face of the AIDS crisis. Rarely has subject matter so heavy, been dealt with in such light/deft manner. I recommend the whole "Queer" LP - particularly the British edition , which differs in tracklisting and uses of samples. (It is likewise available on the band's fine - if somewhat short - best of "Everything is Beautiful 1983-1995"

from Queer &/or Everything is Beautiful 1983-1995, available on CD



  konsu: I always liked these guys too. Queer did miss the mark in america for sure, although I think "Going South" got some airplay... I'm a big fan of the Birdwood Cage LP. A very underrated group from a very popular label.
Hopelessness Blues  performed by Fleet Foxes
Recommended by IndiraHarrisonWilde [profile]

The arrangement in this song is perfection. Everything fits together so well but it all stands out in its own turn. Also, the lyrics are superb:

I was raised up believing I was somehow unique/
Like a snowflake distinct among snowflakes; unique in each way you can see/
And now after some thinking, I'd say I'd rather be/
a functioning cog in some great machinery serving something beyond me




Houses On The Hill  performed by Whiskeytown  1997
Recommended by LawrenceM [profile]

I don't know what it is about this song. "Strangers Almanac" is a brilliant - probably my all time favourite 'alt.country' record - but this song transcends even that superlative, to be one of my favourite songs of all time. It has mved me to tears twice now, and no doubt will again. Ryan Adam's bruise of a voice, the beautiful lyrics, the sad subject matter. Just perfect.

from Strangers Almanac, available on CD



How High The Moon  performed by June Christy  1959
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Got a haircut today (short, choppy, fab). Getting a haircut often makes me think of June because she did have the greatest barnet ever - that fringe!

So I've pulled out my June collection - a paltry 4 LPs but growing - and am lovin' a bit of this tonight. The instrumentation here reminds me a lot of Ella Mae Morse's corner of the market, someone I should really get around to recommending on this site.

How High The Moon opens gentle as duck down, moving into a light finger snappin' mood then onto a heavy big band scat rhythm. Christy's technique is superlative and you can almost hear her intuitively measuring the band, taking each note perfectly.

This LP is a set of re-interpretations of songs June originally sang with the Stan Kenton Orchestra. Being a June novice, I'm not aware of the original version but I doubt I could like it more.

from June Christy Recalls Those Kenton Days (Capitol ST 1202)



Hurry to Me  performed by Roy Budd  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A superb recording of a really perfect song. Ennio Morricone's theme to the obscure movie 'metti, una cera a cena' (one night at dinner) is here performed in a classic crisp, clear version by Roy Budd. I'm not sure if I love this recording so much because it was the first version I heard, but I think it may even be better than the Morricone recording. Anyway, if you don't know this song, you will probably recognise it when you hear it. It features an infuriatingly catchy repetitive female wordless-vocal over a gentle bossa beat, with rich strings and piano. Every now and then everything goes quiet and all you hear are the vocals and a faint tremelo guitar. It is really amazingly beautiful. There is also a great italian version of this song by Milva, which sounds amazingly like the group Stereolab.

from Soldier Blue (Pye NSPL 18348)
available on CD - Sound Spectrum (Sequel)




  leonthedog: The Budd version is also available on "Rebirth of the Budd," for those (like myself) wanting an introduction to his work. The Sandpipers' version on "Canto Morricone Vol." is equally nice.
  DickieB: I just wanted to recommend ‘The Sound Spectrum’ which this is on. I’ve had a copy of years but have only just realised that it’s essential listening - if you like this sort of thing, probably drive you mad otherwise.
  delicado: Yes, it\'s a cracking compilation. It\'s so well done that if you listen to the tracks out of context (e.g. on the original LPs), they don\'t sound as thrilling as they do on this mix!
Hurt So Bad  performed by Nancy Holloway
Recommended by mr_klenster [profile]

This is a perfect cover in every way, arranged by Daniel Janin. The heavy, driving bass, long whine of the horns, and thick drumming make a monster instrumental. Nothing like the Bacharach version. Nancy Holloway does an outstanding rendition of the lyrics, delicate in some places, husky in others, bleeding and pleading the whole way through. The slow, pained delivery of the lyrics almost seem to be off pace with the tempo of the beat, but the horn melodies punctuate and hold this song together. There are qualities about this song that I find impossible to describe. All that's left to say is that this song is so cool and mesmerizing that it's hard not to close your eyes, and let yourself slip into the textures of this song. I never get tired of it.

from Hello Dolly!



I Believe In a Thing Called Love  performed by The Darkness  2003
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

This song is fun, and over the top and has a great beat. A perfect first single for the Darkness, and very very catchy.

from Permission to Land (Atlantic)



  olli: edson have a pretty odd acoustic cover of this.
  spinner303: cool song, fun, the video makes the song: http://www.thedarknessrock.com/media/video/
I Can See Only You  performed by Roger Nichols & The Small Circle Of Friends  1968
Recommended by laughingmood [profile]

The perfect example of the kind of soft pop song I love. Heavy with melencholy. The strings and clarinet on this track break my heart. The fadeout is one of the greatest in history.

from Roger [email protected] The Small Circle Of Friends (A&M)
available on CD - The Complete Roger Nichols & The Small Circle Of Friends



  olli: hmm, just made me curious. i generally hate fadeouts..they always seem to obscure some kind of interesting or trippy stuff that was starting happen in the studio:) gotta check it out though, thanks.
  eftimihn: This one was arranged by Bob Thompson not Nick DeCaro. Actually i just wanted to recommend this, because today i received my newly reissued copy by Rev-Ola. An even more complete 20 track edition, fantastic remastering, extensive essay and at a reasonable price tag. Awesome.
  laughingmood: Thanks for the info on Bob Thompson's arrangment on this track. All I've ever had is the Japanese reissue and I've never been able to fully read all the info! I'll have to change that. I really need to get that new reissue. I've heard the liners and photos are all really nice.
  delicado: I also have the japanese issue. Are there extra tracks on the Rev-Ola one?
  eftimihn: The Rev-Ola one has one additional track compared to the japanese 19-track version and it's "St. Bernie The Sno-Dog". It was Roger Nichols' first ever recording in 1964 and is, quite frankly, absolutely forgettable (waltzing child-like song, with yodeling and funny voices, makes you feel rather uncomfortable after the preceding soft rock bliss). Nichols refers to this as "a pile of crap" in the essay/liner notes, a track he never really wanted to do. Just read the essay and must say it's wonderfully done. I have to stress that the sound quality on the new Rev-Ola issue is absolutely amazing, surpassing the japanese one on every level: Virtually no background noise, clearer highs, bass is rendered deeper and better, the harmonies got even silkier, overall better dynamics and resolution. It just won't get any better than this. So, kudos to Rev-Ola...
  laughingmood: Wow! That is very cool. Generally I think Rev-Ola's remasters tend to be a bit on the trebley side but of course I'll pick this up. Mainly for the liners by Steve Stanley. This album has been in my top five since I heard it, yet...I know very little of the detailed background because of the japanese liners. Steven Stanley also did the Bergen White reissue liners and is the head of LA-based pop act, The Now People.
  konsu: Hmmm... Once again no mention of Smokey Roberds. He was in the closely related A&M group The Parade. He claims partial writing credits for this in an interview : http://www.doctorroberds.com/parade.html ... If you like this album you owe yourself a listen of that "other" great one-off long player. They do a great version of "Kinda Wasted Without You" thats more raw with less overdubs. Really a magical time at A&M!
I Close My Eyes  performed by Bee Gees  1967
Recommended by tinks [profile]

It's a sad fact that the Bee Gees are a group primarily remembered for only one thing. If this were a perfect world, people would realize what an jaw-droppingly amazing group they once were. To me, their first LP is an orchestral psychedelic pop masterpiece easily the equal of the Kinks' "Village Green" or Billy Nicholls' "Would You Believe", and also just about as close at Britain ever got to replicating "Pet Sounds". On this track, listen for the insane rubber-band bassline, the staccato organ fills, the odd timbre of the voices or the occassional flute bit. It's a song bursting with an enthusiam the likes of which people only had during the middle 60s.

from Bee Gees' 1st, available on CD




  ronin: Ah, 1967. "NY Mining Disaster 1941" is a major hit in Boston. And Bee Gees 1st, complete w/cover art by Klaus Voorman, was the 1st lp I ever bought. If only the Bee Gees had kept singing like this instead of the whole falsetto/disco bit! "Odd timbre of voices" indeed! Robin (we always assumed) had his top teeth hanging out when he did this one. His vocal versatility is amazing. "Craise Finton Kirk," with its simple piano accompaniment, is a standout from this lp., too.
I Dont Know How To Love Him  performed by Shirley Bassey  1971
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Thanks to robert[o] for bringing this song to my mind. This is my favorite of all of Shirley Bassey's recordings. Her powerful voice is perfectly suited for this deeply emotional track from the hit musical "Jesus Christ Superstar". Backed by lush orchestrations, Shirley hits the notes perfectly and her fabulous vibrato captures the feelings of the song.

from And I Love You So (United Artists UAS 5643)


I Dont Need A Doctor  performed by Sheila B. Devotion  1977
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Ah, Sheila, resplendent in her purple sequined hotpants, is having such a good time on the cover of this record with her tight-trousered pals. And so she might - for her group have made a blinding record.

She's in love, you see, and it's making her feel ill (not sleeping, sweating etc.) but this is "good" and all the disco nation roars in approval.

Perfect chirpy pop music for everyone.

from Singin' In The Rain (Carrere EMC 3236)



I Think I Love You  performed by Partridge Family  1971
Recommended by unathanthium [profile]

Perfect American family drive around America in psychedelic bus singing their wholesome songs.Look at their teeth shine.Shirley Jones,star of musicals such as Carousel,steers her flock to stardom.The harpsichord makes this song with Lurch from the Addams Family guesting.If only.Covered by Voice of the Beehive,if you want credibility.If you hear this song on the radio(you won't)you won't be able to resist singing along(you really won't).




I Think It’s Going To Rain Today  performed by Dusty Springfield  1968
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

The lady may have left the stage, but her spirit lives on in her recordings, and this is among her finest!! Sadly unreleased in the US for 28 years, this gloriously somber song was included in the 1995 anthology box set. Dusty sings with a sadness in her voice as she vocally paints a picture of a dreary day. While the overcast sky fails to crush her spirit, it does provide an opportunity for introspection and reflection. She is accompanied only by piano and orchestral strings which give this song a beautifully sad sound that make it perfect for playing on a rainy day.

from the Dusty Springfield Anthology, available on CD




  delicado: I must say, this is a quite brilliant recording; thanks for mentioning it! I heard the original Randy Newman version the other day, but to me, neither the arrangement or vocal performance were a patch on Dusty. Not that I'm biased or anything!
I'm Gonna Miss You  performed by The Mingles  1971
Recommended by john_l [profile]

My favourite Canadian rock single of all time. It's a slow one, which starts with solo piano, picks up the acoustic guitar, then gets a heavy fuzzy guitar in the chorus that complements the melody perfectly. Then repeat! With an organ and full band. Followed by a nice guitar solo at the end! Add in some interestingly-placed key changes (which are necessary to keep it level) and you've got a masterpiece, says I. Needless to say, I'm the only person on the planet outside the artists themselves who remembers it ...




I'm Your Man  performed by Leonard Cohen
Recommended by Reina [profile]

Leonarn Cohen has the deepest, darkest, creepiest voice ever. It's perfect for this song--a song about complete devotion. It sounds almost stalker-like. But awesome.

"I would crawl to you baby, and I'd fall at your feet, and I'd howl at your beauty like a dog in heat..."




Ice Cold Lemonade  performed by Death By Chocolate  2000
Recommended by djfreshmoney [profile]

There must be tons of songs that follow this format. I'll call it the 'Tequila' form. Cool instrumental punctuated by someone speaking the name of the song. There are so many songs like this I'd guess that no one could pull off this kind of tune nowadays- without it sounding hopelessly retro. But this tune does it for me. Perfect summer groover. Sound like a bedroom recording, kinda lo-fi.


available on CD - Death By Chocolate




  ronaldo: really great song. perfect for a 60s-themed party. bet everyone will dance just like the people in the background of pulp's video for 'common people'. it also sounds a lot like the archies' 'sugar sugar'.
If You Go Away  performed by Dusty Springfield  1967
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Dusty's intimate reading of this song is pin point perfect (no surprise!). Starting out in low quiet tones, the song crescendos as she promises anything to make her love stay with her for just a few minutes more. Heartbreakingly beautiful!!

from The Look Of Love (Philips PHS 600 256)
available on CD - The Dusty Springfield Anthology (Box Set) (Mercury 314 553 501)


If you go away  performed by Emiliana Torrini
Recommended by effel [profile]

Though this song may be described as a tear-jerker, it is perfect in its genre. The lyrics are heartbreaking, and the setup of the song is simple and effective. Three sad verses, about what would happen 'if you would go away', are followed by what wonderful things would happen if you wouldn't, accompanied by a melody of heavenly beauty...




In My Room  performed by Yazoo (shortened to Yaz in USA)  1982
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Take a mournful song about a late-night bout of insomnia brought on by lonliness, add a few synthesiser loops, some random and often indistinguishable chatter, and mix in a reading of St Matthew 6:9-13 (the Lord's Prayer) for good measure.

One of those perfect music moments from the "New Wave" era of the early 1980's.

from Upstairs At Eric's, available on CD


In the Aeroplane Over the Sea  performed by Neutral Milk Hotel  1997
Recommended by two-headed boy [profile]

I didn't know it then, but when I purchased the album 'In the Aeroplane Over the Sea' my world changed. When I put the album into my CD player, I did it with a naivete of someone who thought they'd 'heard it all.' I did it clumsily, with haste, handled like a Beatles or Beach Boys album, the way I had done for years. When I listened to the album I did it with reckless abandon while driving 38 miles per hour on my lunch break, and later in the drive-through at McDonalds. These mistakes were inherited, and I refuse blame. They were passed through the genetic make-up of our peers and born out of the music we've been given; I didn't expect this! Well, our music has changed, and it did so without our knowing and our approval. This album proved and disproved an entire treatise of critical analysis on a generation of music that I thought I had known, and it did so with a fucking velvet sledgehammer.

The lyrics: "And one day we will die and our ashes will fly from the aeroplane over the sea, but for now we are young let us lay in the sun and count every beautiful thing we can see." More lyrics: "What a beautiful face I have found in this place that is circling all around the sun, what a beautiful dream that would flash in the screen in a blink of an eye and be gone from me." The melody: A timeless, haunting thing that was metaphysically resurrected from a wiser place. The voice: Wrenched out of the jaws of a holocaust from 50 years ago, we hear a possessed Jeff Mangum invest his soul. The sound: An apocalypse that can reinvent the turntable by its simplistic form; with a saw, guitar, drum, bass, horns, and lord knows what else all handled with deceptive elegance of a garage mechanic constructing a supermodel. And, lastly, the spirit: A tragedy and rape of virginity known only to the persecuted and executed; the ghost of Anne Frank materializes long enough to show us her world, and in her hands we are strangely at peace.

This song is a gift very few will experience. It is endless in its reach and should be accepted like a sibling into your collection. It will one day prove itself beyond category, but for now it is a masterful novel from the hands of a mysterious songwriter who should know how sincerely I cherish his songs.

from In the Aeroplane Over the Sea



  karlmort: this album is going to make a huge impact on you if you dare to listen.
  evolutum: All I have to say is that I agree with the above. My wife and I had this song played at our wedding reception. With tears in our eyes we danced. I would like to have it played at my funeral.
  umbrellasfollowrain: Whenever I hear that someone loves this album as much as I do this strange things happens where I want to draw you all into a bearhug where we cry our fears away all through the long night.
  el.oh man.: this song can make you feel so many emotions at once. it truly is a wrok of art. there is almost no way that you wouldnt like it. everytime i hear it, i fall in love with the amazing writing talents of these guys.
  pullmyhair: This is one of my most life-changing albums. It does something to me, almost spiritually. If people have an open mind, they need to hear this.
Internationa Jet Set  performed by The Specials  1980
Recommended by geezer [profile]

A weird and unsettling piece of lounge music ,nightmarish backing vocals and jazz like vibes set the tone ,with a bontempi like beat pushing the track into shark infested waters and tropical scariness .A brief but perfect vocal passage from the sardonic Terry Hall sends this track in to the realm of sublime brilliance .

from More Specials, available on CD


Iron City  performed by Grant Green  1967
Recommended by tinks [profile]

There is a significant amount of groove present in this, Green's paean to his adopted hometown of Pittsburgh. Green's guitar playing is absolutely sublime in this trio arrangement featuring the incredible Big John Patton on Hammond and Ben Dixon on drums. Green takes the lead throughout the song, and Patton provides some inspired, laid-back organ playing with a few terrific vamps thrown in and Dixon lays down a perfect rhythmic counterpoint to it all. One of those tracks that you just can't help but to bop your head to.

from Iron City, available on CD



It Don’t Mean A Thing If It Ain’t Got That Swing  performed by Duke Ellington w. Ivie Anderson  1932
Recommended by jaflapper [profile]

This song has probably been done a thousand times, but this version is definitely worth listening to. To me this is pure music. Ivie Anderson's voice fits just perfectly with The Duke's music, it's as if she was meant to sing his songs.




It’s Love  performed by Trudy Richards  1957
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Taken from her rare full length LP (many 45's and 78's are floating around out there) this wonderful track is perfect for Trudy's full, slightly husky voice. She is accompanied by the Billy May orchestra and he knows how to frame her voice with just the right arrangement! This fabulous composition by the great team of Comden and Green swings with all of the joy and enthusiasm you feel when you find your soulmate. Sadly, this album is out of print and somewhat rare. If you can get your hands on it, God has smiled on you and you should rush to the checkout counter without delay!

from Crazy in Love! (Capital T 838 (British pressing))


It's a Steal  performed by Edwyn Collins  1997
Recommended by tinks [profile]

The opening track of Edwyn's usually-overlooked follow-up to 1994's "Gorgeous George", this song is a perfect example of what orchestral pop should be.

from I'm Not Following You, available on CD



It's My Life  performed by Talk Talk  1984
Recommended by Mike [profile]

This song is one I remember enjoying greatly as soon as I heard it shortly after its release as a single. To me it encapsulated perfectly the angst and frustration I often felt at that time. It did this as much through its sophisticated musical content and texture as through the lyrics. Listening to it now, it's as good an example as any of how different synth sounds go in and out of fashion. Hollis gives a typically intense vocal performance, and there are subtle hints in some of the instrumental lines of the more jazzy direction the band would later take. Highly recommended - don't miss this one. Oh, sorry - wrong site. Thought I saw the word Ebay somewhere.

from It's My Life (EMI)


Im Shadowing You  performed by The Singers Unlimited  1975
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Wonderful song (written by Blossom Dearie and Johnny Mercer), perfectly performed, produced and arranged. The Singers Unlimited recorded over a dozen albums between 1972/1981 for the acclaimed german MPS label. This track has an incredibly mellow, almost etheral sound with a breezy bossa rhythm, delicate instrumentation by the Pat Williams Orchestra and the Singers' magic voices on top of it.

from Feeling Free (MPS/Verve)
available on CD - Magic Voices (Motor Music)



Ive Got Something On My Mind  performed by The Left Banke  1967
Recommended by konsu [profile]

There really isn't a perfect recommendation for this group,all their songs are fantastic!This one just suits my fancy as of now,and has that great "do the monkey" kind of go-go beat that's just plain infectious.This group was capable of tons of emotion,and their influence can be heard a lot in today's indie pop.Harpsichords abound,and their entire works are available on one CD, and it'll never let you down...

from Walk Away Renee/Pretty Ballerina (Smash MGS 67088)
available on CD - There's Gonna Be A Storm (Polygram USA)




  olli: amazing song, glad someone had already posted it. just picked up the album, it's superb.
J’Attendrai  performed by Michael Berard  2001
Recommended by russk666 [profile]

An acoustic (classical) guitar rendition played over the closing credits of the Showtime Film: "Varian's War" The vertuoso Jazz musician from Quebec has graced us with the finest performance of this much loved and performed chanson extant. It is perfection.

from DVD :"Varian's War" (Showtime Entertainment)
available on CD - not (none)


Julie With...  performed by Brian Eno  1977
Recommended by bugbarbecue [profile]

Picture yourself in a boat on a river.

Actually, in this case it happens to be the middle of the ocean. Just drifting any direction. No land in sight, nothing else on the water, not even any clouds. No distractions. Just you, the boat, and the water.

Oh, and Julie -- she's there -- with her open blouse, gazing up into the empty sky.

What's so powerful about Eno's "Julie With..." (and this is perhaps representative of his entire career) is that he gives you an experience in perfect detail, as if reading a book.

Even if you discount the lyrics, which, although not exactly Shakespearian, are clear and unambiguous, there is no escaping the image that Eno is presenting.

Casting aside any overanalysis, what we're left with is an outstanding bit of relaxing, but emotionally evocative chillout music. Completely beatles, the instrumentation is typical Eno: pad synthesizers, minimoog and guitar with heavy chorus. Not something you'd throw on at an afterparty, but great for a sunset in solitude.

from Before And After Science, available on CD


Just In Time  performed by Blossom Dearie  1959
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Blossom bounces her way thru this happy song about perfect love that has arrived just at the moment the end of the rope had been reached. She sings with a sense of joy and relief and you can't help but feel that things are going to be better going forward. Blossom's years of cabaret performing have given her a perfect piano playing style that accompanies her voice to a perfect fit. Kudos to Verve for dusting off this great recording, shining it up and putting out in a deluxe CD package!!

from Blossom Dearie Sings Comden and Green, available on CD


King of the Carrot Flowers Prt. 1,2 & 3.  performed by Neutral Milk Hotel  1997
Recommended by two-headed boy [profile]

A perfect segue into a perfect album, King of the Carrot Flowers is a masterpiece. This is the way songs should be written, performed, and produced. Jeff Mangum strums the catchiest 3 chords on his acoustic guitar while his piercing vocals spill lyrics of psychedelic sophistication. I can still remember the first time I heard him sing the lyric - 'and your mom would drink until she was no longer speaking, and dad would dream of all the different ways to die, each one a little more than he would dare to try' - in a rising climax. The energy and power is then sustained into a C drone from an organ, followed by an amped acoustic guitar being plucked clumsily. And like a street preacher we again hear Jeff, he belts 'I love you Jesus Christ' while the rest of the band hit fuzzed-out power chords F and C until a storm swells with cymbals, horn, bass, guitar, Jeff's voice and another rising movement to yet another climax. Propelled by an electric frequency that chops like a helicopter blade inches over-head we are lead into Part 3, often referred to as 'Up and Over'. This last part explodes into fuzz rock in all it's garage-roots glory with lyrics like - 'I will shout until they know what I mean, I mean the marriage of a dead dog sing, in a synthetic flying machine'. As the fuzz is sustained heavily the song ends with 1 last climax; the one-note piano brings us to a close.

King of the Carrot Flowers Part 1 introduces the theme of 'loss of innocence'. The narrator, addressing his lover nostalgically, compares the emotional deterioration of the older parents with the emotional and sexual discovery of their youth - 'your mom would stick a fork right into daddy's shoulder, and dad would throw the garbage all across the floor, as we would lay and learn what each other's bodies were for.' This motive returns later in the album, as does his 'Jesus Christ' theme. Jeff Mangum alerts the listener in his lyric sheet that he believes what he sings, and that this 'Christ' theme is but the spiritual light he finds within everything. The album further treats themes like the Holocaust, death of loved ones, visions of ghosts, and all the horrors of man with this light. It is a beautiful and terrifying experience unlike any rock record to date. Personally, my favorite song of all time.

from In the Aeroplane Over the Sea (Elephant 6)


Leave Out Babylon  performed by bunny & Skitter
Recommended by james [profile]

perfect hangover listening. just as the piercing headache eases off and the sadness and self-loathing set in, " I'm gonna leave out Babylon, gonna make the change"...




legal man  performed by belle & sebastian  2000
Recommended by shaka_klaus [profile]

i once met these guys at a festival. we discussed belle & sebastian and they went 'let stuart sing his songs and kick the looper-man out of the group as well as that gentle waves-chick' i don't remember my reply... legal man is a perfect example of belle & sebastian as a group i think. the fact that i like sitar and the tempo makes me like it even more.

from legal man e.p. (jeepster)
available on CD - legal man (jeepster)




  delicado: Although I have most of their records, I'd never heard this track before, and it really surprised me. It sounds almost like a vintage organ/sitar instrumental, but then the drumming gives it kind of a stone roses feel. Interesting stuff!
Let’s Get Married  performed by Mariya Takeuchi  1984
Recommended by drchilledair [profile]

I am a connoisseur (er, fan) of Japanese pop music, not just young further-out acts/groups like Cornelius (lost w/o his tape loops) and Love Psychedelico (think Beatles Meets Velvet Underground). But also that strain of Japanese pop which draws heavily on the stylistic traditions of the usual Brill Building suspects. i.e. Solo Nihogo artists like Mariko Takeuchi, especially those tracks with arrangements by the great Tomaji Sogawa. Also Chage and Aska, Eichi Ohtaki, (sometimes called Japan's Phil Spector), Gospellers, Rag Fair and, of course, Pizzicato Five. I am especially drawn to the efforts of Tatsuro Yamashita as a solo artist, and of his tracks with his wife, Mariya Takeuchi, released under her name. On their own and as a team they have been recording since the 1980s and in (affectionately known by his fans as) Tats' case since the late seventies (his first album was co-produced and arranged in the U.S. by the 4 Seasons' Charles Callelo). There are a number of other artists like this in Japan with uncommonly lengthy---by U.S. standards---careers. And believe it or not, a hit record in Japan sells in numbers that are generally far larger than the U.S. despite a population that is roughly half as large.

One of my favorite Takeuchi - Yamashita collaborations (she writes and sings, he arranges) is "Let's Get Married," which would not be perceived as being retro or sixties or somesuch by (IMHO) the more flexible and openminded Japanese music audience. Even though, admittedly it does draw upon such musical conceits. Instead, Let's Get Married would merely be regarded as a great record, case closed.

This 1984 cut track is timelessly, and extra-territorily infectuous. But with the exception of Kyu Sakamoto in 1963 with his fluke number one single, Sukiyaki, to the best of my knowledge no Japanese artist of any musical inclination has been able to crack the U.S. charts in any significant way. General garden variety xenophobia coupled with a hard time wrapping the tongue around those hard-to-pronounce names with two many vowels and and syllables. It is doubtful that LGM, even though it is sung by Takeuchi in perfectly accented English, was ever released in the U.S.

Starting with a full blown fanfare of the Wedding March played on organ, after twenty seconds, Let's Get Married abruptly switches gears and mood and becomes an ever-ascending excercise in neo-Spectorian pop, replete with castinets, chimes, a swirling ooh-wah background chorale (courtesy of an overdubbed Yamashita), multiple drumkits, a full complement of string players and plenty of good old fashioned Gold Star Studio-style echo. A paen to the joys of marriage, my favorite moment happens at 1:42 way down in the mix right after Takeuchi sings the line "You and me with a small house and a dog," where, if you listen carefully you can hear the sound of a dog yapping for joy. Homage to the "Pet" at the end of Brian Wilson's "Caroline, No" perhaps?

Both Yamashita and Takeuchi had number one albums in Japan last year. Unlike most of their 70s and 80s U.S. rock/pop counterparts, they have not been cast aside by the bulk of Japanese record buyers, but continue to peak at the top of the charts with every new issue. A listen to this perfectly crafted, classic, three minute (well. . . 3;45 actually) track should help illustrate why this is so.

Bill Reed (new to this list)

from Impressions, available on CD


Light My Fire  performed by Shirley Bassey  1970
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

Prior to hearing her "Something" LP, I always referred to Dame Shirley as "The Godzilla of Song". By this I meant I always felt she treated a tune the way Rodan treated Tokyo, like something to be smashed underfoot. While I lived/died by her Bond themes, and such like, I never thought she was capable of nuance, restraint, and/or sexiness. Then I heard this god-like album, brilliantly produced and arranged by Johnny Harris. This cover of The Doors' song perfectly sums up the record's strengths. It's jazzy, sexy, incredibly funky, yet still totally Dame Shirley in all her over-the-top-glory. Probably the best Doors cover ever (though Nico's toxic reading of "The End", and Siouxsie and The Banshees' strangely Motown-esque version of "You're Lost Little Girl" come awfully close.)

from Something, available on CD


Linus and Lucy  performed by Vince Guaraldi  1964
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

This song is the most recognised theme from any of the numerous Peanuts television specials. While I am a huge fan of Charles Schulz and his beloved comic strip characters, this song and the album it is pulled from could easily stand on it's own. Mr. Guaraldi is a master at jazz-oriented piano and his trio plays together like a well-oiled machine. The absence of any vocals makes his music the perfect background for dinner parties and gatherings where conversation is to be encouraged.

from A Boy Named Charlie Brown, available on CD


Little Bit  performed by Lykke Li
Recommended by tied.to.a.melody [profile]

This song has a very interesting sound using steal drums among other things to create a steady and bright beat. The artist's voice is beautiful and light, combinig perfectly with the song's meaning and the instrumental parts.




Long Way Down  performed by Jimmie Spheeris  1971
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Found this sealed copy at a local thriftery, an artist i've never heard from a good period at Columbia. Most of the LP meanders in a poetic way, highlighting Spheeris's moody lyrics, sometimes getting a little too "drippy" at times. This track stands out like a champ from the rest, and was penned by a sideman on the LP, Lee Calvin Nicoli. It has such a great pop appeal, in a sort of Cat Stevens way, with a brilliant arrangement (by the author no doubt), that moves along bouncing and resting... A perfect song for a rainy sunday afternoon!

Seems this fellow died very young, and has quite a cult following from what i've read. Should be a nice discovery for fans of 70's folk. And singer-songwriter stuff.

from Isle of View, available on CD


Look After You  performed by The Fray
Recommended by TheTromboneNinja [profile]

I love this song because it is so romantic, sweet, and perfect. There is Isaac Slade on vocals, along with back vocalist Joe King (<3). There's a piano, cello, and drumset. It's a beautiful song, happy and passionate, perfect to sing along to, Isaac has a great voice, and lyrics are beautiful.

from How to Save a Life (Epic)


Love and Pride   performed by KING  1985
Recommended by geezer [profile]

A huge hit in the U.K in 1985 and the debut single from a band with global potential still retaing elements of the quick fire genres that happened in those times edgy punk sentiments ,white boy funk and even the two tone /mod revival appeal ,all things to all people ,all the ingredients to make the perfect contemporary pop song,.Its rousing anthemic chorus should have been the springboard to stadium size success which somehow slipped away within a year or two,perhaps its catch all ambitions recalled the adage that you cant please all the people all the time .This one piece of brilliance still remains as a monument to all the should have beens and great white hopes.

from Best of
available on CD - Best of Love and Pride


Love Is a Necessary Evil  performed by Blossom Dearie  1964
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

I cannot say enough good things about Blossom Dearie! She is truly one of those performers that everyone should have in their collection. This song is perfect for her singing style and she runs with it. You can almost envision her throwing her arms up in resignation to the fact that love is a pain but none of us can live without it.
This track is pulled from Blossom's only album for Capital Records. She is backed by an orchestra rather than the usual small jazz combo which better suits her intimate style, but she shines nonetheless.

from May I Come In, available on CD



  OrganLeroy: I love this Blossom Dearie album. While small combos normally backed her up, Jack Marshall really made the orchestra work, very sensitive, and subdued to not cramp her style...... I have been looking for charts/sheet music for this tune for my combo to use, NO LUCK so far..... If anyone has a lead on it, I'd REALLY appreciate. THANKS
Love so fine  performed by Roger Nichols and the Small Circle of Friends  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

It's hard not to smile when you hear this lovely, rousing late 60s number. Roger Nichols is the composer (along with Paul Williams) of many late 60s and 70s hits for, amongst others, The Carpenters. He wrote this song with 'Pet Sounds' lyricist Tony Asher, and they created a beautiful combination of sunny soft pop sounds (handclaps, brass, group harmonies) and pleasing, happy words. Musically, it is superior and extra-catchy, with nice Bacharach-esque touches and great instrumentation. The lead vocal also deserves a mention for sounding almost supernaturally brilliant (far better than it sounds in the sound sample). The singer is Melinda Macleod; her voice is lovely anyway, but here it sounds as if 3 perfect takes have been somehow overlaid on top of each other to produce an incredibly rich, soothing effect. It's over quickly - in just over two minutes. At which point I normally listen to it again a few times.

from Roger Nichols and the Small Circle of Friends (A&M)
available on CD - Complete (Polydor Japan)




  PappaWheelie: I couldn't agree more. This is the epitome of what Pizzicato Five were trying to recreate in the early 90's.
  klatu: I didn't realize someone had picked this one already! I spelled it "&" instead of "and". Excellent choice!
love song for the dead che  performed by the united states of america  1968
Recommended by olli [profile]

spacy female vocal-based sadpop, perfect for cold weather and sunday afternoons. these guys pioneered this kind of music, if you're familiar with white noise,
os mutantes or even broadcast this album is your jackpot.
it's one of the more calm and mellow tracks on the albums, and one of my favourites.
absolutely gorgeus chorus, totally wide, deep string based arrangement.

..And dig the gentle, almost non-audible rhythm track.

from the united states of america



love with the three of us  performed by stereo total  2001
Recommended by olli [profile]

english language version of "l' amour a 3", available as a bonus track on the american release of "musique automatique".

cute electronic pop song about threesomes, courtesy of french-german electro-rockabilly-breakbeat-chanson-disco-pop sensation stereo total.
features some great moaning samples.
the ooohohouou- sound in the chorus remind me of a norwegian children's programme i used to watch when i was a kid. i just love the vocals in this version. they might not be technically perfect, but the french-german accent is really cute, and adds a lot to the feel of the song.

"it's absolutely out, i know it's hippie shit/
but i say it loud, with the three of us, i love it"

(by the way, stereo total are very nice people. they deserve your love)


available on CD - musique automatique (kill rock stars)



Lover I Dont Have to Love  performed by Bright Eyes  2002
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

This song is the perfect song for anybody who is angry with love, or coming off a bad relationship. Connor Oberst is a great lyricist and this song captures that feeling of just wanting somebody, anybody so bad, and not caring who it is.

from Lifted, or the Story is In the Soil, Keep Your Ears to the Groun (Saddle Creek)



lover’s spit  performed by broken social scene
Recommended by licoricewhipped [profile]

its so lonely and perfect.




Lullaby  performed by Krzysztof Komeda & Mia Farrow  1968
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

And I am not just including this because it is from Rosemary's Baby, my very favourite film of all time. Well, maybe I am a little - the opening credits where Polanski guides us over the rooftops of the Bramford while Mia murmurs her "la la la"s sets up perfectly the movie heaven that is to come.

Actors usually make a hash of singing (and, of course, vice versa - Bjork is great in Dancer In The Dark but that's all I can come up with), although I've heard that Cybil Shepherd makes a decent stab. But Mia can't fail to impress with her innocent singing voice, keeping in the character of Rosemary even though she doesn't speak a word in this song. Komeda maintains his usual atmospheric wonder, with the sort of piano based joy that gave such a fruitful relationship with Polanski's films.

Lots of others have had a pop at this, usually with some degree of success as the melody is so strong (discounting a dodgy metal version of it by some chancers whose name escapes me). My favourites are Hugo Montenegro's (on Good Vibrations) and Claudine Longet's lyric-added version, Sleep Safe And Warm.

from Rosemary's Baby, available on CD




  Swinging London: I love this too! It seems to pull the whole movie into a class of it's own. I've been trying to find the Claudine Longet version for years!
Ma Jeunesse Fout le Camp  performed by Francoise Hardy
Recommended by ladonnaoscurata [profile]

I adore Francoise Hardy. Her music may be a bit too sweet for some, but this song is a favourite of mine. It's nostalgic and melancholy, and strangely comforting. My French isn't perfect, but I believe the song is about the loss of innocence and youth.

from 36 Grandes Succes


Main title - Vampire Killers  performed by Krzysztof Komeda  1967
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

The perfect theme to Roman Polanski's underrated comic horror film, The Fearless Vampire Killers. With stacked vocal harmonies, suggesting the background singers at some sort of Bulgarian black mass, floating on bat wings over a very jazzy rhythm section, this song is, at once, very creepy and very funny. I have long believed that Siouxsie and The Banshees came into existence entirely due this influence of this track. (Play it back to back with "Switch" or "Israel" or "Cascade" sometime, and you'll see what I mean.) Stereolab likewise. Broadcast or Goldfrapp could do a brilliant cover of it.

from Complete Recordings Of Krzysztof Komeda Vol 19, available on CD


Manon  performed by Serge Gainsbourg
Recommended by Davidthesaint [profile]

This song has one of those melodys that I've listened to a lot of times and still I can't really say that I've figured it out... The string arrangement is stunning also... works perfectly with Serge's voice... Everybody should be able to recognize the french word for hate... he sings it very hateful...




Marquee Moon  performed by Television  1975
Recommended by theothercynic [profile]

The title track of Television's 1975 album is the greatest statement of their cumulative abilities as a band. A majestic epic of dual guitar interplay, metronome bass playing, unconventional jazz drumming, and the strangled vocal screeds of Tom Verlaine, Marquee Moon begins with a double-stop riff. A second tangled guitar weaves in, a bass thuds upward, and a lockstep rhythm forms behind the surreal lyrics. From the chorus to the long, flowing jams that follow the third verse, the guitar interplay between Tom Verlaine and Richard Lloyd amazes again and again. Instead of rhythm and lead guitar, the two guitarists trade solos and phrases, tones and colors. Even when Richard Lloyd plays simply, he dominates the color and tone of the solo he underscores, and when he lets loose a solo, it flows like poetry, phrasing and declaiming the beauty of the notes it contains. Band leader Tom Verlaine twists and curves his notes all over here, careening in on himself and threatening to implode before finding a perfect spot. The majestic peaks this song climbs to seem almost impossible, and it very nearly stumbles by running long. However, nothing can detract from the climactic jams that culminate in Tom Verlaine's singing bird-call guitar notes and gentle spills of warbling riffs.


available on CD - Marquee Moon (Elektra)


May my heart be cast into stone  performed by Other Voices  1967
Recommended by Ron1967-1970 [profile]

Another one of my faves... grrrrrrrreat orchestration, unbelievably well produced and heavenly
vocals in perfect harmony. A song to bring me on my knees... hoping it won't stop... so sweet, yet goes very crescendo... a definite 'two thumbs up' for this one... This group never made an album. It's one of those typical 'studio groups' who produced a sound that could knock you KO (IF you like the positive sound of the late 60s). It takes a genius to arrange a song like that: 'And may my heart be cast into stone" (immediately followed by two short orchestral outbursts pa-taa pa-taa) "And may the world go deaf when I roar" (pa-taa pa-taa)... One word: d e l i g h t f u l





  trebole: I was going to recommend this same song and looking for some info on the net I discovered by chance you have already recommended it. Just listening to it makes me feel like clapping my fingers and sing aloud to heaven with my eyes full of tears. Love the background vocals too!
  trebole: Just wanted to add, the song I have is performed by a girl group called Toys. Is that right?
  PaulLevinson: Thanks for the good words about our record, Ron. Actually, we weren't a studio group. Here are some details on The Other Voices: The Other Voices consisted of me, Stu Nitekman (who later wrote a book about Scrabble, the board game, under the name Jonathan Hatch - JH also does voice-overs and commercials under that name now), and Ira Margolis. We had previously been a folk-rock group called The New Outlook. We were singing in Central Park in NYC one Sunday afternoon. Ellie Greenwich and Mike Rashkow walked by, liked what they heard, and said they'd like to produce us. They signed us, changed our name to The Other Voices, and landed us a contract with Atlantic Records. May My Heart Be Cast Into Stone was one of three songs we went in and recorded in a NYC studio. The other two were "Hung Up On Love" and "No Olympian Heights". Only "Hung On Love" was written by one of us -- me (and Mikie Harris). "Hung Up On Love" was included on Rhino Handmade's Come to the Sunshine: Soft Pop Nuggets for the WEA Vaults in 2004 (Andrew Sandoval compiled it). I now a professor, author of science fiction and books about the cellphone (I'm currently working on a book about the First Amendment), appear a lot on television, etc - details on my web page: www.sff.net/people/paullevinson All best wishes and Happy New Year! Paul PS - The Toys also have a version of Cast Into Stone - same song, different recording.
Melody  performed by Serge Gainsbourg  1971
Recommended by eurotrashkit [profile]

Melody Nelson is probably one of the best serge gainsbourg albums.
he mumbles and sings about the fictional character Melody Nelson, a young red haired teenager.
the opening track 'Melody' would've almost been enough to fill an entire album with: it's full of bass, violins and soft drums but it never comes across as being over the top.
and that's what this album is: perfectly produced, orchestrated and beautiful...
beautiful, yet quietly disturbing.
"melody nelson" is a defining french album.

well, that's what i think anyway : )

from Melody Nelson, available on CD



  robert[o]: One of the BEST LPs ever, period, end of sentence! Also - a great lost piece of the UK glam rock jigsaw, I think. Listen to this record, then listen to Bowie's "Ziggy Stardust" or "Aladdin Sane", Roxy Music's "Stranded" or "For Your Pleasure", even "The Slider" or "Tanx" by T. Rex. Serge's fingerprints are all over those records.
Metti Una Sera A Cena  performed by Milva  1972
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

While "Metti una sera a cena" has always been amongst my favourite Ennio Morricone themes this interpretation by Milva lifts the quality of the song to an even higher sphere. In fact, its hard to describe the intensity of this version : Milvas voice is perfectly suited for this piece, the arrangement is even crisper and more dynamic than the original Morricone recording, the full blown crescendo of strings and voice at the end is simply overwhelming. My only complaint is the song seems to fade out a bit too early.

from Dedicato A Milva Da Ennio Morricone (Ricordi)
available on CD - Canto Morricone Vol.3 - The 70s (Bear Family Records)




  scrubbles: I love this song. Very chi-chi sixties sounding, refreshing as a glass of lemonade.
  dominb: There are several versions of "Metti",besides the original s/track lp,there is an entire lp of other versions available...the live Piero Piccioni conducted version feat. Edda Dell'Orso is fantastic.
  eftimihn: Yeah, the Piccioni version is a crescending epic, makes the hair on my neck raise when i'm in the right mood. What is that "entire LP of other versions" you were referring to ? Is it coincidentally called "Metti una sera a cena grande" ? And where did you get it ?
  dominb: Yeah,that's the lp I meant,I search blogger and other places for music,I got the Piccioni vers. off Limewire (useful for finding obscure stuff and things you might not buy) but I found a link to the entire lp,here it is:http://community.livejournal.com/relaxmusic/792781.html just right click on each song to d/load as the "vip link" doesn't work."Blogger" is a v.good place to search for morricone,if you are a fan and want anymore links to d/loads,feel free to email me at [email protected] and I'll steer you in the right direction.
  eftimihn: Thanks for offering some advice and help, i find this trend in posting interesting stuff on highly specialized blogs very nice, also the possibility of searching for this stuff via Blogger. As for "Metti una sera a cena grande", it's very interesting for me where this album pops up on the net, because this was, in fact, compiled by me a year ago or so :-D
  dominb: You compiled it?Wow,that's amazing!I guess you work for a record company?Yes,if the internet is great for one thing alone it's the access to music you would otherwise not hear.I don't really agree with people posting full albums they have just ripped from a new cd (an odd track or clip is fine) but for out of print or obscure vinyl these blogs are ideal.It keeps the music alive for the future which is what the composers would want most I think.
  eftimihn: No, i don't work for a record company, i just enjoy doing compilations of stuff i really love and spread it if i find others might like it too, like with this one. I fully agree with you that blogs should be limited too out-of-print or vinyl stuff. But i sincerly hope that one day record companies open their vaults and put their entire catalogue online so people don't have to search the web for rare gems that otherwise would completely vanish, i have the feeling though that this won't ever happen...
  dominb: I came across a samba record morricone did with the singer chico buarque,maybe you've heard it,there are a few very unusual songs on it,here is the link:http://balacobaco2.blogspot.com/2006/03/chico-buarque-de-hollanda-discografia.html
  dominb: other morricone i discovered,2 great scores for "roma come chicago" and "una breve stagione",not great sound quality but both feature some great tracks that I had not heard before. http://bedazzled.blogs.com/bedazzled/2006/04/roma_come_chica.html
Middle Of The Road  performed by Denim  1992
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

From the era when it seemed every band was named after a fabric, this angular indie gem was, for my money, one of the very best singles of the nascent Britpop era. Precipitating the self-referential indulgences of later bands, but not with the aura of smugness that pervaded the Albarn-esque dahn-tha-dawgs mockernee, the legend that is no-surname Lawrence (from alternative gods Felt) spews forth a classic.

The best way to describe this is 'miserable glam' - a great Mud-style beat clashes perfectly with Lawrence's scathing vocals of how he hates everything about so-called classic rock: "Spector's wall, knock it down; Jerry Lee, run him out of town." He ends up extolling the virtues of MOR and, in a stroke of utter pop genius, segues his tune into Middle Of The Road's hit Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep as sung by the kind of girl who populated the 70's Top Of The Pops LPs.

from Middle Of The Road CD Single, available on CD



Miracles  performed by Soulounge  2003
Recommended by lenny [profile]

Regularly I fall in love with songs that have a harmonic, perfectly tuned voice chorus like "miracles". The Fender Rhodes keyboard and a moderate bass-line completes the relaxed mood.
I immediatly feel this bittersweet mixture of good times memories and melancholy.

from Home



Mister Love  performed by Dr. Buzzard's Original Savannah Band  1978
Recommended by PappaWheelie [profile]

Cosmopolitan Disco with a warm orchestration igniting the perfect melody, Cory Daye's vocal performance can't go wrong. Dr. Buzzard's music is unlike any other music with the battered "Disco" tag. As with most of their discography, this is highly recommended! Also try "The Gigolo and I" and "Transistor Madness-Future DJ" from their wrongly criticized "Dr. Buzzard's Original Savannah Band Meets King Pennett" album.

from Dr. Buzzard's Original Savannah Band Meets King Penett (RCA)
available on CD - Very Best of Dr. Buzzard's Original Savannah Band (RCA)




  ryder0059: I JUST WANTED TO SAY MISS CORY DAYE VOICE IS ONE OF A KIND,IT IS ABSOLUTELY BREATHTAKING,SASSY WITTY,STYLISH.I WISH SOMEBODY WOULD GET HER BACK INTO THE STUDIO AS SOMEONE WOULD MAKE LOTS OF MONEY.I DONT GET IT AS HER CORY AND ME RECORD IS OUT OF PRINT BUT SELLS FOR THIRTY DOLLARS ON EBAY AND OTHER OUT OF THE COUNTRY SELLERS LIKE ROCK HOUSE MUSIC. I REALLY BELIEVE THAT IF THEY PLAYED SOME OF HER MUSIC ON THE RADIO NOW IT WOULD SELL LIKE GOLD COME ONE SOMEONE PLEASE GET HER BACK INTO THE STUDIO THANKS FOR YOUR TIME JOHN KARVASALES
  Lemluv: Thank you for posting this. I have been enchanted by the works of August Darnell, Stony Brower and Co. in all it's manifestations. Seductive yet sophisticated, concealing a rapier and wit all the time dressed to impress (from Tropical Gangsters to Zoot Suits, y mas). They were pegged as a "disco" group, but were much more. What gets me the most is how visual their music could be. Nostalgic, contemporary, and ahead of it's time simultaneously.
Morning, Girl  performed by Neon Philharmonic
Recommended by I, Claudius [profile]

Perfect poppy '60s record, both accessible and arty: Jimmy Webb collides with Brian Wilson and Bacharach, gorgeously arranged for members of the Nashville Philharmonic.

from The Moth Confesses, available on CD


Mrs. Robinson  performed by The Ray Bloch Singers  1970
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Wow. This is just...wow. I've just gotta say that I have an absolutely unnatural attraction to this group. Imagine if you will, a chorus of super-square middle-aged white folks, swinging it's way through the rockin' hits of the day, only performing them all with absolutely perfect diction & grammar. The mastermind behind this way one Mr. Ray Bloch, who, according to the back cover to every one of the LPs that I own, was the musical director for the Ed Sullivan Show. All I know is that anything the man touched was gold! Check out his versions of "Penny Lane" and "Light My Fire" on the "Hits of '67" LP, or his absolutely quizzical take on the ENTIRE soundtrack from "Hair".

from Hits of '68 (Ambassador)



  konsu: Too true... I love the cover too. With the spunky teens shopping and sippin' on ice cream sodas in a flower montage.
  tinks: i'm glad i'm not alone in my unholy obsession!
My Loves A Monster  performed by Clea Bradford  196?
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

A cool portion of that underated genre, easy soul. Bradford's vocals (a less roaring Shirley Bassey is the nearest comparison I can think of) complement the light arrangement perfectly. Fits in with that whole John Schroeder Orchestra vibe. Sometimes you just want a lovely vocalist singing a nice song.

from the single My Loves A Monster (Cadet 5602)



Naked kids  performed by Grouplove
Recommended by cori6798 [profile]

It's about the perfect summer day




Never Let You Go  performed by Thirstbusters
Recommended by MrMusiqism [profile]

So emotional and beautiful piano line with incredible voice and chords and lyrics and the way the whole band fits together. Absolutely perfect and inspiring. PLEASE LISTEN TO IT!


available on CD - Time you awake


New Partner  performed by Palace Music
Recommended by umbrellasfollowrain [profile]

Memory's a funny thing. Especially romantic memory.
The first time I heard this song was two days after the first time I fell in love. Everywhere I went, I sang its earnest chorus "And you are always on my mind" in my head, thinking about the one I was in love with. In the shower staring at a bottle of hair conditioner, I sang, "You are always on my mind". On the subway, trying to ignore a potential fistfight about to break out, I sang, "You are always on my mind". In the supermarket produce section, holding the perfect shape of a lemon in my hand, I sang, "You are always on my mind". I was giddy and happy and the song understood. "Hey!" the song said, "Hey!" Will Oldman sang, "I got a new partner now!"
But jacket weather set in and things grew colder and we broke up and I was miserable and I stored the CD away on a top shelf with other memorabilia of that love who's happy power was really freakin' painful for me to think about now.
Things weren't always so bleak and I got me a new love and some years later, when I listened to the song again, I noticed something about the lyrics I hadn't before. See, in reality, the song isn't joyous at all. Will Oldman is singing about a past love, a love who is always on his mind when all the time he is seeing another girl, a different girl from the one always on his mind. He can't be with that girl. He has a new partner now. What I thought was a song about new joy was a song about nostalgic loss.
I didn't see how it was possible that I had suppressed that true meaning for as long as I had, considering how often I sang the song and how much it meant to me at the time. I knew the lyrics like the back of my hand and when I listen to music I dredge up all I can get from the lyrics like I'm a devout scribe interpreting the bible.
One of the beauties of pop songs is that they take on the flavour of your life at the time you listened to them and carry that flavour on to whenever you listen to the song again, while meanwhile you're morphing and changing and discarding what songs you don't want to remember that you loved and making mixed Cd's for long cartrips of the songs you do you do want to remember. This song is weird in that IT seemed to be the one that was morphing the next time I heard it and not me, like it was a person that had changed over time that I was encountering again.
Besides which, what a fucking lovely song it is.

from Viva Last Blues



  olli: now THAT's what i call a recommendation. Im gonna have to find and soak this up now...
  olli: beautiful song. i've been a sporadic fan of will oldham related stuff for some years now, but hadnt heard this until now. thanks! hmm. on a side note, this is the 666th american release that has been recommended here. i might be a bit childish, but i was hoping that number would go to some really, really bad contemporary pop music. Hey, you can't always get what you want:)
  fjell_strom: This song was the soundtrack to my incorrigible devotion to a lovely young girl when I myself was a bit younger. I used to listen to this tune repeatedly in my tiny little newly discovered room in the immensely overwhelming new land in which I found myself during the adventure which was to last the next four years, wandering Europe by my heartstrings. This was the song. I used to drink gin martinis to it. And eat the olive. And shudder because winter had come to my little home, and she was always, at least as often as the song played, on my mind.
Ninna Nanna per Adulti  performed by Ennio Morricone  1968
Recommended by texjernigan [profile]

There's already an entry for this album, but I felt like I had to note it with an mp3. Ditto to everything that m_thom said, this song is what pushed me over the edge, that perfect heroine high that no other piece of music has given in me since, but it created in me a desire for beautiful music, and that's what brings me here today. If anybody has a copy of the film, I'd pretty much do anything for it.





Noah’s Dove  performed by 10,000 Maniacs  1992
Recommended by Yammer [profile]

For admirers of classic pop song construction, production, and performance, Noah's Dove is jaw-dropping in its perfection. The subtle piano hook, deep and dark chord changes, and the warm, dry-eyed, heartbreakingly acute singing grab your ears, while the lyrics (an unhurried, unsparing epitaph to a relationship with a cheating scumbag) clench your heart. The best part may be that it introduces Our Time In Eden, a collection of finely-crafted folk-pop songs that served as a worthy finale for the Maniacs.

from Our Time In Eden


Noah’s Dove  performed by 10,000 Maniacs  1992
Recommended by genebean [profile]

The sound is just perfect. The piano part has been stuck in my head for years. Its another one of those rainy day songs that kind of make you stop everything you're doing and just sit there and listen.

from Our Time in Eden (Elektra)


Nondescriptionist Ethic  performed by Giants Chair  1996
Recommended by MoeShinola [profile]

This song epitomizes the Kansas City Sound of indy rock in the mid-90s. It's loud, but not grunge or punk. They sounded like Fugazi a little, but the sound is at a distance from you, not in-your-face. It's a perfect hard rock song; direct, knows where it's going, gets there with no fuss but with a little dessert left over at the end. The frontman later changed his stage name and now makes honky-tonk music.

from Purity And Control (Caulfield)


Now Theres That Fear Again  performed by Mm  2002
Recommended by pleasepleaseme [profile]

This track begins with the sounds of a bong being puffed and the clicking of a metal lighter being flicked. This album is a winner, from start to finish. If you are a fan of the Cocteau Twins, Eno, Cluster, or Bjork, give this one a try! Perfect! Ambient Rock at its best. And very warm Electronica too! So good, you may hit the repeat button on your player more then once.

from Finally We Are No One, available on CD


obsolete  performed by mc solaar
Recommended by licoricewhipped [profile]

one of my favorite songs of all time. its perfect for every occasion.




Ocean Drive  performed by Daryll-Ann  1996
Recommended by Herr V [profile]

Slow and intimate song, heavenly melodies and what I think is a perfect harmony. One of the songs on the "Weeps" album from the shamefully underrated band Daryll-Ann. Just about anything from this band is great stuff, obvious references to the Byrds and other sixties' jangle-pop, but strong enough to survive.

from Weeps (Excelsior 136.6002.29)



Ode to Billy Joe  performed by Ronnie Aldrich  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A near-perfect take on this classic song. Ronnie dispenses with vocals, instead building a beautiful mood with some great strings, a relentless beat and percussive guitar. The bluesey melody is carried delicately by the piano. I'm not really getting it across here, but the track is astounding - astonishingly addictive and well recorded, building wonderfully to a warm and incredibly groovy climax.

from For Lovers Only (London/Phase 4)



Ol’ 55  performed by Tom Waits
Recommended by fkoski [profile]

Music and lyrics go together so well...Perfectly captures that "holy," awakened, alive feeling of its being early, early morning and you're just driving away from a beautiful few days with a friend or lover.......





  FlyingDutchman1971: Sarah McLachlan recorded a great cover of this song. It is available on the soundtrack album to the film 'Boys on the Side'
Once Upon a Summertime  performed by Blossom Dearie  1958
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

A very ethereal song that is perfect for the lilting girlish voice of Blossom Dearie. She is also an accomplished pianist and plays on every song she sings. She is backed by a standard jazz trio on this track and they play in a wonderfully subdued manor that allows her voice and the words to be the focal point of this song. Originally written by a french songwriter, Blossom Dearie heard the song while living and performing in France in the mid-1950's. Upon her return to the United States, she asked her friend, songwriter Johnny Mercer, to write english lyrics to the wonderful melody. The words he wrote tell a beautiful story of love lost, but fondly remembered thru a familiar smell or sound. A standout track from the marvelous LP of the same name. Give it a listen the next time you go to your local music store.

from Once Upon a Summertime, available on CD


Only For You  performed by The Match  1969
Recommended by laughingmood [profile]

I love the "New Light" album by the Match. Such a perfect example of soft pop. I think these guys, along with The Small Circle Of Friends and The Free Design, are the perfect example of what harmonic soft pop sounds like. This track, with that great trumpet line, is just one of 14 classics on this album. I had heard some label in Korea was supposed to be re-issuing it but that was a long time ago.

from A New Light (RCA)


Open Door  performed by Genesis  1980
Recommended by Mike [profile]

It is hard to imagine a more musically wistful verse than that of this song. The swelling chorus augments it perfectly and very dramatically. This B side from the "Duke" era is surely one of Mike Rutherford's best songs, and one of the highlights of the post-Gabriel Genesis for those who appreciate the band's slower numbers.


available on CD - Genesis Archive Vol 2



  makebusy7: Um, that song was a throwaway no matter how you slice it
  Mike: It's all about musical taste, really, although even if it was not to my taste, I would find it hard to put together an argument for it as a throwaway.
  mrtanner: I think this is an absolutely beautiful track!
  Mike: Oh yes, it's quite special...glad someone else appreciates it!
Oui je dis adieu  performed by Franoise Hardy  1971
Recommended by whoops [profile]

Franoise Hardy at the beginning of the seventies had gained the right to be seen as something different than simply a part of the y y movement of the sixties. In 1971 with the help of a brazilian guitarist named Tuca she was about to make what is considered by many (and by me) as her best album. "La question" has a perfect instrumentation (strings, guitar and bass) and stunning arrangements. I dare you not to fall in love with the first 30 seconds of "Oui je dis adieu", in a way it reminds me of Scott Walker's "Plastic palace people" it has the same circular construction.

from La question, available on CD


Peaches En Regalia  performed by Frank Zappa  1969
Recommended by G400 Custom [profile]

A short instrumental featuring dozens of musicians playing sumptuous melodies, this perfect fusion of rock and 'classical' forms might just be the most authentically radical record I own.

from Hot Rats, available on CD


Peel Me a Grape  performed by Diana Krall
Recommended by 37piecesflair [profile]

Such a taucy tune, Diana purrs it perfectly.




Pelas Sombras  performed by Arthur Verocai  1972
Recommended by mr_klenster [profile]

I'm really blown away by this song (and this entire album), it's simply a masterpiece to my ears. A possible comparison might be to Oba, La Vem Ela by Jorge Ben (who Verocai arranged for), as the guitar chords and lush, cool tones are quite similar. This song however moves with a much greater sense of urgency, and right from the start, it a spills out like a mournful plea. As a listener, the attention to detail in the arrangement and instrumentation is obvious. The song is packed densely with sound and great short soloing, all played skillfully by a large band of famous contemporaries, whom Verocai personally recruited. There's something very magical about how the vocals and instruments combine, and how the song plays out. It feels as though you are witness to a uniquely perfect and possessed performance that would be impossible to reproduce. A beautifully moving and perfect song that leaves you craving more.


available on CD - Arthur Verocai (Luv N' Haight)



Perdita  performed by Angelo Badalamenti  1990
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A perfectly distilled instrumental which seems to capture everything poignant and affecting about Badalamenti's soundtrack work. 'Perdita' opens with a faint piano, being played seemingly with one finger, which gets louder and is joined gradually by a rich string section. Rather like some of Ennio Morricone's best themes, this is very simple, but so beautiful that it doesn't end up sounding obvious or clichd. On the other hand, perhaps I'm just being nostalgic about being 16 again.

from Wild at Heart (Soundtrack), available on CD



Perfect  performed by Fairground Attraction  1988
Recommended by acidburn [profile]

from The First of a Million Kisses


Perfect  performed by Simple Plan  2002
Recommended by acidburn [profile]

from No Pads, No Helmets...Just Balls


Perfect Kiss  performed by New Order  198?
Recommended by Limebass [profile]

Just by saying the name of the band some bells should ring. I really like the song, has a very catchy beat and some good lyrics as well. Should wacth the performance of the song in Glasgow so you know what I mean.




Perfect Lines  performed by The Promise Ring
Recommended by eve [profile]




Piano Sonata No. 14 (Moonlight Sonata)  performed by Ludwig van Beethoven
Recommended by Darke Soul [profile]

This is my favorite piece of classical music, so beautiful it often brings me to tears. You are strictly forbidden to go to your grave without having heard this song.


available on CD - Beethoven's Greatest Hits


Playground Love  performed by Air  2000
Recommended by delicado [profile]

To me, this one of the most perfect songs released in recent years. It's hard to pin down what makes this track so affecting - the instrumentation is mostly synth; there is also an understated, slightly Bowie-style vocal. Overall I think it is the music itself - the fragile chord sequence and instrumentation evoke a strange sense of lost summer memories.

from Virgin Suicides, available on CD




  secularus: This track is sublime. Atmosphere to the nth degree. Sophia Coppola is very lucky to have a gem like this as the pervasive track to her film, The Virgin Suicides. Mesmerizing.
  tinks: that ain't the only reason sofia coppola is very lucky, but that's another story. i agree, i love the entire score to the film.
Poor People  performed by Alan Price  1973
Recommended by brightdayler [profile]

I heard this, weirdly enough, at some random film festival in Rotterdam? In a short film, at that! Pretentious! Luckily I remembered to memorize some lyrics so I could search for them when I got back to the USA and my computer. This song is perfect for listening to while strolling an English park, preferably with an umbrella that is subbing as your walking stick (because you're the kind of person who needs one). You're just checking out a park that you've never been to before. If you then come home and eat some yogurt for lunch...I think you know what I'm talking about here: mood.

from O Lucky Man! (Wea International)


Portland, Oregon  performed by Loretta Lynn featuring Jack White  2004
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

Incredible. Loretta Lynn's incredible and powerful voice carries over the fuzzy distortion and wailing guitars in a song that is sexy, mysterious and gorgeous. Jack White once again proves his brilliance as a guitarist, while his vocals sound perfect when put up against Loretta's. An amazing duet.

from Van Lear Rose (Interscope)



previsao do tempo  performed by Marcos Valle  1973
Recommended by klatu [profile]

I arbitrarily chose the title track, as this is a very flowing album that needs to be listened to in one piece. Very experimental use of Brazilian sounds. It seems like Garra is the popular Valle of the period, but I give the edge on this one and Vento Sul. His other masterpiece is "Samba '68", with the best of his early compositions arranged and produced into their perfect forms by Deodato.

from Previsao Do Tempo, available on CD


Private Dancer  performed by Tina Turner  1984
Recommended by countofbluecars [profile]

This sultry ballad from 1984 is the perfect showcase for Tina's great voice. A nice chill out song and good soundtrack for a romantic evening.




Pushing The Car  performed by Krzysztof Komeda  1966
Recommended by bobbyspacetroup [profile]

The main theme of Cul-De-Sac. Komeda's off-kilter jazz sensibility was really perfectly suited to Polanski's absurdist comedy. Like many of the best film scores, it seems absolutely essential to the film. If you like Komeda's style, this track really delivers.

from Cul-De-Sac
available on CD - The Complete Recordings Of Krzysztof Komeda, Vol. 13 (Polonia)



Quando o carnaval chegar  performed by Quarteto em Cy  1972
Recommended by delicado [profile]

The opening track on the 1972 album 'Quarteto em Cy,' this is an interpretation of a Chico Buarque song, written for the film of the same name by Cac Diegues. I find this recording very affecting. It helps that the spectrum of sound is that kind of superb blend of strings, piano, bossa nova guitars, and female vocals that I find so perfect. But I think it's also just the fragile, melancholic atmosphere of the song that gets me. After the introduction, featuring a flowing string arrangement that reminds me of the work Claus Ogerman did with Jobim, the song gets going, and the mood becomes a little lighter. This album has just been reissued on CD in Brazil, and is highly recommended.

from Quarteto em Cy, available on CD




  konsu: Yes! I've been hooked on their version of "Tudo Que Voce Podia Ser" lately, from the same 72' LP. That year was great for brazillian recordings in general. Also check out Marcos Valle's "Vento Sul".
Quiet Friend  performed by Steve Roach  1984
Recommended by MoeShinola [profile]

One of the most beautiful things I've ever heard, This new age/ambient track begins with an evolving synth pad that sings like angels' longing. Gradually, a slow sequence takes over, evoking the stillness and peace of the grave. This song might be described as going to the light - and arriving there.

from Structures From Silence (Atlantic/Projekt)


Ragam / Tanam / Pallavi  performed by L. Subramaniam  1985
Recommended by magicsteven [profile]

A concert performance by Dr. L. Subramaniam on the electric violin. Mesmerising.

from En Concert (Ocora / Radio France HM 83)
available on CD - L. Subramaniam En Concert (Harmonia Mundi)


Reaching out from Here  performed by The Boo Radleys  1994
Recommended by geezer [profile]

A Band doomed by the vagueries of fashion ,too late for the Madchester boom and too early for Britpop,despite consistantly great records like this ,a melancholy ,sixties influenced piece of perfect pop,never quite breaking into glee but a memorable chorus and a fine economic restrained pop song.A band worth looking back on in small doses

from Wake Up!, available on CD


Revenge  performed by Mindless Self Indulgence  2008
Recommended by drumandspace [profile]

"Revenge" is a catchy, electro punk song on Mindless Self Indulgence's new CD "If." Besides Jimmy Urine's (the lead singer) hallmark falsetto reeling in the chorus, this song has a certain feel that takes me back to the days of "Frankenstein Girls Will Seem Strangely Sexy." Listen to the bridge the second time around ( a little after the two minute marker) and you will notice the detail of some perfect timed techno. The tune behind "This...is...my...re..venge..." is just hypnotic and I wish I could just isolate that part into a song of its own. The introduction is a little annoying but with the help of the "seek" button I have perfected fast forwarding it to the actual song and enjoying two minutes of pure bliss any industrial, jungle, or techno fan will simularily enjoy.

from IF


Rhode Island Is Famous For You  performed by Blossom Dearie  1960
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

A cute and amusing song from the 1948 musical, 'Inside USA', this song is perfect for Ms. Dearie's adorable voice. She swings thru a state-by-state list, hilighting what each state is famous for, at first on a factual basis, then going off in a whimsical frenzy with such phrases as, "Pencils, come from Pencil-vania, vests from Vest Virginia, and tents from Tent-essee, they know mink where they grow mink, in Wyomink, a camp chair in New Hampchair, that's for me!" I'm amazed that the Farelly Brothers haven't gotten this one to use in one of their films yet!

from Blossom Dearie, Soubrette, Sings Hit Broadway Songs (Verve MGV 2133)
available on CD - Blossom Dearie - Verve Jazz Masters 51 (Verve/Polygram 529906)


Rhythm  performed by The Cat Empire
Recommended by SineadW09 [profile]

A sexy, fun song. Perfect for drinking with friends, or jamming out all on your own.




Right as Rain  performed by The Minders  2001
Recommended by two-headed boy [profile]

So far the best thing I've heard all year! The Minders return, this time they invite us into their neighborhood by way of Golden Street. We still feel the quaint influence of Britain's great pop secrets, the Kinks, but we also hear another side of this band that has been long overdue, themselves. The Minders have discovered their voice only glimpsed at in earlier recordings. And 'Right As Rain' is as good as it gets. There is no avoiding the contagions found in the head-bopping performance, you will be infected with a fever you may never wish to recover from. Put plainly, you will love this song, guaranteed! The drumsticks click, the bass rolls in, the electric guitars whir, the beat throbs and then, in a moment of pure expectation, we hear Martyn's vocals like honey dripping from heaven. It is Martyn's voice that carries us through this song and we are disappointed when he pauses to breath. The longest pause comes during the backwards guitar solo, complete with screaming feedback and enriched by keyboards and bass. The refrain is just as exciting when Martyn returns to refill our ears with his perfect British accent. By golly, I wish you could hear it now.

from Golden Street (SpinArt)




  tinks: I should hope his British accent is perfect...being that he's British and all! It always amazes me when I hear praise come in for the Minders from places far & near...those cats live in my neighborhood!
  tinks: Oh, and to clarify...I love the Minders, too! What I meant was that I still think of them as a local band!
Rock Lobster  performed by The B-52’s  1979
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

The B-52's were one of several late-'70s bands for which there was no real category. With their modified surf guitar sound, their thrift-shop fashion sense, and their jokey demeanor, they certainly weren't in the rock & roll mainstream, but they exhibited none of punk's sneering rebelliousness or musical aggression, either the only anarchy that seemed to interest the B-52's was of the sartorial variety. "Rock Lobster" was the first B-52's song to catch popular attention, and it's easy to see why. The minimalist guitar lick is like a beach-bum's rendition of the James Bond theme, the one-note organ ostinato complements it perfectly, and Fred Scheider's campy sprechgesang jumps out at you immediately. Yet despite the song's self-consciously weird texture and silly lyrics about earlobes falling off and communal towel coordination, there's a thread of darkness weaving through it. Make no mistake this is not a song with hidden meaning lurking below the surface. But its surface is a little more complicated than it seems to be at first. For one thing, it's almost seven minutes long, and it does start to drag toward the end. Right when it does, you notice the mood getting darker Schneider delivers lines about "having fun" and "baking in the sun" in a hoarse croak, and the guitar starts sounding repetitive in a slightly creepy way. Suddenly you realize that the whole song has been in a minor key, and as Schneider shouts and the guitar barks out its angular riff over and over, you start to wonder if maybe there's some kind of commentary going on here. But then Kate Pierson's angelic voice comes in with a surprisingly pretty falling harmony part that can only be described as a descant, which repeats several times, gradually paring itself down to a single phrase, and abruptly the song is over. The whole song ends up being a goofy party confection with a slightly crunchy center a pretty satisfying overall flavor combination.
(AMG)

from The B-52's, available on CD


Rocket Number Nine Take Off For The Planet Venus  performed by Sun Ra and His Arkestra  1960
Recommended by executiveslacks [profile]

I've been listening to Sun Ra a lot lately and am mesmerized by this song. As far as I'm concerned, it's the perfect blend of jazz and avant-garde. Throw in a space theme (what else?) and you have a classic.

from Easy Listening for Intergalactic Travel, available on CD


Romeo’s Tune  performed by Steve Forbert  1979
Recommended by fost\'r [profile]

I think this one was recorded in '79...It was released late that year and peaked (at least in the US) in 1980.

Strikes a perfect balance between simplicity (Forbert's a singer-songwriter type) and complexity (there are several sections mixed and matched). Probably my favorite of the 1980s.

You've likely heard this song if you were listening to Pop music in 1980; it also received Adult Contemporary and Rock airplay. It has a beautify piano introduction which is repeated throughout. The intro piano gives way to a piaon-acoustic guitar-bass-drumkit backing to Forbert's vocals; later embellishments include backing singers, organ, and electric guitar.

Anyone heard this one?

from Jackrabbit Slim (?)


Round & Round  performed by New Order  1989
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

"Technique" is widely regarded as New Orders best album and i surely second that opinion: No fillers, all killers and the balance between "live" sounding songs and balearic, synthesized songs is just perfect. "Round & Round" falls in the latter category: Energetic, multi-layered, sequenced synth stuff going on, with some guitar by Sumner and, for me most importantly probably, Peter Hook's distinctive, emotional bass sound. I guess it's Hook's hooks i dig the most in the New Order soundscape, always delivering a consistency in their sound over many musical changes during the years. It's unmatched for me how that man evokes such emotions and melody out of a bass guitar.

from Technique, available on CD




  kohl: yes. awesome song.
Satan is in my Ass  performed by Evil Superstars  1996
Recommended by eurotrashkit [profile]

this song, made by the zappa-esque belgian band, the evil superstars, is more zappa-esque then zappa would ever get.

it feels like a huge record store collapsing and, in the process, blending all kinds of style elements in a composition of pure pop-mayhem. the song sums up a dozen of genres at supersonic rate (such as death metal, rock, crooning and even jazz) but never falls apart.
the music is perfect, played by talented musicians who try to sound like it's their first time handling a guitar or drum kit.
but, the one thing that makes this whole thing sound like it does are the vocals and absurd (or cheezy?) lyrics by the lead singer mauro pawlowski, for example:
"HE IS SOMEKIND OF A BAD GUY BUT WHEN HE READS THE PAPERS NOWADAYS HE HAS TO HOLD BACK THE KEROSINE IN HIS EYES SOMEWHERE IN A FORTRESS HE HIDES HIS MISTRESS I'M TALKING 'BOUT A PLANKTON EATING ROBOTCOW IN A CARDBOARD DRESS"----need i say more?
if you want to hear free jazz going pop, then check out this one!
nice introduction link: http://www.deadbeattown.com/bands/superstars.htm

from Love is okay, available on CD


Serenade For Missy  performed by The Residents  1982
Recommended by Tangento [profile]

This is my first recommendation, so I will go easy on all of you. The following description is from my website. (it is the only way to do the song justice):

This can only be compared to something like "Retro-60's Upside-down Elevator Muzak".
(although it certainly draws from 20's/ 30's Big Band escapism)
The thing is, if this actually were playing in an elevator, the people there would certainly perform an odd ritual of alternately:
a. Merrily tapping their foot, and then
b. Looking up at the speaker, frowning and befuddled.
This is a song, which back in my partying days, we would use as a soundtrack for the following activity:
We would put our tiny baby Alligator Lizard, Festus
(who was an inch long, head to tail, and smaller around than a pencil)
...we would put him on this cheap little multi-colored fiber-optic "fountain" and put the clear cube back over it.
We would then watch as this "fountain" would very slowly spin around, Festus aboard, with this completely absurd (but oddly beautiful) music playing.
This produced near-catastrophic laughter because he would be looking up at you with this little tiny frown, as if to say;
"what the hell is wrong with you people?"
To this day, I cannot properly answer that question.
R.I.P., Festus.

Additional info:
The sax is not my favorite instrument, but it is perfectly utilized here. It wavers between slightly obnoxious and smooth as silk.
What really make the track sweet, however are the unique guitar stylings of Snakefinger.

from The Tunes of Two Cities, available on CD


shortboard city  performed by The T yde  2003
Recommended by norfy [profile]

i love this band-sure they have ripped of the almighty 'felt' but what the hell-this track chugs and grooves along like loaded era-'velvets',the aforementioned 'felt', 'television' and a thousand perfect pop songs-the rest of the album is a killer and i urge you to purchase this immediately-features the godlike ric menck on drums and i beleive thay share members with'beechwood sparks'-a reason for being-a reason to keep believing.

from Twice, available on CD


Simply Thrilled Honey  performed by Orange Juice  1981
Recommended by LawrenceM [profile]

one of a clutch of four almost perfect pop songs released by Scots indie outfit on the Postcard Records label in the early 80s. They went on to be slicker, and mostly remembered for their 1985 hit "Rip It Up". But this is them at their best.

from non-LP single (Postcard Recordings Of Scotland)
available on CD - The Heather's On Fire (Postcard Recordings Of Scotland)



Skin Trade  performed by Duran Duran  1986
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Beneath the avant-garde lyrics and futuristic synth textures, there was always a pulsing dance music quality that drove the classic Duran Duran sound. As they progressed into the late '80s, they allowed that dance element to move up front and dominate their style. A good example of this tactic is "Skin Trade," a hit whose silky and funky style led to it being mistaken for a Prince song. The lyrics have a surprisingly direct, soul-searching feel to them as they lay out scenarios of people shortchanging their dreams to make money. These moments are followed with the dramatic proclamation that makes up the chorus: "Will someone please explain/The reasons for this strange behavior?/In exploitation's name/We must be working for the skin trade." The music lends contrast to the angry tone of the lyrics by creating a sultry, mellow melody that juxtaposes verses with a soft, hypnotic ebb and flow with an ever-ascending chorus that revs up the song's inherent drama. Duran Duran's recording is fuelled by funky but gently layered guitar textures and subtle drum work that push its groove along, plus some atmospheric synth textures on the chorus. Interestingly, Simon LeBon uses his normal tenor voice for the choruses but sings much of the verses in a lush, soulful falsetto that led many pop fans to initially mistake "Skin Trade" for a Prince ballad. The result was a perfect blend of slow-dance textures and adult social critique. It didn't do as well as "Notorious," just barely making the Top 40 in the U.S., but it got plenty of radio airplay and is fondly remembered by the group's fans as one of Duran Duran's most mature achievements of the late '80s.
(AMG)

from Notorious, available on CD


Smoke Rings  performed by Les Paul and Mary Ford  1952
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I've been in love with this tune since I heard the superb instrumental version of it on 1990's 'Wild at Heart' soundtrack. I'm a big fan of Les Paul and Mary Ford's records - the combination of immaculate multitracked guitars and spooky, clear vocals is a real winner for me. I only found out about this recording quite recently. It really is stunning. It's slow, plodding along while Les's intricate but very cool guitar lines twinkle around over the top. This song makes me feel very nostalgic, although I'm not sure exactly what for. The lyrics really add something to the atmosphere - 'tell me where do they go/those smoke rings that blow each night'. Anyway, please ignore my inadequate description and listen to this exquisite, perfect recording.

from Bye Bye Blues (Capitol)
available on CD - Bye Bye Blues/Les & Mary (COLLECTABLES)



Snake Hill  performed by Conor Oberst and The Mystic Valley Band
Recommended by DearPrudence [profile]

Weird song. Great Song. Taylor Hollingsworth sings this one and its the perfect closure to the great album that is Outer South. It's sad and slow and yet it is able to make you smile and sing along.




Some of your lovin'  performed by Dusty Springfield  1965
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This song is a little more....soulful.. than lots of the stuff I listen to. I find it utterly charming though. Dusty was a goddess, and singing this lovely, simple Goffin/King song she completely slays me. It's a slow arrangement in which Dusty is accompanied by piano, light, gospel-style backing vocals and unobtrusive strings. There's nothing complex or especially clever here; just beautifully executed and perfectly distilled pop.

from the single Some of your lovin'
available on CD - Silver Collection (Philips)




  Mike: Nice pun on "slays" and "executed" there.
  Swinging London: Dusty said that this was the only song she sang that she actually took home after recording it and played it over & over.
something like you  performed by michael head  1997
Recommended by scouser [profile]

beautiful song from a beautiful album,to say this song is perfect is an understatement.only someone without a heart could fail to be moved by this.

from magical world of the strands
available on CD - the magical world of the strands (megaphone music)



  modadelic: you.re totally right about michael head. i've always thought the first pale fountains album 'pacific st.' was an excellent summer record that lasts all year and still sounds wonderfull 20 years down the road.
Son of a Preacher Man  performed by Joan Osbourne
Recommended by xicanti [profile]

Generally, I don't much like other peoples' versions of Dusty Springfield songs, but Joan Osbourne really makes this one work. She's got the perfect voice for it. I could listen to this on repeat for days without getting tired of it.

from Joan Osbourne: Early Recordings


Sore  performed by Buck 65  2003
Recommended by trivia [profile]

Although Buck's "ragged old man" routine can be charming, it usually comes off feeling more like a Tom Waits rip-off than a Tom Waits homage. "Sore" is my favorite track on "Talkin' Honky Blues" because it does away with the overly-cute oddball beat poetry that Buck often indugles in and offers a more sincere and unaffected portrayal of the wayfaring nomad / poor white trucker.

Buck's in a one horse town with a broken down pick-up, left to set up shop in a shoddy motel and reflect on his life. The lyrics are country gold all rapped up pretty: "I'm drawn to familiar environments and dangers / I look in my photo albums and all I see is strangers / What is my problem?"

I'm a sucker for good desolation-hop (unfortunately for me, there isn't much out there), and "Sore" fits the bill perfectly.

from Talkin' Honky Blues, available on CD



Sosta Vietata  performed by Ennio Morricone  1975
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Thanks are due to bobbyspacetroup for bringing my attention to this track. I foolishly thought I must have heard all the brilliant Morricone in existence. I was wrong. This is an incredibly perfect track, slightly reminiscent of the track 'Jet Society' by the Cordara Orchestra. It has lush strings, and a melody that is typical of Morricone - simple, obvious even, but very effective, with great instrumentation (in this case, harpsichord and later brass).

from Il Poliziotto Della Brigata Criminale
available on CD - Belmondo Morricone Verneuil (Playtime)




  eftimihn: After listening to a fairly large amount of Morricone music over the years this still stands out as one of his very best tracks for me. Oddly enough, this one never got compiled for one of the countless compilations that cover his "lounge" sound of the late 60s to the mid 70s. This should have been on "Molte Mondo Morricone", one of only a few essential tracks that were overlooked on this otherwise excellent trilogy.
  nighteye: I agree with you, this is a incredible track! The slow lush strings are perfect. I can't say I have heard much of Morricone's music, but if the rest is anything like this - he is going right in my list of favorite composers.
  eftimihn: Nighteye, you should definitely give the Mondo-Trilogy a spin. Can't really praise these comps enough, they actually got me into Morricone and are by far the best ones when it comes to sum up the maestros non-spaghetti late 60s to mid 70s work.
  nighteye: Yeah, thanks eftimihn I think I have to look at those compilations.
Spanish Grease  performed by Willie Bobo  1965
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Although it's simple and rather well known, I never seem to tire of hearing this track. The blend of percussion, vocals and instrumentation is so delicious that people always stop to listen when I put it on. It's also a perfect distillation of what I think Latin Jazz should be - the horns, percussion and vocals are relentless and full of energy, but always tasteful.

from Spanish Grease (Verve V 8631)
available on CD - Uno, Dos, Tres/Spanish Grease (Verve)



Spin, Spin, Spin  performed by Terry Callier  1964
Recommended by trivia [profile]

"Spin, Spin, Spin" is a graceful and romantic folk song which Callier sings with a smirk - almost as if he's in on a secret joke. His guitar phrasing is pitch perfect and his voice is both rich and subtle. HP Lovecraft covered this tune as a string-heavy psych-lite track on "HP Lovecraft II," but I prefer this original rendition's low-key and unpretentious acoustic charm.

from New Folk Sound of Terry Callier (Prestige)


Spirit Compass  performed by The Kennedys  1995
Recommended by Harch [profile]

This is the closing song on Pete and Maura Kennedy's debut album, "River of Fallen Stars".

Its shimmering guitars, hypnotic rhythm and delicate vocals are the perfect close to a truly fine album.

They have performed it at my requset at three of their shows which I have seen, and they play it better each time!

from River of Fallen Stars, available on CD


Spring Affair  performed by Donna Summer  1976
Recommended by lilly747 [profile]

The perfect slice of disco...everything is right, the wild bassline, pounding beat, streaking violins and the re-requisit amount of donna 'ahh's' and 'ohhs'....what more can you ask you!

from Four Seasons of Love, available on CD


Starsign  performed by Teenage Fanclub  1991
Recommended by MoeShinola [profile]

This song helped turn me on to Alt-Rock. There was a homemade-looking video that MTV aired a few times. It was kinda grainy and unfocused, which suited this song well as it sounds like it's coming from far away. Still rocking, though. There are moments of shimmery clean guitar that compliment the grunge perfectly. The intro is also shimmery & cool. It takes it's time washing over you before the drums come in. A classic. This whole album is a classic. Only one misfire on it, Bandwagonesque was Spin Magazines record of the year for 1991, eclipsing Nevermind and a host of others in that magical year.

from Bandwagonesque (Geffen)


Steal Yo Sixes  performed by Avocado Baby  1997
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Back in the mid 90's, my booty was real far into the UK underground indie scene. For a short time, I was buying virtually all the 45's from a small coterie of labels and, of course, making sure I kept the inserts intact.

The Slampt Underground Organisation were, for a time, the UK's most uncompromisingly independent label. Their hearts were in the right place and their principles tight - against 'selling out', and for 'making music in your bedroom'. There was a real affinity with the riot grrrl / Olympia scene in the US, and Slampt had a way of looking at things not unlike Calvin Johnson and K records.

Avocado Baby were Pete and Rachel, the founders and organisers of Slampt. They released a handful of tapes and 45s on their own and other tiny record labels.

Steal Yo Sixes is about playing ludo. It's pretty daft, and the lowest lo-fi imaginable with a toy horn, xylophone and tape hiss being the only instruments. Still, it has an undeniable childlike charm, and due to its obscurity and short length, makes perfect mix tape / CD-r fodder.

There a line, "When we play ludo, why do I always lose-o?" that gets across the feel perfectly.

from Foolish And Punk single (Beekeeper-Shakedown Bee21-Step01)



Sugababes On The Run  performed by Sugababes  2000
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Before the Sugababes became just a catalogue of "epic" ballads and stylist errors they were a phenomenally good UK pop band. Not marketing themselves as slappers or party girls, they exhibited an edginess not commonly associated with mainstream chart acts. The whole first album is a miraculous hotbed of beats and songwriting that gels so unbelievably well with the girls' image that you can believe their contribution to the process was more than just the "change a word, take a third" Spice Girls school of songwriting. Overload and Run For Cover are two of my favourite singles of the last ten years.

Equally commendable (and something else, along with member Siobhan and nice clothes, that fell by the wayside come second album time) was their attention to B sides and bonus tracks. Most had a quality that rivalled the album songs and singles - and Sugababes On The Run is even better. I can see why it wouldn't fit on the album - too novelty-ish, few people can pull off a track with their own name in it - but it works perfectly as a flitty ditty about the best teen subject: being pissed off at your parents.

Nevertheless, it does has a depth to it. In its own pop way, it's examining the precipice between youth and cynicism - does getting older always mean losing your ideals?

Probably....

The sweetness of the vocals (particularly Keisha's) and the general kid sister affection of the 'Babes mean that, however much crap they release I'll still be there every new release Monday hoping for another B-side of this quality - and getting a god-awful remix instead.

from New Year CD Single, available on CD



sunday morning  performed by margo guryan  1968
Recommended by daidai [profile]

i love this psyche sounding classic. the backing track vocals compliment one another perfectly. i love the strings in this song. a little poppy but rocking.

from take a picture



  delicado: I agree that this is quite brilliant. I've had the Spanky and our Gang version of this for a few years, and I have to admit I had assumed that they wrote it. But this version is even better! Amazingly rocking and beautiful. The rest of the album is superb as well, don't you agree? I can listen to it all day...
  tempted: Oh yes, the arrangement and the atmosphere on each and every song by Margo Guryan is so beautiful. The intimate chamber strings, flutes and Margo's voice.. a lot like Claudine Longet's. The version by Bobbie Gentry & Glen Campbell is a fine one, too.
Sunday Morning  performed by Acid House Kings  2002
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

The opening track from Acid House Kings' latest record "Mondays Are Like Tuesdays and Tuesdays Are Like Wednesdays". For me the song captures perfectly what a sunday morning should feel like : its gentle, light, clear blue sky, sun-drenched yet with a light breeze, a certain freshness. The song represents all that with a very light, transparent, mostly accoustic arrangement, enriched with some synth strings and guitar and with the charming voice of Julia Lannerheim including some nice ba-ba-ba's. The whole album is excellent and highly recommended.

from Mondays Are Like Tuesdays and Tuesdays Are Like Wednesdays, available on CD



Sunken City  performed by Les Baxter  1961
Recommended by nighteye [profile]

This is one of Baxters best songs, although there are many incredible Les Baxter pieces, this one really stands out from the rest. The title 'Sunken City' is perfect, you really feel like you are floating in the bright blue ocean, searching for a lost city. The instruments Baxter chose for this song are interesting; oboes, a haunting choir along with some vibraphones and piano chords, the result is however amazing.
Listen to this song late at night with the lights dimmed.

from Jewels of the Sea (Capitol)
available on CD - Exotic Moods of Les Baxter



Sunny  performed by Oscar Peterson  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A great take on the pop classic “sunny” - taken at a fast tempo with a bouncy piano style and a hip beat. A really great track, produced by Claus Ogerman, who really was one of the coolest arrangers; perfect for me anyway - able to perfect both lush and beat oriented 'now sound' type stuff.

from Motions and Emotions (MPS 21207137)
available on CD - Snowflakes (Motor)




  konsu: A really cool record. Also with a nice version of "Ode To Billy Joe" and Jobim's "Wave".
Sunshine Among Us  performed by Eternity’s Children  1968
Recommended by masayo [profile]

Ahh, how much I love Eternity's Children's sounds...
A week ago, I bought their CD where 25 songs in, as my bootleg's mix was terrible and no main vocal on Lifetime Day! Anyway, now I enjoy its perfect tracks, especially Lifetime Day, Your World and this song Sunshine Among Us. I do love Sunshine..'s catchy melody, beautifully thick effected harmonies and groovy backing rythm section including keyboards.
By the way, the liner notes says " However, each year, on the day before Thanksgiving, Bruce Blackman leads members of various Eternity's Children lineups at a benefit in Greenville, Mississippi featuring reunions of the area's best-loved acts" wow...this year also?!?!...I really wanna join the event!!

from Eternity's Children (Tower)



  luna: Bruce Blackman comes to The Krakerjacks Annual re-union. He is an invited guest, it is an event every nite-b4-thanksgiving that we;The Krackerjacks, have a big throw down in own,and Bruce's hometown. Charlie Ross is our Bassist; nothing what-so-ever to do with the children or Starbuck.We're all seasoned musicians, and have been together since 1981.
  luna: PS Now that I'm fully awake,let me state that Bruce is a very good friend of ours,as we've all been around him, or played in groups with him since the 60's. He is a musical genius. He is also a very talented writer. The best keyboard player I've ever known. The Biloxi days seem like a dream now, man, we had some fun! Just wanted to clear that up! We all love ya, Bruce.
  493440: Bruce: I don't know who you are Luna but I appreciate the nice comments. By the way, that crap in the Eternity's Children liner notes about me leading you guys in G'ville is totally bogus. I have no idea where that came from at all, certainly not from me. The whole Biloxi/Children thing is a vague memory to me as well. And by the way, the Krackerjacks kick ass!
  luna: You know me, Bruce; I'll tell you when I see you again. You've always amzed me, and I admired you from a distance. I was the one yall left behind when The Omen started at the Fiesta. See ya soon!
  cks6: Does anyone know where I can buy a copy of the Krackerjack's CD entitled "Rockin in the Delta"? Please email me at [email protected] if you have any information. Thanks!
  Andelyn: Hi everyone. Had to jump in here. I spent many of my 'growing up' years in Greenville, MS. My brother, Allen Graves, was a member of the Lancers mentioned here. I recognize a lot of the names surfacing in the posts here.
  eyazoo: Looking for a Krackerjack CD...any one would do. I love them and would especially like to get one with that "green grass" song. I grew up in Yazoo county and my step-dad actually played with them for a while....so I had a CD, but it has disappeared (I think someone took it). Anyway, It would be great if the Krackerjacks could post something on their myspace page about purchasing CDs.
Sunshower  performed by Dr. Buzzard’s Original Savannah Band  1976
Recommended by ambassador [profile]

This one fits well with with my previous reccomendation in the melancholy/eerie vein. I read somewhere that the song was in the African JuJu style, but discofied of course given its 1976 production. It was this song that proved to be the Dr. Buzzard . . . was not your average disco band. Cory Daye's vocals are beautiful and harken back to an earlier era of classic jazz vocals, like Ella and Billie. The children's backup vocals are what gives it the spooky quality, probably because the intrumentation is dark, like seeing those cute (but scary) kids come out of the corn fields in Children of the Corn. The last chorus just sends chills down my spine as Cory digs into the lyrics and dances around them as the everything sort or brightens up, like the sun coming out after a summer rain. This makes the title all make such perfect sense.

from Dr. Buzzard's Original Savannah Band, available on CD



  Festy: You know what makes the last chorus for me (or choruses from after the kids singing only accompanied by percussion)... as simple as it may sound... it's the handclaps. They add so much and I always look forward to them coming along. I became obsessed with this song about 6 months ago and bought the CD, which, as I expected, doesn't contain so many fantastic songs on it, but, still an enjoyable CD. I really enjoy your recommendations!
Supergirl  performed by Stereo Total  2003
Recommended by Superchat [profile]

A quick, fun/funny, simple little song that keeps your ears awake. Supergirl... a sweet and twisted lyrical journey about finding that perfect person.

from Monokini (Kill Rock Stars)



  olli: hey supergirl! gotta love stereo total, this is one of my favourites too.
Surfin' Bird  performed by The Trashmen  1963
Recommended by m.ace [profile]

"Pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa ooma mow mow papa oom mow ma mow..." The Trashmen's crazed co-mingling of The Rivingtons' "Papa Oom-Mow-Mow" and "The Bird's The Word" may be the most perfect rock 'n' roll song of them all. Meaningless / beyond meaning. An atomic audio monolith. Pure drive with no purpose. A divine visitation that lives outside logic.

from the single Surfin' Bird
available on CD - Tube City! The Best of The Trashmen (Sundazed)




  Goes Up To 11: A true "garage" classic! If you were in your early teens in 1963, sweating like a pig at a dance in a school gymnasium with the local cover band up on stage wailing away, this was a song you wanted to hear over and over. Even more mindless than the ultra-classic "Louie Louie" but also even more fun!
Surfs Up  performed by The Beach Boys  1966
Recommended by Ganesha [profile]

Possibly the most beautiful and complex pop song ever written. This is the apex of Brians foray into modular music. Loved by Bernstein and McCartney. This song will take you years to sink in. Perfect. I have heard some amazing versions he has done of this equally as powerful.

from Surfs Up


Suspended From Class  performed by Camera Obscura  2004
Recommended by autopilot [profile]

Do you like soft rock? Belle & Sebastien? 60's pop?

If you answered yes to the above, this song (and the whole album) is a must listen. Twee vocals, cheeky lyrics, delicate harmonies and the occasional trumpet solo fill out a song about a schoolgirl crush gone wrong.

Quite simply a perfect song for lying in a grassy field watching the sun set.

from Underachievers Please Try Harder, available on CD


Take Your Time (Coming Home)  performed by fun.  2009
Recommended by discosinner [profile]

The final song in the album Aim and Ignite couldn't be more perfect. It is the perfectly orchestrated song on an album that transcends musical genres. Vocalist Nate Ruess (of The Format fame) shows that he may be one of the best songwriters of his generation and indeed all time. What else can I say, this song and album is beautiful and should be listened to by everyone.

from Aim & Ignite, available on CD


The Ballad of Mary Magdalen  performed by Cry Cry Cry  1998
Recommended by indigobo [profile]

This clever little gem was written by folk singer/songwriter Richard Shindell and originally appears on his 1994 Shanachie release, Blue Divide, as "The Ballad of Mary Magdalene." A perfect example of Shindell's non-confessional, often ironic, storytelling, it recounts the ill-fated love affair between the title character and JC: "Jesus loves me, this I know/ why on earth, did I ever let him go?/ He was always faithful, he was always kind/ but he walked off with this heart of mine." On this version, Shindell is joined by fellow folkies Dar Williams (lead vocal) and Lucy Kaplansky (harmony). In 1998 A.D., the three artists became incarnate as Cry Cry Cry for one album, which, if you like three-part harmony, is almost a religious experience. A good example, too, of what Shindell can do with a Martin acoustic.

from Cry Cry Cry (Razor and Tie)



The day the earth stood still  performed by David Essex  1969
Recommended by Ron1967-1970 [profile]

THE perfect popsong ? Not sure, but it comes close to it. The tune has that typical late 60s "sound". Bombastically orchestrated in the "Barry Ryan style"... it's a melodrama with lots of
catchy hooks... IF you can find it, you will love it ... I usually rate a song not higher than
8/10, but this one... well, what can I say... 11/10 !!!




The Day You Take One, You Have to Take the Other  performed by The Marvelettes  1967
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Classic uptempo Motown girl sound! Fits the Berry Gordy formula so perfectly that it should have been a huge hit. Features a terrific bubbling bassline and mesmerizing finger snaps!

from The Marvelettes (Tamla)




  scrubbles: Ooooh, I dig this song - gotta love those Smokey Robinson lyrics! "A little bad comes along with every good/You've got to take the bitter with the sweet."
  Swinging London: Reminds me of 'Don't Mess With Bill'. Quite an old fashioned sound for 1967...The Marvelettes didn't seem to really keep up with the times. Good though.
the end of the world  performed by skeeter davis  1963
Recommended by olli [profile]

the perfect teen heartbreak country ballad. the arrangement on this just BLOWS me away. check out the dissonant strings and the gentle steel guitar! not to mention skeeters vocals.. she never sounded better in my opinion, it just comes across as so goddamn heartfelt. marvel at the heavy, deadpan spoken word section at the end!
A desert island break-up song if there ever was one:)

Why does my heart go on beating
Why do these eyes of mine cry
Don't they know it's the end of the world
It ended when you said goodbye

from the end of the world (rca)



  jeanette: Skeeter sadly died earlier this month. This is a gorgeous song, also brilliantly done by brit-chick Twinkle who I've enthused about elsewhere on these pages. I also love Skeeter's poppier moments, in particular the superlative I Can't Stay Mad At You.
  olli: twinkle covered this? ooh, can't wait to hear it, i totally dig "golden lights"!
The Face I Love  performed by Chris Montez  1968
Recommended by heinmukk [profile]

nice one! i discovered chris montez lately and i like what he has done.
this song is a cover of astrud gilbertos song from the album "beach samba" (which i didn't recognize until reading it at allmusic.com) and begins with a nice organ-melody as an intro. i especially like the sound of that organ, it's a very sweet and not to heavy one. so that it fits perfect into the mood of this song and giving it a little more sweetness.
as always chris montez sings like a woman and if one doesn't know this it wouldn't be necessarily clear to one. (correct english....?)
while searching for chris montez stuff i came across "the more i see you" performed by montez which was covered last year by a onehitwonderband here in germany and you couldn't escape to hear it at least twice a day no matter where you were leaving and going. the cover was very strict arranged along montez' version. i wonder how i would think of the montez original if this onehitwonder band wouldn't have done this cruelty?!
anyway, last years summer was great anyway...(sex every day...)
and now, you go and listen to that montez guy!!

from watch what happens
available on CD - Digitally Remastered Best


The Girl I Lost in the Rain  performed by The Walker Brothers  1965
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This is total genius. Perfectly formed dramatic faux classical mid sixties pop. Scott does a solo vocal.


available on CD - Everything Under the Sun (Universal)



The Luckiest  performed by Ben Folds  2001
Recommended by genebean [profile]

This song is one of the best songs I have ever heard...actually the whole album is great! Its Ben and his keys and a background orchestra in this song. Anyways, I believe the song is about how he knows he is the luckiest because he knows how perfect him and his wife belong together.

from Rockin' the Suburbs (Epic)


The Scientist  performed by Coldplay  2002
Recommended by cryofthecelt [profile]

I've been a huge fan of the UK-based "wuss-rock" band Coldplay since their debut album "Parachutes." One night, as I was watching a much-anticipated episode of my favorite TV show, "Smallville" - an episode called "Rosetta" guest-starring Christopher Reeve - I heart the heart-rendering chords of lead singer Christ Martin's piano and thought aloud "Hey, that's Coldplay!" I hadn't yet heard that song, so I surfed onto a "Smallville" fansite to check the title and found that it was called "The Scientist" from Coldplay's most recent album "A Rush of Blood to the Head."
"The Scientist" is a song that will remind you of being in love - more likely, of being in love with someone who doesn't love you back or with someone whom you pissed off and doesn't want to be around you anymore. It's basically the most perfect song about unrequieted love. It is beautiful and haunting, as many of Coldplay's songs are. Give it a listen. You won't regret it.

from A Rush of Blood to the Head, available on CD


The Shadow Of Your Smile (live)  performed by Blossom Dearie  1966
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Another great performance by the woman I am in constant awe of. The great people at Fontana saw fit to record one of her live shows at the legendary London jazz club, Ronnie Scott's and it's truly a great thing because Blossom is in perfect form and truly pours her heart and soul into her set. The audience sits in reverant silence during this track and witnesses the great Ms. Dearie's intimate recital of this great song right up until the last word is sung and they can no longer contain their need to applaud and cheer. Much to my dismay, this is just about the only recording that is currently available from her years with Fontana in the UK, and the others remain hard to find if not completely out of reach.

from Blossom Time At Ronnie Scott's, available on CD


The smell of incense  performed by West Coast Pop Art Experimental band  1967
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

I love the WCPAEB, they really seem to encapsulate Psychedelia perfectly. Light, blurred and dreamy. And unlike many of their contemporaries seem completely untouched by Garage authenticity. Not that theres anything wrong with garage punk per se, but it means that theres none of blundering of 'talk about girls' to fray those tinted moods.

Oh, it has loud guitars and harmonies right enough, but the whole thing is pitched just right to lift the dregs of any mood enhancers you may have floating around in your bloodstream and send them spinning into your brain.

from Volume 2, available on CD




  john_l: I hadn't realized it was a WCPAEB original. I've only heard the version by Southwest FOB, which was pleasant enough.
the spider and the fly  performed by London After Midnight
Recommended by silent_wretch [profile]

"Eternal bliss, something I can show you. Spread your arms and let my wings enfold you my love, my love"

Ah! perfectly dark romance...


available on CD - Selected Scenes From The End Of The World


The Streets Of Your Town  performed by The Go-Betweens  1988
Recommended by LawrenceM [profile]

the perfect song for driving in your car on a hot summer's afternoon,

from 16 Lover's Lane, available on CD



  eftimihn: I can absolutely confirm that, since i played it various times on the occasion described above. Ivy recently did a very sweet version of the tune on their last album "Guestroom".
The wind blows her hair  performed by The Seeds  1967
Recommended by Mirko [profile]

One of my all time favourites.This is garage psychedelia at its best.It has a haunted manor feeling with the organ sound (Darryl)which is just hypnotising.The lyrics are also perfect.One of those mistery songs which were blasters but did not make it for some reason.

from Web of Sound



  stupidwall: i like mr farmer alot better
  olli: can't seem to make you mine is pretty good, too.
The World Spins Madly On  performed by The Weepies
Recommended by Starr [profile]

A good listen. The band is overall pretty neat. They are very mellow, and perfect for bonfires on the beach, post-party hanging out music, etc.

from Say I Am You


Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye  performed by The Casinos  1967
Recommended by Aguirre [profile]

Doo-Wop one hit wonder that charted in '67. Perfect for slow-dancing.

from Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye (Fraternity)


theo b  performed by sunny day real estate  1995
Recommended by complacentbasement [profile]

the song starts out with three crisp hi-hat clicks, the bell of a ride, then the drums and a sweet, warm toned bass lock in for a driving, mid-tempo, beautifully melodic cut time. guitars, once in, are clean-toned and somewhat polyphonically arranged, (that is, they play alot of single-note lines that swirl around each other, harmonizing at spots, and creating counterpoint). the vocals are potentially a little hard to swallow at first, jeremy has a tendency to sing a little through the nose, but it's really quite endearing. i personally find that after a bit of exposure to it, not only does it fit the music perfectly, but i really have grown to love it, (i listen to them ALOT).
this is one of those songs that you put on when you need to feel better- a kind of resolute, "well, time to go on, and hope for the best" feel. it can also easily be listened to when in a great mood. best listened to outside, looking at the sky.
when listening to ANY sunny day real estate, you must be patient. it's patient music, and it requires a certain amount of consideration that keeps it from being good "background music."
i fucking love this stuff.

from lp2 (the pink album) (sub pop sp316b)


There She Goes  performed by The La's  1988
Recommended by LawrenceM [profile]

2:42 of pop perfection ... the chiming guitar sounds like something Roger McGuinn could have come up with. However, the skiffle beat and Liverpool drawl make this sound like a song from the docks, not the sunshine state.

from The La's, available on CD


There She Goes  performed by The Las  1990
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

The most perfect pop single ever from a band that only ever had the one perfect song off of the one perfect album.

from The Las (Go!)


Therell be another spring  performed by Monica Zetterlund  1960
Recommended by Mike [profile]

A superb version. A very purely beautiful, very expressively controlled vocal. A perfectly stylish trio backing. The rest of the album also holds to a very high standard indeed - a real pleasure. I've never enjoyed vocal jazz more!

from The Lost Tapes at Bell Sound Studios NYC, available on CD


Thru Spray Colored Glasses  performed by Dino Desi and Billy  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A heavenly pop vocal track, one of the last tracks ever recorded by Dino, Desi and Billy. The production (by Stu Phillips, who did the Hollyridge Strings and some cool soundtracks) is dreamy and soft, perfectly matching the idealized lyrics (the world seems so wonderful...etc).

from Follow Me (soundtrack) (Universal City UNI73056)
available on CD - The Mad Mad World of Soundtracks (Motor music)




  yugo: Ooh!I love this LP.Besides,I've just finished to upload it into iPod. I love "Thru Spray Colored Glasses",too. But the tune I love best in this LP is "Just Lookin' For Someone". What do you think,mate?
  nighteye: I believe that both 'The Gentle People' and 'Handsomeboy Technique' has sampled this track?
  masayo: Since I know the Match version, I have been eager to listen to the original one. Thank you Delicado, finally I could listen to a piece of it!
Tiao brao forte  performed by Marcos Valle  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A sophisticated and understated pop bossa. This song can breeze by the first time you hear it, but the unexpected hooks and chord changes make for addictive listening. There are strings, a gentle and high male vocal and a rhythmic piano. It really is heavenly. I should add that the CD compilation this appears on, 'the essential...volume 2', is really one of the very best single-artist compilations I've ever heard. The liner notes are not perfect though - this song is erroneously listed as 'Tiao branco forte'. Great compilation though, one which showed me that Marcos really is a genius.

from Viola Enluarada (Odeon)
available on CD - The Essential Marcos Valle, Vol 2 (Mr Bongo)



To Cry You a Song  performed by Jethro Tull  1970
Recommended by kouros [profile]

There's a great dynamics in this piece of prog-rock as it combines sharp and interesting melodies with great but simple soundscape. There's a lot of air in the record an Martin Barre's guitarplaying sounds easy on top of heavy riffing duet of bass and drums .Ian Anderson's vocals are just perfect for this song. I would not change a thing here.

from Benefit


Too Young  performed by Phoenix  2000
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

To me this is one of the best pop songs of the last 10 years or so where just everything falls perfectly into place and couldn't be bettered in any way. It's insanely catchy without ever getting annoying, it's immaculately produced with the whole instrumentation blending together perfectly (including extremely lush synths all over the place provided by Daft Punks Thomas Bangalter) and it doesn't wear off even after listening to it for ages. I was glad to see this track finally getting some exposure on the "Lost In Translation" soundtrack recently. If only they would write more songs of that caliber, but instead both albums they released to date are rather patchy.

from United, available on CD



Tracy  performed by Mogwai  1997
Recommended by Genza [profile]

Like all perfect Mogwai's tracks, Tracy is quiet and then loud. However, the track is particularly spine-tingling. Mogwai use sustained reverb guitar and xylaphone to stunning effect. The taped argument between the band, that is added to the fade out of the song, is also cool.

from Mogwai Young Team (Chemikal Underground CHEM018CD)



  delicado: I still think 'helicon played at 45 instead of 33' is their best track! Funny - hearing it at the wrong speed and really liking it kind of ruined it for me...
Trampoline  performed by The Greenberry Woods  1994
Recommended by Yammer [profile]

Any label searching for the perfect pop cover to resurrect from the forgotten early-90s (as with "There She Goes") would do well to give several listens to this equally bustling-yet-melodic paean to the bittersweet tang of youthful somethingorothers. Jangling electric guitars, singalong choruses (it doesn't get any easier than "come and see/trampoline"), mumbling, presumably insightful scatting over the reprise, layered harmonies, and a throwback yowling guitar solo. Merely sneering, "I already have one Oasis album," does not excuse you from the obligation to hear and love this song!!!

from Rapple Dapple (Sire)
available on CD - Powertopia! Power Pop Classics of the '90s (Rhino)



  luvs23: Sugar by Stretch Princess IS VERY VERY VERRRRRY similar to There She Goes by the La's. A similar high-pitch vocal with an addictive hit chorus: "Sugar Sugar sticking me to my babe Sugar Sugar sticking me to my babe Sticking up to my babe sticking up to my babe sticking up to my babe" Beautifully sung, I can't stop listening to it.
Two Wings Mambo  performed by Gallon Drunk  1991
Recommended by phil [profile]

I've recently decided to sell all my records, on the grounds that they are a bit 20th Century. So I went through them to see if there was anything worth replacing; and in general, the answer was no: I had several hundred records, and they were all rubbish.

However

I DID discover 2 records by Gallon Drunk which were absolutely fantastic - I can't believe that I haven't listened to them for so long. Both this album and the follow up (From the Heart of Town) are really good, very exciting and dynamic records. I picked Two Wings Mambo but almost any song of these
would do - Just One More, Jake on the Make, Arlington Road etc, they're all grrrrrrrrrrreat.

TWM has this huge introduction, beginning with the trademark super-cheap maracas sound, before all kicking in with the mambo beat. It has the sort of quiet verse/ loud chorus deal perfected by Nick Cave over the years only with a slightly funkier beat than Nick normally has. James Johnston eventually joined the Bad Seeds of course.

His singing definitely got better over the years - if I have sold this to you, I recommend that you start with From the heart of town.

from You, the night... and the music, available on CD


Unchanging Window  performed by Broadcast  2000
Recommended by tempted [profile]

Broadcast are the perfect retro-futuristic band. They make space age pop like no one else today. Haunting Moogs, fuzzy, reverb-laden guitars and tight bass and drums. Trish Keenan's voice sounds like an understatement with its simple, effortless tone. For lovers of Morricone, United States Of America and Stereolab.

from Noise Made By People, available on CD



Underwater Chase  performed by Al Caiola  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I had forgotten quite how brilliant this track is until it strangely popped into my head yesterday. It was originally available on Al's superb 'Sounds for Spies and Private Eyes' album, as well as volume 2 of the 'Music to Read James Bond By' series on United Artists records. It's very obviously James Bond rip-off music, but it's so perfectly executed, with cool percussive brass and Al's reverb-laden guitar nicely complemented by a swinging organ, that you can't help but love it.

from Sounds for Spies and Private Eyes (United Artists UAS 6435)
available on CD - Ultra Lounge - Cocktail Capers (Capitol)



Underwater Love   performed by Smoke City  1997
Recommended by geezer [profile]

Possibly the most peculiar song to ever hit the top 5,surreal in the extreme but oh ,so beautiful,like a little piece of music from every corner of the globe distilled through a trip hop filter,it has the funk foundations of acid jazz ,the majesty of the samba and the exotic mystery of Asia .Part spoken,oddly sung and complimented by an incessant tropical ambience thats hard to pin down.A real pearl from an oyster as suggested by the songs sublime watery brilliance .Initially used to sell L--I jeans ,a perfect example of why beauty and commerce should neve