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You searched for ‘hard’, which matched 272 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
"estoril à noite"  performed by the durutti column
Recommended by kohl [profile]

this is excellent. i've never been a fan of purely instrumental tracks, but this is just too perfect. sets a great mood. almost makes you feel as if you were alone on the beach at night. melancholic, sad, almost cold. the music has a brittle, yet lingering quality which is hard to achieve and yet it is here. so, so good.




"hotel room"  performed by richard hawley  2005
Recommended by kohl [profile]

his voice is almost gloomy, but in a striking and haunting way. it does fit the mood of the song--it sounds earnest and intense without being too singer-songwriter-y.


available on CD - coles corner


(I Cant Get No) Satisfaction  performed by Otis Redding  1965
Recommended by antarctica [profile]

Much like Aretha Franklin did with his 'Respect', Otis Redding took this song and made it his own. The Stones' driving guitar becomes funky, pulsating horns. When Redding breaks it down at the end with his signature improvisational style there's no turning back. This track'll leave you going, "Mick who? The Rolling whats?"





(Want You) Back In My Life Again  performed by The Carpenters  1981
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

One of the last Carpenters singles from their final studio album. I find this sweet 'n perky song strangely compelling, since it shows Richard and Karen Carpenter awkwardly trying to adjust their wholesome image to an early '80s synth pop template. Karen's voice is so processed and overdubbed that she blends in seamlessly with the synth-heavy backup -- still, the effect isn't cheezy but full and lucious. Knowing that Karen was slowly dying during this time makes this tune odder still.

from Made In America, available on CD (A&M)


1000 Times  performed by Tahiti 80  2002
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

A perfect piece of contemporary pop music: uplifting and sunshiny, yet with the right dose of melancholia. The production is excellent, as well as the instrumentation with a very driving rhythm section, warm electric piano, guitars and horns. What makes this really stand out is the terrific string arrangement by Richard Hewson (A protegee of George Martin and quite busy arranging during the 70s) which is very floating, sweeping and lush.

from Wallpaper For The Soul, available on CD (Minty Fresh)




  texjernigan: Ooh yeah
2002 - A Hit Song  performed by The Free Design  1969
Recommended by rum [profile]

Despite '2002 - A Hit Song's insistent chorus of "it's gonna be a hit, hit, hit!", by the end you're not convinced, "it's not gonna be a hit is it Free Designers?" "No I'm afraid not Rum. To be honest it hasn't a hope in hell. Oh yeah we're bitter, of course we are, but, you know, when you're in the idiom of soft rock you can't get away with angst, you've got to maintain this 'pleasing' faade, so that's why we sound so jolly, so 'up' on this song. But yeah, it's hard..." Yes, they may, as they sing, have "sealed it with a kiss" but the cracks show. And it's that that makes this song particularly memorable. It's fascinating to see the rips in their Peter Pan wonderland, a place where they usually spend their time flying kites, blowing bubbles, befriending dolphins. And so this palpable excitement you hear in their heady harmonies is not fuelled by a surefire optimism of success but by an almost delirious desperation, "hit, hit, hit, sure to be a hit, hit, hit, gonna make a hit, hit, hit" they sing, panting, shaking nervously, craving that big fix. The track is a flip-side to the Byrds' 'So You Wanna Be A Rock'N'Roll Star'. Both are bitter recipes for pop success but whereas the Byrds are pissed off that any talentless buffoon can follow their recipe to success get a hit, the Free Design are pissed that "We did all this last time, and it did not work!". I guess you have to suffer for your art, and maybe the Free Design were having too happy a time. Or maybe their hair didn't swing right or their pants weren't tight.

from Heaven/Earth, available on CD (Project 3)



  olli: heh..brilliant commentary.
  konsu: Wow. I never thought of that song as such an exploded schematic. But it does shed light on their own self awareness even if unintentional at the time.
A Hard Day’s Night  performed by Goldie Hawn  1998
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

A perfect straight-forward jazzy take on the Beatles' classic. Goldie is in peak performance and reminds me of Michelle Pfeiffer in 'Fabulous Baker Boys' on this song.

from George Martin - In My Life, available on CD (MCA/Universal)


a hard rain’s a-gonna fall  performed by jason mraz
Recommended by luvyaxoxo523 [profile]




Africa  performed by Shelly Manne  1968
Recommended by bobbyspacetroup [profile]

For those who like Mike Simpson's "Jungle Odyssey," Nino Nardini and Roger Roger's "Jungle Obsession," and Henry Mancini's "Hatari," I would recommend Manne's entire "Daktari" LP. Prime late '60s Exotica Africana.

from Daktari (Atlantic SD 8157)



Afro - Harping  performed by Dorothy Ashby  196?
Recommended by Arthur [profile]

Cool in the Xxtreme !
Sixties dance jazz funk instumental from harpist Dorothy. Complete with organs, flutes and bongos it is driving classy joyful music .

The album also contains the awesome "Action Line " which is weirdly atmospheric and deeply strange

from Afro - Harping ( CADET LPS809)


All Men Play On Ten  performed by Manowar  1985
Recommended by rum [profile]

There is something magic about a song like All Men Play On Ten in this post-Spinal Tap Metal world. Such an earnest rock anthem, in such an irony saturated market Youve got to have respect for Manowar. Is it a mark of defiance or of ignorance and stupidity? Hard to tell. Maybe both. But then this song is essentially about doing things their own way, and not listening to anybody. So who cares anyway? Well, its worth listening to Eric Adams for 4 minutes at least. He has a message for us all. Hes no puritanical, know-it-all, hes a reformed character preaching a rocknroll gospel. Believe it or not brothers, he too has fallen. There was a time when he did it for the money, yes thats right, he sold his soul to the loud music-hating devil. And the devil said hmmm Mr Adams, for your money I have some things I need you to do for me, adjustments as it were. Eric said, well okay, what do you suggest? The devil demanded that he turn down his amps, why be proud, dont play so loud, be like us and get a sound thats real THIN. OK, I reckon I could do that, just a bit, said Eric, a little put out. But the demands didnt end there, Eric was pinched and plucked for his silver dollar, wear a polyester suit, act happy, look cute, get a haircut and buy small gear. And inevitably it all got too much. Erics no pigeon weaver, and he got real mad, and he turned to the devil and said, HOLD IT, RIGHT THERE! And good for him. For this is a great track. Very catchy.

from Sign Of The Hammer



  frmars: Tried your recommandation. Very poor music. Erased it.
  rum: hmmm... such a painfully earnest rock comment, in such an irony saturated market. I think you may have missed the point somewhat. Lighten up kid, and broaden your scope.
Allora Il Treno  performed by Bruno Nicolai  1975
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

This track is simply outstanding, a showcase for Nicolai as well as for Edda Dell'Orso. It's insane how this is put together: funky rhythm section with drums, bass and acoustic guitar, loads of brass throughout, reverb-laden plucked strings interchange with sweeping, floating strings and an incredible vocal performance by Edda Dell'Orso. Hard to describe how magically this is woven together...

from Allora Il Treno
available on CD - Esay Tempo Vol.10 (Easy Tempo)



Always You (Single Version)  performed by The Sundowners  1968
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

To me this is certainly a pinnacle of pure late 60s sunshine pop. Composed by pop genius Roger Nichols the timeless, idealistic lyrics were written by Tony Asher (who wrote most of the lyrics with Brian Wilson on Pet Sounds) not by his regular partner Paul Williams. Sunshine pop hardly gets any sunnier than on this track: great production, strings galore, Beach Boys-esque vocal harmonies, great bassline & trumpet and catchy as hell with it's uplifting chord progressions throughout. While the album version (recently included on the highly recommended "The Get Easy! Sunshine Pop Collection") is good already, the single version is just crisper, lusher, just perfect.

from Captain Nemo (Decca)
available on CD - The Get Easy! Sunshine Pop Collection (Universal)




  delicado: I have to agree. What a beautiful track! Very similar to the Small Circle of Friends record, but perhaps even better! I just have the version from the compilation; I'll try and track down the single.
  eftimihn: Delicado, you have the single version already, it's the one on my Roger Nichols compilation, i just somehow forgot to mark it as the single version. The single is clocking in at 2:18, the album version runs 3 minutes.
  delicado: Cool; I'll listen again. This track is sure to make it onto one of my comps; surely it could make a soft pop fan out of anyone!
  tinks: great album, and a horrendously overlooked group..."dear undecided" is the best beatles song that the beatles never recorded.
  Major Minor: I agree this is the best version... I think it's the same one that's on the "Sunshine days" compilation.... The one on Captain Nemo isn't awful or anything, but the orchestral intro does go on a bit...
American Jesus  performed by Bad Religion  1993
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

The lyrics to this song, even though they were written years ago still hold up today. Nothing has changed, which is kind of sad. This song hits you hard with it's political message with very little subtlety, but it doesn't need it because the message is so strong and so frustrated. Bad Religion's best work.

from Recipe For Hate (Epitaph)



Any Girl Can Make Me Smile  performed by ANT  2002
Recommended by kkkerplunkkk [profile]

A beautiful, soft, sad, fragile piece about a couple breaking up and bursting into tears as they do. Incredible for its intimate feel and sparse instrumentation (voice, organ, harmonica, egg shaker) chilling lyrics 'you close your eyes but there's no paradise, you count the cost of all we've lost and all we've wasted'. It hits the nail bang on the head! Love it to bits.

from A Long Way To Blow A Kiss, available on CD (Fortune and Glory)


Art is Hard  performed by Cursive
Recommended by DearPrudence [profile]

Great use of the Cello and Tim Kasher doing what he knows best : writing a classy emo song that wont ever end up on Hot Topic.
It's a great song and a powerful one. Probably the best Cursive has ever made.




Art to Zebras  performed by Sy Richardson  1977
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

If you had one of the premium movie channels in the 1980's, you may have happened across a late-night showing of the Softcore-Porn-Musical film "Cinderella". While several of the musical numbers are quite good and rather amusing, the best song (imho) is "Art to Zebras", performed by 'Fairy Godmother' (a stereotypical crossdressing gay black man). This song is basically a list of all of the items he has stolen from the townspeople... and being that the film was made in 1977, yes, it is a disco number. Definitely a relic of it's time but nonetheless a great number from one of the films I keep in my Guilty Pleasure Chest.




As tears go by  performed by Nancy Sinatra  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This song is an interesting case study into the question of 'why do I like this version of the song more than any other'. I have a half-baked theory that for me, I mostly just like the first version of any great song I hear, regardless of whether or not it is the original or 'best' version. But this track is so different to the Rolling Stones's version that I think it would probably divide people pretty clearly. Produced by Lee Hazlewood/Billy Strange, 'as tears go by' is here recast as a crisp pop bossa nova. They even change the chords slightly (adding a new chord as she sings 'by'). To me, this makes the song vastly superior to the original (or any other I've heard). But I'm not sure anyone has ever agreed with me yet on that one...

from Boots, available on CD (Reprise)




  tinks: i had to go back and listen to this album after you mentioned it...and it is an incredible version, i really love that soft bossa sound that it's got going on. the rest of the lp is great, too!
  FlyingDutchman1971: i was lucky enough to find a vg++ copy of this LP at Goodwill several years back and this is definitely the best track on the album!! A great interpretation of the song!!
  n-jeff: I love this version, theres a cello or something under the introduction that adds a lovely melancholy feel. Quite a sophisticated sounding track. well removed from the bludgeoning innuendo I associate (and love) with Nancy and Lee. I had one of the few run-ins over musical policy with my old promoter over this track, he thought it far too downbeat.
  RCA76: I love this version of this song, infact I didn't know for a long time that this is a Rolling Stone's tune, but again because it's a version that is so original it really is incredible. Quite popular in Latin America (not so much w/ the Stone's version).
As You Are  performed by Travis  1999
Recommended by Mike [profile]

Hardly the first successful song to take its musical inspiration from a Beatles number. I would choose to listen to it over "Across the Universe" almost every time.

from The Man Who, available on CD


Ask Yourself Why  performed by Michel LeGrand  1969
Recommended by konsu [profile]

A really nice cinema-pop gem from the team that brought us The Windmills of your Mind. Sung by Sally Stevens, one of Hollywoods great voices. Such a charming little song. It's one of those things you instantly play again after the first time you hear it. It's more or less a song about freedom, with lyrics that still sound fresh today:"...Bullets fly like popcorn on the screen, recommended wholesome nice & clean, making love's the thing that can't be seen... Why?"

Found it on this sort of cash-in LP for LeGrand's UA soundtrack work from 1970. Originally from the soundtrack for "La Piscine", which is harder than hell to find on it's own. The LP is awsome for fans of LeGrand for it has 3 tunes from "The Thomas Crown Affair" , "La Piscine" , "The Young Girls Of Rochefort" & the jazz theme from "Play Dirty".

from The Windmills of your Mind (United Artists UAS 6715)


At Once You Fall In Love  performed by Birgit Lystager  1970
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

Birgit Lystager is incredible, a Danish cross between Astrud Gilberto and Karen Carpenter with really artily written and composed pop songs. It's hard to choose just one tune from this magnificent and scarce album, but I'm often unable to get that "Eyes and hair and legs, oh what a sight/She's a flash of light in darkest night...." chorus out of my head for days at a time. To the above two chanteuses I might also add a dash of Joni Mitchell because of the conversational lyrics and melodic savoir-faire (maybe I should also mention Francoise Hardy right about here as well!). The arrangement is lush and expansive with more than a hint of Bacharach (whose "Another Night" is covered spectacularly on the same album). All this is already more than enough, but lovely Birgit also opted to go the extra mile and pose stark naked on the gatefold LP cover, tastefully exhibiting her considerable assets. (Heh heh, he said "assets.") In any event, this song, and the album it comes from, would be completely brilliant no matter what she looked like. Extremely hard to find, but WELL worth the search. I recommend Soulseek.....

from Ready To Meet You (Artist)



  criz: Yes, we are talking about a real rare album, worth searching for. Filled with unexpected chords and abosutely anti-typical for that era of Danish popular-music, or should I state it: Compromise-lessness. Compared to Bacharach's music, I myself find the pieces on this album more sophisticated - not saying that Bacharach finds the "easy way out!" "I'm Waiting For A Bus", the opening tune of the album is truly my favourite. May I also recommand the Birgit-album "Love's Labyrinth", also worth a search. Here you will find Elton John's break-through "Your Song" in a version of international class, among other fine pieces. Arrangements made in the same style as Ready To Meet You. And yes, also with a nice-looking picture on the cover. Go look for it - but not in my house!
  tempted: You guys share my thoughts on this 100%. A friend of mine from Stockholm made me a copy of Ready To Meet You just at the doorstep of summer '01. That summer I barely spent a day without enjoying that record. I'd been a passionate fan of 60's soft pop and psych (and Bacharach) but had never heard anything like Birgit Lystager. The adventurousness of the compositions and the colour of Birgit's voice are what sets this record totally apart from other stuff from that era. It's great that you guys have found this, too!
  tempted: ...but please guys, if you have until know somehow managed not to get a glimpse of the cover of Ready To Meet You then don't. It will shatter every pretty thought that you may have about the chanteuse. It's totally rude. But this is just my opinion...!
  criz: Latest news...In Denmark a 7-CD-set has just arrived, with 76 Birgit Lystager-tunes, including the two English albums - and very fair priced. Have a look at www.lystamusic.com - and be guided to the places to buy it on the internet (link-page). Just a recommendation from one who knows!
Baila Chibiquiban  performed by Nico Gomez and His Afro Percussion Inc.  197?
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A very catchy and percussive hard funk track by Nico Gomez. Electric guitars, a chanting vocal chorus, and an enormous beat. It's wild and relentless and utterly seductive.

from Nico Gomez and His Afro Percussion Inc (Omega)



baked a cake  performed by Mick Thomas and the sure thing  2001
Recommended by phil [profile]

This chap Mick Thomas is extremely sentimental, and if you want to get into him, you have to expect to have your heart strings tugged pretty regular. However, if your make up is unashamedly sentimental as mine is, you can really get into this very plain, open and beautiful style of singing.

This one is one of Mick's best - I haven't quite worked out the genders on it (some people think he is singing as a woman in this one) but he certainly takes the place of a rather downtrodden, unconfident person. The chorus is very delicately judged:
I'd have baked a cake
if I knew you were coming
but now that you're here
it's time we did some talking
who'm I trying to kid?
I knew you'd be coming around


The backing is slow, but expressive hawaiian guitars subordinated to the lyrics. Mick's voice itself is incredibly expressive - he's a big old chap, and his voice has a lot of power but also it seems to have the sound of experience behind it. He also has a brilliant range -I've tried to sing this many a time and it's very hard.

from Dust on my shoes, available on CD


Balance of Nature  performed by Burt Bacharach  1973
Recommended by konsu [profile]

What a great song! Burt's a heavy hitter on these pages, as you can tell I'm sure. There is something magical when he sings, maybe it's because he seems to humble the incredible songs he writes, or that he works with the best singers to walk the earth. Here is Burt at his best, in a spare setting with a strolling rhythm and paced piano chords, almost like he's singing to you across a smoky piano bar. The song conveys a simple truth, and almost makes it seem like a gospel, that nature continues unabated despite human trials and tribulations... How true.

A hard LP to get your hands on it seems. But worth the wait!

from Living Together (A&M SP 3527)


Be My Baby  performed by Vanessa Paradis  1992
Recommended by poo [profile]


Written by Lenny Kravitz. This track is a gem. Once listened, its hard to forget the tune. Her smooth vocal suits this track well.




big trucks  performed by pedro the lion  1998
Recommended by complacentbasement [profile]

this song is written as a dialogue between father and son. and no, it's not actually about big trucks (or tonka trucks, which is too bad, because a song about tonka truks would be pretty damn sweet). the words are phenominal. any son of a father will be able to relate to this song. maybe even girls too.

from it's hard to find a friend (jade tree jt1063)


birds do it (german’ sex education movies’ songs of  performed by compilation
Recommended by modette [profile]

maravillosa recopilacin alemana que con frase irnica por ttulo nos presenta una veintena de canciones de diversa musicalidad.
en l encontramos desde el funky mas setenta a cargo de Heinz Kiessling (petra), el sonido hammond y groove del siempre increible Jack Arel (following you), la diversin ertica ms lounge de Uschi Moser (love, jet t'aime, l'amour y sunny honey) o el beat ritmico de Gerhard Heinz (look at me), junto con otros temas que recuerdan al pop, la psicodelia, etc...
en conjunto, un disco para pedir ya, con el fantastico libreto repleto de fotos de las peliculas mencionandas que tampoco tiene desperdicio.

from birds do it, available on CD


Blame It On A Monday  performed by Anita Kerr Singers  1972
Recommended by konsu [profile]

This is my favorite these days. Totally cuts into my dull recession-based lifestyle and peppers it with some yellow Nashville sunshine....

The song bounces through a hum-drum monday with the bouyant post-it note poetics of a 9 to 5 cutie... Nothing is going right today, and the song sounds like the antedote :

" ...Gotta' go to work, really gotta per-cu-late... Try to catch the fish that's jumping off your
dish-or-plate...." To "Don't ask for help... from anybody... cause they'll only turn you down-ooo...
na-na-na-na-na, ooooooooooh na-na-na-na-na, Blame it on a mondaaaaayy..... YEAH! ....

The session smokes and the players are astounding! Huge southern brass-blasts counterpoint the bouncing hoe-down groove... It must have been a hoot to play because the track clocks in at over four minutes, but you hardly notice for all the fun....Funky in a very music-city way. Almost Nancy & Lee like, with a little Free Design-like harmonic optimisim in the vocal arrangements, which Anita's well known for.

I recommend the whole record though.It plays straight through, and you play it again & again. A lost gem.

from Grow To Know Me (AMPEX A-10136)



Blue Glasses  performed by Smokey & Miho  2002
Recommended by aquila49 [profile]

Put some SPF-40 on your ears before listening to this unadultered mix of bossa-pop sunshine from the duo of Miho Hatori (Cibo Matto) and Beck session man Smokey Hormel.

An infectious guitar joined by percussion and horn slinks around and through Miho's precise, breathless vocal.

Four plus minutes of aural ecstasy. (You have to work awful hard to make something sound so easy.)

from Smokey & Miho (Afros Sambas 001)



Blues for Hari  performed by Emil Richards
Recommended by human-cannonball [profile]

A very tasty and rather 'European-sounding' cover of the 1967's psyche-jazz Tom Scott's original from the well-known session percussionist-vibraphonist Emil Richards. Although it comes in a compilation of Emil's best late 60s latin-jazz recordings (interestingly, not a single horn instrument is used in the whole set!), this is an energetic percussive jazz-rock piece, with great vibraphone and bells(!) solos.


available on CD - Luntana (Afro-Cuban Jazz) (Soundsational (Italy))



  konsu: Kudos for rep'n mister Richards! I love this track! This is from the awsome "New Time Element" LP he did for UNI.The whole record is conceptual versions of contemporary pop tunes done in wild time signatures. Check out his take on "Take 5", he does it in 4/4 time! He also does "Georgy Girl" in 5/4 & "Happy Together" in 15/8 time!Also check out Emil Richard's Journey To Bliss LP... MAD STUFF!!!
Blues for Hari  performed by Dave Mackay & Vicky Hamilton  1969
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Groovy! groovy! This is one of the better versions of Tom Scott's indo-jazz swinger, and has been compiled a lot over the years. It has this great buzzy sitar played by Bill Plummer, and some sweet flute by Ira Schulman, who's presence on the album just sets the whole thing off! Dave Mackay's the blind pianist behind a lot of great west coast jazz like Don Ellis & Emil Richards, and his touch is just effortless. The two harmonize on the best tracks, like this one, sounding an awful lot like Jackie & Roy at times! Also, Vicky does a great Gismonti-inspired piece called "Moon Rider" and there's a version of Mackay's moody "Here" that's just sublime. A winner all the way, and must for J&R fans for sure.

from Dave Mackay & Vicky Hamilton (Impulse! AS 9184)


Bouncing Babies  performed by The Teardrop Explodes  1980
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Teardrop Explodes second single, "Bouncing Babies", was released in July 1979, following the departure of organist Paul Simpson and the arrival of his replacement Gerald Quinn. With those changes, the group's sound, too, would alter dramatically, as Quinn took the band into the crypt-like depths of proto-Goth; in true Phantom of the Opera style, his organ haunts the grooves, while Gary Dwyer pounds his drums like a man whos just discovered he's been buried alive, and Michael Finkler reenacts the Texas Chainsaw Massacre with his buzzsaw guitar.

Ecstatic reviews greeted the single, but its lifespan was short before long, Bouncing Babies was so hard to find that the Freshies came close to scoring a hit simply by bemoaning that difficulty their &"I Can't Get (Bouncing Babies by the Teardrop xplodes)" itself ranks alongside its namesake among the most memorable of the age.
(AMG)

from Kilimanjaro, available on CD


Break Fool  performed by Rah Digga  2000
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

The first lady of the Flipmode Squad. Amazing. Her voice is deep and rasping, tough and hard. She doesn't fall into the traps set for so many other female MCs - "looking pretty in the video", to quote another of her songs - or coming across uber-sexed, or singing any bloody ballads.

She rhymes with precision and with more than a dash of humour. Sounds as fresh as it did 4 years ago, and makes me frustrated for that long overdue second album.

from Dirty Harriet, available on CD



Breaking The Law  performed by Judas Priest  1980
Recommended by brooksyinc [profile]

A great metal song, which, fittingly, is a great song to "Break The Law" too. Not that I'm saying you should :)

from British Steel


Brooklyn Go Hard - feat. Santigold  performed by JAY-Z
Recommended by DeathandHarmony [profile]




Burn the Witch  performed by Queens of the Stone Age  2006
Recommended by Combustion [profile]

Hard rock with a hint of blues, this song features ZZ Top guitarist and vocalist Billy Gibbons. I think the song's brilliant and definitely would recommend it to anyone who enjoys rock.

from Lullabies to Paralyze (Universal Music Group)


By the time I get to Phoenix  performed by Dorothy Ashby  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

The idea of a funky jazz harp rendition of this classic Jim Webb song is probably cheesy to some people, but trust me, this one works brilliantly. The opening shimmers delightfully with fender rhodes piano, strings, and a huge breakbeat. Dorothy's harp then takes over, and we move into a nice pop/funk/jazz take on the song. The relentless beat is pretty funny when you compare this version to others (e.g. the Glen Campbell hit version, also Nick Cave's classic stripped down version from 'Kicking against the pricks'), but it is really very charming, happy stuff. A similar funk/pop hybrid occurs on her version of 'Windmills of your mind' - highly recommended.

from Dorothy's Harp (Cadet)



California Waiting  performed by Kings of Leon  2003
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

This song grabs you and doesn't let go. Catchy, melodic and flowing... It's very hard not to listen to this song without bobbing your head along with it. The slurred southern drawl of the lead singer, and the sparkly melody really put you in a specific place and time. A very cool track, and one that's perfect for drinking to.

from Youth and Young Manhood (RCA)


Call Me Irresponsible  performed by Bobby Darin  1964
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Bobby Darin - truly one of the smoothest singers the US has ever produced, and there's nothing that showcases this pop-cabaret style like his tenure at Capitol. A singer of great versatility, he swings effortlesly on this album, having great technique and even greater rhythmic feel.

Call Me Irresponsible, something of a standard really, is my favourite. Darin's vocals make you fall in love with his irresponsible, unreliable, unpredictable charm. Accompanied by finger clickin' good Richard Wess big-band sounds. Wow. Whatta man.

from From Hello Dolly To Goodbye Charlie (Capitol T2194)
available on CD - Oh! Look At Me Now / From Hello Dolly To Goodbye Charlie (Capitol)



Can’t Help Loving That Man  performed by Trudy Richards  1957
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

I originally came across this recording on the soundtrack to the film 'the Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert' and I have been thanking my lucky stars since! Taken from the rare and out of print LP 'Crazy In Love' (which you should purchase on sight if you ever come across it!) Ms. Richards throws a good swing into this exquisite torch song and brings down the house with the help of Billy May and his orchestra! I am forever indebted to the person or persons who compiled the 'Priscilla' soundtrack and led me to this great song and the original LP from which it was taken!

from Crazy In Love! (Capital T 838 (British pressing))
available on CD - the Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert - Soundtrack (Mother/Island)


Can't wait too long  performed by The Beach Boys  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A superb, achingly beautiful song which, to my knowledge, never appeared on a Beach Boys album, and was merely a studio outtake. The track opens with an incredible dense wall of harmonized vocals, and emotive lyrics ("I miss you darlin, I miss you so hard"). Later, the rhythm changes, and it becomes (to my taste) slightly cheesily rocky, but not so much as to ruin the song, which still rates as one of the Beach Boys' finest.


available on CD - Smiley Smile/Wild Honey (EMI/Capitol)




  catfish: also check the different version on the box set. fantastic tune, and recorded after smile was shelved - proof that brian's genius endure a sea of troubles...
Carousels  performed by mewithoutyou  2004
Recommended by Adamdiss [profile]

It's hard to find a song that captures emotion like this one and if there is one, it's probably another mewithoutyou song.

from Catch For Us The Foxes (Tooth and Nail)


Catolé  performed by Orquestra Jean Kelson  1965
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This is a jazzy, haunting track from an LP I bought in Brazil last year. I've tried hard to find information about Jean Kelson, but the only mention I've found (other than those I've made myself) is in one of Ed Motta's excellent archived radio shows at his official site (http://www2.uol.com.br/edmotta/sala.htm). Ed plays a different track from this album, Munganga.

Catolé sounds musically like a variation of Baden Powell's classic 'Berimbau', and opens with an incredibly catchy refrain featuring piano, percussion and trumpet. Gentle male voices then come in and flesh out the melody. The entire album is great. I wonder what the chances are of it coming out on CD...

from Berimbau e Bigorrilho (Copacabana CLPS 21012)



Cavaleiro Andante  performed by Abilio Manoel  1970
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

This song is simply unreal. It starts out in a kind of 4/4 samba groove with a highly prominent cuica and a funky strummed acoustic guitar chord progression before the super-catchy pizzicato-violins riff comes in, and Abilio's mellow voice singing the melody. It's sunshiney and catchy, with a bit of a haunting aftertaste, very Brazilian. I can never hear this song enough times!! Abilio Manoel is a Sao Paulo-based singer-songwriter from the late-60s-70s (still active) who wrote a few moderate hits without attaining even a Marcos Valle level of popularity. Good for Marcos, since Abilio's work would have caused me a few sleepless nights if I were him. And both on the same label, too! Abilio's stuff is hard to find, but very worth the effort.....I've already given Dusty Groove the heads-up about the CD....

from Pena Verde (Odeon)
available on CD - 20 Sucessos (EMI Brazil)




  delicado: sounds great; I look forward to checking it out!
Champagne And Caviar  performed by Elegant Taste  1975
Recommended by DJJimmyBee [profile]

Lush, with strings, mid 70's sweet soul group ballad...Lyrically about the proverbial lunch box/hard hat guy on the job singin' 'bout the love he's gonna bring home to his gyrrrrl

from only on 45



Chanson D'O  performed by Francoise Hardy  1971
Recommended by delicado [profile]

You might be familiar with Francoise's incredible 1971 album La Question, a track from which was recommended by another user almost four years ago (Oui, je dis adieu). I managed to get a friend to copy the album for me at the time, and I recall being very taken by 'Viens', the first song. I put this track on a compilation but somehow never really savoured the album as a whole.

Recently I found I could get the album on CD, so picked it up (along with another interesting Francoise album, 'If you listen').

The difference for me now I have the CD is vast, and I'm now able to appreciate the album in all its glory. The clincher for me is the blend of percussive Brazilian guitar, beautiful strings, and the Melody Nelson-style sparseness of the arrangements.

I chose this track to recommend because of the bizarre extra dimension brought by the fact that Francoise is just scatting - there are no words - and the intermittent moments of complete silence, which are surprising and really hold the attention. Parts of the chord sequence remind me of Henry Mancini (in particular, a track called 'Softly' from the Mr Lucky soundtrack), while the overall effect of the sexy echoey vocal naturally brings to mind Ennio Morricone's work with Edda Dell'Orso.

from La Question, available on CD




  ambassador: this album's a favorite of mine, too. I also really like her album "Soliel" of a couple years earlier. The interesting thing about this album is that the Brazilian female guitarist Tuca (just one name) backed her on this as she did on Nara Leao's gorgeous tribute to Bossa Nova (recorded in France), "Dez Anos Depois." If you listen to these albums side by side you can clearly here the similarities, not to say they sound identical. And doesn't Fracoise look stunning on the b&w album cover?
Chapel Hill  performed by Sonic Youth  199?
Recommended by barrygriffin [profile]

Genre: Grunge/Hard Rock/Art Rock

Recommended for anyone interested in getting into Sonic Youth.

from Dirty (Geffen)
available on CD - Yes (Geffen)


Coastin  performed by Cities Aviv  2010
Recommended by geezer [profile]

Hard hittin philosophical rap and sublime orchestral sample combine with crisp machine beats .The track exists for its languid summer chant of "Coastin,Im Coastin".Its beauty is in its amazing choice of lyrics and music which you can chose to drop in and out of at random with equally rewarding results .

from Digital low, available on CD


Cola Bottle Baby  performed by Edwin Birdsong  1979
Recommended by olli [profile]

Great weirdofunk song, it demonstrates best aspects of the sound of the seventies turning into the eighties. The insanely catchy bloop-twang bassline was sampled by Daft Punk for HarderBetterFasterStronger, but this is a gem in its own right. Five minutes and ten seconds go by amazingly fast when i'm listening to this baby.


available on CD - sampled vol 3


Cold Water  performed by Tom Waits  1999
Recommended by StAgGeR [profile]

This is a great song to listen to on days when nothing seems to be going right. In my case: when driving my blind sister around in a delapidated taxi, with broken windows, and a gas meter on empty. The best line in my opinion is: "Blind or crippled, Sharp or dull. I'm reading the Bible by a 40 watt bulb. What price freedom. Dirt is my rug.
Well I sleep like a baby with the snakes and the bugs". I love this track! Keith Richards played lead guitar and sings backing vox on this one. Their voices/styles mesh together very well. It's one of the more bluesy tracks on the record, but it's done very well...not like a lame neo-white boy blues revival thing. It's actually believable...after all, IT'S TOM WAITS FOR CHRIST SAKE! I think this is one of the more powerful songs on the record. Well...maybe a toss-up between this one and "Chocolate Jesus"...or "Hold on"...or "Get Behind the Mule" (you can't beat the lyric: "Punctuated birds on the power line. In a Studebaker with the Birdie Joe Joaks. I'm diggin all the way to China with a silver spoon, while the hangman fumbles with the noose..."). Hell...it's just a damn good record.

from Mule Variations (Epitaph Records)
available on CD - yes (yes)


Come Live with Me  performed by Dorothy Ashby  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An exquisite and much-sampled version of this nice tune from the Valley of the Dolls soundtrack. The slow, funky beat is simply one of the sweetest you will ever hear, and the harp melody is ethereal and beautiful.

from Afro-Harping, available on CD



Come Rain or Come Shine  performed by Judy Garland  1963
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

For those of you out there who are still perplexed by the cult of Judy, may I suggest hardily this amazing DVD? Culled from her now legendary CBS TV series in the early 1960s, this collection features a selection of solo performances, and Come Rain or Come Shine sums up things here perfectly. It is a frenzied, riveting, almost frightening reading of the song. Nick Cave or Polly Harvey wish they were this intense or perhaps (wisely) they dont. Judy at this point is a woman ravaged by both her life - alcohol, pills, suicide attempts, catastrophic illness and innumerable career failures and comebacks - and to a certain extent her own astonishing, almost vampryric talent. To see this frail little creature she was in her early 40s, but looks about 60 totter onto this empty stage and become possessed by a song - her voice soaring, her talent surging through her like high voltage electricity - is almost too much to watch. But one has to watch her even if only to see whether see she spontaneously combusts during the performance. (And those old time Judy-queens still amongst us God bless them swear this footage only hints at what it was like to see her live.) Must be seen/heard to be believed.

from The Judy Garland Show: Just Judy DVD (Pioneer Artists PA-11577)


Comme  performed by Francoise Hardy  1966
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

Dreamy. One of my favorite F. Hardy songs, if only because I can easily imagine her singing it while strolling through a meadow of sunflowers, breezes gently blowing her hair. Ahem. The light arrangement with subtle strings and harp accompanyment is gorgeous.


available on CD - The Vogue Years (Camdem/BMG)



Concerto For A Rainy Day  performed by Electric Light Orchestra  1977
Recommended by petethefeet [profile]

Turn the lights down, turn the volume up and just LISTEN!! Whatever mood you're in, this will enhance it. The strings are just brilliant. I've listened to this track AT LEAST once a week for 25 years and will never tire of it. The whole concept of ELO captured my imagination from theearly 70s, and although they got a bit commercialised over the years, who didn't? Some say they copied The Beatles, isn't that the sincerest form of flattery? Other bands copied ELO (Cheap trick, Huey Lewis & The News,etc.). I defy any music lover to not like this!

from Out Of The Blue, available on CD



  audioadventures: Out of the Blue - one of my favourite albums of all time. From Summer and Lightening to Big Wheels, Concerto for a Rainy Day is just class. ELO must be the most sampled band at the moment. Maybe they are now cool!
  coercri: I wholeheartedly agree. The Concerto for a Rainy Day is abolutely the best. Even my 14 year old daughter loves it!!! ELO has been an exceptional group over the years. I only regret not seeing them in concert.
Crazy Dreams  performed by Paul Brady  1983
Recommended by Stian______ [profile]

Singer\songwriter Paul Brady deals with Folk music . This song is in my opinion up to the level of Bob Dylan \Neil Young . Its melancholic but still up-beat .I like the lyrics a lot : " Tonight were gonna paint this town, were gonna drink champagne till we both fall down ,we'll find some other crazy dream -tomorrow" . Its hard to explain ,but the song moves me very much, the song is pretentious in some ways , but Bradys simple(but not dull) singing makes it not sum up as such.

from Hard Station, available on CD


crystal lullaby  performed by Carpenters  1972
Recommended by klatu [profile]

When my sister and I were small, this album was the one we listened to most commonly for naps, after a lunch of something like chili, fritos and "green" kool aid. It's the most solid album the Carpenters ever did by some distance, and Richard actually wrote two of the best songs, "goodbye to love" and this one. It blends well into the follow-up, "road ode". Other standouts include the title track by Leon Russell, "it's going to take some time" by Carole King, and "i won't last a day without you", another golden Carpenters interpretation of Roger Nichols/Paul Williams. I would love to hear this song performed by Astronaut Wife. See "konsu" for that link...

from A Song For You, available on CD


Cmon And Join Us  performed by Alzo & Udine  1969
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

Folk? Soul? Pop? Rock? I don't know, I just know I REALLY like it. The sole album by this mysterious duo (Alzo's got a solo album too) is the very definition of groovy. This song, like the rest of the record, is hard to describe, but let's just imagine a funkier version of the 60s Bee Gees crossed with, I don't know, Donovan? No, maybe the Rascals crossed with Jose Feliciano and Joe Bataan is closer to it. It totally works, especially when they get to the falsetto chorus of "Everybody feel iiiiit......come on and clap your hands!" People, find this record: it will improve your life!

from C'mon And Join Us!, available on CD



  delicado: It totally works; thanks for bringing it to my attention!
Daley’s Gone  performed by Steve Goodman  1977
Recommended by schlick [profile]

Stirring, honest, down-to-earth tribute to the late Chicago mayor, Richard Daley Sr.

from Say it in Private, available on CD


Danger! She’s a Stranger  performed by The Five Stairsteps  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I fell in love with this song this evening. At this point it's hard to find many words to describe it; I'm just dazzled by how wonderful it is. It's a mournful and spooky-sounding soul song, opening with some percussion, and then some harmonized background vocals, drums, brass and piano. I guess the kicker for me are the shimmering strings in the arrangement, which come in with the main vocal. The vocals are fraught with emotion, and there is a very interesting use of vocal sounds as the song fades out.

Being a Five Stairsteps novice, I'd like to know if they recorded many other tracks like this. I gather that the record was produced by Curtis Mayfield, but I've never heard anything by him with quite such a delectable arrangement. Any advice would be appreciated!


available on CD - The First Family of Soul (Buddah)




  Arthur: The Five Stairsteps have a history going back to the mid sixties -they recorded for Curtis Mayfields 'Windy C' label and later for George Harrison's 'Dark Horse' label Group main man Kenni Burke is still active in the music business, having co penned the much copied and sampled "Rising To The Top" and has recently (last year) visited the UK where he performed a number of PA's and recorded at least one song. I have to confess I never heard "Danger! She's a Stranger" but will make it my mission to do so!
  tinks: oh my god, this is one of my all-time favorite songs! i can't believe i never thought to put it up. i love the backing vocals..."danger! stranger!"
  delicado: You have excellent taste! For the record, I was able to find one other Five Stairsteps track that has a similar moody feel to it. It's called 'Something's Missing', and is almost like a prototype version of 'Danger...'
  bobbyspacetroup: Sampled by Outkast incidentally (check out "Two Dope Boyz In A Cadillac").
  delicado: Yeah, I read about this and checked out the Outkast song. I have to say I wasn't that impressed. I think maybe the big beat over the piano and gentle shimmering strings killed it for me a bit!
  artlongjr: Fascinating to read the comments here...I didn't know Outkast had sampled this. I remember first hearing this song when I got their first album way back in 1981, and it is my favorite tune on there. It's a classic of Chicago soul. The strings, horns and Clarence Burke Jr.'s lead vocals and the group harmonies add up to a delightfully foreboding, almost sinister mood on this number. This came out in 1966, I also have "Something's Missing", which came out on Buddah in 1967. I keep telling everybody I know that the Stairsteps are easily the equals of the Jackson Five! They also did a terrific funk-psychedelic number in 1969 on Curtom called "Madame Mary"...I can't figure out the lyrics but it may be about marijuana!
  karen: If you like "Danger She's a Stranger", you will love "You've Waited Too Long". I remember the Five Stairsteps, and they were a lot more talented than the Jackson Five (and better looking). But unfortunately they were not on a major label like Motown, but they got a lot of respect and admiration in the Black community and plenty of airplay in DC, NY, Philly, etc. "Oooh Child" was a major hit...I wonder what they are doing now and how they look.
daniella  performed by Shack  1999
Recommended by simon [profile]

a song perched on the end of Shack's half realised album'H.M.S Fable'album-a haunting folk ballad that is close to death and as beautiful as a sunny winter's morning...the melody spooks you and as the head brithers are no starngers to the perils of hard drugs it makes the song even more poignant.the Head brothers continue to remain the U.K's most underrated songwriters-sort of like the older,wiser and more sussed father's of the Coral and all those new scally psych bands that will never be anywhere as good as this...investigate!!!

from H.M.S Fable, available on CD


Dansero  performed by Richard Hayman  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

The album that this track is taken from was one of those strange albums that acquired mythical status in my mind. Based on a mixture of rumor and personal imagination (I could never actually find a copy), I convinced myself that this must be the coolest album ever made, a perfect fusion of moog, latin and mod sounds. A few years later I picked up the album very cheaply on ebay. Beautiful and interesting as it is, many of the tracks go slightly over the line for me.

'Dansero' is the only track on the LP that captures the blend that I was looking for. It's nice and short at under 3 minutes, and features a delightfully kooky introduction that sounds like the Jean-Jacques Perrey moog flourishes that the group Stereolab sampled on their 'Transient Random Noise Bursts...' album. The drums and moog then join up for a nice pop instrumental, catchy and bouncy. Different moog effects are piled on, but always quite effectively, making this one of the most enduringly successful moog-pop tracks in my collection.

from Genuine Electric Latin Love Machine (Command)



Dark On You Now  performed by The Ashes  1967
Recommended by artlongjr [profile]

This song is a classic of the psychedelic era, by a group that later became known as the Peanut Butter Conspiracy. I first discovered it years ago on a 1967 compilation album called "West Coast Love-In" which featured about four of the Ashes' songs. It was "Dark on You Now" that really wigged me out-it is an awesome, slow-paced, moody number that features the spine-tingling vocals of Sandi Robison and the prominent 12-string guitar of John Merrill. The song is incredibly atmospheric and reminds me of a combination of the Byrds and Jefferson Airplane when both of those groups were in their prime. It is also at four minutes plus quite long for the era. I listed this as being recorded in 1967 but it may have been waxed in 1966...at any rate it is surely one of the great songs of the early psychedelic era.

I have the first Peanut Butter Conspiracy album which contains a re-recorded version of this song, harder rocking and not nearly as good. The original Ashes version was recorded as a 45 for the Vault label (which also issued "West Coast Love-In").


from Spreading from the Ashes (Big Beat)
available on CD - Spreading From the Ashes (Big Beat)



  n-jeff: I'm sure I have this on one of the pebbles "Highs of the mid sixties" series ("volume 3 Hollywood a go-go" IIRC) although I believe they credit it as "Follow the sun", I'm sure. Great summer song.
  artlongjr: That is a cover version by a band called the Love Exchange..."Swallow the Sun" is a key lyric in this song, but I really don't know what it means!
Daymaker  performed by Bob  1990
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Absolutely cracking track. I was nuts for this back in 1990 when it came out and recently rediscovered it. A really nice mix of guitar driven pop, excellent Beach Boys influenced vocals and catchy, shuffling beat. Just a great track. Bob are a hard band to track down stuff by because their name is so generic. But you can listen to it (and all their releases actually) at their site - http://houseofteeth.co.uk/

from Stride up EP (House of Teeth)


Desire Lines  performed by Lush  1994
Recommended by parlop [profile]

So beautiful and quietly emotional as a lot of shoegazing is. One of their longest songs... it starts out with the wailing guitar melody that's repeated throughout and accented by Miki Berenyi's calm and melancholy vocals, but the instrumental parts are really the most prominent parts of the song. The best part is at around 3:53 when the guitars go crazy. the whole thing seems very representative of sadness and getting to that point where you just can't hold it in anymore and you start weeping hardcore. it's a good song... the only one that can make me cry over and over again.

from Split (4AD)


detroit  performed by primal scream  2002
Recommended by olli [profile]

insanely hard, pulsating fascist dance punk piece, easily the best song on primal scream`s uneven last album. features some mean distorted synthezisers, a gigantic bassline and some great, sneering vocals from Jim Reid of the jesus and mary chain. (am i the only one who has a problem with bobby gillespie`s singing voice?)i often find myself jumping around the house while listening to this.

from evil heat


Detroit 442  performed by Blondie  1977
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

In some ways an obvious pop-punk classic, but still one that's generally overlooked in favour of their singles. One of the greatest nights between my best friend and I was the time that not only did we discover this was both of our favourite Blondie song, but we found out that, rather shamefully, each of us harboured a secret crush on Rimmer from Red Dwarf.

The song is the best among some real class on Plastic Letters. The noises made by a band on the brink of the mainstream super-success they were so worthy of. Deborah Harry never sounded tougher (except perhaps on Rifle Range), a persona that fits her like the ripped catsuit she famously sported on Top Of The Pops.

from Plastic Letters, available on CD



Diabolic Scheme  performed by The Hives  2004
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

The Hives best song of their career thus far. A brilliant ballad in the middle of their most hard rocking album yet. Howlin' Pele Almqvists voice drawls menacingly over guitar and strings that play as though the earth is collapsing. An incredible and beautiful song from an otherwise hard rocking band.

from Tyrranosaurus Hives (Interscope)


Dinnertime  performed by Spiderbait  1999
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

Its 4 tracks into the CD, and after one of the fluffy pop numbers, so it quite takes you by surprise when a guitar kicks in of such rawness that it feels like small blisters are erupting over your eardrums.
In come the bass and drums, and the girly vocals (Janet presumably) with a nice sarcastic tone. The sarcasm seems to be a feature of the band.
Threres also a triffic 1980 style disco remix on the extra CD, for extra amusement. To be honest I love the whole LP, it has nice fat drums, lovely rolling bass, and they aren't afraid to use the technology, it was hard to pick one song out, but this one had the edge for Janets voice and that ruff guitar. God I love Fuzz.

Oddly the person who played the CD to me first dismissed them as just another Oz-Rock band. Nah, way off the mark.

from Grand Slam, available on CD




  n-jeff: My 4 year old daughter worked out enough of the CD player controls to play the disco remix back to back about twenty times over this weekend. Still sounds great.
Distortions  performed by Clinic
Recommended by nathanwoolls [profile]

It seems that I'm the only person to recommend Clinic (if I'm using this site properly). Anyway, Clinic are a band from Liverpool with 2 (I think) fantastic albums so far. I chose this song from their first album, Internal Wrangler, for no other reason than it's the first one that sprung to mind. Hard to describe what they sound like, but they remind me of the Velvet Underground, Beach Boys, Dick Dale. That's probably not a very good or accurate description. People in the UK might recognise another song from this album (The Second Line) from a Levi's ad a few years ago. Anyway, if you like Radiohead, Flaming Lips, Mercury Rev, Grandaddy, that kind of thing, find this album, you might like it.

from Internal Wrangle (Domino)


Dollskin  performed by Toadies
Recommended by Mikirod [profile]

Hard rock song, quite energic, but also melodic. That voice full of rage sounds great to me.





Dolphins  performed by Tim Buckley  1968
Recommended by DecemberGuy [profile]

Live cover of a Tim Hardin..I think Beth Orton & Billy Bragg have covered it as well. What can I say..the vocal on this is mindblowing. I'd heard Tim Buckley's son Jeff Buckley before..and you can tell that he learned a lot from his old man..this song has been floating through my head now for a couple of days..like some kind of wierd somnambulent dream..awesome

from Dream Letter:Live in London 1968, available on CD


Dracula i love you  performed by Tuca
Recommended by moondog [profile]

If anyone ever wondered why Francoise Hardy never did an album as good as La Question this woman might well be the answer. For it was Tuca that was responsible for, well as i have figured out at least, the songs, production and string arrangements on that particular album. Tuca only made three albums herself, all of which is flawed, but at her best shows her influence on the la question album. With a voice somewhere between nara leao and joyce her songs really did come onto her own on her last album Dracula i love you. The title track is a haunting ballad that almost sounds if Kate Bush had been born in Brazil. Well, nearly i must add because i had so high expectations after the la question album so i was a bit disappointed when i heard her albums. But you could only imagine what great music Tuca could have done. This track at least shows her enormous potential and a sense of atmosphere that i haven´t heard from any other brazilian artist. Tuca tragically died in 1978 after trying losing weight to fast. Does anyone know more about her?

from Dracula i love you


Dragula  performed by Rob Zombie  1999
Recommended by falicon [profile]

Pure energy and hate...what more could you ask for from hard rock?

from American made music to strip by, available on CD



driver  performed by the damnation of adam blessing  1969
Recommended by shaka_klaus [profile]

one of my fave dj's, michael wink, played this at the 1st sinful swedish mod weekender. i was kind of doped (kids, don't use hard drugs...) up so i really liked it. it's a heavy, "beardy", as my friend ricky rickenbacker would describe it, kind of a tune. late 60's garagerock... i really like it. the cover of the 45 shows the guys bare breasted. mmmm.

from back to the river single (ua 35159)


Drugs  performed by This Mortal Coil  1986
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

Perhaps the least typical track from the 4AD house band and, ironically, one of the projects great triumphs. Abandoning for a moment their gorgeous prototype - beautifully dreamy soundscapes and/or readings of songs by Tim Buckley, Alex Chilton, etc. this Talking Heads cover is little more that a series of grinding, funky sample loops w/Alison Limericks soulful vocals drifting in and out. A brilliant rethink of the song, that anticipates (perhaps influenced?) the Bristol/trip-hop mob - Portishead, Tricky, Massive Attack, et al. (Can still be found as a vinyl 10 single, if you look hard.)

from Filigree & Shadow (4AD)
available on CD - Filigree and Shadow (4AD)



  kohl: great band.
  konsu: Sort of ironic too, considering an interview with Ivo I once read with a short list of groups he wished he'd signed to 4AD, which included Portishead. TMC was such an ifluential project that completely escaped the 80's indie mainstream indeed.
dub dope  performed by HARDFLOOR
Recommended by paypah [profile]




Dum Maro Dum  performed by Asha Bhosle  1971
Recommended by mr_klenster [profile]

Okay, here's an obvious Bollywood recommendation, a genre I don't know a lot about, but nevertheless, it's really a great track. It's from the movie Hare Rama Hare Krishna. The way Bollywood movies were able to draw elements of psychedelic, funk, and dance music, then fuse it with Hindi music is incredible to me. This song has a addictive, hard, danceable, and completely credible sound, not to be confused with some lighter, cheesier, or more kitsch Bollywood fare. Great stuff.





  olli: great choice! Im no expert either, but the most appealing hindi tracks to me are the ones that feature a style of singing wich diverges from what you hear in most bollywood recordings, there seems way to many songs out there with cool instrumental parts that have bland and unoriginal vocals running over them. The doob doob o'rama series are just about the only compilations i've found so far that feature really great tracks (in my ears, anyway). too bad no one seems to be interested in releasing separate soundtracks to spesific films, theres a lot of films out there that seem to have mindblowing soundtracks.. believe this was written by rd burman by the way, i find it generally easier to locate cool bolllywood music by paying attention to the composers rather than the singers, too bad most compilations don't bother to list more than the main vocalist.
Elevate My Mind  performed by Stereo MC’S  1991
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Knowledge is power and Stereo MC'S know how to preach it! Rob B turns out a great groove and a positive message reminding you to take the high road or get burned by your bad choices. I find it easy to get the memorable refrain "I wanna go higher" stuck in my head...

from Supernatural, available on CD


False Goodbyes  performed by Echo and the Bunnymen  1990
Recommended by diogenes44 [profile]

From the much maligned (unfairly) non Mc Cullough lp, a slice of dreamy, aggressive psychedelia with some of Will Sergeant's finest moments on guitar and a vocal to match from "the singer who never was". Should be on every compilation of the band but no doubt will remain hard to find. A pity.

from Reverberation (Korova)


Fantasia tragica  performed by Stelvio Cipriani  1971
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

This is one of these sensationally sensual, wonderful instrumental tracks only the italians could pull off in late sixties/early seventies. This is the title theme to "La morte cammina con i tacchi alti/Death walks on High Heels", one of the numerous gialli (thriller movies with that special italian touch) to come out of italy in heavy doses from the late sixties up to the mid seventies. Wonderful scores have been one of the constitutive elements of these films and while the scores that Ennio Morricone did for these movies (e.g. "L'ucello dalle piume di cristallo/Bird with the crystal plumage, "Cosa avete fatto a Solange/What have they done to Solange", Una lucertola con la pelle di donna/Lizard on a womans skin" or "Le foto proibite di una signora per bene/ Forbidden fotos of a lady above suspicion") have been long released, a lot of excellent music is still locked up in the vaults of CAM, Cinevox and other italian soundtrack labels. Thanks to the hard work of the guys at DigitMovies a lot of these scores now successively get a proper, remastered release (often for the first time ever), music otherwise would have been lost in oblivion forever. Stelvio Cipriani may not be remotely as well known as Morricone (who, naturally, overshines just every other italian composer), but he was very prolific in the heyday of italian cinema, scoring an equally wide range of different genres from westerns to gialli and from romantic movies to italain police (so called "poliziotteschi") and crime movies. This title track of "La morte cammina con i tacchi alti" doesn't have to hide behind the best of themes Morricone did, in fact the orchestration does sound very Morricone itself with an uptempo-ish bossa nova beat, lush strings, wonderful harpsicord and a female voice carrying the main melody with a bitterweet tone. The voice is delivered by Nora Orlandi, one of the very few female soundtrack composers and she could easily be mixed up with Edda Dell'Orso here. Wonderful stuff, recommended for anyone who enjoys the "Mondo Morricone" comps.

from La morte cammina con i tacchi alti, available on CD



Fascination  performed by Saint Etienne  2004
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

With Saint Etienne being one of my favourite groups of the last decades (and possibly the best british pop group today) it's really hard to pick a track, it wouldn't be hard to recommend dozens of amazing tracks they did the last 15 years. That said, "Fascination" is the only new song they produced since Finisterre (2002) and it was included on their first compilation released in the US. It doesn't really matter if they embrace a more late 60s style a la Good Humor or a more electronic or dance approach to their music, due to Sarah Cracknells distinctive voice and Stanleys and Wiggs' ear for strong melodies it always sounds essentially Saint Etienne. This one is a heartfelt, bittersweet song, with an almost Hip Hop-ish basic beat, lush synths, floating harp-like electronica and a great piano melody.

from Travel Edition 1990-2005, available on CD



Feed the Birds (Tuppence a Bag)  performed by Julie Andrews  1964
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Most people probably prefer 'Super-cali-fragil-istic-expi-ali-docious' or 'Spoonful of Sugar', but this is my favorite song from the classic film. It can still make me cry whenever I hear it.

from 'Mary Poppins' Original Soundtrack, available on CD


Female of the Species  performed by Meg Myles  1961
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

I can just imagine people sitting in a seedy New York movie theatre on 42nd Street back in 1961 watching a b-movie called "Satan in High Heels". The film is in its last reel and suddenly the main female character comes out on the nightclub stage wearing a leather outfit complete with 6-inch dominitrix boots and a riding crop! The music swells and she starts to sing:
---
i'm the kind of woman, not hard to understand,
i'm the one who cracks the whip and holds the upper hand
I'll beat you, mistreat you, til you quiver and quail,
the female of the species is more deadly than the male.
---
This little film isn't likely to have ever had a soundtrack album which in a way is sad because in addition to this camply little gem there are a couple of other cute vocals by Meg Myles and the other actresses in the film and some great jazz instrumentals sprinkled throughout as well. The fine folks at Something Weird Video have kindly put this little film out on DVD. You can also catch the scene containing this song on their compilation of movie trailers (where I first discovered this film) released to inform people of their DVD catalog.

from from the film "Satan in High Heels" (Something Weird Video www.somethingweird.com)


Fine Art Of Friendship  performed by Kings X  1990
Recommended by MoeShinola [profile]

King's X is my favorite hard rock band by far. This song is on Faith Hope & Love, a very psychedelic record with a sound different from their others. They must have had the fairy dust going on at the recording sessions for this album because the sound is just beyond bluesy and groovy. The guitar just sounds...slinky! that's the word. Slink and snaky and dark. Their harmonies are a wonder to behold as usual, and the lyrics are mystical and weird.

from Faith Hope & Love (Megaforce UPC)


First Contact  performed by Erasure  1997
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Erasure is always guarenteed to get your feet moving and this song is certainly no exception. A surreal dancy story of alien abduction set to a great housy beat with prominent piano work that brings Robert Miles' "Dreamland" album to mind every time I listen to it. A great bassbeat mix of 'In My Arms' also appears among the nine tracks on this single.

from Rain CD Single, available on CD


Flight 643  performed by Tiesto  2004
Recommended by Wynnde [profile]

One of the most influential and awesome dance tracks of '04..and still bears playing today. Rumored to have been written during a flight from Amsterdam to the US, the title certainly supports the idea.
Rolling bassline, tight and hard kick and an amazing array of drumwork compliment a very simple and yet gracefully full-on melody (Tiesto's signature in my opinion). As with most of Tiesto's production work, an excellent track and well put together, displaying an awesome talent for a wonderful genre...Trance.




Frank Mills  performed by Sandie Shaw  1970
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Always one of my favourites from Hair for its cutie-pie quality. I think it encapsulates a certain kind of teenage girl, forward but fickle, scared but full of bravado. And that's very unusual for a song to do; the complexity of pubescent girls is very rarely explored without titillation and / or simplicity.

Sandie, hardly a teen herself at 23, nevertheless gives this a very beautiful interpretation in French. Her accent to me sounds good but what do I know, I can barely manage "la plume de ma tante".

Good accompaniment arranged by her long-time collaborator Ken Woodman.

from Pourvu Que Ca Dure, available on CD




  Kevinattheabbey: There is now an English version available of Sandie's 'Frank Mills' (previously unreleased). It's on 'Reviewing The Situation' (EMI 7243 8 66108 2 9) Also has a great cappella version of Paul McCartneys 'Junk' on it.
Fried Bananas  performed by Benny Golson  1967
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Freakishly cool jet-set jazz from the great Benny Golson. A Gary Mcfarland tune that he wrote for his "In Sound" LP, and I must say his version seemed pretty hard to top,until this. A mindblowing mix of styles from the period are included in this one track:Gary Mcfarland's easy-latin swing(complete with whistles),The elecrtrified sax sound of Eddie Harris, and a swirling vocal ensemble thats almost in a Hugo Montenegro mode! Wild!!

from Tune In, Turn On, available on CD


Function at the Junction  performed by Ramsey Lewis  1966
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A very swinging, groovy Latin jazz take on Shorty Long's Motown classic finds Lewis at the height of his form. As expected, Richard Evans turns in an astounding arrangement, utilizing handclaps, studio chatter and a magnificent horn chart.

from Goin' Latin (Cadet)



Golden Lights  performed by Twinkle  1965
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This is a simple but rather bitter pop song, although on the surface it sounds quite sweet. If I recall correctly, it was written about the singer that Twinkle was seeing at the time. The gentle arrangement features acoustic guitar and some brass. It's not hard to hear why Morrissey liked this song enough to cover it with The Smiths.

Twinkle has a lovely clear voice, and much as I respect Moz, this version towers above the one done by The Smiths, which suffers from a strange mix of production styles. That said, I have a strange mix of emotions on hearing the song, since I heard the Smiths version at 14, but only got into this one in the last few years.

from the single Golden Lights
available on CD - Twinkle (RPM)



Gotta' Get Back to You  performed by Tommy James & the Shondells  1970
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Now, I'm not normally a Tommy James fan, but I found this record cheap one day. I was intrigued by the cover featuring a very country-rock-ish painting of a stagecoach. Well, the album turned out to be mediocre at best, but this song...this song fucking rocks. There's really no other way to put it. It sounds almost like Humble Pie, for Christ's sake!

But before you rush out to buy the LP...the rest of it is a bit dodgy, to say to the least. But if you REALLY like stuff that sounds like Humble Pie (and who the hell doesn't!?), it's worth the price of admission for this song.

from Travelin' (Roulette SR 42044)


Grand Dark Feeling of Emptiness  performed by Bonnnie Prince Billy  1999
Recommended by umbrellasfollowrain [profile]

He's a psychobilly from the woods. His bearded figure foraged out to tell you what he saw, and he's pared his story down to the bare essentials so that his story is your story. "Over the hill, like always you know/ where Billy and Frankie and Henry and Joe/ they beat and broke me hard and slow/ to prove that I was nobody." His wound is your wound, and you follow the lyrics through as he wonders what gave him his redemption. And though you never thought of yourself as having found redemption per se, it seems like you must have. Essentially, Bonnie Prince Billy makes boys cry.

from Ease on Down the Road
available on CD - Ease On Down the Road


Groovin With Mr. Bloe  performed by Mr. Bloe  1970
Recommended by tempted [profile]

With the likes of Buzzsaw by The Turtles and Dance With The Devil by Cozy Powell, Groovin' With Mr. Bloe is one of my favourite late 60's-early 70's groovy "novelty" pop instrumentals.
Beginning with a tight drum beat that carries on throughout the song and followed by one of the fattest basslines ever, this is a real dancefloor gem for hip crowds. Best of all is the harmonica lead by Mr. Bloe himself, a session musician by the name of Harry Pitch. Groovin'...became a surprise top ten hit but the best credit to the song is that it allegedly still enjoys club play by Richard Searling, the legendary northern soul deejay.

from Groovin' With Mr. Bloe (DJM)



  n-jeff: I take the opportunity to play it out whenever I can, it's a belter of a record, and still relatively easy to find in UK charity shops. Good choice!
Gypsy Rose Lee  performed by The Distillers
Recommended by ladyfelicity [profile]

Hardcore, with Brodie's raspy voice, but she's singing, not yelling in this song. I especially like the phrase "you were Marilyn Monroe."




hang up your boots!  performed by The Business
Recommended by inbloom44 [profile]

The Snotty British working class punk version of an old hard core song.




Hard Time Killing Floor Blues  performed by Skip James
Recommended by dwmjuk [profile]

Despite the vocal style of James (not appreciated by myself) this track is a true masterpiece - listful, solemn and mysterious. Numerous good covers inc. Kelly Joe Phelps, & Chris Thomas King (O Brother Where art thou). The original's guitarwork is superior to other versions - sparse and perfectly timed. However Phelps has, in my oppinion, a more appripraite voice for the track.






  dyfl: The Twilight Singers (actually just Greg Dulli, from the Afghan Whigs, and Mark Lanegan from The Screaming Trees) just released a very good cover of this on their album SHE LOVES YOU, which I highly recommend...
Hard Times  performed by Eastmountainsouth
Recommended by CaitlinSpelledWrong [profile]

Hard Times comes from the Elizabethtown soundtrack, which is a great cd by the way. This song is beautiful, everyone in the world should hear. I'm not exagerating. "Let us pause in lifes pleasures and count it's many tears."


available on CD - Elizabethtown soundtrack


Heat Proof  performed by The Upsetters  1969
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Excellent organ-heavy song centered around the rhythm of Otis Redding's "Hard to Handle". Nice and fluid. Everything that is great about Jamaican soul in one neat little package, from Lee Perry's debut album as producer.

from The Upsetter, available on CD



Heaven Up Here  performed by Echo & the Bunnymen  1981
Recommended by Fig Alert [profile]

I'm glad that I get the opportunity to be the first to recommend a Bunnymen track, especially since their early work, which I feel is far stronger than anything after "Porcupine," is unknown, primarily Stateside, to many.

"Heaven Up Here" is a car losing it's wheels at full speed while cornering on a high mountain pass. Will Sargeant's opening chick-chick-chicking on guitar gives way to a straight bassdrop, headlong into Pete DeFreitas' insistent pounding on drums, while Ian McColluch's yelps sound utterly desperate, claustrophobic, pleading and angry simultaneously. There's a pause in the careening during the bridge, just long enough for Ian to remind us that "We're all groovy, groovy people...we're okay, we're okay," before it all plunges straight down the cliffside, banging, exploding, scraping and finally, ending succinctly.

I don't ever recall hearing back then, and rarely today, such a beautifully cacophonic melding of swirling psychedelia and assaultive punk/pop. The guitars are cascades of shimmering shards of sound. Les Pattinson's coy, but effective bassline floats beneath the furious energy DeFreitas unleashes on his drumkit. "Mac the Mouth" may be the frontman, but I think this gem is DeFreitas' piece all the way.

After 20+ years of living with this album, and this song in particular, the pump, pump, pump of the bass drum still sends shivers up my spine. Don't overlook this album as a whole either!

from Heaven Up Here (Sire/Warner 3569-2)



Here in heaven  performed by Sparks  1974
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Just unbelievably awesome stuff!

It's a song about a suicide pact gone wrong. Amazing falsetto (and non-falsetto) vocals. Great glam production. Fantastic guitar solo at 1:40.

It's hard to choose just one track to recommend by this group, but I've settled for this one for now. 'Thank God it isn't Christmas' was a close runner up.

(weirdly, there are a few tracks by them that I would really rather never hear again in my life. Like 'Get in the swing'. Have you heard this track? I have serious trouble with it!)

Anyway, 1974 - great year!

from Kimono My House (Island)




  Mike: Sparks have indeed produced some good and some extremely bad material. I may still own - somewhere - this LP, though the most-played track on it was always "This town ain't big enough..." 1974 - yes, an incredible year which also brought us such marvels as the Glitter Band's "Angel Face".
  geezer: only Sparks could be comfortable with such subject matter there is humour in everything they do like Tryouts for the Human Race a song for sperm everywhere
Here We Are Falling in Love Again  performed by Meta Roos & Nippe Sylwens Band
Recommended by mr_klenster [profile]

Somewhere between tacky and slick. The instrumentation on this track is extremely dense, and played at a frenetic pace. There are moments packed so thick with sound, and played at such speed, that it's hard to distinguish all the elements going on. The loungy and somewhat artificial projection of soul in her voice sort of gets to me after a while, but on the whole I think this track storms.




Hey  performed by Julio Iglesisas  1982
Recommended by geezer [profile]

Ive only ever heard this sung in spanish and lyrically this beautiful piece of orchestrated balladry means nothing,However its hard not to be touched by the emotion of his frail almost thin voice .A friend of my wife heard this once and exclaimed "i dont know what the F--k he singing about but its so beautiful!!.As concise and accurate description if ever i heard one .

from Hey!, available on CD


Highway 101  performed by social distortion
Recommended by inbloom44 [profile]

Catchy but still hard and edgy. What a grown up Punk kid should sound like.




History  performed by Mai Tai  1985
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Dutch pop is where it's at.

One of the best 80's songs, and hard to think of anything that more neatly sums up the decade - named after a cocktail, plenty of synth effects, that slight tinniness endemic to all the greatest 80's pop. I'm sure a lot of you will remember this song, and hopefully with affection. Mai Tai had the un-popstar names Caroline, Mildred and Jetty, and they pissed on Five Star.

from History (Metronome 825 947-1)


Howl  performed by Florence and the Machine
Recommended by Nori [profile]

It can be hard to make out her lyrics in some places, but this song is glorious. I love the fragments of the poem from 'The Wolfman'. I also love 'Hardest of Hearts', 'Bird Song', and 'Heavy In Your Arms', among others.


available on CD - Lungs


Hurt So Bad  performed by Nancy Holloway
Recommended by mr_klenster [profile]

This is a perfect cover in every way, arranged by Daniel Janin. The heavy, driving bass, long whine of the horns, and thick drumming make a monster instrumental. Nothing like the Bacharach version. Nancy Holloway does an outstanding rendition of the lyrics, delicate in some places, husky in others, bleeding and pleading the whole way through. The slow, pained delivery of the lyrics almost seem to be off pace with the tempo of the beat, but the horn melodies punctuate and hold this song together. There are qualities about this song that I find impossible to describe. All that's left to say is that this song is so cool and mesmerizing that it's hard not to close your eyes, and let yourself slip into the textures of this song. I never get tired of it.

from Hello Dolly!



I Cried Like a Silly Boy  performed by DeVotchKa  2006
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

DeVotchKa are kind of hard to describe... but I'll try... think: Morrissey meets Julio Iglesias meets Henry Mancini meets Jobim...

I was happily surprised to hear their music when I went to see the film 'Little Miss Sunshine' this past weekend.


available on CD - Curse Your Little Heart (Ace Fu Records)


I Feel Pretty  performed by Little Richard  1996
Recommended by Arthur [profile]

The King of Rock And Roll excells himself in this 1996 track from the various artists album ' The Songs Of West Side Story ' . Done as a kind of Blues / Waltz, it is of course a girls song as a norm and only Richard could get away with this gender reversal version and boy it really works !

The album also has a great version of 'Somewhere ' from Aretha Franklin too.

from The Songs Of Westside Story, available on CD


I want your kiss  performed by Lani Groves (with Phil Moore and the Afro Latin Soultet)  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This one has really been haunting me. I recently heard this rare and sought after album, and was entranced by the opening track, a devastating vocal. Although Lani Groves sings in English, in a style very similar to Sergio Mendes and Brasil 66, I knew that this was a Brazilian track that I had heard before.

Researching a song with as generic a title as 'I want your kiss' is hard though, and with no knowledge of who the composer was, most of the search engine results were soft porn stories. After a while I threw on Elis Regina's first album, Samba - eu canto assim, and happily found the information I was looking for. The original Portuguese song is called 'Sou sem paz', and was written by Adylson Godoy, who may or may not be the same person as Amilton Godoy, who was the pianist in the Zimbo Trio.

After all my research, I was disappointed to learn that this song has hardly ever been recorded; the only versions I know of are this and those by the Zimbo Trio and Elis Regina.

Trivia aside, this is a nice fusion of several of my musical passions. The chord sequence is unusual, delicate and surprising, and the vocal is passionate. I think it would be fair to say that Lani Groves doesn't have quite Elis's passionate delivery, but for me this is offset by the beautiful backing arrangement, featuring some great organ playing.

from Afro Brazil Oba! (Tower)



I Will Get On  performed by Annie  2002
Recommended by SleazyListening [profile]

You may remember Annie from her/their housey dancefloor number of a year or two back "The Greatest Hit".

Well, they've come back with this, a sublime downbeat track with a lush-yet-delicate female vocal. Instrumentally, it reminds me of a slower, swinging P-funk number, quite minimal beats but funky as all hell (in a chill kinda way).

Absolutely beautiful -hard to find but worth looking.

Originally a limited-release 7" on Norwegian label Telle, and quickly licensed by UK house label Loaded -it appears on a sampler they released late 2002.


available on CD - (vinyl) (Loaded)


I’ll Be Your Man  performed by The Black Keys  2002
Recommended by CaitlinSpelledWrong [profile]

I like a lot of the Black Keys music but I'll Be Your Man is my favorite. Their music is hard to explain. It has a lot soul. It sounds kind of like new motown if that makes any since. I think fans of motown music will enjoy this song.


available on CD - The Big Come Up


I’m Free  performed by Soup Dragons  1990
Recommended by acidburn [profile]

from Lovegod


I’ve Grown Accustomed to Her Face  performed by Stan Getz and Cal Tjader Sextet  1958
Recommended by kaptnunderpnts [profile]

this is perhaps my favorite jazz ballad. maybe the most romantic song you'll ever here. stan getz's saxaphone sounds like it came down from the clouds. it sounds so soft and warm. it's often so subtle that you here just air passing across the reed. and cal tjader's vibraphone adds just the right punctuation. the song is ethereal. romantic and ethereal are hardly words i use often, but they seem to be the best i could think of to describe this song.

from Stan Getz and Cal Tjader Sextet - San Francisco


If I Hadn’t Got You (Digitalism mix)  performed by Lisa Stansfield  2005
Recommended by djronniebruno [profile]

the dubs of this song are great. Digitalism put a new spin on the song that is originally an r&b song. They give it a great dancefloor work over. Hard edged genius.




If The Price Is Right  performed by Hero Dishonest  200?
Recommended by Durruti [profile]

The Finnish ultra speed hardcore. There are two vocals. Both are screaming all the time. One Of them is macho, "tough guy" style. It can be nice introduction to Hero Dishonest.

from Juggernaut, available on CD


Il n’y a pas d’amour Heureux  performed by Francoise Hardy
Recommended by Davidthesaint [profile]

George Brassens wrote this one and his version of it is equally good... But he performs it alone with his acoustic guitar... Hardy is helped by a violin and an accordion which make her version extremely enjoyable and so so so beautiful...




Image - Part 1  performed by Hank Levine Orchestra  1961
Recommended by standish [profile]

Slow-burn, easy-listening intrumental. (Harder to find are the later UK versions by Alan Haven and 'The Now Sound of Vic Templar & His Mood Orchestra'.)




In the Windmills of Your Mind  performed by Richard Hayman  1969
Recommended by jimmymontrose [profile]

sort of like a psychedelic Esquivel

from Genuine Electric Latin Love Machine: Persuasive Electronics (Command 947)



  tinks: i love the cover from that lp. and hey, i'm jumblebunny on the livejournal. what the...!?
Is You Is Or Is You Ain't My Baby  performed by Renee Olstead  2004
Recommended by music2go [profile]

I've always loved this song. I know Louis Jordon's and Joe Jackson's versions and when I heard this one by Renee Olstead, I was floored. I had to have it. This woman's album was recorded when she was 15 and I can hardly believe it. She has made anything she's done her own and she's really someone to watch out for. I just heard that she is an actress on a sit-com as well as a marvelous singer.

from Renee Olstead, available on CD


It’s Dangerous Business Walking Out Your Front Door  performed by Underoath  2004
Recommended by Biscuit [profile]

Driving, melodic, hardcore emo Christian sound, with screaming vocals on top and behind melodic vocals. There are a few vocal breaks, pauses, and major crescendos. It is just an amazing emotional song, and it also has amazing lyrics.

from They're Only Chasing Safety (Tooth and Nail)


It’s Love  performed by Trudy Richards  1957
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Taken from her rare full length LP (many 45's and 78's are floating around out there) this wonderful track is perfect for Trudy's full, slightly husky voice. She is accompanied by the Billy May orchestra and he knows how to frame her voice with just the right arrangement! This fabulous composition by the great team of Comden and Green swings with all of the joy and enthusiasm you feel when you find your soulmate. Sadly, this album is out of print and somewhat rare. If you can get your hands on it, God has smiled on you and you should rush to the checkout counter without delay!

from Crazy in Love! (Capital T 838 (British pressing))


It'll Never Happen Again  performed by Tim Hardin  1966
Recommended by G400 Custom [profile]

This wonderful record is the closest I've heard to an American Nick Drake. Very short and jazzy, acoustic guitar, vibraphone, impeccable white soul vocals... what more do you need? Good if you like Tim Buckley. That someone could be this good on their debut album is little short of incredible. Heroin victim Hardin's second album is even better.

from Tim Hardin
available on CD - Tim Hardin 1/2 (Repertoire)


Its A Lovely Game Louise  performed by The Cyrkle  1969
Recommended by konsu [profile]

I'm always suprised by this group. The freshness of this song is hardly questionable, mainly because the soundtrack is a hidden gem recently unearthed. And for Cyrkle fans like me, it's a dream come true. The song is a spare bossa-tinged affair, done as sort of a stripped down folky interlude. But the track stands on it's own amongst their better known tracks like "The Visit", of which it bears a resemblance. It sounds like Tom Dawes took the reigns on this project, arranging and producing the whole thing to make one of the more memorable and interesting soundtracks I have.

Fans of Elliot Smith should check this one.

from The Minx (Flying Dutchman Amsterdam AMS 12007)
available on CD - The MInx


Its Hard To Say Goodbye  performed by Claudine Longet  1968
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

I absolutely love Claudine Longet, especially her 60's A&M records due to the consistency in arrangement and production (all A&M albums were arranged by Nick DeCaro and produced by Tommy LiPuma). This is a great Roger Nichols/Paul Williams tune and the arrangement and production, with lovely strings, is just wonderfully done.

from Love Is Blue (A&M SP 4142)



Jazz Potatoes  performed by Jorge Ben  1973
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

This lost Jorge Ben stormer has a rawer sound and harder rock edge to it than usual during this, his greatest period. Relegated to an obscure soundtrack LP, it stomps all over the place at a slower, heavier and more menacing tempo than anything on "Ben" or "A Tabua De Esmeralda." The beat is anchored by that famous acoustic guitar sound, heavy bass and a loud cowbell, as Jorge yells out improvised nonsense in a hilarious mix of Spanish and English! "Rock Steady-O!!" Must be heard to be believed.

from A Volta De Beto Rockfeller (Soundtrack) (Polydor)


Jumpin Jack Flash  performed by Thelma Houston  1969
Recommended by lilly747 [profile]

Fabulous cover version of a song which has been covered soooo many times, northern soulful foot stomping version, which great vocals, shouts and musical phrasing by Ms Houston

from The Best of Thelma Houston (Spectrum)


jumpin jack flash  performed by ananda shankar  1970
Recommended by shaka_klaus [profile]

one of my fave songs at the moment. what's better than a funky sitar mover? a funky sitar/moog mover! i think you can find it on ebay or on some indian comps.

from ananda shankar (reprise)



  n-jeff: A true go-go swinger! It works in ways that it quite clearly shouldn't. The LP should be quite available, it was re-issued cheaply fairly recently.
  tinks: oh hell yes. i love me some ananda...but i also have a special affinity for such lesser more exploitative sitarists such as big jim sullivan or lord sitar. i recently dug a sweet thelma houston version of the song at the swap meet, for what it's worth.
Just Lust  performed by Buzzcocks  1978
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

"Just Lust" was the B-side to the Buzzcocks' highest-charting single, the Pete Shelley punk-pop classic "Ever Fallen in Love?," eventually reaching number 12 on the U.K. singles chart in September of 1978. The mysterious co-author " Dial" is, in fact, a pseudonym for the band's early manager, Richard Boon, who also shared songwriting credits on "What Ever Happened?," the B-side to the Buzzcocks' infamously banned first single "Orgasm Addict." However, the effect of his involvement in not apparent here, as the music is classic Buzzcocks masters of the punk-fueled power pop nugget. The rhythm is springy, the track's nervous tension as wired as the melody is infectious. Punchy verses with quick-hit vocals are alternated with short dreamy sections of woozy flanged guitar and chopped up-tempo shifts, the band expertly maneuvering in tight spaces. Shelley follows the twists and turns with clipped phrases followed by drawn-out melodies in sync with the compact arrangement: "Your dream to possess/It hurts/It's so unjust/Just lust, just lust/If nothing mattered less/Then I wouldn't make a fuss/Just lust, just lust/I was slow to catch on and that just makes it worse/If passion is a fashion then emotion is just a curse." Though the track was also included on the Buzzcocks' second album, Love Bites, the group had yet to make an impact in the United States. Thankfully, this little gem was not left to languish in obscurity as it was included in the influential collected singles package Singles Going Steady, compiled as the band's introduction to American audiences and released in the states in 1979.
(AMG)

from Love Bites, available on CD


Keep Yourself Alive  performed by Queen  1973
Recommended by Ozmala [profile]

The first song on their first CD, and a great one it is. It's hard to listen to it without feeling happy and energized. And not in a superficial way, either. It's just so happy, and so powerful, and SO HAPPY. Honestly *happy*, too, not just cheerful. It's wonderful.

from Queen (Hollywood Records)


Kick Start My Heart  performed by Motley Crue
Recommended by blackbison2008 [profile]

Distortion, hair metal era but it doesn't sound typical of that style. It's hard to describe. Cool sounding vocals, pretty sweet guitar hook.

from Dr. Feelgood, available on CD


Kojak Theme  performed by "The Pop Singers & Orchestra"  197?
Recommended by konsu [profile]

One of the better records of this ilk, surely for this one, which is hard to find and is such a typically great theme. Kojak, of course, was the blowpop sucking detective played by Telly Savalas. And like the "Rockford Files", "Baretta", and "S.W.A.T.", deserves it's place in the not-so-rare groove DJ file. With the obligatory Moog sound leading the melody, it becomes instantly recognizable (and dateable). Whoever the cats are on this session are cutting some decent shit for sure. They also turn out a surprisingly funky version of the M.A.S.H. theme, as well as the three aforementioned. The crazy Peter Pan cover art is there, with cute stuff like poorly drawn representations of Alan Alda looking at a martini glass, and Gabe Kaplan's finger being bit by Baretta's Cockatoo!!

Does anyone know the composer?

from Themes From Hit TV Shows (Peter Pan 8185)



La Spiaggia  performed by Ennio Morricone  1971
Recommended by bobbyspacetroup [profile]

Another of my favorite Morricone tracks. It's a long one at over 8 minutes. As is often the case (with Morricone especially), it's so hard for me to describe the mood of this song -- warm, sexy, yet heartbreakingly sad.

from Veruschka (Point Records PRCD 111 (I, 1995))




  leonthedog: Yes, this one's rather spooky - and beautiful. I recommend the entire album!
Last DJ  performed by Noah And The Whale
Recommended by daniela_por [profile]

It's very hard to describe Noah and The Whale's music, but I guess it can be considered pop. Really nice song.




Les Girls  performed by Dan Terry Orchestra & Chorus  1969
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Man! You really have to get up early in the morning to find tracks like this. LA big band funk, banks of brass, electric bass throbbing away, and the hard hitting Jimmy Gordon on drums! But the best part is the vocals, done it a way that makes it sound like an Odeon recording from late 60's Brazil!... Stunning. The rest of the LP is no slouch either though, and reminds me a lot of Quincy's late 60's work and the Project 3 era Enoch Light stuff.

Highly recommended to lounge DJ's and fans of mod rarities.


from Lonely Place (Happy Tiger MT 1005)



Let New Days Dawn  performed by A Cautionary Tale  2006
Recommended by aggryle [profile]

Beautiful composition and production with a darkly uplifting, somber mood and feel. Definitely will make you stop and focus on it as you are filled with melancholy feelings, though once the song ends, you feel better than when it began. Hard to find album, but you can listen to the song on myspace.com/acautionarytale.

from Let New Days Dawn, available on CD


Let’s Get Married  performed by Mariya Takeuchi  1984
Recommended by drchilledair [profile]

I am a connoisseur (er, fan) of Japanese pop music, not just young further-out acts/groups like Cornelius (lost w/o his tape loops) and Love Psychedelico (think Beatles Meets Velvet Underground). But also that strain of Japanese pop which draws heavily on the stylistic traditions of the usual Brill Building suspects. i.e. Solo Nihogo artists like Mariko Takeuchi, especially those tracks with arrangements by the great Tomaji Sogawa. Also Chage and Aska, Eichi Ohtaki, (sometimes called Japan's Phil Spector), Gospellers, Rag Fair and, of course, Pizzicato Five. I am especially drawn to the efforts of Tatsuro Yamashita as a solo artist, and of his tracks with his wife, Mariya Takeuchi, released under her name. On their own and as a team they have been recording since the 1980s and in (affectionately known by his fans as) Tats' case since the late seventies (his first album was co-produced and arranged in the U.S. by the 4 Seasons' Charles Callelo). There are a number of other artists like this in Japan with uncommonly lengthy---by U.S. standards---careers. And believe it or not, a hit record in Japan sells in numbers that are generally far larger than the U.S. despite a population that is roughly half as large.

One of my favorite Takeuchi - Yamashita collaborations (she writes and sings, he arranges) is "Let's Get Married," which would not be perceived as being retro or sixties or somesuch by (IMHO) the more flexible and openminded Japanese music audience. Even though, admittedly it does draw upon such musical conceits. Instead, Let's Get Married would merely be regarded as a great record, case closed.

This 1984 cut track is timelessly, and extra-territorily infectuous. But with the exception of Kyu Sakamoto in 1963 with his fluke number one single, Sukiyaki, to the best of my knowledge no Japanese artist of any musical inclination has been able to crack the U.S. charts in any significant way. General garden variety xenophobia coupled with a hard time wrapping the tongue around those hard-to-pronounce names with two many vowels and and syllables. It is doubtful that LGM, even though it is sung by Takeuchi in perfectly accented English, was ever released in the U.S.

Starting with a full blown fanfare of the Wedding March played on organ, after twenty seconds, Let's Get Married abruptly switches gears and mood and becomes an ever-ascending excercise in neo-Spectorian pop, replete with castinets, chimes, a swirling ooh-wah background chorale (courtesy of an overdubbed Yamashita), multiple drumkits, a full complement of string players and plenty of good old fashioned Gold Star Studio-style echo. A paen to the joys of marriage, my favorite moment happens at 1:42 way down in the mix right after Takeuchi sings the line "You and me with a small house and a dog," where, if you listen carefully you can hear the sound of a dog yapping for joy. Homage to the "Pet" at the end of Brian Wilson's "Caroline, No" perhaps?

Both Yamashita and Takeuchi had number one albums in Japan last year. Unlike most of their 70s and 80s U.S. rock/pop counterparts, they have not been cast aside by the bulk of Japanese record buyers, but continue to peak at the top of the charts with every new issue. A listen to this perfectly crafted, classic, three minute (well. . . 3;45 actually) track should help illustrate why this is so.

Bill Reed (new to this list)

from Impressions, available on CD


Liebestod  performed by Leontyne Price
Recommended by cryofthecelt [profile]

This song, as heard at the death scene of "William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet", is a piece from Richard Wagner's famous "Tristan und Isolde."
I don't know exactly how to describe it, but I can tell you this:
A few years ago, after studying Shakespeare's tragedy "Romeo and Juliet" and watching Baz Luhrmann's version of the film, young student Kip Kinkel became obsessed with what is often called "the greatest love story ever told." Kip believed that "Romeo and Juliet" was exceptionally relevant to his own life. He had recently been a victim of unrequieted love and he felt his parents' constnat pull over him. One day, Kip had a psychotic break. He carried a gun to school and shot several of his classmates, killing them or leaving them seriously injured. He ran. As his parents arrived back at home, Kip blasted "Liebestod" on his stereo, took up his gun, and shot and killed both of them. The music was still playing loud and clear when the police arrived at his home to arrest him.
Scarily enough, that is how moving this music really is.

from Prima Donna Collection Highlights (BMG Classica/RCA Victor Red Seal)
available on CD - William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet Volume 2 (Capitol)



  weaveroffates: Actually, Kip Kinkel came home the night before the school shootings, shot his parents (who were very upset because he was expelled from school for having a gun in his locker) and then the next day went to school and killed/injured his peers. The soundtrack to the 1996 version was playing on repeat when the police found the bodies of his parents...but when he killed his parents.
Living Dead Girl  performed by Rob Zombie
Recommended by straitjacket [profile]

As most of his songs it has a neat title and I find the hard driving beat great to drive to.

from Hellbilly Deluxe


Long Live the King  performed by Gary McFarland  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

It's hard to pick a particular Gary McFarland song to recommend: although I love almost all of them, there aren't that many that particularly stand out. Most have some of the same trademarks: whistling or wordless vocals, brass, guitar, and a gentle bossa nova beat. They're slightly wistful, and make me feel like it's summer whenever I hear them. McFarland also worked with some outstanding musicians, including Gabor Szabo and Kenny Burrell on guitar, Grady Tate on drums, and Willie Bobo on percussion.

Long live the king is actually slightly different - it's a simple, upbeat number with a rock beat, bacharach-style trumpet, and picked guitar; a boogaloo-style saxophone also makes an occasional appearance, as does a hammond organ. The German 'Latin Lounge' CD showcases his work on the Verve label, and it's all excellent.

from Scorpio and other signs (Verve V-8738)
available on CD - Latin Lounge (Motor)



  tinks: i'm glad to hear that mcfarland has finally been put on cd in some sort. i absolutely love him, just because he's so ridiculous. if you like this, you should check out the album he produced for cal tjader entitled "tjader sounds out burt bacharach".
  b. toklas: There actually is at least one album thats standing out a bit. Its called "Butterscotch Rum" (1971) and has a guy called Peter Smith accompanying Gary McFarland. He sings and wrote the lyrics and even illustrated the cover! I suppose hes an Englishman, because his voice has a kind of Robert Wyatt-ish timbre. Its a very good album with a slightly melancholic mood, and with that special laid-back and somewhat loose instrumentation that is characteristic for a lot of McFarlands later work. Very cool and heartwarming at the same time. Would like to have met him and have little chat sitting in rocking chairs. (Oh I forgot: some of the songs on "Butterscotch Rum" are Seventies RocknRoll. They are not too bad, but usually I skip them.)
Lost In The Paradise  performed by Gal Costa  1969
Recommended by Mr Steal [profile]

From one of the key Tropicalia albums, a typically genius Veloso composition, with a jazzy but vaguely psychedelic feel, sung in gorgeously beguiling style (and in English!) by Gal. Actually, this whole LP is essential. (note: in London there seem to be a lot of vinyl pressings of dubious legality of vintage Brazilian LPs around at the moment. Sound quality is sometimes iffy, but most of this stuff is hard to find on CD).

from Gal Costa (Philips R765.068L)




  delicado: a fantastic recording; thanks for drawing my attention to it. Sergio Mendes and Brasil 66 do a great version on their 1970 'Stillness' album as well.
Love so fine  performed by Roger Nichols and the Small Circle of Friends  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

It's hard not to smile when you hear this lovely, rousing late 60s number. Roger Nichols is the composer (along with Paul Williams) of many late 60s and 70s hits for, amongst others, The Carpenters. He wrote this song with 'Pet Sounds' lyricist Tony Asher, and they created a beautiful combination of sunny soft pop sounds (handclaps, brass, group harmonies) and pleasing, happy words. Musically, it is superior and extra-catchy, with nice Bacharach-esque touches and great instrumentation. The lead vocal also deserves a mention for sounding almost supernaturally brilliant (far better than it sounds in the sound sample). The singer is Melinda Macleod; her voice is lovely anyway, but here it sounds as if 3 perfect takes have been somehow overlaid on top of each other to produce an incredibly rich, soothing effect. It's over quickly - in just over two minutes. At which point I normally listen to it again a few times.

from Roger Nichols and the Small Circle of Friends (A&M)
available on CD - Complete (Polydor Japan)




  PappaWheelie: I couldn't agree more. This is the epitome of what Pizzicato Five were trying to recreate in the early 90's.
  klatu: I didn't realize someone had picked this one already! I spelled it "&" instead of "and". Excellent choice!
Love Vigilantes  performed by New Order  1985
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I heard this track again recently and it had an almost chemical effect on me. Why? It's hard to say. I can't claim to be especially moved by the lyrics, but the song captures a certain mood which makes me want to shake around. The track has a nice balance of instrumentation - New Order trademarks like strong, crisp drums and prominent bass, and a melody played on the melodica.

The other highlight of the song for me is the manically strummed guitar break near the end - a great moment. Maybe it's just nostalgia, but this track still has a lot of power for me.

from Low Life, available on CD



love's gone bad  performed by chris clark/the underdogs  196?
Recommended by shaka_klaus [profile]

a soul nugget from white mama chris clark. however this song did not hit as hard as expected so the boys in the underdogs recorded it too and released it (on the same label!) a few weeks later. i don't understand why it didn't make the charts because it's a great song.






  scrubbles: Oh, man, I agree. This song ROCKS. Holland-Dozier-Holland must have had major issues with Motown when they wrote this, it's overflowing with grit and pissed-offiness. I would give a slight edge to Chris Clark's version, the lyrics somehow seem more credible coming from a Dusty Springfield soundalike than a Paul Revere and the Raiders soundalike.
Love, love, love  performed by Gerhard Heinz  196?
Recommended by delicado [profile]

What a winning track! Opening with Morricone-style 'boing' sounds, this is a sexy, funky pop song with interchanging female/male vocals and pounding drums.

The sub-genre of pop songs in this style, featuring flirting and laughing alongside groovy 60s backings, is under-appreciated. I can think of a few more examples: Piero Umiliani's 'Flirt a Rio', Marcos Valle's 'Ele e ela', and my previous recommendation, Ed Lincoln's 'Bon-jour'. Mina's 'Parole Parole' almost fits as well, although the interplay there is a bit more dramataic than flirtatious.

Confusingly, there's another track called "Love, L'Amour, Amore" by Gerhard Heinz, which appears on the "Melodies in Love" compilation of his work. But I gather from hearing a clip that this is a different track altogether.

from Birds Do It: Music From German Sex Education Movies of the 60's, available on CD



Lucy and the Bourgeoisie  performed by Ashley Park  2000
Recommended by saturnhead [profile]

Very popular Canadian pop band. You know them from Kindercore Records...home of Of Montreal, The Olivia Tremor Control, Richard Davies. This song is an orch-pop, bacharachian, stereolab ish number

from Town and Country, available on CD



Lynns Baby  performed by Mark Eric  1969
Recommended by artlongjr [profile]

It's hard to recommend a single track from this album, the whole thing is a classic of California pop. I'm glad it's finally been reissued on CD.

Mark Eric Malmborg created a genuine masterpiece with this recording, which has a bittersweet mood throughout that reminds me of "Pet Sounds". I originally came across this LP in 1989 when I found a copy at a thrift store (it had once been in the collection of the local public library!)and just looking at the cover I figured it would be great, and it was!

"Lynn's Baby" is the last track on the original LP and is a beautiful song about a girl who has been seduced and left with an out of wedlock baby by an older, manipulative guy who's left her after the usual empty promises...rather an unusual theme for a pop song! The combination of Mark Eric's voice (somewhat reminiscent of Brian Wilson) and the gorgeous string arrangement are enough to really bring out the goose bumps.

This CD is one that I absolutely can't recommend enough to fans of the beautiful 1960's pop music.

from A Midsummer's Day Dream, available on CD


Ma Jeunesse Fout le Camp  performed by Francoise Hardy
Recommended by ladonnaoscurata [profile]

I adore Francoise Hardy. Her music may be a bit too sweet for some, but this song is a favourite of mine. It's nostalgic and melancholy, and strangely comforting. My French isn't perfect, but I believe the song is about the loss of innocence and youth.

from 36 Grandes Succes


Maggie May  performed by Simtec & Wylie  1972
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Okay, I know what you're thinking. Rod Stewart?? But hold your horses, buckeroos! This is one incredible funky take on Rod's old show-stopper. Simtec & Wylie were a duo from Chicago who were modeled after such testifyin' '60s soul acts as Sam & Dave, Williams & Watson, Bob & Earl, Mel & Tim and the like. In the early 70s, they signed up with Gene Chandler's (of "Duke of Earl" fame) vanity label, Mister Chand. There, somebody convinced them that recording a cover of "Maggie May" would be a great idea. It was. First of all, they got rid of that exasperatingly unfunky mandolin intro from the original and replaced it with an electric guitar with heavy feedback. They also sped the tempo up considerably, transforming the whole thing from something rather cloying into a defiant statement...these boys aren't content to remember their time with Maggie, they're back to show her what they've learned in the meantime.

from the single Maggie May (Mister Chand)


Majory Razor Blade  performed by Kevin Coyne
Recommended by camus [profile]

70's oh so 70's daubs of wierd gaudiness, layered over plain drabness.

Quirky....very quirky also hilarious, disturbing and unforgettable.

Sample Lyric " Oh what a woman what a tongue, what an abrasive manner"

I first heard this when i around 15 or 16, borrowed from a local Mushroom dealer called Mad dog, I kid you not. At the time I'd "Inadvertently" consumed some of his wares, and was beginning to get hazy and paisley, hence he made me and a couple of friends lay down on his room floor, head to toe, turned off the lights and put Majory Razorblade on.........we giggled in the darkness like school kids,which we were, as we listened to the tale of the woman with the long and fusty dress..I've never forgotten it....

I highly recommend the Album Majory Razorblade, by Kevin Coyne - a lost genius. The title track sets the tone for an album full of seedy characters, each lost in their own wanton little worlds, with lashings of philosphical blurbs "Being on your own is hard, being with someone is harder"

well worth exploring.........




Mama Blues  performed by Alvino Rey  1961
Recommended by delicado [profile]

From an excellent early hi-fi album, this is a hilarious slow blues number in which Alvino makes his steel guitar talk. In fact, he has a conversation with it. In spite of what you might think, this actually stands up to repeated listening, unlike the 'Talking Guitar' records made later in the sixties by Pete Drake, which I find harder to handle. Incidentally, I've never heard an Alvino Rey record I wasn't astounded by.

from His Greatest Hits (Dot DLP 3391)



Manon  performed by Serge Gainsbourg  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A lovely, dark, haunting song with an intricate string arrangement; this really got me hooked on Gainsbourg as soon as I heard it. Musically, the song dazzles me - the arrangement flows beautifully and sounds very original (to me, anyway; if I'm wrong, please help steer me in the direction of more recordings like this!). Serge is a great vocalist here as well. At times he whispers, but some lines he really spits out - 'a quel point je HAIS......ce que tu es...' The guy was a genius.

from Jane Birkin & Serge Gainsbourg, available on CD




  Mike: I must agree with you (it seems pretty appropriate to do so as you introduced the song to me yourself a few years ago) - this is a very beautiful song, very beautifully and expressively sung, and the arrangement is frankly stunning. This is definitely one of those Gainsbourg tracks which really hits the heights in every department. Surely worth a listen, even to those who can't stand the bulk of Serge's output.
  tempted: Scott Walker has some similarly haunting orchestral arrangements but as a singer he's a sheep whereas Serge's a wolf. A great sheep, though.
Mark Rae’s Medicine (Kraak & Smaak Remix)  performed by Kraak & Smaak  2007
Recommended by iPodChick [profile]

The multi-talented Dutch artists Kraak & Smaak shine in their unprecedented, soul-shaking compilation, The Remix Sessions due out May 29th. Named by IDJ as "one of the most incendiary live outfits," Kraak & Smaak take that crackling energy and infuse classic jams with their signature style. Music lovers everywhere will rejoice as hard-to-find tracks, many of which were only released on vinyl, join each other in this boogie-licious showcase.

From banging dance floor "Mimezine Can't get Enough (Kraak & Smaak Remix)," to funky, midtempo "Jamiroquai Electric Mistress (Kraak & Smaak Remix)" to eerie, internationally-infused "Skeewiff Man of Constant Sorrow (Kraak & Smaak Remix)," Kraak & Smaak reveals their astounding vision for the possibilities of electronica. This beat-driven assembly is an invaluable resource for re-tracing the various pathways of this modern musical expression.

from The Remix Sessions (Quango Records)



  aquila49: Recommendation is by a recording industry shill. You can find the exact some wording at ubl.com and Indie911.comstraight from a press release. Ugghh.
Marquee Moon  performed by Television  1977
Recommended by LawrenceM [profile]

Fusing pyschedelia with Velvets drone, the 10 minute plus "Marquee Moon" is a staggering piece of music from one of the best albums of the NY punk movement. I'm not usually a far of virtuoso guitar heroics, but here it works so well ... with Richard Lloyd & Tom Verlaine's distinctive guitar technique seemingly battling it out for supremacy. Many bands have based their entire career on this song.

from Marquee Moon, available on CD



Marquee Moon  performed by Television  1975
Recommended by theothercynic [profile]

The title track of Television's 1975 album is the greatest statement of their cumulative abilities as a band. A majestic epic of dual guitar interplay, metronome bass playing, unconventional jazz drumming, and the strangled vocal screeds of Tom Verlaine, Marquee Moon begins with a double-stop riff. A second tangled guitar weaves in, a bass thuds upward, and a lockstep rhythm forms behind the surreal lyrics. From the chorus to the long, flowing jams that follow the third verse, the guitar interplay between Tom Verlaine and Richard Lloyd amazes again and again. Instead of rhythm and lead guitar, the two guitarists trade solos and phrases, tones and colors. Even when Richard Lloyd plays simply, he dominates the color and tone of the solo he underscores, and when he lets loose a solo, it flows like poetry, phrasing and declaiming the beauty of the notes it contains. Band leader Tom Verlaine twists and curves his notes all over here, careening in on himself and threatening to implode before finding a perfect spot. The majestic peaks this song climbs to seem almost impossible, and it very nearly stumbles by running long. However, nothing can detract from the climactic jams that culminate in Tom Verlaine's singing bird-call guitar notes and gentle spills of warbling riffs.


available on CD - Marquee Moon (Elektra)


Metti Una Sera A Cena  performed by Milva  1972
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

While "Metti una sera a cena" has always been amongst my favourite Ennio Morricone themes this interpretation by Milva lifts the quality of the song to an even higher sphere. In fact, its hard to describe the intensity of this version : Milvas voice is perfectly suited for this piece, the arrangement is even crisper and more dynamic than the original Morricone recording, the full blown crescendo of strings and voice at the end is simply overwhelming. My only complaint is the song seems to fade out a bit too early.

from Dedicato A Milva Da Ennio Morricone (Ricordi)
available on CD - Canto Morricone Vol.3 - The 70s (Bear Family Records)




  scrubbles: I love this song. Very chi-chi sixties sounding, refreshing as a glass of lemonade.
  dominb: There are several versions of "Metti",besides the original s/track lp,there is an entire lp of other versions available...the live Piero Piccioni conducted version feat. Edda Dell'Orso is fantastic.
  eftimihn: Yeah, the Piccioni version is a crescending epic, makes the hair on my neck raise when i'm in the right mood. What is that "entire LP of other versions" you were referring to ? Is it coincidentally called "Metti una sera a cena grande" ? And where did you get it ?
  dominb: Yeah,that's the lp I meant,I search blogger and other places for music,I got the Piccioni vers. off Limewire (useful for finding obscure stuff and things you might not buy) but I found a link to the entire lp,here it is:http://community.livejournal.com/relaxmusic/792781.html just right click on each song to d/load as the "vip link" doesn't work."Blogger" is a v.good place to search for morricone,if you are a fan and want anymore links to d/loads,feel free to email me at [email protected] and I'll steer you in the right direction.
  eftimihn: Thanks for offering some advice and help, i find this trend in posting interesting stuff on highly specialized blogs very nice, also the possibility of searching for this stuff via Blogger. As for "Metti una sera a cena grande", it's very interesting for me where this album pops up on the net, because this was, in fact, compiled by me a year ago or so :-D
  dominb: You compiled it?Wow,that's amazing!I guess you work for a record company?Yes,if the internet is great for one thing alone it's the access to music you would otherwise not hear.I don't really agree with people posting full albums they have just ripped from a new cd (an odd track or clip is fine) but for out of print or obscure vinyl these blogs are ideal.It keeps the music alive for the future which is what the composers would want most I think.
  eftimihn: No, i don't work for a record company, i just enjoy doing compilations of stuff i really love and spread it if i find others might like it too, like with this one. I fully agree with you that blogs should be limited too out-of-print or vinyl stuff. But i sincerly hope that one day record companies open their vaults and put their entire catalogue online so people don't have to search the web for rare gems that otherwise would completely vanish, i have the feeling though that this won't ever happen...
  dominb: I came across a samba record morricone did with the singer chico buarque,maybe you've heard it,there are a few very unusual songs on it,here is the link:http://balacobaco2.blogspot.com/2006/03/chico-buarque-de-hollanda-discografia.html
  dominb: other morricone i discovered,2 great scores for "roma come chicago" and "una breve stagione",not great sound quality but both feature some great tracks that I had not heard before. http://bedazzled.blogs.com/bedazzled/2006/04/roma_come_chica.html
Middle Of The Road  performed by The Pretenders  1984
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Who could forget the rousing "woo-hooa-a-hooas" that helped define the Pretenders' 1984 smash hit "Middle of the Road"? In a decade that saw synthesizer-oriented pop music arriving on U.S. soil from England, singer/guitarist Chrissie Hynde and bandmates tear it up on this classic example of pure, unadulterated rock music. The Pretenders' offering successfully maintains a formulaic rock pattern, with drums that beat on at a driving frenetic 4/4 pace and guitar riffs that induce foot stomping by the most conservative crowd. By the time the harmonica solo kicks in toward the track's end, "Middle of the Road" has worked itself up into such a musical romp that it challenges anyone to remain sitting down. There is no technical or instrumental trickery to be found here, no "secret sauce"; the song is very much in your face. Its rollicking music and lyrics that paint a picture of a journey make anyone want to hop into the car and take off for the open road. "Middle of the road, is trying to find me/ I'm standing in the middle of life with my plans behind me." You'd be hard-pressed to find anyone who didn't identify with that sentiment. The Pretenders zeroed in on one of humankind's most basic, secret desire to get up and go and backed it with an equally driven musical arrangement. And that's what makes this recording a timeless classic.
(AMG)

from Learning To Crawl, available on CD


Minitoka  performed by DJ Food  2000
Recommended by bobbyspacetroup [profile]

DJ Food's Kaleidoscope was a mind-blowing record for me when I first heard it, and I'm still very fond of it after countless listens. I guess I liked it for many of the same reasons I initially liked Tipsy's Trip Tease; they both took samples I was familiar with, or at least some of which I was familiar with, and pushed them in totally unexpected directions. DJ Food's samples are perhaps more varied and less dense than Tipsy's but still just as finely and imaginatively put together. It's hard for me to single out favorite tracks on this record, but this one is a great piece of modern Exotica. The primary sample here is "By The Waters of Minnetonka" from Stanley Black's "Exotic Percussion" record on London's Phase 4 label. There are some other nice touches including harp, slide guitar, bird sounds, and even a little Ravel ("Daphnis et Chloe"). Highly recommended.

from Kaleidoscope, available on CD




  delicado: I'm also a fan of the album, and I adore this track. The way the thick synth sound merges with the 40-year old sample is quite brilliant.
Miss Allens Blues  performed by Ernestine Allen  1961
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Maybe it's just me getting older, but I lap this kinda stuff up these days. I can't get enough of ol' style R&B, jump blues or a song like this: swingin', heartbreaking and outstandingly sung by a woman who is undeservedly just a footnote in musical history.

Ernestine (who sometimes recorded under the name Annisteen) works her smooth chords to a blues vocal with light jazzy backing. Almost Peggy Lee like in places, but with the benefit of King Curtis' sax and an amazing rhythm section that Ernestine obviously connects with.

The lyrics are beautiful, too: "You cry so hard, you cry like you never cried before; you moan and you groan so sad, you give the blues to your neighbour next door."

from Let It Roll, available on CD



Miss World  performed by Hole  1994
Recommended by oceanacid [profile]

An incredible emaotional hard rocking song that is totally relatable.

from Live Through This, available on CD


Mon Amie La Rose  performed by Natacha Atlas  2001
Recommended by Mike [profile]

I am not familiar with the original by Francoise Hardy, but consider this version to be very hauntingly expressive. The artist's interesting and highly effective fusion of the middle eastern and western is as prominent as in her other recordings.

from Gedida, available on CD


Morning Thought  performed by Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr.
Recommended by lhirsch92 [profile]




Mrs. Bluebird  performed by Sunshine Day  1999
Recommended by bobbyspacetroup [profile]

"Mrs. Bluebird" by Eternity's Children is one of the great songs I carried away from the now-defunct LuxuriaMusic. This version is from a "children's record" produced by Richard Preston & Louis Philippe. The arrangement is pretty faithful to the original, maybe a little longer with subtle but important differences. Philippe's singular vocal style compliments the song suprisingly well. Very cool.

from Simultaneous Ice Cream, available on CD



Muscle Museum  performed by Muse  1999
Recommended by amused [profile]

Amazingly atmospheric, great bass line with the vocals, guitar, bass and drums interwoven incredibly. Hard to describe but deffinitely my favourite song from this excellent album.

from Showbiz (Mushroom)


My Baby Likes to Boogaloo  performed by Don Gardner  1967
Recommended by realpill [profile]

It's an absolutely over-the-top hard soul dance tune. I first heard it on a soul compilation and recently, against all odds, I found the 45! Really cool mid paced groove with amazing guitar sound.





My John the Conqueror Root  performed by Muddy Waters  1964
Recommended by lionson76 [profile]

The album title is a bit of a misnomer; Muddy Waters is a gin-you-wine Blues singer, and "My John the Conqueror Root" is a triumphant Blues song. Here Muddy Waters describes his "root" as a source of confidence, power, and I think mojo. Kinda makes me wonder what he means by "root"... In any case, put this song on when you need to look hard-times straight in the eye and go'n wit yo' bad self!

from Folk Singer, available on CD


My Loves A Monster  performed by Clea Bradford  196?
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

A cool portion of that underated genre, easy soul. Bradford's vocals (a less roaring Shirley Bassey is the nearest comparison I can think of) complement the light arrangement perfectly. Fits in with that whole John Schroeder Orchestra vibe. Sometimes you just want a lovely vocalist singing a nice song.

from the single My Loves A Monster (Cadet 5602)



Never Thought You'd Leave Me  performed by The Pleasure Seekers  1966
Recommended by penelope_66 [profile]

Female fronted 60's garage groups are hard to come by, so this song intantly got my attention. I don't know a lot about this band; I happened to come across this song on a comp cd with little info in the liner notes. I'm assuming the band was named after the '64 film of the same title. I do know, however, that some of their stuff was just re-released. This song may have been recorded in '65 or '66. If you're the type that shuns away from buying an entire cd for one song, fear not, there are quite a few gems on this one (including another by this particular group).

from What A Way To Die (Satan Records)
available on CD - Hang It Out To Dry! (Satan Records)




  PappaWheelie: Not sure if you knew this or not, but Pleasure Seekers was Suzi Quatro and her sisters.
Nondescriptionist Ethic  performed by Giants Chair  1996
Recommended by MoeShinola [profile]

This song epitomizes the Kansas City Sound of indy rock in the mid-90s. It's loud, but not grunge or punk. They sounded like Fugazi a little, but the sound is at a distance from you, not in-your-face. It's a perfect hard rock song; direct, knows where it's going, gets there with no fuss but with a little dessert left over at the end. The frontman later changed his stage name and now makes honky-tonk music.

from Purity And Control (Caulfield)


Novo Sabor  performed by Moacyr Marques  196?
Recommended by sodapop650 [profile]

Moacyr Marques puts the Beatles standards (circa about 1964) through the Bossa mill. Better than Os Sam Beatles (which is really Manfredo Fest) Because Marques gets busy on the old Hammond B-3. The whole LP is a winner with all your favorites (I want to hold your hand, Hard Days Night, If I Fell, and of course, Jicket to Ride - the spelling error is theirs). It must be filled with Musidisc allstars becasue the quality of the music elevates the recording above the obvious novelty value to make it a real "corker" - to use a Beatles era term). Whether or not you can ever find a copy of this I don't know - but if you do - grab it.

from Novo Sabor (Musidisc Hi-Fi 2147)



  sodapop650: Also - I don't know why, but if anybody out there speaks portugese and can translate the title, for some reason the cover of the album is a picture of a young couple on a vespa in front of the eifel tower and holding a loaf of french bread (where could they be?) but what any of it has to do with the Beatles I don't know.
  fjordlord: the title means New Taste
Oba, la vem ela  performed by Jorge Ben  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An incredible, hard-to-describe classic from Jorge Ben. It opens with a funky, feverishly strummed chord sequence, and builds up beautifully. Warm strings come in, while the vocals become more and more manic (in a good way). I really can't do this song justice in words, but I urge you to check it out. Jorge Ben really is a genius songwriter, and his backing group, 'trio mocoto' really rock.

from Forca Bruta
available on CD - mojo club volume 4 (Polygram Germany)




  sodapop650: My favorite Jorge Ben is his work on the LP "Tudo Azul" by Ze Maria. If you are not familiar with Ze Maria he is a very hip brazilian organist. The easy comparison whould be with Walter Wanderley, but he is way way cooler with a chimelike reverbed style and a lot darker sound, almost creepy voodoo northern Brazil Bahia sound like the way "Os Afrosambas" by Baden Powell Vinicius de Moraes and Quarteto Em Cy is. A guy I work with is from Brazil and says that although just about everyone is Catholic in Brazil many practice voodoo too and that Vinicius made a pact with the Devil in return for his career - There is something distant and weird about that LP - and the Ze Maria LP as well. Anyway, I think "Tudo Azul" which is available on CD is the first versions of Ben classics Mas Que Nada and Por Causa de Voce Menina. If you go on to ebay look for a guy named Alan Bastos, he sells tons of cool Brazilian CDs cheap.
  tinks: was this recorded in '69? it's the first track on his '76 "samba nova" lp...is that a re-recording, or what? can somebody shed some light for me? at any rate, it's a great album for, uh, "lovin'". my favorite track would have to be "vendedor de bananas cosa nostra--bicho do mato", if not for its unwieldly title alone.
  sodapop651: No this LP is on Continental Label and recorded in 1963. It is available on CD. Tudo Azul, I think it means "everything Blue"
  tinks: the version i have is definitely not from 63, it's waaay too funky.
  delicado: I'm confused about the whole thing. I have no idea where I originally got 1969 from (other than that the arrangement suggested it); the song is on 'Forca Bruta', which I thought was from 1975, but I think in retrospect that's just the date of the copy my (appalling quality) LP was bootlegged from.
  delicado: Ok. It turns out there's a pretty good Jorge Ben discography at http://www.uol.com.br/benjor/disco.htm, which confirms the date of Forca Bruta as 1970. I think sodapop was talking about the (completely separate) Ze Maria album. I heard 'mas que nada' from this album, and it was indeed excellent.
  Marco-Visitante: Official and completes discography of Jorge Ben Jor is here: http://www.jorgebenjor.com.br/sec_discogra_discos.php?language=en
  sodapop650: But I've changed my mind. My new favorite Ben classic is "Carnaval Triste" of the Sacundin LP. There is also a great Ze Maria cover of it off an even earlier LP I'm not sure who penned it or recorded it first. But its meditative and chantlike and very voodoo.
On (µ-ziq Remix)  performed by Aphex Twin  1993
Recommended by danomene [profile]

This song is a mellow eletronica piece that blends the jittery feeling of jungle with the melodic nature of more ambient techno.

from On Remixes (Warp Records WAP39CDR)


Once in Lifetime  performed by Talking Heads  1980
Recommended by geezer [profile]

A bubbling almost loop like backing track punctuated by David Byrnes deranged t.v evangelist style exclamations "My god this is not my beautiful house ,this is not my beautiful wife,what have i done"? .Then a stroke of genius to pull the song back from the edge of avant garde ,a joyous funky ,gospel inspired chorus .A band at their most inspired and confident with the wizardry of Eno pressing all the right buttons.Hard to believe no one has recomended this before.

from Remain in Light
available on CD - Remain In Light


Only You  performed by Little Richard  1964
Recommended by Arthur [profile]

Richards unique take on this standard is unlikely in the extreme.
Recorded for Vee Jay records in 1964 as am album track it seems it only appeared on 45 an "Oldie".
Almost big band in style it's about as jazzy as richard ever got-so far ! It's available on numerous re-issue albums.

I was heard a female version -same backing but different tune and lyric. I've never managed to find out what it is.

from Little Richard Is Back (Vee Jay Vee Jay LP1107)


Open Door  performed by Genesis  1980
Recommended by Mike [profile]

It is hard to imagine a more musically wistful verse than that of this song. The swelling chorus augments it perfectly and very dramatically. This B side from the "Duke" era is surely one of Mike Rutherford's best songs, and one of the highlights of the post-Gabriel Genesis for those who appreciate the band's slower numbers.


available on CD - Genesis Archive Vol 2



  makebusy7: Um, that song was a throwaway no matter how you slice it
  Mike: It's all about musical taste, really, although even if it was not to my taste, I would find it hard to put together an argument for it as a throwaway.
  mrtanner: I think this is an absolutely beautiful track!
  Mike: Oh yes, it's quite special...glad someone else appreciates it!
Oui je dis adieu  performed by Franoise Hardy  1971
Recommended by whoops [profile]

Franoise Hardy at the beginning of the seventies had gained the right to be seen as something different than simply a part of the y y movement of the sixties. In 1971 with the help of a brazilian guitarist named Tuca she was about to make what is considered by many (and by me) as her best album. "La question" has a perfect instrumentation (strings, guitar and bass) and stunning arrangements. I dare you not to fall in love with the first 30 seconds of "Oui je dis adieu", in a way it reminds me of Scott Walker's "Plastic palace people" it has the same circular construction.

from La question, available on CD


Out of my hands  performed by Richard x Heyman  1998
Recommended by moondog [profile]

Music for pussies producer Steve Albini once answered when he shared his thoughts about the genre powerpop. So, perhaps that makes me one then but anyone who likes melodies got to admit that the genre has produced some gems over the years. Richard x Heyman is one of the standouts in the genre. When he doesn´t tune his rickenbacker in his tabbey road studio in new york he goes out searching for homeless cats. So, maybe now i got you all concvinced that the man differs a bit from the average powerpopper. Out of my hands is taken from the mighty fine cornerstone and is overflowing with hooks,hooks my friends which is exactly what i need right now.

from cornerstone


Out of my mind on dope and speed  performed by Julian Cope  1986
Recommended by phil [profile]

And people say eminem is hard - Julian was singing about drugs long before. This one is truly magnificent: "Then I heard my mother cry/ 'I'm out of my mind on dope and speed!'/ No no, let me tell you not no word of a lie..." Julian sings in a Scott Walker style. He also cheerily gives instructions to his musicians as he goes along: "This time, stay on A!". It's really good. For whatever reason, the album this was on was suppressed, but he stuck it out on the greatest hits (Floored Genius) anyway.

from Skellington (unreleased)
available on CD - Floored Genius (Sony)



Out of this World  performed by Tony Hatch  1962
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A superb twangy, bongo-ridden theme from Tony Hatch. It's hard to believe this is the same man who wrote the themes for soap operas like 'Crossroads' and 'Neighbours', but it is... Overall this sounds kind of how I once expected/hoped John Barry's early 60s work might sound - harpsichord, twangy guitar etc. It opens with some eerie effects, bongoes and spare harpsichord sound before breaking into a fully fledged shadows/spy theme style masterpiece, stopping abruptly after just over two minutes. Since I heard this on a compilation, I have no idea as to its origin, which is a shame, as I would love to track down any similar work Tony Hatch may have done. I did some research, and it seems that the session guitarist on this track was none other than Big Jim Sullivan, who cut a couple of sitar LPs on Mercury in the 60s.
n.b. this is not the same tune as the much recorded and superb Harold Arlen/Johnny Mercer 'out of this world'.

from the single Out of this World
available on CD - Easy Project II: House of Loungecore (Sequel)




  n-jeff: For some reason my parents acquired 2 mint copies of this on 7. Needless to say they didn't keep 'em long, heh, heh. Its a nice enough track, don't I remember some flute in there. but Tony was also the composer of some great early 60's pop, he did a number of LP's with Petula Clark, including the hits 'Downtown' and 'Don't sleep in the Subway' written with Jackie Trent (I think- Oh names, names, names). So to only remember him for Neighbours is cruel (and don't forget one variant of the Crossroads theme was recorded by paul Macartney and Wings, bet that isn't on the greates hits LP).
  delicado: totally; I think Tony's a genius; don't get me wrong! 'I know a place' and 'I couldn't live without your love' are two other great pop songs he was responsible for...
Out of this World  performed by Buddy Merrill  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Ok, I feel kind of lame for recommending two tracks called 'out of this world' in one sitting, but as soon as I remembered this one, I felt compelled to recommend it. Before I became completely obsessed with the kind of smooth bossa-influenced stuff I've been recommending, my big thing in music was that it had to be twangy. This is quite twangy, but in a very tasteful way. An incredibly haunting song whoever it is performed by, 'out of this world' here gets its other-worldliness from Buddy's incredible multitracked guitars - the main tune is played on the slide guitar, while several other parts relentlessly pick out accompaniments. It's hard to categorize this track really - it's not remotely funky or particularly rocking, yet it's very catchy and undeniably compelling.

from Latin Festival (Accent)


Out The Window  performed by Violent Femmes  1991
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Yeah, yeah, just about everyone has heard the classic first album by the Milwaukee trio... however, some of their truly best efforts are to be found on later releases. "Out the Window" is one of those femme-gems that many people are sadly unaware of. Gordon Gano is in top form in this ode to unfortunate clumsiness ("life was short and life was sweet", I was thinking as I hit the street, I could hardly believe, I could scarcely conceive, that I had gone out the window).
The femme-enized remake of 'Do You Really Want To Hurt Me' on this album is also not to be missed!

from Why Do Birds Sing, available on CD


Party Up  performed by DMX  1999
Recommended by Betto_Colombia [profile]

If you're into hardcore rap from the clubs you are gonna love it. Very commercial. Nice mixes and dirty lyrics.

The chorus is petty catchy: Y'all gon' make me lose my mind up in HERE, up in here...


available on CD - And Then There Was X


Pas Gentille  performed by Franoise Hardy
Recommended by djfreshmoney [profile]

Guitar strummin', laid back tune from Franoise Hardy. Cool, bluesy.


available on CD - The Vogue Years



Penetration  performed by Pedro The Lion  2002
Recommended by Herr V [profile]

I could recomment almost any song Pedro The Lion has recorded, but this recent song embodies most of what PTL stands for: quiet, folky, melancholy lyrics but also angry, hard and bitter. You can download this song from the label website: www.jadetree.com

from Control, available on CD



Pinocchio  performed by Mary Roos  1977
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

It's strange hearing a sweet, soothing kiddie tune sung in German, with all its hard syllables. "Pinocchio"'s sugary, synth-based production can best be described as "ABBA lite". Mary Roos is a singer I know little about, except she once entered the Eurovision song contest with "Arizona Man", an early Giorgio Moroder composition. She's so appealing here, though, that I would like to look into her other stuff.





Playground Love  performed by Air  2000
Recommended by delicado [profile]

To me, this one of the most perfect songs released in recent years. It's hard to pin down what makes this track so affecting - the instrumentation is mostly synth; there is also an understated, slightly Bowie-style vocal. Overall I think it is the music itself - the fragile chord sequence and instrumentation evoke a strange sense of lost summer memories.

from Virgin Suicides, available on CD




  secularus: This track is sublime. Atmosphere to the nth degree. Sophia Coppola is very lucky to have a gem like this as the pervasive track to her film, The Virgin Suicides. Mesmerizing.
  tinks: that ain't the only reason sofia coppola is very lucky, but that's another story. i agree, i love the entire score to the film.
Prams  performed by Vital Disorders  1981
Recommended by unathanthium [profile]

We had a good time in the eighties,we really did.Unemployment,strikes,kids inculcated with the Thatcher mantra of making money which has depoliticized the youth of today.Fortunately the hypocrisy of Blair has encouraged a few students to tear themselves away from their business studies and take to the streets.Revolution revives art;it happened in the late 50's and 60's when teenagers rebelled against the staidness of post war England,
and again in the bleak mid 70's when youth rebelled against the poor prospects on offer.Fashion,music and literature are never healthier than when faced with intransigence.
In 1981 the post punk landscape was a glorious directionless quagmire.Record labels littered the nation,some only managing a few releases.Lowther International was home to the Vital Disorders who were angry but not too angry to write a great tune.
The Prams EP contains three slices of political pop,domestic and general.Prams is a scream of feminist outrage,of how women have their dreams ruptured,trapped by the drudgery of daily life,the omnipotent cry of the tyrannical baby squashing their ambitions.

"Lets talk about prams and washing machines,
Lets talk about the end of childhood dreams".

That is the chorus,sung with increasing vitriol as the song progresses,until you can almost feel the phlegm hit your face,as Tina Pilchards spits out those words one final time.Sizzling.




Premonitions  performed by Townhall
Recommended by Reina [profile]

This song will probably be very hard to find. They are kind of a local band and not that well known. But they are really cool--unique, passionate, free spirited. Basically hippies. In Premonitions they express concern over the state of the planet but remain upbeat and optimistic.

"Let's be creative with our destinies..."




Real Pain  performed by Kraak & Smaak  2007
Recommended by iPodChick [profile]

The multi-talented Dutch artists Kraak & Smaak shine in their unprecedented, soul-shaking compilation, The Remix Sessions due out May 29th. Named by IDJ as "one of the most incendiary live outfits," Kraak & Smaak take that crackling energy and infuse classic jams with their signature style. Music lovers everywhere will rejoice as hard-to-find tracks, many of which were only released on vinyl, join each other in this boogie-licious showcase.

From banging dance floor "Mimezine Can't get Enough (Kraak & Smaak Remix)," to funky, midtempo "Jamiroquai Electric Mistress (Kraak & Smaak Remix)" to eerie, internationally-infused "Skeewiff Man of Constant Sorrow (Kraak & Smaak Remix)," Kraak & Smaak reveals their astounding vision for the possibilities of electronica. This beat-driven assembly is an invaluable resource for re-tracing the various pathways of this modern musical expression.

from The Remix Sessions (Quango Records)



  aquila49: If this recommendation sounds like an ad, it's because it is one! I found the exact same wording on another siteindie911.com. iPodChick works for the recording industry. Is that acceptable to Musical Taste members? It isn't to me. By the way, I like Kraak and Smaakbut I am not coming here anymore if shills like "iPodChick" are going to be posting "recommendations."
  delicado: Hi aquila49 - thanks for your comment. yeah, I figured this was probably an 'inside' recommendation although I didn't do the follow-up googling! I don't mind say people recommending their own band so long as it's one song and they're pretty straight up about it, but obviously this isn't the same thing. I guess I should set out some guidelines somewhere. If anyone else has any feelings about this feel free to chime in!
  n-jeff: I agree with aquila49 - off with their heads! I hardly buy music papers because too much is regurgitated verbatim from press releases. I must admit when I read the initial recommendation my mind glazed over halfway through the first phrase, so I couldn't actually read it. Send them back to MYSPACE!
  aquila49: I guess "ipodchick" doesn't have anything to say about thisor anything else. Good riddance.
  liveinpeace: I think the music speaks for itself, however it may have come to our awareness. I do not criticize ipodchick or anyone else for not posting more here. You have made people feel so "welcomed" to join in the discussion. Just keep on living in peace, love, and music.
Richard Nixon  performed by Rod & The MSR Singers  197?
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

One of the more famous song-poems, this is sung by the man with a thousand names, Rodd Keith. Being English, I had never really heard of the song-poem concept until an article in (I think) Cool & Strange Music magazine. Then this compilation CD came out and, wow, pinch my cheeks and call me a convert.



Anything that encourages the bizarre side of human nature gets my approval and song-poems certainly do that. Especially the right wing freaks, who seem to be over-represented in the genre. This is one of those very over-zealous numbers, stating (pre-Watergate) that Nixon is "a man of priceless worth".



What I love about Rodd Keith is that, no matter how banal or weird the lyrics kicked out by some Arkansas dweller are, he gives a sterling performance. This is no different. The spirit in which the song is written is strictly adhered to by Keith, adding of course to its overall charm.

from The American Song-Poem Anthology: Do You Know The Difference..., available on CD



Ride On  performed by Ebony Jam  1970
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A thoroughly wild hard funk track with some great congas...this came out on the same tiny label that Bing Crosby recorded for in his final years, and it couldn't be much more diametrically opposed! I don't have any info at all about this band or their other releases, so if you do, please let me know!

from the single Ride On (Amos)



Riding To Work in the Year 2025  performed by The Flaming Lips
Recommended by bobbyspacetroup [profile]

A wonderful cinematic track which originally appeared in extended form on the now hard to find "Zaireeka" album. Seemingly some sort of narrative about a delusional morning commuter. Check out the "Zaireeka" version if you can or, if you can't, check out this great sounding stereo mixdown.

from Waiting For A Superman EP (Warner Bros. 9 44793-2)
available on CD - Waiting For A Superman (Warner Bros.)



Ring Worm  performed by Van Morrison  1968
Recommended by agnamaracs [profile]

Okay, I'm going to summarize the story as best as I can.

Van Morrison's first recording contract as a solo artist was with a small label called Bang, owned by a man named Bert Berns. Among Bang's hits were "I Want Candy" by the Strangeloves, "Hang On Sloopy" by the McCoys, "Cherry Cherry" by Neil Diamond, and of course "Brown Eyed Girl" by Van Morrison.

Bang released Morrison's first album, "Blowin' Your Mind," in 1967. The thing is, Morrison had nothing to do with it. He wanted out of his contract. Berns died in December of that year, but Bang (now run by Berns's wife Ilene) still wanted ten songs from Van. He gave 'em 31.

The Bang Contractuals, as these sessions have come to be known, can be split into three categories: throwaways ("Twist and Shake," "Stomp and Scream"), cynical commentary ("The Big Royalty Check," "Blow in Your Nose" [a play on "Blowin' Your Mind]), and the just plain bizarre.

"Ring Worm" is a member of the third group. First of all, Morrison doesn't sing the lyrics, he speaks them. Second, the lyrics are:

I can see by the look on your face... that you've got ring worm.
I'm very sorry, but... I have to tell you that... you've got... ring worm...
It's a very common disease...
Actually, you're very lucky to have... ring worm, because you may have... had something else.


Finally, after the lyrics comes the most bizarre "singing" I've ever heard. I can't even describe it. You'll have to hear it for yourself. I will say this: if you're familiar with Van's more commercial works, you will be dumbfounded.

Of course, we all know the rest of the story: later in 1968, Morrison signed to Warner Bros., recorded "Astral Weeks," and became a legend. I have friends, however, that believe the Bang Contractuals to be his best album.

The material shouldn't be too hard to find: since its first release (apparently, by a small Portuguese label in 1992), the Bang Contractuals have been released over and over, always as a two-disc set with the more "legitimate" Bang material ("Brown Eyed Girl," etc.) Look for titles such as "The Complete Bang Sessions," "Payin' Dues," and (ugh) "Brown Eyed Beginnings."

from The Lost Tapes (Movie Play Gold)
available on CD - ah, thousands of 'em (take yer pick)




  eftimihn: I already knew this weird story, but being a fan of Van for 15 years or so it wasn't until these 2 tracks (together with "You Say France And I Whistle") were featured on Otis Fodder's 365 Days Project that i eventually heard them. Hilarious stuff. It's pretty much a precedence that shows what happens when record companies force artists to be creative and deliver what they want...
Riverman  performed by Nick Drake  1969
Recommended by geezer [profile]

The most beautiful song ever recorded ,hard to qualify,hard to measure,i know ,but one listen of this gentle folk infused languid samba will convince and convert.
Everything on this is right,the apologetic vocal,the crying strings and a portentous forboding lyric,everything seems to move along at a rivers pace.it could last for two minutes or two hours,its effect on your senses would still be divine

from Five Leave Left
available on CD - Five Leaves Left


Road ode  performed by The Carpenters  1972
Recommended by delicado [profile]

The Carpenters have become like Abba were for me about 15 years ago - I can lose hours at a time just listening to their best songs with the volume up high. I actually never really dared to venture beyond my favorites from Abba's hits, but with the Carpenters I have a few LPs and recently picked up a 5-CD reader's digest set, allowing me to hear some less famous tracks by them.

This track is a bit of a revelation for me. Highly produced, early 70s. Piano-led, with strings, guitar, bass etc, and Richard providing some backing vocals. Karen's singing is beautiful as ever, although her voice sounds a bit funny - she over-pronounces words like 'goes'. The verse is plaintive and moody, while the brief chorus is funky in that glorious way tracks from the early 70s can be funky. This section is reprised with pretty sick flute playing!

In all, a really beautiful track that for me showcases all the best things the Carpenters have to offer. The band are still stigmatized by many, for reasons I'm not exactly clear on. I understand that this kind of highly produced, clean sounding music might not be for everyone, but if you've just been put off listening to them because they're not very cool, maybe give this track a try!

from A song for you (A song for you)
available on CD - Magical Memories of the Carpenters (Reader's Digest)



  FlyingDutchman1971: You are not alone in you love of the Carpenters! I am proud to say that I have every studio album produced by Richard and Karen and still play them all the time. I need to pull them off the shelves and post a few songs on here... thanks for bringing it to my attention!
  callgirlscene: I like the Carpenters too. They have a pristine flawless and happy quality that is slightly unreal. It's fascinating and yet there's a kind of tragic undercurrent in some of their music too.
Rock ’n’ Roll  performed by Detroit  1971
Recommended by schlick [profile]

Terrific, hard rockin' version of the Velvet Underground song.

from Detroit, available on CD


rock’n’roll  performed by motrhead  1987
Recommended by angelica [profile]

pared-down gritty rock'n'roll, this song hammers away from start to finish in classic motrhead style. the lyrics are what really distinguish this track for me, however... lemmy rasps "i've got rock'n'roll / to save me from the cold / and if that's all there is / it ain't so bad", making this song a paean to his love of rock and roll above all else. no woman, no bed will tie him down... only rock'n'roll will comfort him in his old age. and at 58, he's still rockin' hard. even though he's a dirty old man and i'm slightly afraid of him... well, it still fills me with hope.

from Rock'N'Roll, available on CD


Roses and Revolvers  performed by Janko Nilovic  1970
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Janko Nilovic deserves attention. He composed a huge volume of library music in the 1960s and 70s, and what I've heard of his work has all been excellent. Some of it has recently been made available on CD by the Cosmic Sounds label, who are also releasing new work by him. It's hard to sum up his work, because it was quite diverse. From what I've heard, Nilovic was like a jazzier, more wild version of other contemporary library composers like Roger Roger and Nino Nardini.

This is a wonderful instrumental that opens with a bare breakbeat. This is soon joined by bass and electric guitar, which then give way to a Morricone-style harpsichord, which riffs over a descending minor chord sequence. The whole thing remains funky and slightly menacing as different parts drop in and out. The whole piece is really just a simple jam, but the impeccable arrangement takes it to a higher level.

from Supra Pop Impressions (Montparnasse 2000 MP16)



Runaround Sue  performed by Dion & the Belmonts  1962
Recommended by fantasticsupremedeluxe [profile]

"I should have known it from the very start
This girl would leave me with a broken heart
Now listen people, what I'm telling you
keep away from Runaround Sue


I miss her lips and the smile on her face
touch of her hands and this girls warm embrace
so if you don't wanna cry like I do
keep away from Runaround Sue"


Half sad, half funky. A very groovy Doo Wop - track with a funny melody that makes it hard to believe that the guy is really blue...


available on CD - Dion Hits (1958-1963) (Ace)


Runnin' Out of Fools  performed by Neko Case  2002
Recommended by mitchiavelli [profile]

Neko puts her golden throat to this sultry old soul number and creates magic.

It is one of the few covers on her new album 'Blacklisted' but is the one where she really demonstrates her voice's depth, range and emotion.

Simply brilliant.

from Blacklisted, available on CD


sacrafice  performed by rudementary peni  198?
Recommended by somthingklever [profile]

verry brutal




Sailors Song  performed by Fairport Convention  1969
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

I first heard this cover of a traditional folk song via the 20 jazzfunkgreats blogspot. But I'd heard of Fairport convention previously, Sandy Denny, Richard Thompson and all that, but like so many English people i couldn't bring myself to listen to an English folk group - well MY LOSS.
The song is in two parts, with an eye opening second half drone jam. Spellbinding stuff, with the violin scraping long notes, and (presumably) Richard Thompson scattering trebly white noise almost chords around on top it. It's hard to gauge how much cross fertilisation back and forth between America and the UK their would have been but it's hard to imagine that this wasn't informed by the Velvet Underground.

from Unhalbricking (Island)
available on CD - Unhalfbricking (Island)


Se telefonando  performed by Mina  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A dramatic pop number from the 60s in which Mina passionately belts out the tune. The opening is gentle, with a delicate trumpet melody; it then builds up to a huge climax with full orchestra. The song is infuriatingly catchy and familiar; I'm sure I had heard it many times before I finally identified it about five years ago. Very highly recommended.


available on CD - Canto Morricone, Vol 1 (Bear Family)




  andyjl: This song was covered in a great version by Francoise Hardy (as "Je changerais d'avis"). It's on several compilations of her 60s recordings.
  delicado: Francoise also recorded it in English (the recording is exactly the same apart from the vocals) as 'I will change my life'. Great stuff!
Send me some lovin`  performed by Little Richard  1957
Recommended by valesca [profile]

Im not sure if this ballad comes from the good old times of rock-n-roll where Little Richard captured the censors attention because of shouting and leering at the audience while wearing make up or if it`s part of his "gospel era". (In 1957, in the midst of a sold-out tour, Richard quit rock-n-roll to become a preacher in the Seventh Day Adventist Church...) But one thing is for sure: his screaming distinctive voice together with the affirmative melody make this (first?) version of "Send me some lovin` memorable!


available on CD - Little Richard - The EP Collection (Seeformile)



  Arthur: The true King Of Rock And Roll and yes, the original version. It is from the fifties so it's pre Richards gospel era. Tracks like this show Richard as a main contender for the title of one of the the first Soul artistes. 'I'm Just a Lonely Guy'from the same period is equally great and check out his Vee Jay recording from 1965 'I Don't know What You Got (But It's Got Me)' for pure Soul ballad artistry.
Shoots and Ladders  performed by Korn
Recommended by gypsy36 [profile]

I think this is one of Korn's first songs to get airplay, although most people I know don't remember it. It came out during the Grunge era of the 90's.

This is not a serious, meaningful song, but it is fun! How could you not like to hear your favorite childhood nursery rhymes translated into a hardcore rock song? It's a great idea!

After singing somewhat diabolical versions of "Ring-Around-A-Rosy", "London Bridge Is Falling Down," "Mary Had A Little Lamb," etc...Jonathan Davis leads us into the main chorus:

"Nursery rhymes are said, verses in my head
Into my childhood they're spoonfed
Hidden violence revealed, darkness that seems real
Look at the pages that cause all this evil"

The most interesting thing about this song is that each rhyme has a unique style, kind of like songs within a song; and it all fits together neatly.




Slide  performed by Goo Goo Dolls  1998
Recommended by Carrie [profile]

Wanna wake up where you are,
I won't say anything at all.
So, why don't you slide,
Yeah, I'm gonna let it slide..


This song is about a guy and a girl. The girl, raised by strict Catholic parents, got pregnant, and the guy and girl are trying to decide whether to have an abortion, get married, etc.

Their usual hard-rock sound missing, "Slide" continued a string of ballad-like hits for the Goo Goo Dolls.

from Dizzy Up Girl, available on CD



  leanne: Thank you for mentioning the goo goo dolls in your recommendations but aren't you overlooking their older albums that aren't as well known? They have amazing music in their past - check it out.
So um amor  performed by Shorty Rogers and his Giants  1961
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A short, but astoundingly catchy instrumental in the bossa nova style. This is led by guitar and bass, with subtle stabs from the horn section. It's hard to put into words how clean, yet edgy and catchy the sound is. Somehow, in spite of all the instrumentation, there is a lot of space in the mix. This is from an LP on reprise called simply 'Bossa Nova', with a generic looking sleeve that is also used for a much less bossa-inspired Barney Kessell LP.

from Bossa Nova (Reprise R-6050)



Sob Story  performed by Minor Threat  198x
Recommended by Durruti [profile]

This song is about.... ehh, the lyrics are quite self explaintory::

"Life's not been good for you
It's just not fair
You did nothing to deserve it
You did nothing at all
Sit back and watch
It turns from bad to worse
No matter how loud you cry
It always hurts.....
Everybody gets
The breaks that belonged to you
Everybody takes
Your just desserts....




At first I wasn't very satisfied with this song. It's hardcore, lyrics are shouted and I didn't understand anything, I only listened to melody and other things. Than I read lyrics and listened to it again.
THIS SONG IS VERY GOOD. ONE OF THE BEST MINOR THREAT SONGS (They are all great except "Guilty Of Being White", I hate lyrics. It remind me of nazi skins)
Minor Threat are one of the greatest hardcore bands of all time. Straight Edge is movement, which started becouse of one Minor Threat's song with the same name. The lyric side of MN is great, instrumental part to. They are great. They'll always be. IF YOU DON'T LIKE MINOR THREAT YOU DON'T LIKE HARDCORE! Sorry, but that's true.

You can find their whole discography on one CD which consists of 26 songs.

from Complete Discography, available on CD


Solar Winds  performed by Devin Townsend  2007
Recommended by MightyMetMan [profile]

An absolutely amazing song that spans many many many genres including ambient, metal, rock, and all out wackiness. Truly gives a great idea of the depth and breadth of Devin Townsend's genius.

from Ziltoid The Omniscient!
available on CD - Ziltoid the Omniscient!


somliga gr med trasiga skor  performed by cornelis vreeswijk
Recommended by olli [profile]

it's about time i recommended some vreeswijk. after all he's one of my very favourite artsts, and pretty obscure outside scandinavia. it's hard to decide wich song to post, as i guess you'd have to be scandinavian to enjoy the masterful, deceptivly simple lyrics. the best way to describe the man is as kind of a swedish crossbred of serge gainsbourg, tom waits and bob dylan.
this is one of his best-known songs, a qusasi-joyous melancholy number about death and hopelessness.
i once heard someone say something that summed up the power of this guy pretty well: "I dont understand swedish, however I do understand Cornelis Vreeswijk"


the best place to start if you're interested n an initial taste, is probably the new 2-cd set. if you're like me, youll soon advance to the original lp's and the 5-cd set "master cees memoarer".

lyrics:
Somliga gr med trasiga skor, sg vad beror det p?
Gud fader som i himmelen bor kanske vill ha det s.
Gud fader som i himmelen bor blundar och sover stt. Vem bryr sig om ett par trasiga skor nr man r gammal och trtt?
Vem bryr sig om hur dagarna gr? Dom vandrar som dom vill.
Medborgare, om ett hundra r finns du ej lngre till.
D har nn annan tagit din stol, det vet du inte av.
Du knner varken regn eller sol ner i din mrka grav.
Vem bryr sig om hur ntterna far? Jag bryr mig inte ett spr. Bara jag fr ha mitt ansikte kvar dolt i min lsklings hr.
Jag r en tvivelaktig figur, duger ej mycket till. Bakom ett hrn str dden p lur, han tar mig nr han vill.
Somliga gr med trasiga skor tills dom har slutat g. Djvulen som i helvetet bor fr sig ett gott skratt d
a very, very bad and rushed translation of the lyrics,most of the humor and finer points are lost but at least you'll know what's it about:

some walk around in bad shoes, say, why is is it so?
maybe the good lord up in the sky wants it that way.
the good lord up in the sky sleeps calmly now.
who cares about a pair of bad shoes when they are old and tired?
who cares how the days pass? they go the way the want.
fellow citizen, in a hundred years you will no longer exist.
someone else will have taken your chair, but you won't know about that.
you'll feel neither rain nor sun, down in your dark grave.
who cares how the nights pass? i don't care at all.
as long as i get to keep my my face tucked in my love's hair.
i'm a questionable character, not good for much.
behind a corner death lurks, he'll take me whenever he wants.
some walk around in bad shoes/ until hey walk no more
the devil, who lives down in the hell/ will have a good laugh then.






  daniel: Hello, I dont like your translation of "somliga gr med trasiga skor", You have changed alot in the lyrics, If you like the song you should work on it and translate it corectly. Daniel
Sophisticated Lady  performed by Robert Maxwell  1962
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This instrumental version of sophisticated lady is unlike any other I have ever heard. The harp is used alongside some strange instrumentation and recording techniques to create a unique other worldly sound. There is also a Richard Maxwell trademark - an incongruous, rasping 50s style sax solo in the middle. He was a pretty interesting guy, all in all; his Decca albums pretty much all seem to be interesting.

from Peg O My Heart (Decca DL74563)



Space Lord  performed by Monster Magnet  1998
Recommended by King Charles [profile]

After nearly three and a half years of speculation, I finally bought this album in the fall of 2003. Wow. As soon as I popped it in, I knew that it was Monster Magnet, but I knew I had a new band to add to my favorite list. These guys rock, period, they're in the lower upper class of hard rock (with upper upper being reserved for such acts as Metallica, Iron Maiden, and Dream Theater), hell I don't even want to categorize them, as this would place a restriction on their potential (in much the same way the Jewish cannot write the word "God," and Muslims cannot draw Him, according to friends I have of those faiths). The song starts off like a fireside story, we've got a low bass beat, a great little intro compliments of Ed Mundell. Wyndorf's space, money, power, sex and religion influenced lyrics become prevalent as soon as the song begins, and we are launched into a maracca, tambourine, and 70's/80's hard line influenced metal trip. Ned Raggett's characterization of an 'acid folk' edge to the beginning of the song gives it good justice, and Space Lord slowly cranks up the volume, settling down once, and then cranking it up again, ready to conquer worlds with the hard rock edge that has kept Monster Magnet in the limelight, but away from the new age/pathetic sounds. Upon listening to this song, we think "classic rock," not because of it's refusal to metamorphose (or rather, transmogrify) into today's rock, but because of it's influence from the aforementioned 60's - 80's hard core, unfiltered, instrumentally diverse sound (including alternate percussive effects from tambourines and maraccas, as well as keyboard infiltration that would make The Doors jealous), which is uniquely self-complimenting, orchestrated, and coherent. Space Lord deals with becoming (unconsciously) corrupt with power, wealth, and ultimately desire (Now give me the strenth to split the world into, yeah/I've ate all the rest, and now I've gotta eat you), which may delineate the stereotypical American 'powertrip,' hence the album's appropriate name. If you are looking for unrelenting excellent rock, which isn't too harsh to listen to, but most certainly isn't along the lines of Phish or Weezer (in any respect at all), I recommend this song, album and any others one could get one's hands on. 5 out of 5 stars for its genre.

from Power Trip


Speak Low  performed by Harpers Bizarre  1976
Recommended by konsu [profile]

When I first came to this site I was suprised to not see any Harper's Bizarre tunes! They were a pretty fab vocal group who seem to be getting their due.

This song is from an almost unknown "lost" album from 76'. (Their heyday was the mid to late 60's, and had great success with their hit "Feelin' Groovy" in 67') And is a suprisingly jammin' version of a song from 1943 called "Speak Low" (From the film "One Touch of Venus"). I've heard other versions of this song, but nothing like this!

It starts off sounding like an O'donell Levy track, with a slinky/breezy latin step, and smooth, jazzy, compressed chords gliding across the top..... And then the vocal kicks-in, with this apropos low vocal harmony, instantly recognizable as HB, but more subdued.... They take the song and totally make it their own! Really just a superb track! Very A&M like, but with a bit more whimsy.... This record is hard to come by and needs a re-issue..... HELLO?!

HB is a must for fans of later B-boy's stuff or other Sunny pop from LA in the 60's and 70's!!!

from As Time Goes By (Forest Bay Company DS-7545-LP)



Still is Still Moving To Me  performed by Toots & The Maytals w/ Willie Nelson
Recommended by Steenie [profile]

I'd actually never heard of this band, but after having heard the song over the speakers in a bookstore I was in I went to one of the cashiers and asked her the name of it. She passed me the CD case...now it is one of my favourite tunes (to listen to and to sing!).

Very catchy reggae, simple but meaningful lyrics. And though Willie Nelson has never been tops on my favourite singers/bands list, I veyr much like the way he sings this song...and surprisingly he doesn't sound so out-of-place doing reggae. I'd like to know what other recordings of this song exist. In the meantime, listen to this version!

The percussion is VERY cool.

"Still Is Still Moving To Me"

Still is still moving to me
And I swim like a fish in the sea all the time
But if that's what it takes to be free I don't mind
Still is still moving to me
Still is still moving to me

And it's hard to explain how I feel
It won't go in words but I know that it's real
I can be moving or I can be still
But still is still moving me
Still is still moving to me

(Repeat)

from True Love, available on CD


Stone Cold Yesterday  performed by The Connells  1990
Recommended by john_l [profile]

This is a fairly straight-ahead rocker with a well-defined beat, which some have called the Connells' best song. My favourite thing about it is that snaking guitar line which lies in behind the vocals in the first verse, and then starts to repeat an octave higher in the second, but quickly changes direction. Very inventive! It reminds me of the shorter guitar line that leads into the chorus on "Upside Down" from their previous LP "Fun and Games".

This LP seemed to see the band influenced by grunge and moving in a direction featuring a harder guitar sound, but I don't think it was an improvement at all, and I do have most of their CDs ...

from One Simple Word, available on CD


Stronger  performed by Kanye West
Recommended by MistaNee [profile]

It contains a sample from Daft Punk's 2001 song Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger.





  delicado: wow, they don't wait long these days, huh! We should sample this song and put it out!
Stronger  performed by Kanye West
Recommended by MistaNee [profile]

It contains a sample from Daft Punk's 2001 song Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger.




Suddenly Everything Has Changed  performed by The Flaming Lips  1999
Recommended by clupton [profile]

Ever been doing some mundane, everyday type chore and have a sudden, deep realization about life, the universe, etc., strike you from out of the blue? Here's your song. It's a wonderful piece of symphonic pop; kind of hard to believe how much these guys have matured over the years . . .

from The Soft Bulletin



Surrender to Me  performed by Boston  1994
Recommended by CinnaBeatle [profile]

This is a hard rock power ballad, close to heavy metal at points, from Boston's fourth album. It's extremely overlooked, especially since it compares with some of their biggest hits.

from Walk On


Sweet Talking Candyman  performed by Lynn Carey (visually performed by ’The Carrie Nations’)  1970
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

From the film that saved Twentieth Century Fox from one of it's many brushes with bankruptcy... This song is very much a product of it's time and has only become more campy as the years pass by. It tells the story of a 17 year-old runaway who hitches a ride with a drug dealer and shacks up with him in New Orleans only to be hardened by his neglect and abuse. Talk of a DVD release of this film thru Criterion is running rampant on the internet, I do hope it is true!

from Beyond the Valley of the Dolls - Original Soundtrack, available on CD



  n-jeff: Is it camp? Am I just too out of touch with my taste? To me its a great song off one of my favourite Soundtracks. I may have chosen "in the long run" over it, but not necessarily. Maybe Lynn Careys vocal performance is a little powerful for modern tastes. Dunno still don't get camp.
Great choice anyway!

  jeanette: Both the song and the film are amazing, in my opinion. I think the only reason it gets tarred with that 'camp' brush is the movie is one of those all-but-the-kitchen-sink storylines and the songs get lumped in too. I hope that DVD rumour is true. BTW, struck very lucky at a record fair today and got the 7" of Come With The Gentle People for a mere 50p, surely worth miles more than that??!
  FlyingDutchman1971: "Beyond the Valley of the Dolls" 2-Disc DVD will be released on June 13, 2006.
Sympathy For the Devil  performed by The Rolling Stones  1968
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

With the wild African rhythms, yelped back-up vocals and honky-tonk piano, this song is bizarre and crazed and lot of fun. Lyrically it's also very cool with Mick Jagger singing from the persona of a very gentlemanly and straightforward Satan. It's also incredibly timeless and influential. Listen to Outkast's recent album, or the Libertines, or the Music and you can hear shades of this song without a doubt.

from Beggar's Banquet (Abko)


Taken By A Stranger  performed by Lena Meyer-Landrut  2011
Recommended by ESC_Dream [profile]

German entry for Eurovision Song Contest 2011, 10th place

from Good News, available on CD


Teenage Wristband  performed by The Twilight Singers  2003
Recommended by dyfl [profile]

Enormous, gorgeous, hard-rocking (what a silly phrase) song about hedonism/surrender/desperation/"goin' for a ride." Like "Born To Run," "Baba O'Riley," and "Let's Go Crazy" thrown in a blender and soundtracking a black-and-white indie film.


available on CD - Blackberry Belle (One Little Indian)



Temptation  performed by New Order  1982
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Although far less well known than the 12" version and the 1987 'substance' rerecording, I'm utterly in love with this 7" version. I think perhaps the band hate it, since it doesn't seem ever to have appeared on CD, and was not even on the recent 'Retro' box set. At a little over 5 minutes long, it just seems much more focused and affecting to me than the overlong 12" version and the scrappy 1987 version.

It opens with that hypnotic beat/synth sound that has become famous since the song was used in various film soundtracks (most famously, Trainspotting, and most recently, 24 hour party people. Both used the later, rubbish version though). On this version, there's a twangy guitar sound added over the top of the introduction. The other main difference from other versions is vastly improved vocals (particularly over the 1987 version), and that wonderful early New Order guitar sound, as witnessed on other classic tracks like 'Ceremony' and 'Procession'. Like a handful of other tracks I've recommended, it's hard for me to be completely objective about this one, because I've adored it since my mid-teens. But having just bought an extra copy of the single, I'm happy to report that it sounds as brilliant as ever.

This recording showcases a raw and under-appreciated New Order/Joy Division sound that mixes early synth sounds and beats with punky guitars in a really beautiful and affecting way. I still enjoy their later stuff, but it's tracks like this that really attract me to the band.

from the single Temptation (Factory fac63)




  n-jeff: I've not heard the 7 since I was at college in 82, but there is also a version about 15-20 minutes long on one of the first "Touch" cassettes, where they have cut it with an interview. The whole thing seems to have been a lengthy Jam, edited differently for different releases. So the 7 would give you the most focused version. Compare the 7 and 12 edits of the KLF's "3am Eternal" for the enhancing effect of a great edit.
  Genza: I totally agree with everything delicado says. Early New Order rocks. Everything after and including Blue Monday is more poppy - and I can live with that. But most of their albums are very patchy - with half the tracks good and the other half almost unlistenable. But Temptation is an utter, utter classic. And I just love Dreams Never End, Cries and Whispers and In a Lonely Place. Well, any early New Order - it all that has tinny dance-music quality but still holds that desolate Joy Division sound.
The Ballad of Mary Magdalen  performed by Cry Cry Cry  1998
Recommended by indigobo [profile]

This clever little gem was written by folk singer/songwriter Richard Shindell and originally appears on his 1994 Shanachie release, Blue Divide, as "The Ballad of Mary Magdalene." A perfect example of Shindell's non-confessional, often ironic, storytelling, it recounts the ill-fated love affair between the title character and JC: "Jesus loves me, this I know/ why on earth, did I ever let him go?/ He was always faithful, he was always kind/ but he walked off with this heart of mine." On this version, Shindell is joined by fellow folkies Dar Williams (lead vocal) and Lucy Kaplansky (harmony). In 1998 A.D., the three artists became incarnate as Cry Cry Cry for one album, which, if you like three-part harmony, is almost a religious experience. A good example, too, of what Shindell can do with a Martin acoustic.

from Cry Cry Cry (Razor and Tie)



The band played Waltzing Matilda  performed by Eric Bogle, The Pogues, Mike Harding, others
Recommended by godnose [profile]

Genre: Folk. An anti-war song written by a real craftsman. The lyrics vividly describe one man's experience at and after Gallipoli in WW1.





  petalcart: art linkletter made 'we love you, call collect' about his youngest daughter...I can find the version by this title by Art and his daughter Diane but I am looking for the one with Art by himself.......Anyone with wuggestion on how to locate this record, please advise.........Thnaks in advance......
The Breeze and I  performed by Santo and Johnny  1962
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This recording is utter genius, and I have no idea why I didn't recommend it before. The track opens with some spooky ambient steel guitar sound effects, before some bongoes and vibes set the scene for the tune, which is picked out superbly twangily on the guitar. The great thing about the track is the spooky little effects and chromatic tunes that pop in and out in the background. Some of these are on the steel guitar, but the others could be vocal or vibraphone; it's hard to tell. It's all over in just over 2 minutes, but this really is a delightfully exotic recording.

from Encore (Canadian American JUMP 1023)
available on CD - Encore - the best of the rest (Jump-O-Rama)



  Tangento: Yes! This is an excellent song, and I would also like to recommend the version by Pianists Ferrante & Teicher, available on one of their 6,000 albums. ;) It has such a great musical flow and retro-feel. There are a few other versions I recently downloaded, but virus problems prevent me from getting the artists names for you. I shall return with them.
  Tangento: I have returned with the definitive list of artists who have recorded this magical song: http://www.spaceagepop.com/breeze.htm Enjoy!
The Classical  performed by The Fall  1981
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Message for yer! Message for yer!

My theory is that everyone seriously into music has time for The Fall. They're just too superlative - in places - not to give them massive amounts of respect.

I have no problem with being a selective Fall fan, and probably err too much to "the Brix Years" for serious Mark E Smith hardcases. I love the early to middle period and The Classical, for me, is the absolute pinnacle of their acheivements. A parity of stupidity and - er, classicality - it marries the phrasing genius of Smith with one of the very best group line-ups in their 27 year career.

So what if MES is a toothless old git now? So what if they haven't released an album of worth in many a year? So what if their back catalogue is being shamelessly exploited by various low-rent record labels? They are one of the biggest unacknowledged influences on British music today and it's time they got the props they are worthy of.

from Hex Enduction Hour, available on CD



The Cure For Broken Hearts  performed by ANT  2000
Recommended by kkkerplunkkk [profile]

If you like your pop, soft and acoustic with witty lyrics, then check this out! 'I'd give up all my selfish little dreams to be in hers' coos ANT over a strummed acoustic, brushed snare drum and tinkling Wurlitzer piano.

from Cures For Broken Hearts, available on CD


The Dark of the Matinee  performed by Franz Ferdinand  2004
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

This song is so sinister sounding, and so dark, but at the same time you can dance to it. It's uptempo, but somehow still vaguely depressing. Plus, "It's better in the matinee, the dark of the matinee" is just such a cool lyric.

from Franz Ferdinand (Sony)



The Hardest Part of Hurting Is The Hope  performed by Scott Gibson  2003
Recommended by wattsup [profile]

This is the last tune on the disc "Make REady" by Scott. It is a gorgeous slow love song with a killer refrain and title; "The Hardest Part of Hurting Is The Hope". It features Scott's voice as well lap steel and acoustic guitar. They fit together so well--it is like they are a single performer. It is a great finish to this wonderful disc. It makes me want to start the song all over again [I think I will--grin!].

from Make Ready (Hayden's Ferry B0000A4G4H)


the lady is a tramp  performed by della reese
Recommended by king8egg [profile]

before della reese was touched by an angel she was a singer. it seems that some songs own their singers and other songs the vocalist owns the song. in della's case she definately owns the song. this song rocks and swings with blaring horns and percussion that makes it hard to sit still. and then della's voice comes in with all its unique style letting you know exactly who is boss. after della's version any other version just pales in comparison.

from della, available on CD




  tinks: I've always really loved Buddy Greco's version of this song. Late 50s Vegas mob-pop at it's finest.
The Land / Rainy Sunday Evening  performed by Ramatam  1973
Recommended by john_l [profile]

Ramatam, who walked the earth in the early '70s, were an annoying '50s-influenced hard rock band who nevertheless managed to kick off their second LP with the mostly acoustic two-parter listed here. The first half is slow, slightly off-kilter and full of sharp harmonies, while the second part is the most wistfully resigned paean to lost love this side of the late John Phillips. The whole thing is string-drenched and utterly lovely.

from In April Came The Dawning Of The Red Suns (Atlantic)


The Lord Is Back  performed by Eugene McDaniels  1971
Recommended by human-cannonball [profile]

The first track on the seminal 'Headless Heroes of the Apocalypse' LP McDaniels cut in 1971 is the most furious and energetic of the album. Spiritual afro-soul-rock with a politically aware attitude. A very 'dirty' psychedelic electric bass guitar with a top-class drummer (Alphonse Mouzon) comprise a hard-hitting rhythm section to remember. I prefer this very bluesy track over the more obvious selections from this top-notch release, e.g. the haunting Jagger the Dagger, and Freedom Death Dance.

from Headless Heroes of the Apocalypse (Atlantic)




  konsu: Nice choice!I always liked this song too but could'nt get anyone to pay much attention to his work.One of the more social/politically charged soul jazz records.Cherished by hip-hoppers for years,and sampled quite a bit.Needs to stand again on it's own merits!
The Most Beautiful Girl (In the Room)  performed by Flight of the Conchords  2008
Recommended by Festy [profile]

Fans of Flight of the Conchords, who bill themselves as "New Zealand's 4th most popular guitar-based digi-bongo acapella-rap-funk-comedy folk duo", will know this track already as it is one of their most popular. Although lyrically clever and funny, I think their music writing is saved a lot by the production, to the point where the songs are very listenable and enjoyable (I wouldn't be recommending other wise, I guess). From their first widely available album (self-titled), this track is a highlight, as is 'Ladies of the World' (especially the shortvocal reprise - hard to believe it's them at times), and 'Business Time'. The second album has some great tracks also. The TV show's worth catching also.

from Flight of the Conchords, available on CD



The Next Step Youll Take  performed by Club 8  2003
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Club 8, consisting of songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Johan Angergaard and vcalist Karolina Komstedt, started of in the mid 90s with a twee indie pop sound, with jangly guitars (Angergaard being a major Smiths fan) and simple instrumetation. With the release of their self- titled album in 2001 they added some electronica without losing the general tone of their music which is basically well crafted, melodic, gentle, airy, etheral, melancholic indie pop. Karolina Komstedt vocals are quite similar to early Nina Person of The Cardigans or Claudine Longet in their airy, angelic, dreamlike delivery. "The Next Step You'll Take" is a bossa nova influenced track, with gentle acoustic and electric guitars, some percussion and vibraphone. Nothing groundbreaking, but they combine well known elements in such a charming, delicate way i find them hard to resist.

from Strangely Beautiful, available on CD



The Nights  performed by Lee Hazlewood  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This song is unlike any other I've recommended, but it's hard to hear this and not sense the pure genius which infused Lee's best work. The song is a dramatic narrative about an American woman who runs off to marry an Indian and join their tribe. Instead of singing, Lee simply speaks the words, while every now and again a manic chorus chimes in with 'Thuuu Nights' while a string section scratches away. If I had as cool a voice as Lee (er, and some talent at recording), I guess I could take the songwriting approach that he has here - the music is quite simple, but the narrative as spoken by Lee is gripping, and the entire production is impeccably executed. Check out 'Jos' for another successful song with this formula.

from Hazlewoodism - its cause and cure (LHI)


The Riviera Affair  performed by Neil Richardson  1969
Recommended by nighteye [profile]

Amazing song from the 1960's blending powerful luscious strings with a fast paced catchy melody. One might think that you have landed in the middle of a international crime affair in the French Riviera. Would work amazingly good as a theme-song for a TV-series (maybe it has been used that way already?)


available on CD - The Sound Gallery (Scamp)



The Shadow Of Your Smile (live)  performed by Blossom Dearie  1966
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Another great performance by the woman I am in constant awe of. The great people at Fontana saw fit to record one of her live shows at the legendary London jazz club, Ronnie Scott's and it's truly a great thing because Blossom is in perfect form and truly pours her heart and soul into her set. The audience sits in reverant silence during this track and witnesses the great Ms. Dearie's intimate recital of this great song right up until the last word is sung and they can no longer contain their need to applaud and cheer. Much to my dismay, this is just about the only recording that is currently available from her years with Fontana in the UK, and the others remain hard to find if not completely out of reach.

from Blossom Time At Ronnie Scott's, available on CD


The Shady Dame From Seville  performed by Julie Andrews  1982
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

The best "drag" performance by both Julie Andrews and Robert Preston in the film,'Victor / Victoria'.

from Victor / Victoria - Original Soundtrack (MGM / Polygram Records MG-1-5407)
available on CD - Victor / Victoria - Original Soundtrack (Rhino / WEA)


The Windmills of your Mind  performed by Dusty Springfield
Recommended by Davidthesaint [profile]

The chords are unbelievable... I've never heard such as good as this with as many fancy chord changes going on... It's a wonderful song to sing.. Hard to beat Dusty though




The Witch  performed by The Sonics  1965
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

"The Witch" was the Sonics' debut single, released on Etiquette, the Tacoma, WA-based label owned and operated by local hero Buck Ormsby, member of garage rock pioneers the Wailers, who are known for unearthing the obscure R&B song "Louie, Louie." Reworking the tunes of Little Richard and Bo Diddley, the Sonics worked the local teen-hop circuit as a rock & roll cover band until eventually coming up with some original material with "The Witch" and what would become the flip side to the single, "Psycho." After revamping the lineup, taking on various members of the Searchers, Gerry Roslie commandeered the vocal duties with a bracing blues shouter style that would become the group's trademark. "The Witch," roughly recorded in mono, is a brooding rocker based around a revved-up blues progression with quivering guitar and a basic sax line holding down a simple riff, drums kicking away in the background. Roslie belts his cautionary tale, sagely advising all to steer clear of "evil chicks," with vocal-chord-shredding wails: "So you know the little girl/Who's new in town/Well you better watch out now/Or she'll put you down/'Cause she's an evil chick/Say, she's the witch, oww!" The band barrels on, lacking any semblance of finesse, stomping into a tempo shift and doubling the speed as Roslie howls, "Well she walks around/Late at night/Most other people sleepin' tight/If you hear her knockin' on your door/You better say get away/Wha whoo!" Guitarist Andy Parypa lets loose a note-stumbling guitar solo in a style similar to Dave Davies of the the Kinks. "The Witch" would become a regional hit, receiving extensive airplay on the powerful Seattle AM station KJR, but the Sonics would never break nationally, most of the country not yet ready for the extremely aggressive attach of the group's rough-and-tumble music.
(AMG)

from Here Are the Sonics (Norton 000903)
available on CD - Nuggets: Original Artyfacts from the First Psychedelic Era 1965-1968 (Rhino)



  blackthorne80: I like this!
theo b  performed by sunny day real estate  1995
Recommended by complacentbasement [profile]

the song starts out with three crisp hi-hat clicks, the bell of a ride, then the drums and a sweet, warm toned bass lock in for a driving, mid-tempo, beautifully melodic cut time. guitars, once in, are clean-toned and somewhat polyphonically arranged, (that is, they play alot of single-note lines that swirl around each other, harmonizing at spots, and creating counterpoint). the vocals are potentially a little hard to swallow at first, jeremy has a tendency to sing a little through the nose, but it's really quite endearing. i personally find that after a bit of exposure to it, not only does it fit the music perfectly, but i really have grown to love it, (i listen to them ALOT).
this is one of those songs that you put on when you need to feel better- a kind of resolute, "well, time to go on, and hope for the best" feel. it can also easily be listened to when in a great mood. best listened to outside, looking at the sky.
when listening to ANY sunny day real estate, you must be patient. it's patient music, and it requires a certain amount of consideration that keeps it from being good "background music."
i fucking love this stuff.

from lp2 (the pink album) (sub pop sp316b)


Thesen & Antithesen  performed by Brainstorm  1972
Recommended by human-cannonball [profile]

A long, wild, complex, dark, almost haunting jazz-rock piece that has changed the way I faced German 70s rock. It's in par with the rest of the tracks on the excellent 'Smile a While' LP by this legendary rock band. It's not very hard to find, and I believe it has been re-issued on CD.

from Smile a While (Spiegelei)


This Afternoon  performed by Chad Mitchell  1967
Recommended by konsu [profile]

I almost know nothing about the Chad Mitchell trio, except that John Denver was in the group. I'm not even sure that this is the same guy for that matter. I guess it's really not too suprising that an old folkie would team-up with geniuses like Bob Dorough & Stu Scharf for a little boot in the ass, since those guys seemed to be working a lot of crossover pop material. That's really the reason I picked this up, basically to see what could happen.

The record ends up being incredible actually. Imagine a mix of "golden throat" type schmaltz, Tom Rapp-ish hip folk, Nilssonesque melodrama, and the poetic and jazzy humor of Scharf & Dorough and that will sum it up. It can grow on you for sure.

This track is in the sort of word jazz thing in a highly characterized way hard to describe without taking up too much space... just listen. I think this was a piece from an Alan Arkin LP. Suppose I will have to get one of those now.

from Love, A Feeling Of (Warner Brothers WS 1706)




  b. toklas: The album "Chad" on Bell records is the one to get. Great songs (by Jake Holmes, Joni Mitchell and others) and fantastic arrangements. Hal Blaine and a couple of other wrecking crew members and great musicians are on it, too. In places it also reminds me of the group H.P. Lovecraft. So it might even be interesting for lovers of psychedelic music (not for those who hate strings, of course). I wonder if I should call it a masterpiece.
  artlongjr: I second that on the "Chad" album...it's terrific. There's a 7-minute plus cover of Tim Buckley's "Goodbye and Hello" on there that rather stunned me, since it seems like a very challenging song to sing. The H.P.Lovecraft connection comes through Chicago producer Bill Traut, who owned Dunwich Records (the album is a Dunwich production). Traut was involved with H.P. Lovecraft, and of course the Shadows of Knight.
This is Hardcore  performed by Pulp  1998
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I was never a Pulp fan, and I'm still not exactly a huge one. I never quite got why songs like 'Do you remember the first time' and 'Common People' were so great. I don't mind those songs now, but they never hit me in the way that 'This is Hardcore' did.

It's hard to explain why the dramatic, slightly ridiculous tone of the song appeals to me so much. The song is built around a sample from 'Bolero on the moon rocks' by Peter Thomas, the German film composer, and I think it's used very well - the sample adds texture and atmosphere, but doesn't dictate the song. I enjoy the way things develop at a slow pace, with new musical sections still being introduced late in the song. I'm very fond of all of these, but the slow, dreamy section that comes in at around 4:15 is particularly appealing, with its lush and strangely 80s sounding backgrounds.

Utter, utter genius!

from This is Hardcore, available on CD



  scrubbles: Totally agree ... I remember that the video for this song was equally fantastic - a tribute to '50s technicolor melodramas, but with an added dose of sleaze.
  olli: dammit. just rediscovered this myself and was about to rcommend it. didn't appeal to me the first time around, but then again i probably have a slightly better/ more diverse taste in music now. besides, the years have been kind to it. you're spot on about the use of the peter thomas sample, i have to agree that it's pretty tastefully done.
  olli: if you can use the word "tasteful" about this song, that is:)
This Side of Brightness  performed by Thursday  1998
Recommended by Vagina Man [profile]

The song is one of the best songs I've heard from the genre of emo. For people that don't know emo is a rather new style of alternative, mixing both soft melodies with hard riffs, and compromising of both soft singing and ferocious screams. Thursday is a small group from N.J. Their sound is pretty original, well original in the sense that just about all emo bands are too small to be recognized. Both of Thursday's albums are excellent but if you want to get a taste of them check out This Side of Brightness.

from Waiting


Tive Razao  performed by Seu Jorge  2004
Recommended by ambassador [profile]

So anyone who's seen The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou or City of God will recognize Seu Jorge as the handsome, dark-skinned actor with the gravelly voice. In Life Aquatic he plays Pele, the Brazilian safety officer on board Zissou's boat and the bard that plays Portuguese language covers of David Bowie songs. Although this is changing, even in Brazil he's better known as an actor than a musician. His second solo album (he used to be in a band called Farofa Carioca), Cru, was released last fall in France and was impossibly hard to find until recently. Tive Razao was the first release from this album and is fairly representative and is the shining peak as well. Based around an acoustic guitar riff and Seu Jorge's multi-tracked vocals, the song just floats in this melancholy haze like some of the best Chico Buarqu de Hollanda ballads. The production on this song (and the album) is much more sparse than the previous album, but much more original as well. Jorge even uses what I think is a theremin to add a slight spookiness to the preceedings. The lyrics mean something like, "I had an excuse" or "I had a reason."

from Cru, available on CD



  ambassador: I since found out that the title means "You were right." makes a bit more sense that way.
Tous Les Garons Et Les Filles  performed by Franoise Hardy  1963
Recommended by tinks [profile]

I knew that this song was depressing even before I knew what it was about. Poor Franoise just can't find a boy! I've seen the Scopitone for this, and I really doubt that she was having trouble finding dates, but est-la-vie, right? Anyhow, it's an absolutely beautiful ballad.


available on CD - 36 Grandes Succes (Vogues/BMG France)


Tous Les Garcons Et Les Filles  performed by Francois Hardy  1977
Recommended by TippyCanoe [profile]

sways-ville.

from The Greatest Hits of Francois Hardy (Vogue/Peters International PLD 2000)


Toy Box  performed by Sylvia Striplin  1981
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

This reminds me of The Velvet Underground. Not musically in the slightest but just on one point - while absolutely great, paved the way for some awful copycats.

This is ultra-soft funk, luxuriating in comfort like the fluffy fur Striplin is wearing on the sleeve. Absolutely adorable, and so finely nuanced that it never cloys and just improves with repeated listening. It's hard to pick one song from this LP not just because they're all so damn brilliant but because each and every one of the songs sounds better nestled between their bedfellows.

Unfortunately this kind of style was robbed of all its subtlety and beauty in the 80's leading to the formula of soulless soul that began to proliferate. Enjoy this album for what it is; a creative apex between the decades.

from Give Me Your Love, available on CD



Tracy Had a Hard Day Sunday  performed by West Coast Pop Art Experimental Band  1967
Recommended by songs-I-love [profile]

One beautifully-constructed, jazz-flavoured number.
Its jazzy chords and conga rhythm are complemented by a set of psychedelic lyrics about Tracy who "had a hard day Sunday" for "she had to be herself and no one else". Real ear-candy for me. One of the best (mildly) psychedelic tracks out there, ever.

from West Coast Pop Art Experimental Band, Vol. 2: Breaking Through (Reprise)



  executiveslacks: I was going to recommend this one, but you beat me to it. Great song.
Triste  performed by Pizzicato Five  1995
Recommended by johannp [profile]

This song has a simple but effective instrumentation; piano, drums and bass for the most part, and brass here and there. It manages to be catchy and interesting because of the melody and chords in my opinion. It's hard to point at something specific, yet the song in its entirety just has a certain, very definitive appeal, especially the ending where it almost has an improvised feel.

This song is from what one could think of as the 'middle period' of Pizzicato Five; they had acquired Maki Nomiya as a singer, and not yet ventured into the experimental things they did in the late 90's. Another, shorter version of it is on "Big Hits & Jet Lags '94-'97'", and that's about the only difference between the two.

from Romantique '96, available on CD


Twilight Zone  performed by The Spiders  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

For many years I've continued my life under the misapprehension that one version of the Twilight Theme (in my case, the original Marty Manning version) would do me just fine. But this tremendous Japanese group sounds version is unmissable. Lots of random sound effects with a heavy influence from The Ventures in Space. It kicks off at 1:08 where the drums stop and the sound effects just take over. Lots of random twanging and watery bits. Really cool sounding. Then at 1:40 the drums come in hard and funky. There are a few more little breakdowns and it ends in total chaos leaving you feeling the aliens definitely are coming!

Basically it's a very well executed recording.


available on CD - GS Box Set


Understanding in a Car Crash  performed by Thursday  2001
Recommended by cryofthecelt [profile]

"Understanding in a Car Crash" is the song that brought me to love Thursday, a hardcore emo rock band from the New Jersey area. Emo (for "emo"-tional) is a genre that encompasses deep and tenderly obscure lyrics with raw, impassioned screams and hard rock riffs. Thursday is probably the best emo band out there. This is a great song about wasted time and wanted love, so listen to it! You might discover an emo-punker inside of you that you never knew existed!

from Full Collapse, available on CD


Underwater Love   performed by Smoke City  1997
Recommended by geezer [profile]

Possibly the most peculiar song to ever hit the top 5,surreal in the extreme but oh ,so beautiful,like a little piece of music from every corner of the globe distilled through a trip hop filter,it has the funk foundations of acid jazz ,the majesty of the samba and the exotic mystery of Asia .Part spoken,oddly sung and complimented by an incessant tropical ambience thats hard to pin down.A real pearl from an oyster as suggested by the songs sublime watery brilliance .Initially used to sell L--I jeans ,a perfect example of why beauty and commerce should never be in the same room .

from Flying Away
available on CD - Flying Awaay