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You searched for ‘world’, which matched 186 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
"The Glow" pt. 2  performed by Microphones  2001
Recommended by Open Book [profile]

I call it "THE - concept album." It's almost as if Phil Elvrum nearly single-handedly did what all others before him had tried to accomplish in attempting a thematically based musical piece of artwork. The title track from his stunning masterpiece digs deep into the thoughts of the main character as he battles life, struggles with suicide, and breaks down entirely. Besides the heart-wrenching lyrics, musically, the song is equally brilliant- utilizing both channels of the stereo to spin the listener around, sweeping organs, and a drop-dead gorgeous vocal performance all beginning with a kick ass fuzz-drone rock out featuring blazing drum fills. This songs brings me to tears every time I hear it.

from "The Glow" pt. 2 (K Records)
available on CD - "The Glow" pt.2 (K Records)


"when i’m with you"  performed by the legendary pink dots  2000
Recommended by kohl [profile]

one of my favourite pink dots song. i suppose because, for me, they always manage to convey a sort of 'it's the end of the world' vibe. and the lyrics are cryptic enough that you can't always tell if the presumed outcome is hopeful or not.


available on CD - a perfect mystery (soleilmoon)


...The Collapse of Detective Dullight  performed by Of Montreal  2001
Recommended by two-headed boy [profile]

'The Events Leading up to the Collapse of Detective Dullight' is not a song but a narrative story, and it’s funny as hell. The off-kilter character voices of the already brilliant stream-of-consciousness plot are cartoonish enough for their own Saturday morning series. When the detectives start their investigation nothing makes sense. There’s Jell-O, serenading butterflies, file cabinets, murder, catacombs, and all the seasonings for a hilarious dream. I am usually brought to tears when Detective Slots reads from his revered exercise in free verse titled ‘The Cause of Gauze’. I will supply you with a sample:
"Oh, the cause of gauze. The Manuels have fondled many memories from my lap though each memory has its own lap and swimmers swim laps. Even swimmers have laps however and while in that condition many require a delicate gauze."
If you hear this without purchasing the actual album, 'Coquelicot Asleep in the Poppies: A Variety of Whimisical Verse,' then you are being cheated. The dreams of this band are as colorful as the illustrations they provide us in their album sleeves. The 'Where's Waldo' pictorial representations enrich the listening experience by engaging us in a journey deep into the frying-pan brains of these madmen. In fact, this is a perfect introduction into a very strange world of psychedelicado. Think the Beach Boy's 'Smile.' The reaction of my friends after hearing this have been harmoniously the same, 'they have to be on drugs.' The truth is Of Montreal are not on drugs, they are drugs.

from Coquelicot Asleep in the Poppies: A Variety of Whimsical Verse (Kindercore KC064)


6060-842  performed by The B-52s  1979
Recommended by rum [profile]

The lyrical theme of ‘6060-842’ seems pretty mundane for the B-52s. Tina goes to the ladies room, sees a phone number scrawled on the wall, and so decides to ring it. Hmm… doesn’t sound like it’s gonna be a tale the measure of “the time our car was hijacked by the devil” and the like. Still this IS the B-52s, and recognisably so, “if you’d like a very nice time, just give this number a call” reads the unlikely graffiti. So something must happen. The band are optimistic too, bouncing along excitedly on a jumpy new wave rhythm. Tina, we reckon, is much like the band. She lives for wild parties and crazy adventures. This 6060-842 could be just the ticket. “Oh my gawd! I’m gonna give that there number a ring. You see if I don’t!” So she drops a dime in the phone slot and, “prays she gets the line.” She’s biting her lip, stabbing her nails into her finger tips, “come on… come ON!!!”

But pause a moment. Is she really so naïve? Does she really think a “really nice time” awaits her? In the gnarled and weather beaten hands of a social realist singer-songwriter, the number 6060-842 would lead to abuse, to prostitution, and ultimately, to death. In the hands of the B-52s? I don’t know, you tell me. A debauched toga party in a 1950s vision of the future…? Well, it’s neither. It’s just a brilliant anti-climax. You see Tina and the B-52a might be deranged, but the world they live in is not. It’s bloody typical. She dials 6060-842, and can’t get through! “The number’s been disconnected…” monotones the operator. But Tina won’t accept this, no, and neither will the band. They can’t end the track with Tina accepting the disappointment with a sigh of weary resignation, “ah well, nevermind… maybe next time.” No, no, this anti-climax has worked them up into an angry frenzy. Ricky Wilson vents his frustration with viscious slashes of electric guitar whilst Tina just keeps dialing and dialing, and getting rebuffed and rebuffed, “HELLO!!!” “sorry…” The track probably ends with them all smashing up the phone box. A superb, and much over-looked track.

from The B-52s, available on CD


A HUGE EVER GROWING PULSATING BRAIN...  performed by The Orb  1990
Recommended by Synthetrix [profile]

Full Title is
A HUGE EVER GROWING PULSATING BRAIN THAT RULES FROM THE CENTRE OF THE ULTRAWORLD
What can I say. This record changed my life.

from THE ORB'S ADVENTURES BEYOND THE ULTRAWORLD (BIG LIFE)



  FlyingDutchman1971: This track is amazing! I really enjoy the whole CD! My favorite track is 'Earth'... think I'll have to submit it
A Machine To Break Your Heart  performed by Henning Ohlenbusch  2005
Recommended by catmarigold [profile]

Can't get this song out of my head. The whole album is full of 'em but this is the one that's currently driving me nuts. I thik it's about the end of the world, but I'm not sure.

from Looks Like I'm Tall (Rub Wrongways Records RWOD31)


A Really Good Time  performed by Roxy Music  1974
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

I know, one is supposed to defer to the Eno-epoch Roxy Music, (and the first two LPs are the end of the world), but this may well be the band's most serene momment. Bryan Ferry is at the top his game here - his vocals are heavenly, his lyrics are brilliantly/brutally witty. Add the floating layers of "Melody Nelson" damaged strings and the effect is dazzling.

from Country Life, available on CD (Virgin)



  kath: "all the things you used to do.. a trip to the movies, a drink or two...they don't satisfy you, they don't tell you anything new" perfect song by Roxy at its very height... please keep your recommendations coming, Roberto.
A World I Never Noticed  performed by The Flashbulb
Recommended by DeathandHarmony [profile]




absent friend  performed by Bark Psychosis  1994
Recommended by anarhikos [profile]

A masterpiece of post rock genre! cheerful, jazzy, incredible sound..it takes you to another world..

from Hex


Aint going to Goa  performed by Alabama 3
Recommended by camus [profile]

The ultimate anti "isn't the 3rd world great hippy song" old hippies good new hippies bad.




All Around the World  performed by Cooler Kids
Recommended by Zissy [profile]




All Men Play On Ten  performed by Manowar  1985
Recommended by rum [profile]

There is something magic about a song like ‘All Men Play On Ten’ in this post-Spinal Tap Metal world. Such an earnest rock anthem, in such an irony saturated market… You’ve got to have respect for Manowar. Is it a mark of defiance or of ignorance and stupidity? Hard to tell. Maybe both. But then this song is essentially about doing things their own way, and not listening to anybody. So who cares anyway? Well, it’s worth listening to Eric Adams for 4 minutes at least. He has a message for us all. He’s no puritanical, know-it-all, he’s a reformed character preaching a rock’n’roll gospel. Believe it or not brothers, he too has fallen. There was a time when he did it for the money, yes that’s right, he sold his soul to the loud music-hating devil. And the devil said hmmm Mr Adams, for your money I have some things I need you to do for me, adjustments as it were. Eric said, well okay, what do you suggest? The devil demanded that he turn down his amps, “why be proud, don’t play so loud, be like us and get a sound that’s real THIN”. OK, I reckon I could do that, just a bit, said Eric, a little put out. But the demands didn’t end there, Eric was pinched and plucked for his silver dollar, “wear a polyester suit, act happy, look cute, get a haircut and buy small gear.” And inevitably it all got too much. Eric’s no pigeon weaver, and he got real mad, and he turned to the devil and said, “HOLD IT, RIGHT THERE!” And good for him. For this is a great track. Very catchy.

from Sign Of The Hammer



  frmars: Tried your recommandation. Very poor music. Erased it.
  rum: hmmm... such a painfully earnest rock comment, in such an irony saturated market. I think you may have missed the point somewhat. Lighten up kid, and broaden your scope.
All U Can Eat  performed by Ben Folds  2003
Recommended by snoodlededoogans [profile]

"as political a song as I got" - says Ben Folds.
a quieter bouncy jazzy song where Ben sings to his son about how fucked up the world is. they point and laugh at the ignorance and consumption of most of the world. two verses and a solo or two, a short song comes together for his EP, Sunny 16. here's hoping he'll revisit it and flesh it out with another verse for the promised album...

from Sunny 16 (Epic/Sony)


Always crashing in the same car  performed by David Bowie  1977
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I'm just reacquainting myself with the entire Low album after buying it on CD (my LP has been out of my reach for a few years). It really is utter genius. If they were in any other context, I don't imagine I would enjoy some of the guitar solos featured in this song. Here, they work brilliantly though. The musical basis of 'always crashing in the same car' is quite simple, but the superb musical performances and odd, otherworldly production give it an incredible richness. Bowie's vocal is mournful, and doesn't dominate the track.

from Low, available on CD (RCA)



  frmars: The sound on Low is so particuliar thanks to Brian Eno's collaboration. Same with Bowie's "Heroes" and "Lodger". 3 albums known as the Berlin trilogy. Listen to Brian Eno's solo stuff and shoot in stars...
Amantran  performed by Soul Yatra  2005
Recommended by jazzgoa [profile]

Soul Yatra-the band that tours worldwide for Henessey, has recorded an album titled 'live on tour'.
Download mp3 tracks from the album at:
http://www.geocities.com/jazzgoa/soul

from Live on tour (Raga to Rock records 2354)


Amori Finiti  performed by Giancarlo Gazzani  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

To me, this track is a perfect distillation of all that is wonderful about bossa nova and the various hybrids which it inspired. Bossa nova was taken up all over the world after its rise in the late 50s and early 60s, but Italian musicians seem to have done an especially good job of absorbing its charms.

A simple instrumental, this opens with a plucked guitar and simply builds up and down, adding piano and strings and then taking them out so beautifully that it makes you shiver. Alas, the rest of the compilation this is taken from suffers from poor sound quality. If anyone comes across the original Giancarlo Gazzani album, I'd be very keen to hear it, although I fear this track may be an isolated gem.

from Musica per commenti sonori
available on CD - Metti una bossa a cena (Schema)




  Swinging London: Really nice. Reminds me of a 1966 movie soundtrack. Now I've got to search for the song.
Anything At All  performed by Crosby, Stills & Nash  1977
Recommended by G400 Custom [profile]

Could this be the most self-aware song ever written? 'I'm the world's most opinionated man,' sings sweet-voiced David Crosby in a tone of utter resignation. Bear in mind he'd already dealt with fame, failure, bereavement, heroin, booze and yachting by this point. It's a very stripped-down arrangement, with even CSN's trademark harmony kept to a minimum. And Crosby's rueful laugh towards the end is a real killer. Should I die soon, stop by my funeral and you'll hear this song... From a very underrated album, recorded after that toerag Neil Young had come and gone.

from CSN, available on CD (Warner Brothers)


Ball of Confusion (That’s What the World Is)  performed by Temptations  1970
Recommended by nuthings [profile]

Great funk/soul track with a healthy dose of political and social commentary circa 1970 set to a killer bass line - it's scary how much of it is still relevant today. "A ball of confusion, that's what the world is today..."

from Temptations Greatest Hits Vol 2 (Gordy)
available on CD - My Girl: The Very Best of the Temptations (Motown)


Bat Macumba  performed by Os Mutantes  1968
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Nothing can truly prepare you for your first listen to Os Mutantes. All the hype in the world can only pique your interest...of all the countless reviews I've read, none have ever captured the essence of the band, and I'm not about to attempt it here. Any song from their first album could be my choice here...the psychotic carnie music of "Panis et Circensis", the drugged-out doo-wop of "Baby", the Ray Davies-informed songcraft of "Senhor F" or the Donovan meets Alistair Crowley creepiness of "Trem Fantasma". So I chose this, their best-known freakout. Go find out for yourself.

from Os Mutantes, available on CD (Odeon)




  olli: this is great! i love panis et circensis...heard it a couple of years ago on norwegian radio, but i didn´t find out what the song was called until now... by chance i just found out today that gil gilberto has licenced a lot of his work under the creative commons law... that means we're free to sample and build upon it!
bat macumba  performed by oz mutantes
Recommended by sweetbabymoses [profile]

killer brazillian psyche rock tune has the best bass line in the world






  executiveslacks: Great song, although I have to say I like Gilberto Gil's version the best.
Before We Begin  performed by Broadcast  2003
Recommended by tempted [profile]

Peers and close friends of Stereolab, Birmingham's Broadcast are one of the most interesting alternative pop acts in the world. This song is an example of their extraordinary skills in crafting a haunting, beautiful melody to go with a sound that's like a son of the band The United States Of America and Ennio Morricone. These folks took four years building their own studio. Can't blame them a bit as the results are simply stunning.

from Ha Ha Sound, available on CD (Warp)



  eftimihn: Oh yes, this track is gem, no doubt about that. To me the melody and harmonies incorporated are quite reminiscent of late 60s sunshine pop/soft rock stuff of that era.
  tempted: You're correct there. They must be fans of people like Curt Boettcher and Margo Guryan, too!
  tinks: i love this band. they are so very excellent to see live, as well. and they'll be here in about a month! woohoo!
Big Time  performed by Peter Gabriel  1986
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

An even funkier hit single than "Sledgehammer" ? which had an epic groove but was too slow to actually dance to ? "Big Time" is a sardonic response to yuppie materialism with the funniest lyrics of Peter Gabriel's entire career. (The ending of the song, stopping just before the obvious punch line to all this discussion of how preternaturally huge everything in Gabriel's charmed life is, is a small moment of brilliance.) But the brilliance of the song is in the way it ties all that Gabriel had been learning about African percussion and Middle Eastern melodies ever since the days of his third solo album and ties them all into the service of a walloping great groove, making plain the connections between North Africa and Stax-Volt once and for all. The combination of talking drum and wah-wah guitar owes as much to Booker T and the MGs as it does to King Sunny Ade, which is both the key to "Big Time" and a clue as to why Gabriel's later, more explicitly world music focused albums just aren't as much fun.
(AMG)

from So, available on CD (Geffen)


Bittersweet  performed by Lewis Taylor  1996
Recommended by Latimer [profile]

Lewis Taylor is a major musical talent, and his first album stands as a landmark among modern soul / R&B productions. Imagine Prince on a roll, with the Beach Boys on backing vocals and Jeff Beck adding psychedelic guitar. He does it all. Sweet falsetto vocals, funny lyrics and a worldwide groove. You'll want more.

from Lewis Taylor, available on CD (Island)


Blowfly’s Rap  performed by Blowfly  1980
Recommended by JoNZ [profile]

From the godfather of filthfy rap comes this FUNKY,slamming tune. It tells the story of trucker with a CB radio(timewarp) who is, in his mind anyway, the baddest bastard around. On his journey he picks up a transvestite hooker, masterbates, has a fight with the Grand Dragon of the klu klux klan, claims to be related to Mohammed Ali, and drinks a bottle of wine. The killer rhyme is "We got to the room, pulled off her clothes, and the funk from her p***y started f**king with my nose." If you don't mind that sort of talk, you'll love this cut.

from X-Rated Blofly's Party (Weird World lp-2034)



  delicado: I don't have this record, but must confess that I find Blowfly strangely compelling. The mix of toilet humour, offensiveness, and authentic funk sounds is very potent indeed.
born slippy  performed by underworld
Recommended by licoricewhipped [profile]

this song is just perfect. normally i dont like music like this, but i cant help it with this song.




Bulletproof Soul  performed by Sade  1992
Recommended by MoeShinola [profile]

Hey - don't knock Sade. This is from the Love Deluxe album, which is a great record by any measure. All the songs are original and heartfelt, not formulaic, and with an awareness of third-world misery that's striking coming from a pop princess like her. But she is from Nigeria and knows what she's singing about. Bulletproof Soul is my favorite on the album, a song very dry and quiet and sparse. The backing vocal works in a very sad, soulful harmony line in the chorus that really makes the song.

from Love Deluxe (Sony)


Captain Jack  performed by Ken & Beverly  1968
Recommended by konsu [profile]

One of the far too few originals on this great underrated LP.The duo has a familiar west coast pop-jazz sound,much like their labelmates Bud Shank & Joe Pass.Except where as those two have way too much generally lackluster output,this duo has tons of talent packed into one exciting session! Ken plays an icy alto & soprano not unlike Paul Desmond and Beverly sings with all the grace and soul of ladies like Lena Horne and Dinah Shore. In this track, one of the most energetic on the LP,the group swings in a brisk 5/4,with Ken blowing a soulful line and alternating into creshendos with Beverly paralelling in a sassy vocalese. Wonderfully breezy,and just the kind of peppy bossa-like lounge tune you'll listen to over & over & over...They also do great versions of"A Man & A Woman"(with Ken adding some tasteful vocals himself)and "Eleanor Rigby"! A tough record to find, and no compiled tracks are anywhere to be found.... sad.

from Watch What Happens (World Pacific WP-1862)



Cerraron sus ojos  performed by Kissing Spell  1970
Recommended by chanchoenroca [profile]

This song it's just amazing, psychedelic music from the south of the world (Chile) before the dictatorship of Pinochet. After 73 the band dissapear.
Also, the lyrics are from a poem of Gustavo Adolfo Becquer, some people say, the last romantic one.
I totally recommend this song, it's just amazing please listen to it!

from Los Pájaros


Chocolates  performed by The Aluminum Group  1997
Recommended by tempted [profile]

This is a song that has made me cry twice. The first time was when I first heard it. The second...

"Am I bringing you down/when I'm giving you candy/all I want is the best for you tonight"

Burt Bacharach would be proud of this song had he written it. It reminds me a lot of his work.
The Aluminum Group are truly unique in the world of pop music today. With help of Jim O'Rourke among others they've created celestial music.

from Plano, available on CD (Minty Fresh)




  musicmars: I agree. The Aluminum Group are incredible and "Chocolates" is their best song. Talk about Sophistipop. The new cd "More Happyness" is a masterpiece. I really thought "Happiness was alright but More is ... definitely MORE. I was lucky enough to see them live last year and they put on a wonderful show. the Navin's have unique music, voices and personalities - very funny, beautiful people.
  tinks: i djed a show with them and parker & lily a while ago...they're really nice guys and have impeccable taste in music.
  eftimihn: Perfect song, really with gorgeous, bittersweet melancholia. From the songwriting to the production and arrangement, this is truly impeccable.
  moondog: yeah, really great song, but i think they completely lost it after the plano cd. I thought "pedals" should be their masterpiece after the promising two first cds but remember how disapointed i was after hearing it.
Coffee Talk - Yukihiro Fukutomi Remix  performed by Jazzanova  2001
Recommended by secularus [profile]

Although this track is not my favorite from Berlin's Jazzanova, I think it best represents the best bits of of their own work and their remixes for others. This track is a few years old but has been newly remixed by Japan's Fukutomi. Jazzanova are at the forefront of the nu jazz scene in the dance world. Beginning with a soulful piano introduction, the tune breaks into a heavy bass driven uptempo beat, sprinkled with a bit of a jazz scat, and a sample of a very haunting and seductive flute solo that sounds as if it has been lifted from an old soundtrack. The song however is not as simple as this review and must be listened to carefully to appreciate all that it offers.




Conservative Christian, Right-Wing Republican...  performed by Todd Snider  2004
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Full Title: Conservative Christian, Right-Wing Republican, Straight, White, American Males

--

Self-described left-leaning liberal hippie pothead troubadour Todd Snider muses about the people he considers the root of the world's problems. He's not a mean-spirited man, the liner notes for this song even mention that he loves everyone, even the conservatives he's singing about in this song.

from East Nashville Skyline, available on CD


crazy world  performed by bryon mack
Recommended by youn109 [profile]

acoustic guitar, soft sounding song but it has very strong vocals performed by Bryon Mack.
I like the song because it has a very pleasing melody and the vocals can really be felt, they aren't just heard.




Creole Love Call  performed by The Comedian Harmonists  1933
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An amazing and atmospheric track by this famous German vocal group. There are no words, and the music is produced largely accapella - from what I can hear, there's just piano accompaniment, with some incredible vocal effects that range from beautiful to plain bizarre. The trills and glissando effects are other-worldly, but what really steals the limelight is the tradeoff between a bizarre kitten-like voice and a deep foghorn at 2:12 (featured in the clip)!

None of this will make sense until you hear it, so let me just add that the whole thing has a really pleasant, lazy mood that strongly reminds me of that amazing scene in 'Wild at Heart' when Laura Dern is sat on the car at the gas station and Glen Gray and the Casa Loma band's 'Smoke Rings' is playing.


available on CD - The Comedian Harmonists (Hannibal)




  Turangalila: This track is marvelous, thanks for the heads up.
Dance and Shake Your Tambourine  performed by Universal Robot Band
Recommended by mr_klenster [profile]

Find this song! It is by far one of the funkiest things I've ever heard, it absolutely screams party. The lyrics repeat "dance and shake your tambourine, your funky tambourine, tambourine, tambourine". The instrumentation may get a bit repetitive for some, but the sheer funkiness and humor of this song will put a smile on your face while you're dancing the night away, without a care in the world. I especially get a kick out of the background voices, that seem to approve the shake that this song has. It sounds like it was recorded at a party and a time that you could only dream about experiencing. I like to play this song with the pitch up to about +4, which makes the experience all the more intense.





David  performed by Creation of Sunlight  1968
Recommended by andyjl [profile]

From a legendary pop-psyche LP in the Strawberry Alarm Clock vein ("the Sound of Young Ambition" according to the sleevenotes) about a small boy’s world of make believe, propelled by swirling keyboards. Sunny without being drippy.


available on CD - Creation of Sunlight


Deep Down  performed by Christy  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I'm surprised to find I haven't recommended this song before. An enchanting piece of futuristic pop written by Ennio Morricone, this great tune was part of the score for the wonderfully stylish Mario Bava movie 'Danger: Diabolik'. Christy, who also sung on some Piero Piccioni scores, was (is?) a heartfelt 'belter', and here she sings the italian lyrics, which are peppered with English phrases, especially passionately. There is a cool echoey effect on her voice, giving the whole affair an other-worldly, underwater feel. Musically, it's a very catchy psych-pop track, with a twangy, rocky guitar. It's quite short, but extremely powerful.

from the single Deep Down
available on CD - Canto Morricone Vol. 1 (Bear Family)




  leonthedog: This "Canto Morricone" volume sent me on a frantic chase for so many things; most rewarding was the "Danger: Diabolik" soundtrack. (The movie is a hoot and quite a bargain, too.) Mina... Spaak... Miranda Martino... Rita Monico... and what about Ken Colman? "Trio Junior"??? This CD will infect you, so you'd better just go get it!
  delicado: I realize it has been almost 10 years since I wrote this - but just to throw it out there - this track really is absolutely amazing!
Devil, Devil, Go Away  performed by Little Marcy  1973
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Ever felt there was a hole in your life that only a religious ventriloquist's dummy could fill? Then look no further. One of pop's bona-fide eccentrics, Marcy Tigner, voices Little Marcy in a thoroughly winsome way. The song, nay the whole album, encourages all young children to renounce the devil. However, if the devil were to see the scarily-bad drawing of Little Marcy on the cover, he would correctly deduce that no child is likely to listen to the ravings of a freaky end-of-the-pier doll voiced by an even stranger adult woman.

"Marcy wants you all to know how happy she is singing songs about Jesus" relate the sleevenotes. And, gee Marcy, we sure are glad to hear them!

Please don't think I recommended this song simply to mock it. I genuinely think it's a priceless piece of recorded gold and am more than pleased this site, and the world, is big enough to accommodate special talents like that of Marcy Tigner.

Out of Waco, Texas.

from Happy Am I (Word K-721)




  olli: aah, little marcy. i find her oddly touching. i adore the effect where the guitar seems to be meowing on "i love little pussy", it makes the song even more appealing than the questionable lyrics. "guitar festival of gospel songs" by little marcy's guitarist, bob summers is the current downloadable album over at basichip.com right now, by the way. snatch it while you can!
Did You Give The World Some Love Today, Baby  performed by Doris  1970
Recommended by Pal [profile]

One of the best tracks ever recorded in Sweden, the whole album is actually fantastic!

from Did You Give The... (Odeon 062-34193)
available on CD - Did You Give The World Some Love Today, Baby (Emi Sweden)



Didn’t Know The Time  performed by The Staccatos  1968
Recommended by john_l [profile]

From Ottawa, the Staccatos were Canada's best pop band of the 1960s and, with the possible exception of Strange Advance, still their best ever. This song is a bit of a clone of their biggest hit, 1967's "Half Past Midnight", right down to the lyrical preoccupation with time, but it's still worth a listen if you like that late-'60s "summer pop" sound, because its production is pretty tight and it has several neat little tricks like the best pop songs do. The flip side is called "We Go Together Well" and it's pretty good too, with its fuzzy guitars (or is it the bass?) ...

All of these tracks mentioned here were found on a 1969 LP called "Five Man Electrical Band", which is what the Staccatos had changed their name to. The LP contains both sides of the "It Never Rains On Maple Lane" / "Private Train" release which was the first under that name, but subsequent material followed a musical change of direction to what I would call "swamp rock" after that ghastly "Joy To The World" by Three Dog Night (ugh!), although "Signs" and "I'm A Stranger Here" at least had some lyrical smarts ... a CD of this stuff has been released but unfortunately the Staccatos material has not, apart from "Half Past Midnight" which showed up on a best-of-Canadian compilation.

from Five Man Electrical Band (Capitol)


Diffrerent Stories  performed by I Am The World Trade Center  2004
Recommended by MoeShinola [profile]

Synth-Pop candy. Starts out with strummed clean-tone electric guitar, then the electronic beats come in w/ Amy singing in her languid way. The chorus brings Dan in answering her back. It's one of the best songs on The Cover Up, which was their break-up record. Really good contrast of drama-laden lyrics and happy pop.

from The Cover Up (Gammon)


Disintegration  performed by Jimmy Eat World
Recommended by geopfray [profile]

How this early track never got a release on an album I don't know, but it's truly awesome (especially the drums). Just listen you'll see.




Double Concerto for Flute and Oboe  performed by claudio abbado  1972
Recommended by lesbianwalrus [profile]

its not a song. its a classical composition. - the most ingenious composition in history.

from clear or cloudy


Drowned World / Substitute for Love  performed by Madonna  1998
Recommended by acidburn [profile]

from Ray of Light


Duchess  performed by Scott Walker
Recommended by camus [profile]

I don't think there is any middle ground with old Scott. Love him/hate him

I originally started to listen to him because of recommendations from Julian Cope, not personally, from his book, Head on/Repossessed, a great rock'n'roll read.

To me This is Scott at his best, balancing well his mesmerising voice, with his world weary poetic lyrics, not too over produced, a beatiful ballad.

sample Lyric " You shed your names with the seasons, still they all return with their last remains, and they lay them before you... like reasons...."


available on CD - Kaza the Ultimate Scott


Elias  performed by Dispatch
Recommended by Reina [profile]

This song is a song everyone should hear. Beginning with African drum beats and chants, it has a tribal feel to it. Really cool, upbeat...great to listen to while driving. Check out the live version too.

"I think you could answer all the questions of the world in just one word..."




Floating World  performed by Bowery Electric
Recommended by DeathandHarmony [profile]




Footprints on the Moon  performed by Francis Lai  1973
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An incredibly perfect easy listening piece, this opens with an other-worldly, John-Barry-ish synth sound, and then leads into a groovy, lightly funky piano riff, with shimmering strings. Francis Lai's signature organ sound carries the tune as the song builds into a dramatic orchestral pop masterpiece. A standout track, with superb wistful, lazy, summer day feel, rather like some of the best tracks on the 'Sound Gallery' compilation of a few years ago.

from Plays the compositions of... (UA UA-LA095-F)




  scrubbles: Yow! That sound snippet alone is so cool.
  AndreasNystrom: I finally got the version by Francis Lai, and i think its better then Johnny Harris one. Splendid song!. I love the ending part of it.. cant get that part out of my head :)
  standish: I'd have to go for the Johnny Harris original over the Francis Lai version. It's colder and spookier with less obtrusive strings. "Movements" is available on CD (great sleeve - his expression suggests a combined photo shoot/visit to his proctologist) - but the mono single version (w/"Lulu's Theme") is all you need.
  leonthedog: Well, thanks to all of you I had to track down BOTH versions! Amazing what a difference an arrangement makes. I agree with scrubbles: the clip of Lai's version is the most infectious thing around!
For a short time  performed by Tiddas  1998
Recommended by phil [profile]

Absolutely fantastic, amazing, beautiful singing - it'll really knock your socks off. The tiddas seem to concentrate on singing above everything else - they are three women, two of whom play the acoustic guitar, and that's it, but the result is just sensational harmonies and brilliant interpretations of songs, some of which are aboriginal folk songs, others their own, and others just covers.

This is a cover of a song by the splendidly-named Weddings, Parties, Anything. Both versions are absolutely brilliant but the singing on this tiddas one is just out of this world.

from Lethal by the kilo, available on CD


Freio Aerodinamico  performed by Os 3 Morais  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A truly incredible vocal/jazz pop track which really has everything. Os Tres Morais were (are?) a mysterious Brazilian vocal trio. Here they tackle a great Marcos Valle song, and do such a storming job of it that this may be one my very favorite tracks EVER in the whole world ever! Honestly. Until I put a sound sample up, please accept these measly words of explanation:
1. It's bouncy and smooth and has warm strings
2. It's actually quite funky as well
3. The vocal harmonies are fantastic. I don't think there are any actual words - it's all just beautiful interwoven sound
4. Someone starts playing a scratchy electric guitar rebelliously at end of the song, completely out of context with the rest of it. It sounds cool.

from Os Tres Morais
available on CD - Blue Brazil volume 2 (EMI UK)




  tinks: i have a sneaking suspicion that os tres morais and os tres brasilieros were in fact the same group...the reason that i say this is because os tres brasilieros were a family group comprised of two brothers and a sister, whose last name just happened to be "morais". if so, have a look for the album that i've made a recommendation from. it'd seem to jive, since this comp is on emi, and the lp i have is on capitol.
  delicado: hmm, interesting. Shame there is a dearth of info available for either group... are os tres brasilieros consistently good, out of interest?
  tinks: well, the album i have is pretty standard vocal bossa & samba-type stuff, but it's not bad. very easy to listen to, and there are a few inspired moments. i'll check the liner notes to see if i can garner any more info on them.
  clmarcel: i think the correct name this band is "os tres moraes". here in Brazil, moraes is frequently a last name, while "morais" can be traduzed by "ethics", "moral".
  clmarcel: sorry, i made a mistake. The real name is MORAIS. The link to this band is http://acesso-raro.blogspot.com/ . There can be downloaded the mp3 e see the album cover.
  Luroberto: This ensemble was the best one in the end of the 60s in Brazil. The accurate voise of Jane Moraes was simply marvelous. They have been influenced by Les Swingle Singers. They began their career singing music erudite and in a second moment they joined Bossa Nova hits of Chico Buarque and Tom Jobim. They have enregistered three LPs. When Jane married Herondy and make the kitsch couple Jane & Herondy her brothers relpaced her by Ana Lucia and after one last LP they splited the ensemble for separate careers. One of them is now new as "Santo Morales", a bolero singer. One of their best hits was O Sonho (The Dream), 1968, of Egberto Gismonti.
Getting Away With It  performed by Electronic  1989
Recommended by ref. [profile]

Straight up pop song with a disco sheen. I haven't liked many songs in Electronic's catalogue, despite featuring Bernarnd Sumner from New Order and Johnny Marr from the Smiths, but this song is up there with my favorites from each group.

This song features Neil Tennant from the Pet Shop Boys. What star power!

The lyrics are typical Sumner - casual dream-speak about his relationship with the world.

The refrain is gold, as are the melodies.

Check out the song here:

http://profile.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=user.viewprofile&friendID=42979805

from Getting Away With It (Factory FACD 257)


Girl called rock’n’roll  performed by The Huges  2005
Recommended by tarjalumilla [profile]

There may be some jerky glam rock in it, but it still makes you feel more than a music whore:)

from Size does matter


Go For Yourself  performed by Lennie Hibbert  1971
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

WOW! Reggae-funk doesn't get any bouncier, funkier or more life-affirming than this scorcher. From the late JA vibes player's long-deleted second Studio One LP, "Go For Yourself" is among the hottest examples ever heard of a particular rare species of James Brown-inflected Studio One tracks (Alton Ellis' "Alton's Groove" and the Brentford All-Stars' "Greedy G" are two other prime examples). Totally butter, with a WICKED open drum break that goes on and on, and then late in the track Lennie comes in on vibes sounding like Cal Tjamaican or something! I searched for this record for years, once finding the LP jacket at Coxsone's Musik City in Brooklyn and having the late great Mr. Dodd himself tell me he had no record to go with it!! This repress is among the last things he did, and Jah bless this great man for bringing us a lot of music the world would be unimaginable without....

from More Creation (Studio One SOL 1119)


Goodnight Moon  performed by Shivaree  2002
Recommended by Lubi [profile]

A blend of Mexican, a sprinkling of country and a dose of Southern soul "Goodnight Moon" is a track off the album "I Ought to Give You a Shot in the Head for Making Me Live in This Dump" : classy!

When a song hits me - I will play it like it's going out of fashion, or in this case, coming into fashion!

Until four days ago I knew nothing about this band - I happened to be surfing around looking for inspiration and accidently came upon this song, the singer whom I now know as Ambrosia Paisley has a sultry, quirky voice and given to this song makes it feel like It should be played acoustic in some smoky bar with swing doors, and a bar man called Hank offering neat JD's.

Although that's probably not too far from reality it is being played world wide thanks to Mr Tarrantino who has used this track in his movie soundtrack - Kill Bill 2 - which kind of makes sense to me granted that my original search on Google four days ago started with Nancy Sinatra, which I also found out "Bang Bang my baby shot me down" (another recommendation should I add!) was lent to the Kill Bill 1 soundtrack.

Regressing, I do not know if any other tunes on this album are worthy but Goodnight Moon now firmly has a place in the soundtrack to my life.

from I Ought to Give You a Shot in the Head for Making Me Live in This Dump, available on CD


Hannah  performed by Ray Lamontagne
Recommended by Sixxish [profile]

Even if it's the happiest song in the world, Ray Lamontagne's voice can make any song sad.

Definitely not a bad thing. His raspy, mournful voice is always one I can listen to, no matter the mood I'm in.

from Trouble


Hannah Jane  performed by Hootie & The Blowfish  1994
Recommended by thedoc [profile]

Off the wall lyrics but incredibly fine singing and the arrangements are out of this world. Whatever happened to this fine band?


available on CD - Cracked Rear View (Atlantic)


Hard Times  performed by Eastmountainsouth
Recommended by CaitlinSpelledWrong [profile]

Hard Times comes from the Elizabethtown soundtrack, which is a great cd by the way. This song is beautiful, everyone in the world should hear. I'm not exagerating. "Let us pause in lifes pleasures and count it's many tears."


available on CD - Elizabethtown soundtrack


Harriet’s Got a Song  performed by Ben Kweller
Recommended by purrple [profile]

no one can resist the poppy sounds of the beautiful Ben Kweller.

This song opens with the great line: "I don't stand a chance in this fucked up world..."

from Sha Sha


Head Up  performed by Deftones  1998
Recommended by Vagina Man [profile]

Deftones are a band that needs no introduction. They have been rockin the world for 7 years now, straight out of Cali. They have played with just about every band out there and have even been in a movie, The Crow 2. They are also known for covering the song Wicked by Ice Cube with another California band called Korn. Head Up rocks you from the moment it satrts till the time it finishes, if you want heavy this is it. Its not too crazy but at no point does it ever give off the immpression that it won't kick your ass. The song also has Max Cavalera (former lead singer of Sepultura and new lead singer and founder of Soulfly)singing backup vocals. If you play a sport and need a little bbost to get you in the mood to kick some ass, put this to your ears and let loose.

from Around the Fur (Columbia)


i am a camera  performed by Buggles  1982
Recommended by geezer [profile]

This is what the future sounded like in 1982,misguided technical prophecy and electronic keyboards,but underneath such dated cliche lies a beautiful watery melody ,the sort of tune you could dive into and wallow for ever.

This was Trevor Horn,s apprenticeship,a place he learnt to meld melody with beat and beauty before moving on to conquer the world,the album isnt that good but this tune will stay in your head long after you slip into sleep .

from Adventures in Modern Recording, available on CD


I Can't Walk Roads Of Anger  performed by Bob Lind  1966
Recommended by john_l [profile]

A great folk-rock song from the man who had a hit with the sometimes-derided (but, let's face it, excellent) "Elusive Butterfly" in 1966. This one is even janglier, and the tension builds up in each verse then gets released in the chorus (thanks to the drums). Lind's lyrics were always full of adjectives and imagery, maybe over-showy to some, and that's the case here too, but if you like mid-'60s folk-rock then you gotta hear this!

from Don't Be Concerned (World Pacific)
available on CD - The Best Of Bob Lind (EMI)


I Close My Eyes  performed by Bee Gees  1967
Recommended by tinks [profile]

It's a sad fact that the Bee Gees are a group primarily remembered for only one thing. If this were a perfect world, people would realize what an jaw-droppingly amazing group they once were. To me, their first LP is an orchestral psychedelic pop masterpiece easily the equal of the Kinks' "Village Green" or Billy Nicholls' "Would You Believe", and also just about as close at Britain ever got to replicating "Pet Sounds". On this track, listen for the insane rubber-band bassline, the staccato organ fills, the odd timbre of the voices or the occassional flute bit. It's a song bursting with an enthusiam the likes of which people only had during the middle 60s.

from Bee Gees' 1st, available on CD




  ronin: Ah, 1967. "NY Mining Disaster 1941" is a major hit in Boston. And Bee Gees 1st, complete w/cover art by Klaus Voorman, was the 1st lp I ever bought. If only the Bee Gees had kept singing like this instead of the whole falsetto/disco bit! "Odd timbre of voices" indeed! Robin (we always assumed) had his top teeth hanging out when he did this one. His vocal versatility is amazing. "Craise Finton Kirk," with its simple piano accompaniment, is a standout from this lp., too.
I Don’t Wanna Have A Nice Day  performed by Greg Brown
Recommended by snoodlededoogans [profile]

guitarist and songwriter greg brown tells us how he feels when someone says 'haveAniceDay'. midtempo acoustic number with gruff bassy vocals. very good for themed comps or person-specific mixtapes. from an album called The Live One and various MPR/NPR performances at their archives. repeat listening assured.

from The Live One (Red House Records)


i don't want another man  performed by the feminine complex  1969
Recommended by e [profile]

this a nice song, slightly out of character to the rest of the album ,"Livin' Love"(which is more traditionally sixties pop) this has a big energetic beat and a rousing chorus. perhaps not the most sophisticated composition in the world, but it makes me happy anyway...


available on CD - livin' love (teenbeat)



I Got Rhythm  performed by Ethel Merman  1940
Recommended by Melms [profile]

NO ONE ELSE could belt it out like that. When she finishes the first chorus,instead of reprising the melody for a second time through, she simply belts a single note (a high C) for an entire 32-bar chorus. Her voice COMMANDED audiences the world over to applaud that song. Celine Dion's got nothing on Ethel. Nothing!

from There's No Business Like Show Business: The Collection, available on CD


If There is Something  performed by Roxy Music  1972
Recommended by geezer [profile]

An extraordinary track that begins its life as an awkward attempt at country and western before very quickly resolving itself an removing it self from conventional pop music ,seven minutes later your life will never be the same again.How four conventional instruments could carve something so cosmic is beyond belief,not cosmic in a Floyd way or even a Grateful Dead way but truly other worldly.Ferry,s pledge that he would do ANYTHING for his girl resonate against weird synths ,weird guitar and heart breaking saxophone ,the wiords become the music and the music becomes the words ,a truly cerebral conclusion is achieved This is used to staggering effect in the Daniel Craig film "Flashbacks of a Fool" and to hear and see this track is almost overwhelming.




In the Aeroplane Over the Sea  performed by Neutral Milk Hotel  1997
Recommended by two-headed boy [profile]

I didn't know it then, but when I purchased the album 'In the Aeroplane Over the Sea' my world changed. When I put the album into my CD player, I did it with a naivete of someone who thought they'd 'heard it all.' I did it clumsily, with haste, handled like a Beatles or Beach Boys album, the way I had done for years. When I listened to the album I did it with reckless abandon while driving 38 miles per hour on my lunch break, and later in the drive-through at McDonald’s. These mistakes were inherited, and I refuse blame. They were passed through the genetic make-up of our peers and born out of the music we've been given; I didn't expect this! Well, our music has changed, and it did so without our knowing and our approval. This album proved and disproved an entire treatise of critical analysis on a generation of music that I thought I had known, and it did so with a fucking velvet sledgehammer.

The lyrics: "And one day we will die and our ashes will fly from the aeroplane over the sea, but for now we are young let us lay in the sun and count every beautiful thing we can see." More lyrics: "What a beautiful face I have found in this place that is circling all around the sun, what a beautiful dream that would flash in the screen in a blink of an eye and be gone from me." The melody: A timeless, haunting thing that was metaphysically resurrected from a wiser place. The voice: Wrenched out of the jaws of a holocaust from 50 years ago, we hear a possessed Jeff Mangum invest his soul. The sound: An apocalypse that can reinvent the turntable by it’s simplistic form; with a saw, guitar, drum, bass, horns, and lord knows what else all handled with deceptive elegance of a garage mechanic constructing a supermodel. And, lastly, the spirit: A tragedy and rape of virginity known only to the persecuted and executed; the ghost of Anne Frank materializes long enough to show us her world, and in her hands we are strangely at peace.

This song is a gift very few will experience. It is endless in its reach and should be accepted like a sibling into your collection. It will one day prove itself beyond category, but for now it is a masterful novel from the hands of a mysterious songwriter who should know how sincerely I cherish his songs.

from In the Aeroplane Over the Sea



  karlmort: this album is going to make a huge impact on you if you dare to listen.
  evolutum: All I have to say is that I agree with the above. My wife and I had this song played at our wedding reception. With tears in our eyes we danced. I would like to have it played at my funeral.
  umbrellasfollowrain: Whenever I hear that someone loves this album as much as I do this strange things happens where I want to draw you all into a bearhug where we cry our fears away all through the long night.
  el.oh man.: this song can make you feel so many emotions at once. it truly is a wrok of art. there is almost no way that you wouldnt like it. everytime i hear it, i fall in love with the amazing writing talents of these guys.
  pullmyhair: This is one of my most life-changing albums. It does something to me, almost spiritually. If people have an open mind, they need to hear this.
In This World  performed by Moby
Recommended by DeathandHarmony [profile]




Indian Summer  performed by Chris Botti  2003
Recommended by milesblue [profile]

Chris Botti is an accomplished musician in the worlds of Jazz and Smooth Jazz. His style is reminicent of Miles Davis but with a more melodic approach. This song incorporates an ultra-lounge feel with a cool jazz vibe. Botti's trumpet playing here approaches Miles Davis' minimalist playing style.

from A Thousand Kisses Deep
available on CD - Thousand Kisses Deep


It takes a thief  performed by John Schroeder  1971
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An unusual-sounding instrumental that mixes a 3/4 time signature with a light breakbeat. The song (incorrectly cited as 'the name of the game' on the record I have) is a spooky and groovy instrumental, with a continuous organ riff, great strings, and a big beat. A different interpretation of this song by another British arranger, John Gregory, appears on the excellent German compilation 'the mad mad world of soundtracks'.

from TV Vibrations (Polydor)



It’s Over  performed by Bad Finger
Recommended by TippyCanoe [profile]

another fine song about touring. out of this world harmonies.

from Straight Up (Apple SW-3387)


It’s The End Of The World As We Know It  performed by REM
Recommended by brooksyinc [profile]

Unbelievably catchy, the most poppy song REM ever did and has to be one of the greatest songs I've ever heard. Period

from ?


It's 74 in San Francisco  performed by The Hellers  1968
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

The Hellers were a group of L.A. ad agency people making a pop record, and it shows in this slick opener to their only album. I love the mellow pacing, the otherworldly early synths, and the so-corny-they're-good group vocals. Overall, it comes off like a weird, wonderful hybrid of '60s AM radio promos and mildly psychedelic pop.

from ... Singers...Talkers...Players...Swingers... & Doers (Command)




  bobbyspacetroup: That is a cool song. Very cool. The song I've really grown to love from this album is "The Mist Of Time." It makes me wish The Hellers had done more stuff outside of advertising music.
jackie  performed by Scott Walker  1968
Recommended by klatu [profile]

This is one of the funniest songs I have ever heard. I play it when I have people over listening to music and they get the glazed-over "too much information" look, and I need something to confound expectations. Always with the warning that they need to listen to the whole lyric before breaking down in laughter or confusion. I don't know how closely this english version follows the original Jacques Brel french, but each lyric is more ridiculous than the last! But I thought the Albert/morphine episode of Little House on the Prairie episode was one of the funniest things ever, so maybe I am just warped. This is my favorite Scott Walker album, with the other great Brel tunes "next" and "the girls and the dogs", great originals like "plastic palace people", and the haunting slow version of the Bacharach/David "windows of the world".

from Scott 2, available on CD



  djfreshmoney: I heard this song in a record store and it's what made me want to listen to Scott and Brel. Absolutely, wonderfully timelessly bizarre.
  conan550: Hi again Klatu "Jackie" is one of my fav all time tracks.Its very idiocyncratic and the interpretation by Scott Walker is just right.A very underatted Classic! Regards Mo
Just Like the Movies  performed by Regina Spektor
Recommended by brandyalexander [profile]

I'm already a huge fan of Regina, but for me this is her absolute BEST. Good luck finding it because I'm pretty positive it's not on any of her cd's, but it's a very beautiful song that you can hear her sing live on youtube. It's so weary but very beautiful all at the same time. However I feel like it's the simple, yet honest lyrics that blow me away. "Don't say goodbye like you're burrying him. Cause the world is round and he might return."




just watch the fireworks  performed by jimmy eat world  1999
Recommended by monique [profile]

i'm too tone deaf to fully describe why this song is so good. it's melodic and melancholic without being too depressing. vocals and production are outstanding.

from clarity (captal records)



Just Watch The Fireworks  performed by Jimmy Eat World  1999
Recommended by Shan207 [profile]

Absolutely wonderful song. One of those tracks that you need to listen to in your headphones about a million times before you fully realise the scope of just how wonderful it is. An all-time classic.

from Clarity (Capitol)


Just What I’ve Been Looking For  performed by The Vogues  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Genius late 60s pop with vocal harmonies. This was composed by Roger Nichols, and has some beautiful chord changes and Bacharach-meets-Brian-Wilson interludes.

The verse is sombre and in a minor key, but when they sing 'close to me' to usher in the chorus, the sun comes out! There's some scat singing in the interludes. I had previously only really known the Vogues for '5 o'clock world', but this is superb - an unusual and memorable track.

from Greatest Hits, available on CD



King Of The World  performed by Jackpots  1968
Recommended by audiodrome [profile]




La Bamba  performed by Edmundo Ros and Catarina valente  1966
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

Starts with a piano tinkling up and down the scale, and then the whole Latin Orchestra starts, ultimately Edmundo's raspy voice bellows out of the speakers sounding for all the world like Shaggy's drunken grandfather. Kind of Rhumba, very very danceable, surprisingly modern sounding with a terrific breakdown to the piano in the middle. Beware Edmundo ros has done another version of La Bamba which is terrible.

from Nothing But Aces (Decca PFS 41457)



Looking Glass  performed by The La,s   1989
Recommended by geezer [profile]

An epic finale to an epic album,psychedelic but inside the real world ,existential but accesible,beautiful acoustic guitars and backing harmonies.This is the birth or re birth of British pop music after its castration at the hands of eighties over production and souless technology.Dragging Pink Floyd behind it on its way to meet Oasis a few years down the line .

from self titled 1990, available on CD


Lookin’ At A Baby  performed by The Collage  196?
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Another awsome but forgotten vocal group from 60's California that deserves a proper re-issue!The Collage were a vocal quartet(2 boys & 2 girls)with a very cool sound.Not enough to set them apart from the pack,but very groovy out of their context.The sound is as good as re-discovered groups like Free Design, or Millenium.In fact,Curt Boettcher wrote one of the songs on the LP,as well as Roger Nichols!
This song has a kind of"love awareness" message that seems just as relevant in today's troubled world: "...Look at a baby,what do you see?What do you see,lookin' at a baby?/I can see the world the way that I would like the world to be!..."This song,as the opener on the LP,has a lot of power, with that great 8th note stomp and a big,boomy,bass line with harpsichord.The arrangements are by the great Perry Botkin Jr.,and he gives the whole record a nice swirling,magical quality.And the rest of the album is just as impressive, and should be worth the high price for any lover of the genre.

from The Collage (Smash SRS 7101/MGS 27101)



  kwan_dk: Great song! I was lucky enough to find their album for 1 (!) dollar at a garage sale and loved that great opening track...
  rum: I heard a version of this track on that excellent rhino handmade 'Hallucinations' compilation. It was by the Collectors. I'm not sure whether it was the original or not, but it's really good. I remember looking at a picture of the band and thinking that if these 'collectors' started peering over into my baby's pram, I'd be wheeling him away to the nearest bobby. Ah such was the carefree innocence of the 60s that shabby young men could spend balmy afternoons in the park staring at young children.
  maya: I love this album! I may post some recs once I've listened to it a few times more...and since the year has a question mark, it's from 1967! they've got such a soft, sweet sound, that it's hard to resist.
  artlongjr: This song and band are great, no doubt. They were Canadian and later evolved into Chilliwack (who I haven't heard). I have their first LP which contains this song, and is excellent, it's a classic of West Coast psychedelia. I had a chance to hear their second album from a friend of mine who works in a record store, it's terrific! I think I heard that the name "Collectors" was given to them by a manager or record executive...but please, overlook the dorkiness of the name! This song is getting around, I now have it on two comps.
Lose That Girl  performed by Saint Etienne  1998
Recommended by king8egg [profile]

for years friends have been telling me i should give st. etienne a listen as they thought it was something i'd like. well, it took me long enough but they were right. if they had recorded nothing else than this song i would consider it one of my favourite pop songs. with lines like: "i should have told you to lose that girl/i should have told you that's not your world /on her radio she turned the disco down..." it was destined to end up a favourite of mine.

from Good Humor, available on CD




  delicado: I'm also a recent convert to St. Etienne. I insisted to friends that I didn't like them, but I recently got 1992's 'So Tough', and thought it was brilliant.
  tempted: If there's one group I find very difficult to criticize it's St. Etienne. People say they've made a bad album or two but I think they all are different faces of perfection. "So Tough" is probably the best choice to start with them. That's the band in a nutshell. And the most widely appreciated album.
  OneCharmingBastard: Talk about a sleeper. Not their most obvious single by a long shot (that honor still goes to either their Jimmy Webb tribute "Avenue" or their Bo Donaldson & The Heywoods cover, "Who Do You Think You Are"), but this track not only stands the test of time, but improves like a fine wine. Someday people will love this band. Until then, little four minute bursts of brilliance like this are part of my own private stash of cool cuts.
Love Love Love  performed by Tony Love  2003
Recommended by tlmusic [profile]

It's what the world needs to heal

from It's All About Love (T.L.M.P.)
available on CD - Its All About Love (T.L.M.P.)


Lying is the most fun  performed by Panic at the Disco  2005
Recommended by sparkling.inferno [profile]

it's not the most beautifully written song -or the most appropriate, for that matter- but i love it for the way it was performed, the way Brendon's sometimes high-pitched vocals harmonize so well with the instruments, and its memorability. this song stuck with me for a very long time, however i am also very attached to it on account of more personal reasons.
the intellectual aspects are also what struck me as being meaningful- how often do you hear the word 'harlequin' or 'testosterone' in a song? i enjoy listening to tunes with at least some signs of intellect, rather than hearing a string of curses or slang in an entire three minutes. although there are some profanities in Lying, it's not as bad as many other songs out there, that's for sure.

however, there is a sad aspect to the song as well. apparently, it was inspired by guitarist Ryan Ross' recent breakup with his girlfriend on account of her cheating. he stated:
"At the time it felt like the world had ended. I hated everything. It affected that whole album. I guess it's good that I wrote it down. I might have stabbed somebody."

overall, i think it's a great composition, with an enjoyable melody and a catchy chorus, despite its melancholy roots.

from A Fever You Can't Sweat Out


Mad World  performed by Gary Jules  2002
Recommended by BucketDog [profile]

This is a great cover of the Tears for Fears song. I don't think the original holds a candle to this version. Simple and soulful, you can find it on the Donnie Darko soundtrack or take a listen at garyjules.com on the Trading Snakeoil for Wolftickets CD.

from Donnie Darko soundtrack, available on CD


Mad World  performed by Gary Jules  2001
Recommended by cryofthecelt [profile]

"Mad World" was written and originally performed by the popular 80's band Tears for Fears. A more mellow, piano-based cover of the song was featured in the cult movie "Donnie Darko" (Jake Gylenhaal, Patrick Swayze) as performed by folk artist Gary Jules. His version of "Mad World" reached the coveted Christmas #1 spot in the UK in 2003, despite that it was 3 years old and performed by an unknown artist.
This song is quite possibly my favorite song of all time, at least in my Top Ten, because I feel that it describes life very accurately. The chorus of the song is:
"I find it kind of funny
I find it kind of sad
The dreams in which I'm dying
Are the best I've ever had."
To me, this song is saying "Hang in there...I know life sucks on this earth, but you will go to a far better place after your death."
Depressing? No. This song helps me to carry on.

from Donnie Darko (Enjoy)
available on CD - Trading Snakeoil for Wolftickets (EMI International)



  malpt: This is a rare occasion where I love the cover more than the original. A very awesome song.
Mad World  performed by Gary Jules  2002
Recommended by acidburn [profile]

from Donnie Darko


Magical World  performed by Bassnectar ft. Nelly Furtado
Recommended by khog10 [profile]

A great track to jam to. Extremely different for Ms. Furtado. If you're into it, this is a great song to hoop dance to :)




Maigret  performed by Tony Hatch  1962
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This is one of those mindblowing tracks that occasionally turns up when you least expect it. I bought a generic looking 'Top TV Themes' EP on the Pye Golden Guinea label, mainly because it had a version of the 'Out of this World' theme, which I've recommended elsewhere on this site. But I was disappointed - it turned out that this 'Out of this World' was exactly the same Tony Hatch version that I already had (the EP does not list any track credits).

I listened on, not expecting much, particularly from 'Maigret', a nice enough theme by Ron Grainer, but one that is a kind of accordian waltz!

Imagine my surprise when this turned out to be some kind of trashy, twangy, swampy surf pop masterpiece! It sounds like one of the very best Joe Meek produced instrumentals from the early 60s.

I'm inferring that this is Tony Hatch, since he did the 'Out of this World' and was a staff arranger at Pye in the early 60s. But if anyone else can shed a different light on this recording, I'd be pleased to hear about it!

from Top TV Themes (Pye Golden Guinea W03)




  olli: Funny how anything can be transformed into a masterpiece with the right arrangement, isn't it?
Majory Razor Blade  performed by Kevin Coyne
Recommended by camus [profile]

70's oh so 70's daubs of wierd gaudiness, layered over plain drabness.

Quirky....very quirky also hilarious, disturbing and unforgettable.

Sample Lyric " Oh what a woman what a tongue, what an abrasive manner"

I first heard this when i around 15 or 16, borrowed from a local Mushroom dealer called Mad dog, I kid you not. At the time I'd "Inadvertently" consumed some of his wares, and was beginning to get hazy and paisley, hence he made me and a couple of friends lay down on his room floor, head to toe, turned off the lights and put Majory Razorblade on.........we giggled in the darkness like school kids,which we were, as we listened to the tale of the woman with the long and fusty dress..I've never forgotten it....

I highly recommend the Album Majory Razorblade, by Kevin Coyne - a lost genius. The title track sets the tone for an album full of seedy characters, each lost in their own wanton little worlds, with lashings of philosphical blurbs "Being on your own is hard, being with someone is harder"

well worth exploring.........




May my heart be cast into stone  performed by Other Voices  1967
Recommended by Ron1967-1970 [profile]

Another one of my faves... grrrrrrrreat orchestration, unbelievably well produced and heavenly
vocals in perfect harmony. A song to bring me on my knees... hoping it won't stop... so sweet, yet goes very crescendo... a definite 'two thumbs up' for this one... This group never made an album. It's one of those typical 'studio groups' who produced a sound that could knock you KO (IF you like the positive sound of the late 60s). It takes a genius to arrange a song like that: 'And may my heart be cast into stone" (immediately followed by two short orchestral outbursts pa-taa pa-taa) "And may the world go deaf when I roar" (pa-taa pa-taa)... One word: d e l i g h t f u l





  trebole: I was going to recommend this same song and looking for some info on the net I discovered by chance you have already recommended it. Just listening to it makes me feel like clapping my fingers and sing aloud to heaven with my eyes full of tears. Love the background vocals too!
  trebole: Just wanted to add, the song I have is performed by a girl group called Toys. Is that right?
  PaulLevinson: Thanks for the good words about our record, Ron. Actually, we weren't a studio group. Here are some details on The Other Voices: The Other Voices consisted of me, Stu Nitekman (who later wrote a book about Scrabble, the board game, under the name Jonathan Hatch - JH also does voice-overs and commercials under that name now), and Ira Margolis. We had previously been a folk-rock group called The New Outlook. We were singing in Central Park in NYC one Sunday afternoon. Ellie Greenwich and Mike Rashkow walked by, liked what they heard, and said they'd like to produce us. They signed us, changed our name to The Other Voices, and landed us a contract with Atlantic Records. May My Heart Be Cast Into Stone was one of three songs we went in and recorded in a NYC studio. The other two were "Hung Up On Love" and "No Olympian Heights". Only "Hung On Love" was written by one of us -- me (and Mikie Harris). "Hung Up On Love" was included on Rhino Handmade's Come to the Sunshine: Soft Pop Nuggets for the WEA Vaults in 2004 (Andrew Sandoval compiled it). I now a professor, author of science fiction and books about the cellphone (I'm currently working on a book about the First Amendment), appear a lot on television, etc - details on my web page: www.sff.net/people/paullevinson All best wishes and Happy New Year! Paul PS - The Toys also have a version of Cast Into Stone - same song, different recording.
Ménilmontant  performed by Charles Trenet
Recommended by PappaWheelie [profile]

Smooth voiced crooning from the pre-World War II era of Chanson Francaise. Much more infectious than most of the era.


available on CD - Cocktail Hour-Charles Trenet (COLUMBIA RIVER ENT. GROUP)



Metal Warriors  performed by Manowar  1992
Recommended by rum [profile]

'Metal Warriors' is Manowar's call to arms, a joyous rallying cry to all the "Brothers of True Metal" of the world. Stand tall and proud, they implore, for the magic of the metal has brought you here. The power within each and every one unites them, and to exclusion of everybody else ("if you're not into metal, you are not my friend!"). Anyone that tries to suppress their might will be met with fearless defiance, "we don't turn down for anyone, we do just what we please!". And they live and die metal, and will not tolerate fakes and frauds and softies, "heavy metal, or no metal at all, wimps and posers, leave the hall!" rings out the epic chorus, "heavy metal, or no metal at all, wimps and posers… go on get out!"

So, anyway, put your reservations aside and head out into the streets to find this one, just this one*, awesome, thumping Manowar track. Spinal Tap were playing for laughs, this however, is frighteningly real.

*although 'Achilles, Agony, and Ecstasy in Eight Parts: Prelude/I. Hector Storms' their 30 minute interpretation of Homer's Iliad is certainly worth a listen.

from Triumph Of Steel (Warner 7567824232)


Miss World  performed by Hole  1994
Recommended by oceanacid [profile]

An incredible emaotional hard rocking song that is totally relatable.

from Live Through This, available on CD


Mrs. Bluebird  performed by Eternity’s Children  1967
Recommended by tempted [profile]

A fabulous acid-pop masterpiece featuring one of the most intriguing intros in pop history. Everything I love about psychedelic pop made in the US in the late 6t's comes together in Mrs. Bluebird: the softly mythical, escapist feeling that the harmony and orchestration bring into this music. I frequently use it as a getaway. I think indulging in this music is not sad but it shows you've got the means to make you happy. This song is a Curt Boettcher (The Millennium, Sagittarius) production that cannot have been made while under the influence of drugs!!

from Eternity's Children (Tower)
available on CD - Best of Eternity's Children




  493440: I appreciate the nice comments about "Mrs Bluebird." My name is Bruce Blackman and I wrote Mrs Bluebird. I was the founder of Eternity's Children in 1966. We did not survive because of incredibly bad management. Our two managers had the middle names of "Karl" and "Marion." After I left the group, they tried to cheat me (unsuccessfuly) out of any credit. A few years after Eternity's Children I formed my group Starbuck and we scored a top 3 with my song "Moonlight Feels Right." Three of the members of Eternity's Children were with me in Starbuck.
  john_l: I agree, this is a wonderful song! The organ keeps the beat (after the dreamy intro), the harmonies are great and there's that heavy psychedelic guitar solo in the bridge, although I believe that was edited out of a 45 or radio edit version.
  royjudywhi: In response to Bruce Blackman's comments under response 493440, he is absolutely correct about his penning of Mrs Bluebird. It was a great song off a great album. He is a talented songwriter but a lousey historian. The group was formed by Roy Whittaker when he was at Delta State College in Cleveland Mississippi. Bruce was an important part of the group but failed to survive the rigors of bad management. Bruce and Johnny Walker were the only members of Starbuck who were part of the original Eternity's Children group.
  tbrown: I too am a long time Eternity's Children fan. Grew up in Biloxi, played in a local band in high school. Used to go hear the Children at the Biloxi Hotel and at the Vapors in about 1967. Along with Little David and the Giants, they were the hottest groups around at the time....great memories. I see messages here by Bruce, and it looks like Roy maybe, and also saw one from Charlie Ross. Would love to hear from any of you guys just to find out what you are all up to these days.
  jwalker: Thought you Eternity's Children fans might like an update on another member. Johnny Walker played lead guitar and I believe was the lead vocalist on "Mrs Bluebird". He was also a member of Starbuck with Bruce Blackman later. Johnny's my brother and anybody that wants to contact him may do so through me. He lives 2 miles from here and has no internet access but I'm sure he'd like to hear from anybody out there that remembers Eternity's Children so please feel free to post and date your messages and we'll see that he gets them. Oh, by the way, Charlie Ross, another original member of the Children, is and has been for many years a founding member and the bass player/lead vocalist for the Krackerjacks, a kick-ass band in Greenville, Mississippi, the hometown of Johnny, Charlie and Bruce Blackman. My husband was also their keyboard player for several years.
  luna: For jwalker: Where in the world are you two these days? How's Johnny doin? I'm the other k-board player. Tell Johnny DDD said hello, also hello to your husband.
  trucol: For jwalker: Thanks for the compliment about the KrackerJacks. I have been the drummer since about 1983. Tell Johnny that T.C. said hello. He's one of most incredible guitar players I have ever heard. I first met him in P'cola. He was with another kick-ass band, Lazy Day.
  tempted: Hey guys, have you realized that there's a new 'Children "Lost Sessions" record out on Gear Fab Recs. Congrats!
  tempted: To John_I: the guitar solo remains there on the single version, too. It still gives me shivers.
  musicmars: Hey Bruce, it's an honor to post on a board that you read. I've loved Starbuck since I was 12 or 13. Moonlight Feels Right really is one of the best pop songs of the 70's. All three albums were great. I still have to find the Korona album. Anyway, Mrs. Bluebird, what a song. One of the best pop songs of the 60's. I first heard the remake a few years back from the UK? studio band Sunshine Day. It was a great remake but then my psychedelic record collecting led me to Eternity's Children and their version is even better. I only recently realized that it is the same Bruce Blackman that was in both bands. I'd love to hear some new music from you Bruce.
  luna: For tbrown: I don't you, but I was in Substantial Evidence in the late 60's on the coast.Do you know where Mark Simon,Pat Gill,Ray Zoler,Ted Tearse,Artie Desporte or any of these guys may be? Any info appreciated.
  jscarbo4: Does anybody have pictures of the entire Eternity's Children group? It was always irritating that only four of them were used on the album cover. I'd also like some update info on Roy Whitaker if anyone knows..........Also, does anyone know if Bruce Blackman ever recorded "For Crying Out Loud"? I heard him do it live at Dock-of-the-Bay, and was knocked out by it. Would love to have the recording if it's available.
  jscarbo4: Hey Luna, I wasn't aware of a 6th member of Substantial Evidence...tell me more so that I can add to my site: http://www.artist-murals.com/images/Pictures/Joel_Scarborough/Ray_zoller.htm
  tbrown: to Luna: Drop me an email at [email protected] and I will tell you who I am. WE probably know each other if you were with Substantial Evidence.
  ThomasInPlano: To Charlie Ross: During late '66 and '67 sessions at The Vapors me and some of my Biloxi USAF buddies used to chat with you between sessions talking music and it's direction. I was from Houston so we talked a lot about the Thirteenth Floor Elevators. At the time I didn't know much about acid so we talked like it was a pretty cool thing. I hope that didn't create any problems for you. I later got a tape of one of your reel-to-reel amateur recordings made at The Vapors. Later I was sent to Las Vegas ('67)and then Vietnam('68) so I lost track of how you guys were doing until I came back and was stationed north of Memphis. In '69 Eternity's Children did a TV performance in Memphis and I went to catch that performance on Saturday, only to find that it was taped earlier. I so much wanted to re-establish contact with you and catch up on what had been happening to you while I was away. Well, that was all for not but I hope maybe this will tell you how much your music that we knew back in late '66 and early '67 as Eternity's Children meant to us. Not everyone makes it to the very top, but it doesn't mean that they didn't have a wonderful effect on peoples memories. Your wonderful covers of so many types of music and your great originals will always remain in many peoples hearts. Someday I hope to get to chat with you by phone or email as we did at The Vapors Lounge. Mostly I remember you and Johnny Walker (who was such an inspiration on guitar) and Roy Whittaker. I hope that all of you are doing well as we have all had so many years go by and time starts to take it's toll on the body. Best regards, Thomas
  JKing2: I too am a big fan. I followed the band from Biloxi to Baton Rouge. Why no mention of Linda Lawley? Does anyone know what happened to her and/or her career?
  Roy5: I'm glad so many people remember Mrs Bluebird. I haven't even heard the song since 1968, when it charted, but I haven't forgotten it. I remember staying up one night waiting for our local station to play it. Finally it did--I think about 2:00 in the morning. But it was worth the wait. And I saw them perform on It's Happening, the summer replacement rock show from '68 hosted by Mark Lindsay and Paul Revere. Everything about the song is top of the line. Especially the organ, guitar and the vocal harmonies.
  JohnB: I've been a fan of Eternity's Children since the late 60's when they played the Vapors. Still have an original LP of theirs. God where have the years gone- that was music, and why they didn't go right to the top, well somebody made a big mistake not publicizing them properly. And where is Linda Lawley? Beautiful voice and a beautiful girl.
  dpinsd: In the summer of '68 I had just graduated and was leaving the country during the Vietnam War. I remember Mrs Bluebird by Eternities Children as being the last song I heard in San Diego before I left for New England then on to Portugal. I remember hearing this great song when I was in Rhode Island. I never forgot it. Apparently it is no longer available. I checked on Napster and it is not there either. I really want this song in my music library. It was good to read other comments from others that were also touched by this song that unfortunately did not go high on the charts. Dan in San Diego
  txsdrmr: To all, I grew up in greenville, MS in the 60's and went to Greenville High School with Charlie Ross, Bruce Blackmon and Johnny Walker. Before they hit the big time in the late 60's and 70's they were in some very tight group groups and played gigs in the MS delta almost every weekend. Charlie's original group was the Phantoms while Johnny and Bruce were in the Lancers. Another Greenville native to make the big time was James "Bud" Cockrell, founder of the San Francisco group, Pablo Cruise. If you count Joe Frank Carolla of Hamilton, Joe Fank & Reynolds who was from Leland, MS just 7 miles away, the Delta produced some really great talent. Those of us lucky enough to be there enjoyed some fine music. I've been fans of all these guys ever since and have collected all their 12" vinyls I could find. I'm in Houston, Texas now but still listen to Eternity's Chidren, Starbudk and H,JF, & R to take me back to those great days. -pope-
  raymar: My friends and I used to see Eternity's Children at a club called Jamie's in New Orleans every Wednesday night in 1967-68. We idolized this band and, of course, we were in love with Linda Lawley. It's so great to see that others remeber this group as weel.
  mac: My name is Mike McClain and I played organ with Eternity's Children right after Bruce Blackman left the group. We recorded lots of good music but never really got the push from Tower Records that we needed. I was thrilled when all our stuff that was in the can was released in that album from Europe. It was fun to hear all the old songs again. Wish I knew how to get in touch with Linda. Anyone know?Hey Charlie, Johnny,and Roy,as well as Bo Wagner the great vibe/marimba man that also played on Moonlight Feels Right...(he could also tap dance like crazy..no kidding)What fun those days were..
  luna: I was in substantial evidence briefly in the summer of 1969, after Ted T. quit and went with Flower Power(think that was the name of the group).I sang lead, before the hurricane destroyed everything.Wonderful summer. I now play and sing in the Krackerjacks.
  luna: A few more facts: I've been in touch with Ray Zoller, he's in Colorado. Also, Charlie Ross is our bassist in the KJ's. There was aband in '68' at the Fiesta, called The Omen; the group consisted of;Bruce Blackman on keyboards,Bud Cockrell on bass, Roy Whitaker on drums, Bo Wagner on vibes and percussion,a guy named(believe it or not)David Jones sang lead(should of been me Bruce dammit!),and I think Julie Landry may have been the female vocalist.Lots of known people in lots of groups in those days!I was also in the Lancers' latter days(middle 60's)Ray Z. is doin well.Anyway, just some tid-bits.
  cks6: Does anyone know where I can buy a copy of the Krackerjack's album entilted "Rockin' in the Delta"? Please contact me at [email protected] if you have any information. Thanks!!
  coochiekisser: The band was great. Sista Linda Lawleys rendetion of Hush may be one of the best versions since Billy Joe Royal
  h2obug: jwalker: Were you at anytime ever referred to a 'Fuzzy Walker'? or do you know who may have been? I have a Gibson Custom guitar with a name plate embossed "Fuzzy Walker". Trying to find out who actually owed this guitar before me. email me at [email protected] Thanks P.S. I was a teenager when 'Moonlight Feels Right' hit the air. I seen the group in concert at Six Flags in St. Louis, MO and had photo's with the band members. I loved that song.
  Outlaw: Some Substantial Evidence info from the mouth of Artie Desporte... of the first (5) original band members, Ted Tearse was the first to leave the band. David Dodd took his place as the singer. David was discovered by Substantial Evidence while he was preforming at a club called the Fiesta. The band members approached David and offered him a spot in their band and he accepted. According to Artie, David was with the Band for about 5 or 6 months and for whatever reasons he left the band, and Ted Tearse rejoined. Substantial Evidence eventually added a 10 piece horn section and became known as Substantial Evidence Showband. They had quite a following but none as strange as 4 girls that called themselves " The Fearsome Foursome. " These girls kept journals on all the members of Substantial Evidence. Somehow they knew everywhere they went, what time they arrived and left. Anyway, about the time the Vietnam War broke out, the band members started to come and go. Eventually the band split up and everyone went their seperate ways. The City of Biloxi offered to pay all expenses to have the Band reunite and play at the Gulf Coast Coliseum for a charity event. The offer was extended by Gerald Blessey who also was our Mayor at the time and who played in a band called The Rocking (Rock'n?) Rebels. By this time everyone had their own lives, family and children. The reunion never took place.
  luna: For Outlaw: What's new putty kat? That's for Artie, if you're not him. The reason I used David as my first name was because they already had a guy named Doug! Great memories, great group!
  luna: Hey Artie; Do you remember when we took a train from Stamford Connecticut to Boston? We played in Rhode Island at a club called "The Edge".Anyway, I met a guy in the Army that heard us there.He lives in NJ.The reason I got out of SE was because my draft # was 3!!!(and big daddy Brad, aka Herchel, didn't like my rebellious ways)! The KJ's will be down that way probably this summer, and I'll give you a call.Did Pat and Carol get married??? She has a bunch of pictures I'd love to see.OutLaw, if you're not Artie, please pass this along to him. Thankx
  jumphigher: hi this is to luna pat gill from substatial evidence still lives on the coast and is not married to carol newman and he still owns a cigar shop in the mall.
  luna: for ck6;We did a double cd for our reunion last yr. and "Rockin In The Delta" was included on it along with some other songs from over the yrs. If you go to thekrackerjacks.com, you can contact us for info. Also our last cd "Timeless" is available.
  luna: For jumphigher: What is the name of your dad's store in the mall, and which mall is it in. I'll call him. Tell him I am David from '69. He'll know me. Thanks
  Outlaw1: Luna, Been a while since visiting this site. Forgot my PW and changed email Address. Had to change my username a bit. I am Artie's sista'-n- law. Now that he has a computer, I am sending him this site. Maybe he will stop by and you can talk over old times.
  luna: For Outlaw1: FINALLY, Im on the right trail to some S.E. players. Thank you for revealing yourself. If you see or know where Mark and Pat can be reached, please let me know. I've been in touch with Ray....Thankx--Luna(David)
  mike mcgann: Bruce...I played Mrs. Bluebird over and over at WLOX in Biloxi when I broke into radio in 1968. Saw the group at The Vapors one night that summer...Often wondered what happened to you, then Starbuck hit...I'm about to play 'Moonlight" on the air in a few minutes at WJAS (on 3-7PM) in Pittsburgh, PA. Thanks for the tunes and best of luck Mike
  Denny: Tower Records sure had an amazing roster in its six year existence and Eternity's Children was one of its hottest prospects! As I am writing this, I am listening to side 2 of the LP. "Mrs. Bluebird" has been a favorite of mine since I was a kid growing up in the 70's. With its unique mixture of mellow and upbeat, along with a stun gun guitar solo for the bridge, it should have gone much higher than its #69 peak on Billboard; at least it made the Top 40 on KQV Radio's survey from my hometown of Pittsburgh. I never heard it on radio itself, but if I ever get my own radio show, I guarantee that Eternity's Children will be among my playlist (none of that "same 50 oldies" stuff here). I'd sure love to see some of EC's televison appearances also, particularly "American Bandstand" and "Happening". Perhaps a DVD could be in the works in the future. And like many, I'd also like to know what has become of the lovely Linda Lawley.
  bwagner: bwagner: My name is Bo Wagner member of Eternity's Children and Starbuck. First of all I would love to thank all of our fans for all of their support and wonderful comments over the years. I know all of the band members appreciate it very much. I have been out of contact with everyone (all the band members for a long time)except for Bruce Blackman. We always seem to semi keep in touch. I send best wishes to all of the band members: Johnny, Linda, Charlie, Roy, Bud, Julie, Davie, and one that is never mentioned Bobby Dominquez (the best man at my wedding), all the other Starbuck members and especially Mike Kidd McClain. Mike I have been trying to find you for years. Would love to hear from you as well as all the other members if any of you would like to reconnect. I have read many versions over the years of who was in the band and how things happen and I feel there has been some mistakes. I would like to give my version. This will have to be lengthy, so please excuse the long story in advance. I don't know how else to do it.I was a LA studio musician and former drummer with the Fifth Dimension and currently a member of Lewis and Clark Expedetion with Michael Martin Murphy when I was hired to play drums, vibes, marimba and percussion for the 2nd Eternity's Children album "Timeless" who I was a big fan of. Having been with the Fifth Dimension I truly appreciated their fine vocals and great music. I played drums on every song on the "Timeless" album and added vibes and marimba on many of the songs. The instruments I played fit well with the Children's songs and I truly loved playing with them and we really took to each other.I had always wanted to feature vibes and marimba within a rock format and it worked well with the Children. Roy had left the band and the group asked me to join them. So I left Lewis and Clark and joined the Children. We added another Mississippi musician Bobby Dominquez to play drums so I could play vibes etc. Bruce and Johnny had left the band earlier and I sort of took the place of a guitar player since they had not replaced Johnny. (How can you ever replace Johnny Walker!!!)I sold everything (my car, home, everything ) and moved to Baton Rouge, LA and we all lived in one apartment. We constantly played gigs all over Louisana, Mississippi in every little town there was and I got very familar with the south very quickly and fell in love with the whole southern lifestlye and music scene. It has been written on sites like this over and over again and on our album, CD sleeves that I wasn't a member of the Children, only a studio player. I don't get that. I move to the south, lived with the band, practiced everyday and performed at every gig, tour, TV show as a full fledge member for quite awhile (almost a year), how can I not be considered a member. No I was not part of the original group but I certainly was a member from the beginning of the 2nd album. I was very happy playing with them and proud to be a member and would like to be considered one. I know if you ask Johnny, Bruce, Mike McClain, Bobby, Charlie or Linda they will tell you I was a full fledge member. I'm not sure who is writing the info on the group but my picture is on the front of the "Timeless" album. That should speak for itself. During this time I had met Bruce and Johnny and became good friends. Because of the bad management that had cause Bruce and Johnny to quit, Bobby Dominquez and I quit too. At first everyone was going to quit but back out and Johnny, Bruce and I decided to form our own version of the group and Roy rejoined us on drums at this time too. Bobby joined another group and worked across the street at the Vapors and we added Bud Cockrell and Julie and started working as the Omen at the Fiesta in Biloxi. We were a carbon copy of the original group. I brought in a friend of mine from LA who was a great Canadian singer, Davie Jones, and we had one hell of a good group. We worked very hard to develope new original songs and I feel we came up with really great material. We moved to Pensacola, FL to work with the producer Papa Don and one by one the other members left the original group and joined us. Finally everyone was there and we had double everything and was trying to work out who was going to do what. We were about to sign a new record deal and the bad managers showed up with fake contracts and prevented us from gettint a new deal and we had to dispand. So a year or less went by and Bud Cockrell called me and wanted to get back together and we did and tried to put a group together in Texas. We soon added Bruce to the group but it didn't quite work out so Bruce and I went back to Biloxi and reformed another group with Johnny Walker, Bob Gauthier and Tommy Allred. It lasted for awhile but again didn't gel for what we were really looking for. Again we separated and another year or so past and again Bruce, Johnny and I got back together (now in Atlanta, GA) and formed "Mississippi" and recorded an album in Nashville with Gary Paxton the producer of the Children's "Timeless" album. A great group but to many lead male vocalist. Couldn't really find our own sound. So Johnny went back to Florida and Bruce and I joined up with Elgin Wells,a guitar player and lead singer, a bass player and once again Bobby Dominquez on drums and the first "Starbuck" was formed. It never did click at all. So we broke up again and I went to Disneyworld. Couldn't handle that gig so came back to Atlanta which is where we had formed "Mississippi" and "Starbuck", and rejoined up with Elgin, keyboard player Sloan Hayes, drummer Brian and added bass player Jimmy Cobb. Very soon I was playing drums and we really wanted to do it right this time so I rented a farm and we all lived there and wrote and recorded songs in the daytime and played at clubs in the evening as "Extravaganza". We added David Snavley on drums and after a year added Bruce back to the band. Bruce had been writing songs all the time we were getting strong as a group and it was a good merger. So in a short time we became "Starbuck" once again. Elgin left and we hire Ron Norris for vocals and guitar and Tommy Strain as lead guitar. Finally we were back in the studio and recorded "Moonlight Feels Right" with Bruce as the lead singer. In all these years he had never sang, maybe a little backup. He sang on our demos and the recorded company like his voice and overnight he was our front man. We released "Moonlight Feels Right" and Bruce and I hit the road and went to radio station after radio station separately for a month. Moonlight got play but didn't take off. We broke up again I move back to CA. and the following spring I get a call from Bruce that "Moonlight" had taken off and we had a hit. So I quit the band I was in, in one second, drove straight thru to Atlanta and joined the rest of the guys who had gotten back toghter and we recorded our album straight thru. We were on a roll and didn't stop. "Moonlight" became a hugh hit with Bruce singing and I finally got to feature my marimba as a solo instrument (the reason I joined them in the first place years and years ago) and it worked. I must thank Roy Whittaker for helping to promote "Moonlight Feels Right". He was head of a major radio station in Florida and promoted and played the hell out our song. He helped us a lot. Thanks Roy. After our second album, Johnny Walker rejoined us and we were on tour all the time and lots of TV shows. We ran into Bud Cockrell all the time when he was with Pablo Cruise and did TV shows with him too. Small world. We started our third album and had a few differences and I left the group. They finished the album without me and the following year the group broke up completely. Bruce and I got back together in '84 and recorded two songs "Another Beat of My Heart" and "The Full Cleveland" just the two of us and released them and they were doing well but we decided not to continue. So that is my story. The whole story involves the same players over and over again so that is why I told all of it. I have never responded to one of these sites in all these years but felt compelled to do so now. So I made all of my comments at one time to get it over with. The real moral of this story is never give up. We were persistent and it finally payed off. Again I thank the fans for supporting us all these many years and it is really nice that people are still enjoying and buying our music even though a lot of it is badly mixed and under ground. Bruce and I talked last year and he said there was interest in "Starbuck" getting back together and doing "Where are they Now" or one of those TV shows. I would love to do it. So who knows, maybe we will do it one more time. I live in LA and am now a doctor and have a natural healthcare clinic and make nutritional products. I can be reached at [email protected] Hey Johnny, Mike and any of you that would like to catch up let me hear from you. Thanks everyone for listening to me.
  luna: It is with a heavy heavy heart that I must inform all "The Children" fans that Johnny Walker and Linda Lawley,both, have passed away; both after long illness' that I can't elaborate on. I don't know the details,but I do know to all us who knew and loved them, it is shock and there will be 2 voids in my world.Johnny passed away in Florida a few months back, and Linda in CA.thanksgiving wk'end. Two great people and singers and players.GOD rest them, they will never be forgotten.
  Centerfield: The drummer for Eternity's Children used the name Frank Stevens when he was a DJ for us at WTIX New Orleans in the early 70's. I think his real first name was Roy. What was his last name? Thanks. Bob Walker
  funkypoormusician: Hi folks! My name is Ken Hilley and I am a former resident of the MS Gulf Coast. I ran across this site and this post just by chance while thinking about Juli Landry (the search lead me here). At any rate, I was enjoying the read and thinking of good old days until I read about Johnny Walker and Linda Lawley passing... Just couldn't believe it! What a loss of great talent! I remember Johnny playing that Gretsch guitar and making it sound so wonderful... that coupled with his powerful voice my, my, my! Linda of course was a beautiful lady with the look and the talent to impress anyone. I saw Linda once back in the early 70's at a club above the Fiesta in Biloxi one night. We sat and talked and partied (imagine that) for hours. As I remember we said goodbye early the next morning as the sun came up over the parking lot. I also saw Johnny about that time on several different occasions. He was living in Pensacola, FL and was playing music there. His wife Sue was a friend of mine. I introduced them many years back when Johnny and I lived in the Biloxi Hotel. Anybody remember that place? ha... Charlie Ross where are you! Anyway, those days were great cause there was so much great music, the times were a changing! Just in case you should read this I'd like to say hello to Bruce Blackman, Charlie Ross, Roy Whittaker (sister Sue too), Bo Wagner (wow what a dancer) and all the old friends from those times. A special prayer for Johnny and Linda and their loved ones! I now live in Nashville, TN and am still playing and writing music here. You can catch up with me on my website www.funkypoormusician.com and/or see my video's on youtube at www.youtube.com/funkypoormusician Peace
  lbwdog: Eric Watkins here: Great blog folks!! I see some old friends here. In 1969, I left the MS coast to join one of the last incarnations of "The Omen" with Johnny Walker in Pensacola. Bud Cockrell had left and Johnny came to Biloxi looking for a replacement. At that time, the band consisted of Johnny, Billy Haynes on Hammond, & Ralph Nolan on drums. Looking back, I relished the experience working with Johnny and learned a lot (as I was only 17/18 yrs. old). That band was almost a Procol Harum tribute band, as we did most of the first album, several selections from "Shine On Brightly", and some from "A Salty Dog". I'll never forget Walker singing these great compositions, especially "A Salty Dog", not to mention his great playing. This lasted about a year, and as young people will do, I decided to move on to something else. In late fall of 1970, I was called to join a band in Jackson, MS, which was comprised of Bo Wagner, Bruce Blackman, Tommy Aldridge (Later of Black Oak Arkansas, Ozzy Osborne, Whitesnake, etc.) Darell Gunter, Sara Fulcher, and Danny Lancaster who is the most soulful white singer I know (as well as my soul brother). The band was named Om Shanti (I think by Bo) and debuted at B.J.'s to a packed house. After a couple of months there were some musical differences and the band downsized to a four piece (Danny, Tommy, Darrell, and myself) called "Milk & Honey". We played around the south for about a year and went our own ways, some to reunite at times. Anyway, I recently heard of Johnny's passing and somewhere in the back of my mind, I always wished to do a real "Procol Harum" tribute with him. Well....some things are not to be. Let me leave you with a Johnny W. anecdote. I moved back to P'cola in '74 when he played with "Lazy Day". Went to visit at Johnny & Sue's apartment. If you knew Johnny, you'd know he hated cats!! I walk in to his house, and there are four or five Persians lounging around. I said "Walker, I thought you hated cats!" He says " I did, till I found out you could sell the damned things!!" RIP, J.W. and hi to Bo, Bruce, Ken Hilley, et al.....Many thanks E. W.
  lbwdog: Oh, BTW, to answer a four year old question...... [Quote]/03 Apr 04 ·jscarbo4: ..........Also, does anyone know if Bruce Blackman ever recorded "For Crying Out Loud"? I heard him do it live at Dock-of-the-Bay, and was knocked out by it. Would love to have the recording if it's available.[quote] I was the bassist for Jerry Fisher & The Music Company at Dock of the Bay in Bay St Louis from '81-'98, Jerry was with B,S,&T in the mid seventies. We recorded an album called "In and Outa the Blues" in '92 and several tracks were written by Greg Barnhill who wrote "For Cryin' Out Loud", but don't know that B.B. performed it at The Dock of The Bay.....for the record....EW
  Telewacker: I met Johnny Walker in Atlanta in 1979. He joined a band I was leaving called Misty Morning. I played bass in the group, & the drummer, guitarist, & I left to form our own group with a keyboard player we knew. I will never forget the night he sat in,
  Telewacker: I was blown away! What a great guitarist! And that voice! OMG! I later rejoined Misty Morning, & had the pleasure of sharing many a stage with Johnny. Later, after leaving the group again & switching to guitar, I used a lot of what I heard Johnny do
  Telewacker: To form my style. I\'ll never be as good as he was, he was just a natural, but whenever someone compliments my playing, I tell them about this guy I knew named Johnny Walker & the inspiration he was to me. If they said they\'d never heard of him, I\'d
  Telewacker: think to myself, \"Your loss\". Before I go, I\'ll leave you with an example of his amazing voice. We got a request for \"Danny Boy\" at a club on St Patricks Day, & Johnny said he could sing it, so we said go for it. He did the tune solo, just his guitar
  Telewacker: and voice. From beginning to end, the joint was silent. No one made a sound, mesmerised by his performance. At the end, applause erupted for what sermed like forever.
  Telewacker: I was actually moved to tears, only time that has ever happened to me on stage. If I live to be 100, I doubt I\'ll ever hear anything like it again. I was heart broken by his passing. R.I.P. Johnny.
My Suitor  performed by Berntholer  1984
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Rediscovered this as I was uploading an audio clip for Belle Epoque (this is next alphabetically in my 45's).

I can't work out whether this is joyous or heartbreaking. It eats into the very soul of you when you hear it. My, that sounds dramatic - different from my usual carping. Tinkles on the piano break up the dense atmosphere herein and get you into the claustrophobic world of singer Drita.

Stands alone in 1984. Nothing else sounded anything like it.

from the single My Suitor (Blanco Y Negro NEG 5)



My Sundown  performed by Jimmy Eat World
Recommended by ThisIsAForgery [profile]

Such a nice and melodic song.




Napoleon  performed by Ani DiFranco  1996
Recommended by snoodlededoogans [profile]

if u've ever thought that capitalism aint all it's cracked up to be...ani hears you. this is perhaps THE song about the 'music industry'. ever want to do a 'Fk the RIAA/BPI' comp? here u go. a pristinely crafted effortless sounding very personal rant on what's wrong with the way things are...and how we get by till the world is the way it SHOULD BE...

from Dilate (Righteous Babe)


Nethers (Dubstep Twilight Remix)  performed by eO - www.soundsliketree.com  2011
Recommended by phaeocstar [profile]

eO's through-composed, symphotronic poem incorporates exotic world-fusion compositions with heavy post-dubstep beats, evocative vocals, and elegant instrumentation.

from River Through an Open Door, available on CD



  Nathan1623: Just listened to it. It is pretty soothing and I enjoyed it thank you. (:
new slang  performed by the shins
Recommended by blackstars [profile]

classic. the live version on the single for Oh Inverted World is so
good. please seek it out.




New York New York  performed by Nina Hagen  1983
Recommended by Yammer [profile]

The DIY ethos of punk served to liberate performers from the obligation to have a great deal of technical ability. The unfortunate corollary was that any display of already-acquired virtuousity instantly marked one as part of the Uncool Wankerage, forcing nascent guitar gods like Andy Summers to play as though suddenly arthritic. Possibly the first artist to successfully bridge Old World training and New World raucousness was Nina Hagen. "New York New York" is the East German-trained singer's signature tune. Over a clipped, dry Morodor techno-dystopia background, the verses present Hagen recounting her then-current regimen of glamourous excess in a harsh, metallic raven's shriek. Then, as though descending from the heavens at the end of a Wagnerian opera, comes the chorus -- a meltingly warm (yet uncomfortable) wave of minor chords, then a soaring, yearning, superbly modulated mezzo-soprano...which, after a jolt of realization, is understood to also belong to Nina Hagen. And so on.

from Fearless (CBS)


Nikki  performed by Burt Bacharach
Recommended by Harch [profile]

A bouncy, delightful instrumental. Those who are in their late 40s/early 50s will recognize the song as the theme from the old ABC Movie of the Week TV series. Bacaharach did it twice, first on a mono 45, then re-recorded on a stereo album. Both versions are now available on CD... the mono on the great 3 CD Box Set "The Look Of Love", and the stereo re-make on the new "What The World Needs Now" CD.


available on CD - The Look of Love (Rhino)



  Synthetrix: I love Nikki! I wish the actual version that was used for the ABC Movie of the Week was available. That one is a bit more lush with more strings.
OK Chicago  performed by Resonance  1975
Recommended by texjernigan [profile]

Quintisential Car Chase music, yet stylish and seventies, really puts you in a foreign fast world. I've listened to the rest of the album and I don't know that I'd recommend much else beyond this track, but this really puts you in the mood when you're driving.





Open Your Eyes  performed by The Lords Of The New Church  1982
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Opening with a brat beating bass and melody that is scarily reminiscent of some late 70s euro disco pathos, it’s only when Brian James’ raunchy guitar kicks in that you know you’re well away from the lights of that dance floor and in the grips of a very different master. A hedonistic web of Bators’ beloved conspiracy theorizing, the logical successor to the Wanderers’ paranoia-packed repertoire, ”Open Your Eyes” previewed a closet of horrors that embraced organized religion, the impending World Tour of Pope John Paul II, Bolshevik plots and Ronald Reagan’s apparent rush towards nuclear Armageddon. With session man Matt Black’s synthesizers giving the whole thing a classic rock feel that merged edgily with the band’s own punkish sensibilities, it was, as always, Bators’ viperous lyrics that brought the whole thing into the twilight zone of pre-Internet intrigue. The 80s politicking of Margaret Thatcher’s Britain and Reagan’s cold war America pretty much ensured that both sides were far happier not having to open their eyes. A gleeful Bators was there, though, to make sure they did.
(AMG)

from The Lords of the New Church, available on CD


Ordinary World  performed by Duran Duran  1993
Recommended by acidburn [profile]

from The Wedding Album


Out of this World  performed by Tony Hatch  1962
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A superb twangy, bongo-ridden theme from Tony Hatch. It's hard to believe this is the same man who wrote the themes for soap operas like 'Crossroads' and 'Neighbours', but it is... Overall this sounds kind of how I once expected/hoped John Barry's early 60s work might sound - harpsichord, twangy guitar etc. It opens with some eerie effects, bongoes and spare harpsichord sound before breaking into a fully fledged shadows/spy theme style masterpiece, stopping abruptly after just over two minutes. Since I heard this on a compilation, I have no idea as to its origin, which is a shame, as I would love to track down any similar work Tony Hatch may have done. I did some research, and it seems that the session guitarist on this track was none other than Big Jim Sullivan, who cut a couple of sitar LPs on Mercury in the 60s.
n.b. this is not the same tune as the much recorded and superb Harold Arlen/Johnny Mercer 'out of this world'.

from the single Out of this World
available on CD - Easy Project II: House of Loungecore (Sequel)




  n-jeff: For some reason my parents acquired 2 mint copies of this on 7. Needless to say they didn't keep 'em long, heh, heh. Its a nice enough track, don't I remember some flute in there. but Tony was also the composer of some great early 60's pop, he did a number of LP's with Petula Clark, including the hits 'Downtown' and 'Don't sleep in the Subway' written with Jackie Trent (I think- Oh names, names, names). So to only remember him for Neighbours is cruel (and don't forget one variant of the Crossroads theme was recorded by paul Macartney and Wings, bet that isn't on the greates hits LP).
  delicado: totally; I think Tony's a genius; don't get me wrong! 'I know a place' and 'I couldn't live without your love' are two other great pop songs he was responsible for...
Out of this World  performed by Buddy Merrill  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Ok, I feel kind of lame for recommending two tracks called 'out of this world' in one sitting, but as soon as I remembered this one, I felt compelled to recommend it. Before I became completely obsessed with the kind of smooth bossa-influenced stuff I've been recommending, my big thing in music was that it had to be twangy. This is quite twangy, but in a very tasteful way. An incredibly haunting song whoever it is performed by, 'out of this world' here gets its other-worldliness from Buddy's incredible multitracked guitars - the main tune is played on the slide guitar, while several other parts relentlessly pick out accompaniments. It's hard to categorize this track really - it's not remotely funky or particularly rocking, yet it's very catchy and undeniably compelling.

from Latin Festival (Accent)


peace  performed by plastics  1981
Recommended by olli [profile]

lovely feelgood song from the borderline brilliant japanese new wave band plastics. a break from their often minimalistic intrumentation. oddball lyrics, nice guitar, harmonica and extremely enthusiastic singing.
i love the way the male vocalist seems to be holding his nose while singing in the beginning of the song.


waiting for the taxi
standing in the snow white
newspapers falling on the ground
it's cold and cold and cold

new york is frozen steak
teddy bear and kitty cat
fireplace and candles
all you need is weapon

this is peace
this is funny fairy tale

green green green peace
high high high heel
inside is outside
world is nonsense

dream of the tide wave
my peace is your peace
peace by the people
peace for the peace

this is peace
this is funny fairy tale

all i see is green green
grave yard of lily white
sleeping beauty laying there
with dots and symbols

marmalade evening
fur coats and venus
venus and mighty dragon said
all you need is weapon

this is peace
this is funny fairy tale

from welcome back plastics (island)



Pilots  performed by Goldfrapp  2000
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

An otherworldly beautiful track. Will Gregory provides an excellent arrangement here: smooth, stylish, elegant, lush orchestration with Barry-esque cinematic soundsacapes, evoking images of a slow-motion nightflight. While there is a strong 60s influence, Gregory throws in some subtle, futuristic sounding digital artefacts giving it a slight neo-noir feel.

from Felt Mountain, available on CD



Pink Frost  performed by The Chills
Recommended by LawrenceM [profile]

Classic New Zealand psychedelia .... jangly guitar, haunting, evocative lyrics, fragile vocals and an otherworldly feeling which perfecly evokes Dunedin. The best New Zealand pop song ever written.

from Kaleidoscope World, available on CD




  delicado: I saw The Chills at my first ever gig in March 1990. They were really good actually, but somehow I never followed up and bought any of their records. I will have to check this one out. Playing at the same show were McCarthy, whose records I did buy, and who became Stereolab.
Political World  performed by Carolina Chocolate Drops  2012
Recommended by schlick [profile]

The Drops re-imagine this Dylan tune from his No Mercy release as an awesome, old-fashioned fiddle hoedown.


available on CD - Chimes of Freedom: The Songs of Bob Dylan Honoring 50 Years of Amnesty International (Amnesty International)


Postales  performed by Federico Aubele  1999
Recommended by sunev45 [profile]

sexy, great guitar and dance-able beat. very chill

from Buddha Bar Vol. 7, available on CD


Pyramid Song  performed by Radiohead  2001
Recommended by space [profile]

An elegantly surreal trip through a dream world. Although this song has only eight lines (repeated twice), it manages to say an amazing amount within that short frame. Thom Yorke's wavering vocals and the slow and simple piano instrumentation strip the song down to its fundamental elements, allowing Radiohead's talent to shine through. From "I jumped in the river, what did I see" to "There was nothing to fear and nothing to doubt," this is an amazing song. Every time I listen to it, it gives me a deeper sense of peace.

from Amnesiac



  CEEMOBILE: Good following in the tradition of radioheads style
Ready For The World  performed by How to Dress Well
Recommended by DeathandHarmony [profile]




Repined bastard nation  performed by Satyricon  2002
Recommended by olli [profile]

Satanist surf rock! (or a reasonable facsimile of that would sound like, anyway.)
From the land of polar bears and fjords
comes this insanely massive-sounding piece of black metal with a heavy dose of Dick Dale influences. It's quite poppy for a black metal tune, if you can see past the growling. I have to admit I've never actually listened too closely to the lyrics, i'm sure they're very misantrophic and gloomy and all, but this song feels very uplifting to me somehow. same thing as with Primal Scream's Detroit and Ennio Morricone's Magic and Extacy, i guess.
the synth effects round it out nicely, the guitars are fast and furious, and you got to love that drumming.


(One of these days I'm gonna have to make a mixtape with the world's most glaringly insane shifts of tone from one song to the next. This will fit nicely in between Dean Martin and Jean Jaques Perrey...)

from Volcano



Restons Groupés  performed by Alexandre Desplat  1998
Recommended by nighteye [profile]

Does it get any more happier and sunnier than this? This is a true sunshine pop / jet-set lounge piece with a fast paced beat, lush strings, woodwinds and a catchy melody. The style reminds me of Bacherat's 'Pacific Coast Highway' and Alan Hawkshaw's 'Girl in a Sportscar'. Just imagine your self beeing on the French riviera, crusing around in your sportscar with a beautiful girl at your side and you are the king of the world as you drive into the sunset.

I can be very wrong here, but it seams that this is the title song for the movie with the same name, made in 1998. I could have sworn that this was a piece from the 1960s, the sound, the arrangement, the instruments, sound incredibly accurate and realistic. I found this song on the excellent 'Jet Set Society' compilation from our own eftimihn on this site, a brilliant pick.


available on CD - Mondo Lounge Vol.1 - Jet Set Society




  eftimihn: Excellent description, for me the track evokes similar scenes when listening to it. And you're not wrong, the track really is from 1998, but sounds absolutely late 60s/early 70s. Well, the whole compilation ain't that bad either i guess :-) If anyone is interested: http://www.artofthemix.org/FindAMix/getcontents.asp?strMixID=84985
  nighteye: This song alone almost makes me want to see the movie! I wonder if the whole soundtrack is like this? Btw. I almost got a eargasm at 2:15 minutes into the track. :)
Rose Rouge  performed by St. Germain  2000
Recommended by secularus [profile]

An obvious selection for a favorite track but nonetheless truly deserved. I nearly wet my pants when I heard this track and immediately went up to the dj to ask what it was. I ran out to the record shops in town looking for it and finally found a copy a week later. That was exactly one year ago, this month, March 2001. Its repetitive cymbal/drum shimmy, combined with the samples of "I want you to get together" and "put your hands together one time" begins this journey of jazzy dancefloor heaven. Then the real electricity of the tune begins and yes its otherworldly. Slowly, the house beat teases its way into the song, until it can't take it anymore and the shit hits the fan!! If you don't know it, listen to it and see if you agree.


available on CD - Tourist (Blue Note France)



Running Away  performed by Strange Advance  1985
Recommended by Colinator [profile]

Wonderful lyrically, aswell as a very atmosphere-setting mood in the music.
Here are the lyrics:

Running Away

I've come from a more than human kind
Fugitive child of the human mind
I could run for a thousand miles
It would'nt keep me safe
I search for my soul, you destroy me with fear
Don't want to hurt you
Can we can we ever be together as one
Man what have you done

Chorus

Nowhere to go I've nowhere to stay
I'm running away
I'll hide in the world I can't leave a trace
I'm running away

Danger in every street and every town
A.I screens and hunters abound
I could deceive you live the lie
Plexi-birds and mongrel spies
I could hurt you in the night
Who can I turn to
You tampered with the scheme
And made 'The men who are not'
Man what have you wrought

from 2wo (Capitol)
available on CD - Over 60 Minutes With: Strange Advance


Sa Marina  performed by Wilson Simonal  1968
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

One of Brazil's classic pop hits of the late 60s, written by an incredible songwriting team responsible for dozens of similar gems between 1967 and 1971. Better known in the English version recorded by Brasil '66 as "Pretty World," but Wilson Simonal truly nailed this with his typically soulful vocals and a vintage soul-jazz-Brazil backing courtesy of pianist/arranger Cesar Mariano and his fantastic Som Tres trio. Also note the swirling strings-and-woodwinds arrangement and climactic hand-clapping singalong climax at the end.

from Alegria Alegria Vol. 2 (Odeon)
available on CD - Alegria Alegria Vol.2 (EMI Brazil)



Secret Love  performed by Kathy Kirby  1963
Recommended by Latimer [profile]

This is a British artist who does not deserve to be forgotten. She has a free, ranging voice and total charisma. Her trouble was that she got ripped off for life by a lecherous old-guy manager (Ambrose), who was mainly concerned with her considerable charms and the earnings he could siphon off to himself. She is now impoverished, but remains a great past-pop figure, and a great singer. Also a so-called icon of the homo world, where melodramatic performances are always appreciated. She was contemporary with the Beatles, but of a musical world they left behind.




She's hit  performed by The Birthday Party  1982
Recommended by phil [profile]

Ah - yet another classic about killing women. Cave is excelling himself here - it opens with the immortal line 'there is woman-pie in here.' This one breaks from the standard Birthday Party template - first drums, then bass, then nick, then guitars - by doing all the above, but with the mental leap of playing it at a quarter of the normal speed. The highlight is the inevitable moment when Nick says 'And all the girls across the world.....
.........
...........
are........
hit. '
MAGNIFICENT. Why didn't the sugarhill gang sing it that way?
 
As far as I know, this the only song bassist Tracy Pew is credited with writing. His part is pretty obvious. It's the bass line.

from Live 1981-82 (4AD CAD9005)
available on CD - Junkyard (Mute)



Sick Sad Little World  performed by Incubus
Recommended by Ninjujitsu [profile]




Sing To Me  performed by Boo Hewerdine  2006
Recommended by redkez [profile]

A glorious and beautiful epic of a song, that swoops and soars from verse to chorus, sung in Boo's trademark bittersweet voice. If the world was a fair place, this song should have been a massive hit single and brought Boo the mass recognition that he deserves but that has always just elluded him.

from Harmonograph, available on CD


Sister Ray  performed by The Velvet Underground  1968
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Since I've been recommending on this site for a while, I came up with a new idea in January. A lot of my all time favourites are on here now, so what I thought I would do now is to recommend a track every week that has had most resonance for me over the past seven days.

A bit of background: I've been having an unhappy time at work lately. I sometimes work shifts and don't get in until 11pm. As I have been so stressed with my daily grind, I've been finding it very difficult to wind down at the end of the day.

This song, this week, is suddenly making sense to me. It's calmed the jumble in my head every night by understanding that the world isn't an ordered place. I've been coaxed out of my rigid state by these 17 minutes. It's not my favourite Velvet Underground song - that would be The Murder Mystery - but after years of always thinking Sister Ray was a self-indulgent filler, I think I finally grasp what its purpose is. Or, at least, I now know there are only certain, bloody awful, weeks in which I can find the beautiful oyster inside this track.

I will return to normal service next week with my usual gay disco or girl group love.

from White Light / White Heat, available on CD



  stupidwall: i always thought sister ray was one of their most overrated songs. it mostly just sounds like nonsense. i guess i'll just wait till im unhappy or just in the right mood.
  n-jeff: Sounds like a fairly straight description of some sailors having a heroin and sex orgy with a bunch of transvestites to me.
If such a thing can be said to be straight....

Sleeping In  performed by The Postal Service  2003
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

Just a very wistful, sort of wishing the world would change kind of a song. Makes me feel better when I listen to it. Don't ask me why.

from Give Up (Sub Pop)


So much trouble in the world  performed by Bob Marley  1979
Recommended by macka [profile]

Bob Marley at his very best, this song seems all the more relevant considering current actions world-wide. "You see men sailing on their ego trips, Blast off on their spaceships, Million miles from reality, No care for you, no care for me"

from Natural Mystic, available on CD


So Stylistic  performed by Fannypack  2003
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Looking at these three girls on the cover of their album (and the two shadowy, deadly-dull string-pulling guys on the inside) you'd never think that something so chock-full of bubblegum Brooklyn attitood could produce the smart, sexy sound that is this marvellous track.

It's class in a glass. Sidestepping the cuteness factor and packaged cool (both of which, to their credit, they also do very well) of other tracks on the album, So Stylistic bombs along with a real old-skool hip-hop feel. This is balanced nicely by more than a smattering of electropop and gratuitous use of the vocoder, making it seem relentlessly contemporary. This is a band so up-to-date that they don't bother sampling any of that old jazz or funk nonsense, but go straight for the Yeah Yeah Yeahs (on Things, another album highlight).

A rare example of a band manufactured down to the last pendant and all the better for it.

from So Stylistic, available on CD



Soft Power  performed by Ladytron  2005
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

This gorgeously ominous ditty seems to borrow [intentionally?] more than a little from The Creatures' ode to alcoholic decadence "2nd Floor", but even by Siouxsie and Budgie's standards this is a grim little number. Sort of the title track to the LP - "Witching hour...soft power", the chorus goes - this song evidences the group's successful movement away the explicit influences of The Human League/Fad Gadget/Soft Cell/etc. toward a sort of synth-heavy post-punk along the lines of The Scars, Tuxedomoon, Family Fodder and/or The Banshees' "Kaleidoscope" LP. The melody is beautiful, and the lyrics - full of images of monster glamour girls nightclubbing the rest of world to death - are creepy as fuck.

from Witching Hour, available on CD


Sola (Then)  performed by Rocio Durcal  1977
Recommended by RCA76 [profile]

This is my most favorite song in the world. I love it because it is a classic, latin, late 1970's, sultry, soft, dinner party or alone-with-someone-special type of track. The instrumentation is not totally typical of latin music (fast rhythm, very ornate), it is soft and easy. The vocals are absolutely velvety and very sensual. Although it is a "sad" song, it is one of those songs that makes you want think about that special certain someone.

from Una Vez Mas (Ariola LA-045)
available on CD - Rocio Durcal – Su Historia y Éxitos Musicales Vol. 1 (BMG/Ariola (2004))


Solsbury Hill  performed by Peter Gabriel  1977
Recommended by schlick [profile]

Gabriel's wonderful tribute to the hill overlooking Somerset, England. Nice acoustic guitar work by Steve Hunter.

from Peter Gabriel 1 (Car), available on CD


Soma  performed by Smashing Pumpkins  1993
Recommended by Gwendolyn [profile]

I just love this song. The first time I heard was while I was in high school... My english class was studying A Brave New World and my teacher played this song. It's so peaceful at the beginning and takes a lovely turn at the end when the peace is shattered.

from Siamese Dream


Somebody to Love  performed by Queen  1976
Recommended by cryofthecelt [profile]

"Somebody to Love" is quite possibly my favorite song by Queen, one of my favorite bands in the world. For some reason, this song brings memories of lead singer Freddie Mercury, his energy, his style and his beautiful voice, even though I was only 4 years old when he died of AIDS in 1991.
This song is definitely one of Queen's best, if not one of the greatest songs ever written and performed. The most impressive part is near the end, when all is quiet, and all of the sudden Queen begins singing "Find...me...somebody to lo-ove..." very softly, and crescendoes with clapping and stomping and all kinds of uplifting musical tactics. It's just a magnificent song. My favorite part is when Freddie bursts out,
"I just gotta get out of this prison cell,
Someday I'm gonna be free, Lord!
Find me somebody to love!"

from A Day At the Races (Hollywood Records 161035)
available on CD - Greatest Hits (Hollywood Records)


Somebody To Love  performed by The Boogie Pimps  2005
Recommended by mattypenny [profile]

The third in a series of 3 linked postings, the other being White Rabbit and the original Jefferson Airplane version of this song.

It probably wouldn't be unfair to describe this as a fairly cheese-y dance cover of the Jefferson Airplance song. It puts a fairly similar sounding vocal over a dance track, with some extra squelchy noises.

I would never have thought the world needed a dance version of this song, but its good fun, and it fills the gap when you have one of those need-to-hear-a-disco-fied-version-of-a-60s-goth-classic moments.

Where it gets really wierd, though, is the video. The singer is a fairly genericvideo female without many clothes on. But she's shot as if she's a giant lying across several fields. And then you see a number of babies parachuting out of an airplane, and eventually landing on top of her. You could say its tasteless, crass, sexist or all three (and I probably would), but its kind of nutty enough to suit what there is of the howling vocal.


available on CD - Now 60 or 61 (UK)



  n-jeff: I've not heard this, and I'm not really going to go out of my way to find it, although I appreciate your sentiments. Anyway, before Jefferson Airplane, Grace Slick and some of the others were in a band called The Great Society, and they also did a version of this song, produced by Sly Stone. So it feels like something of a circle turning, although in 1966 he hadn't formed the great melting pot of the family.
There are stories attached to that session, but thats by the by, the Great Societys' legacy would be a very fine live album. You should track it down. Proper Psychedelia.

  mattypenny: Jeff, thanks for the comment. Sly Stone being involved in a version of this sounds intriguing, I will try to track it down. Also interesting that you should use the word 'psychedelia'. You're absolutely right to - I think I didn't because I tend to associate it with either very surreal type of music (e.g. early Pink Floyd) or fairly mellow music (e.g Albatross, Good Morning Starshine, or late Pink Floyd), and both Somebody To Love and White Rabbit are neither.....Well, I suppose White Rabbit is surreal, but in a direct kind of way if that makes sense. You could say its closer to punk than hippy. I know very little about this period to be honest - as you can probably tell - but there's more interesting music there than I once thought. P.S. I wouldn't 'go out of your way to find' the Boogie Pimps version. In the context of the video channel they have on in the gym it was great when it came on - the vocal is similar and as I say the video is just so wierd it's worth watching. All in all quite fun but not essential. cheers, Matt
Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child  performed by Little Jimmy Scott  1969
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Stunning version of this old standard. Jimmy Scott's voice is, without a doubt, one of the most beautiful things in the world. I've never heard anybody else who could channel so much pain into a song. Regardless of your feelings toward David Lynch, you have to respect him for rescuing Scott's career from obscurity.

from The Source, available on CD



  delicado: yeah, I picked up the European reissue of this album recently, and have to agree with you on its power. I first came across Scott on the 'fire, walk with me' soundtrack, and for many years, 'Jimmy Scott' was just that strange voice. I only figured out the gender quite recently.
Sophisticated Lady  performed by Robert Maxwell  1962
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This instrumental version of sophisticated lady is unlike any other I have ever heard. The harp is used alongside some strange instrumentation and recording techniques to create a unique other worldly sound. There is also a Richard Maxwell trademark - an incongruous, rasping 50s style sax solo in the middle. He was a pretty interesting guy, all in all; his Decca albums pretty much all seem to be interesting.

from Peg O My Heart (Decca DL74563)



Sorry for laughing  performed by Josef K  1981
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Genius strumming and amazing vocals. I have to confess that the first thing that occurred to me when I heard this, other than how brilliant it is, was the sudden realisation that The Wedding Present were not a very original band. Not only that, but they were vastly inferior to Josef K.

From what I've heard, this is probably the Josef K song that most emphasizes the 'mega-fast strumming' thing that they had going on (sorry - I'm not very eloquent today!). It's just an incredibly catchy, brilliantly executed single that just sounds otherworldly to me.





  Blueboy: Their debut LP 'The Only Fun In Town' on Postcard Records is an absolute gem. Full on 60's garage band production with spiny guitars and frantic beats. Long live 'The Sound Of Young Scotland'!
Space Lord  performed by Monster Magnet  1998
Recommended by King Charles [profile]

After nearly three and a half years of speculation, I finally bought this album in the fall of 2003. Wow. As soon as I popped it in, I knew that it was Monster Magnet, but I knew I had a new band to add to my favorite list. These guys rock, period, they're in the lower upper class of hard rock (with upper upper being reserved for such acts as Metallica, Iron Maiden, and Dream Theater), hell I don't even want to categorize them, as this would place a restriction on their potential (in much the same way the Jewish cannot write the word "God," and Muslims cannot draw Him, according to friends I have of those faiths). The song starts off like a fireside story, we've got a low bass beat, a great little intro compliments of Ed Mundell. Wyndorf's space, money, power, sex and religion influenced lyrics become prevalent as soon as the song begins, and we are launched into a maracca, tambourine, and 70's/80's hard line influenced metal trip. Ned Raggett's characterization of an 'acid folk' edge to the beginning of the song gives it good justice, and Space Lord slowly cranks up the volume, settling down once, and then cranking it up again, ready to conquer worlds with the hard rock edge that has kept Monster Magnet in the limelight, but away from the new age/pathetic sounds. Upon listening to this song, we think "classic rock," not because of it's refusal to metamorphose (or rather, transmogrify) into today's rock, but because of it's influence from the aforementioned 60's - 80's hard core, unfiltered, instrumentally diverse sound (including alternate percussive effects from tambourines and maraccas, as well as keyboard infiltration that would make The Doors jealous), which is uniquely self-complimenting, orchestrated, and coherent. Space Lord deals with becoming (unconsciously) corrupt with power, wealth, and ultimately desire (Now give me the strenth to split the world into, yeah/I've ate all the rest, and now I've gotta eat you), which may delineate the stereotypical American 'powertrip,' hence the album's appropriate name. If you are looking for unrelenting excellent rock, which isn't too harsh to listen to, but most certainly isn't along the lines of Phish or Weezer (in any respect at all), I recommend this song, album and any others one could get one's hands on. 5 out of 5 stars for its genre.

from Power Trip


Standing In The Rain  performed by Hambi and the Dance  1982
Recommended by john_l [profile]

This is the final track off their 1982 LP "Heartache", which is the Most Underrated LP Of All Time, and one of the three or four best of the 1980s!! The song actually sounds quite a bit like David Bowie's "Let's Dance" (which it preceded by about 18 months, in case anybody wants to raise plagiarism issues), only serious instead of stupid.
It's one of the more subdued tracks on the LP, which I would characterize as being most like the livelier end of Simple Minds (say "Sparkle In The Rain" or "Once Upon A Time"-era), but with a powerful lead singer who is probably closest to Jay Black of '60s hitmakers Jay and the Americans, or maybe Gary Puckett of the Union Gap (I am not knocking Jim Kerr's vocals by the way).

The full track listing for this wonderful LP: Time After Time, Living In A Heartache, Madelaine, L'Image Craquee, Spirits; The World, Dancing Inside You, Major Major, Too Late To Fly The Flag, Standing In The Rain. Produced by Mick Glossop.

from Heartache (Virgin)


Starsailor  performed by Tim Buckley  1970
Recommended by schlick [profile]

A truly out-of-this-world multitracked vocal tour-de-force.

from Starsailor, available on CD


Straight to Hell  performed by The Clash  198?
Recommended by mattypenny [profile]

You could see this as typical of late period Clash or solo Joe Strummer. It's got a vaguely world music type vibe with Far Eastern sounding keyboards and interesting drumming.

It was a double A-side with 'Should I Stay or Should I Go', (which was later re-released (without Straight to Hell) and was a big hit in the UK, following a Levis advert.) Straight to Hell is a lot less 'rock-y' than Should I stay.

If you were going to buy a Clash compilation then I would check whether this is included if you like there more mellow stuff - its on some of the compilations but not others.

I'm lucky enough to have seen this done by both the Clash and Joe Strummer when he was in the Pogues. Both very memorable.

from Combat Rock, available on CD


Sunshine Among Us  performed by Eternity’s Children  1968
Recommended by masayo [profile]

Ahh, how much I love Eternity's Children's sounds...
A week ago, I bought their CD where 25 songs in, as my bootleg's mix was terrible and no main vocal on Lifetime Day! Anyway, now I enjoy its perfect tracks, especially Lifetime Day, Your World and this song Sunshine Among Us. I do love Sunshine..'s catchy melody, beautifully thick effected harmonies and groovy backing rythm section including keyboards.
By the way, the liner notes says " However, each year, on the day before Thanksgiving, Bruce Blackman leads members of various Eternity's Children lineups at a benefit in Greenville, Mississippi featuring reunions of the area's best-loved acts" wow...this year also?!?!...I really wanna join the event!!

from Eternity's Children (Tower)



  luna: Bruce Blackman comes to The Krakerjacks Annual re-union. He is an invited guest, it is an event every nite-b4-thanksgiving that we;The Krackerjacks, have a big throw down in own,and Bruce's hometown. Charlie Ross is our Bassist; nothing what-so-ever to do with the children or Starbuck.We're all seasoned musicians, and have been together since 1981.
  luna: PS Now that I'm fully awake,let me state that Bruce is a very good friend of ours,as we've all been around him, or played in groups with him since the 60's. He is a musical genius. He is also a very talented writer. The best keyboard player I've ever known. The Biloxi days seem like a dream now, man, we had some fun! Just wanted to clear that up! We all love ya, Bruce.
  493440: Bruce: I don't know who you are Luna but I appreciate the nice comments. By the way, that crap in the Eternity's Children liner notes about me leading you guys in G'ville is totally bogus. I have no idea where that came from at all, certainly not from me. The whole Biloxi/Children thing is a vague memory to me as well. And by the way, the Krackerjacks kick ass!
  luna: You know me, Bruce; I'll tell you when I see you again. You've always amzed me, and I admired you from a distance. I was the one yall left behind when The Omen started at the Fiesta. See ya soon!
  cks6: Does anyone know where I can buy a copy of the Krackerjack's CD entitled "Rockin in the Delta"? Please email me at [email protected] if you have any information. Thanks!
  Andelyn: Hi everyone. Had to jump in here. I spent many of my 'growing up' years in Greenville, MS. My brother, Allen Graves, was a member of the Lancers mentioned here. I recognize a lot of the names surfacing in the posts here.
  eyazoo: Looking for a Krackerjack CD...any one would do. I love them and would especially like to get one with that "green grass" song. I grew up in Yazoo county and my step-dad actually played with them for a while....so I had a CD, but it has disappeared (I think someone took it). Anyway, It would be great if the Krackerjacks could post something on their myspace page about purchasing CDs.
Teresa’s Sound World  performed by Sonic Youth
Recommended by Shes lost control [profile]




The Ambushers  performed by Tommy Boyce & Bobby Hart  1968
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Great bubblegum-pop theme to the Dean Martin spy flick done by Boyce & Hart, best known as one of the songwriting teams behind the Monkees. This track features some terrifically dated, non-P.C. lyrics like "blonde hair, brunette, redheads/lying like injuns in the grass/they're comin' through the pass/and buster/you're General Custer". It also features a great Tijuana Brass-esque horn arrangement, and since this came out on A&M, it may actually be Alpert and the boys themselves. The single is pretty easy to find, but it's also available on the fantastic "Mad, Mad World of Soundtracks" comp from Germany, with its accompanying book of soundtrack cover art.

from the single The Ambushers (A&M)
available on CD - The Mad, Mad World of Soundtracks (Motor Music)




  konsu: Super underrated songwriting duo. Fab stuff! Also check out their exellent LP "I Wonder What She's Doing Tonight?",a big hit for them, but the whole record is really solid! From what i've read, these guys are virtuosos, and did all their own arranging as well as guitar & keys! Very fun stuff...
  john_l: I just listened to this track (off their Anthology collection), and frankly it just sounds immature. For me the outstanding track by Boyce & Hart has to be "Alice Long", with its kitchen-sink production style; if I had to list my favourite 10 songs of all time I'm sure it would be right in there!
  tinks: i think immaturity is the a-number-one thing these cats had going for them...i mean, they wrote songs for paul revere & the raiders and the monkees for cryin' out loud! granted, this isn't my fave b&h tune (that title probably goes to "p.o. box 9847", but i digress) but it's good. not everything has to be of pet sounds calibre, after all.
the end of the world  performed by skeeter davis  1963
Recommended by olli [profile]

the perfect teen heartbreak country ballad. the arrangement on this just BLOWS me away. check out the dissonant strings and the gentle steel guitar! not to mention skeeters vocals.. she never sounded better in my opinion, it just comes across as so goddamn heartfelt. marvel at the heavy, deadpan spoken word section at the end!
A desert island break-up song if there ever was one:)

Why does my heart go on beating
Why do these eyes of mine cry
Don't they know it's the end of the world
It ended when you said goodbye

from the end of the world (rca)



  jeanette: Skeeter sadly died earlier this month. This is a gorgeous song, also brilliantly done by brit-chick Twinkle who I've enthused about elsewhere on these pages. I also love Skeeter's poppier moments, in particular the superlative I Can't Stay Mad At You.
  olli: twinkle covered this? ooh, can't wait to hear it, i totally dig "golden lights"!
The Messiah Will Come Again  performed by Gary Moore
Recommended by sixstringman [profile]

Written by Roy Buchanan (the world's greatest unknown guitarist; not my words)and covered by Gary Moore, the guitar work by Gary Moore (formerly of Thin Lizzy)is amazing and can be seen on one of the Gary Moore DVD compilations at Montreaux.




The Most Beautiful Girl (In the Room)  performed by Flight of the Conchords  2008
Recommended by Festy [profile]

Fans of Flight of the Conchords, who bill themselves as "New Zealand's 4th most popular guitar-based digi-bongo acapella-rap-funk-comedy folk duo", will know this track already as it is one of their most popular. Although lyrically clever and funny, I think their music writing is saved a lot by the production, to the point where the songs are very listenable and enjoyable (I wouldn't be recommending other wise, I guess). From their first widely available album (self-titled), this track is a highlight, as is 'Ladies of the World' (especially the shortvocal reprise - hard to believe it's them at times), and 'Business Time'. The second album has some great tracks also. The TV show's worth catching also.

from Flight of the Conchords, available on CD



The Real World  performed by The Ga Ga’s  2004
Recommended by izumi [profile]

This song was first released on their limited edition debut single "Breaking America" which is where I first heard it. Incidentally, I think it's the best song on this 3-track single as opposed to the title track. The lyrics and concept are uber-funky, and the guitar riffs are really really cool. This is a song that points to a band with lots of spunkiness and talent. ^_^

from Tonight the Midway Shines (Sanctuary SANCD319)
available on CD - Breaking America


The Sound of Muzak  performed by Porcupine Tree  2007
Recommended by Metalvangelist76 [profile]


You just need to hear this...if you value Music, of any genre, you need to listen to this as soon as you can.

Hear the sound of music
Drifting in the aisles
Elevator prozac
Stretching on for miles

The music of the future
Will not entertain
It's only meant to repress
And neutralize your brain

Soul gets squeezed out
Edges get blunt
Demographic
Gives what you want

One of the wonders of the world is going down
It\'s going down I know
It\'s one of the blunders of the world that no-one cares
No-one cares enough

Now the sound of music
Comes in silver pills
Engineered to suit you
Building cheaper thrills

The music of rebellion
Makes you wanna rage
But it\'s made by millionaires
Who are nearly twice your age

Soul gets squeezed out
Edges get blunt
Demographic
Gives what you want

One of the wonders of the world is going down
It\'s going down I know
It\'s one of the blunders of the world that no-one cares
No-one cares enough

from In Absentia (Lava/Atlantic Records 83604-2)


The Way of the World  performed by Justin Hayward  1996
Recommended by elfslut [profile]

As a huge Moody Blues fan, I'm always excited to hear a new track by the frontman, Justin Hayward. This track from his 96 solo album is one worth listening to.

Somewhere between 91 and 96, Justin learned to handle his guitar like George Harrison. You'll notice this if you listen to the Moody Blues' 99 offering Strange Times, but that's not the point. On this particular song, you get the Harrison-like guitar-riff along with the haunting vocals that Hayward is famous for. Combined the two are a powerful mix. This song and all the others on the CD are worth taking a listen too.


available on CD - The View From the Hill


The world is outside  performed by The Ghosts  2007
Recommended by Issie [profile]

I love this song because its got a good beat to it and this makes it really catchy. I think the verses are a bit boring and repetive, but the chorus is amazing!




The World is Outside  performed by The Ghosts  2007
Recommended by Issie [profile]

I love this song ! I heard of them a little while back now but I never really got into them - until i heard this song! It's catchy and its got a good rhythm to it- I have been looking for a great song like this for ages!! I recommend it to you if you like bands like Keane and Coldplay! its a great song so listen to it its on youtube!




The World Spins Madly On  performed by The Weepies
Recommended by Starr [profile]

A good listen. The band is overall pretty neat. They are very mellow, and perfect for bonfires on the beach, post-party hanging out music, etc.

from Say I Am You


This World  performed by Steve Hackett  2003
Recommended by Mike [profile]

Guilty proggy hyper-indulgent pleasure from a very consistent album release. Beautiful production.

from To Watch the Storms


Through the Yard of Blonde Girls  performed by Jeff Buckley
Recommended by two-headed boy [profile]

I'm into blonde women, always have been. Perhaps I share a kindship with the late great Jeff Buckley. I can just imagine where he's coming from, standing on stage, electric guitar amped to rock, all that power in his hands, peering out through the crowd into a yard of blonde girls. How wonderfully empowering! Just think of it? A young man in his prime slashing power chords in front of a legion of women, and leaving this song to remind us of what it's like to live this mythical life. I sing along, dreaming of what it would have been like as a rock star, what kind of pleasure could I derive from the world?

Jeff has certainly proven and disproven his own stylings from the seminal album, Grace, to the somewhat obscure and fragile My Sweetheart the Drunk. What could have been still reverberates through my mind when listening to this song in particular. Its compelling simplicity and catchy chorus, "very sexy, very sexy, okay, okay" beckons my blonde girlfriend to break out into song. The slow thrust of crunching guitars, standard rock 4/4 time, heavy drums sitting on every beat - it's almost glam, almost British invasion, almost cock-rock, but Buckley style. And yes, very sexy, very sexy. Trust me guys, girls will love this song!

from My Sweetheart the Drunk, available on CD




  amyliner: Hi, Just to say that Jeff Buckley didn't write Yard of Blonde Girls (not that you'd ever know from the way he performs it. *sigh*) It was written by A.Clark - L.Kramer - I.Lorre. But yes, girls do love this song. Espencially we blonde ones!!!!
  elision: 'yard of blonde girls' seems to be a somewhat pejorative term (the middle-upper class socialites, the 'gold sharks') so while Jeff Buckley may have stood rock god-like and looked upon legions of blonde girls (somehow I doubt that was his main audience) with a sexually approving eye, if the song spoke anything about his truth, he would probably have been looking out for the different one, the pure one who rises above social politicking in her innocence, the Lola.
  ultra-violent romantic: eloquently said elison; i have to agree with you, especially in reference to the "gold sharks glittering." in david browne's dual biography on tim and jeff buckley titled "dream brother," he points out that when jeff recorded this song he made it very apparent that he didn't want any Sony reps to get a hold of it...
Thru Spray Colored Glasses  performed by Dino Desi and Billy  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A heavenly pop vocal track, one of the last tracks ever recorded by Dino, Desi and Billy. The production (by Stu Phillips, who did the Hollyridge Strings and some cool soundtracks) is dreamy and soft, perfectly matching the idealized lyrics (the world seems so wonderful...etc).

from Follow Me (soundtrack) (Universal City UNI73056)
available on CD - The Mad Mad World of Soundtracks (Motor music)




  yugo: Ooh!I love this LP.Besides,I've just finished to upload it into iPod. I love "Thru Spray Colored Glasses",too. But the tune I love best in this LP is "Just Lookin' For Someone". What do you think,mate?
  nighteye: I believe that both 'The Gentle People' and 'Handsomeboy Technique' has sampled this track?
  masayo: Since I know the Match version, I have been eager to listen to the original one. Thank you Delicado, finally I could listen to a piece of it!
Time Out From The World  performed by Goldfrapp  2005
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Am i the only one disappointed Goldfrapp by now almost completely abandoned their "Felt Mountain"-style and are now solely winding down on the glam-electro route? Anyway, "Time Out From The World" could easily have been on the first album, it sounds like a follow up to "Pilots": Gently flowing, nocturnal in texture, floating through a vast open space with delicate electronica and synths building up to a lush finale with an orchestral armada of strings. Despite the electronics it still has this late-60s-John-Barry feeling all over it.

from Supernature, available on CD




  robert[o]: I doubt you're "only one" who wishes Goldfrapp lingered a tad longer on the slopes of Felt Mountain, but I really feel they made the right choice. "Felt Mountain II - The Sequel" would have been really anticlimactic. The Thin White Duchess, @ his height in the 1970's, had the right impulse - once you've got a trope right; move onwards! A great song tip though, and I would give a shout towards "Let It Take You" likewise. It sounds like John Barry arranging a weird Prince song circa "Purple Rain".
  Mike: You're definitely not the only one, Efti ,and there is one more just here. To me, each successive album has contained fewer magically beautiful tracks than the last, the jump "onwards" into material I find uninteresting being accelerated hugely with the new disc. Robert, the evidence suggests that the choice appears to have been the right one when assessed on the basis of commercial success, but artistically I personally think it a shame they chose to concentrate so much on the "T-Rex with synths material". However I'll return to the new record again in a while and see if it grates less on me...
  eftimihn: Thanks for the song recommendation, Robert. Well, i wouldn't have asked for just another Felt Mountain, but maybe for a slower transition towards their new sound, for keeping that magical feel of such stellar song such as "Pilots" or "Utopia". And "Supernature" feels rather "Black Cherry II" to me, so to me they really haven't moved on from there now either. But i know it's always a topic of debate, the "sticking to their style" vs. "changing/progressing from album to album" thing basically. I mean, did anyone complain The Smiths didn't move on to, say, synth pop? Did anyone complain Kraftwerk using electronics for 30 years? I don't know, i like electronic music a lot, but with Goldfrapp i just feel it's a loss such a gifted arranger like Will Gregory with all the right influences, carrying a Morricone/Barry style into a new contemporary sound, is now so firmly into synths and electronics...
  robert[o]: You have some very valid points - I just don't agree that they apply here. A band/artist need not radically change styles release to release, but I stand by my previous statement when you get it right, move on. "Felt Mountain" got it really, really right. In retrospect, I see the shift for that group as correct move artistically. Likewise, I see "Supernature" not so much as "Black Cherry II", but as the logical fulfillment of the shift that that record, now clearly a transitional LP, suggested. I would also say that "Supernature" is a stronger record than "Black Cherry" on pretty much every front (save perhaps the lack of anything as utterly exquisite "Black Cherry's" title track - which I believe is the group's best song to date.) Now I happen to like the obvious points of reference for "Supernature" - glam rock and electro - as much as I do Italian soundtracks. (All three genres do much the same for me - create their own sonic environments, that play with the contents of my skull.) And if Goldfrapp's next LP is "Supernature II", I will complain loudly - (but I hope/suspect Allison and Will are smarter than that.) And @ the risk of fueling further controversy, many a great band/artist has run a great sound/trope/idea/etc. into the floorboards. (See: The Pixies, The Ramones, The Cocteau Twins, (my beloved) T. Rex and, sadly, The Smiths (post "The Queen is Dead") and Kraftwerk (post "Computer World").) Many of the artists I love best - Bowie, Gainsbourg, Joni Mitchell, Kate Bush, Siouxsie, Wire, The Fall, Broadcast - all remake/remodel themselves every so often. Sometimes said exercise fails - but seem, to me, to create a sense of artistic vitality within the work of said bands/artists. (And "Supernature" feels, to me, thick with that very vitality.) Also let's not fall prey to the reverse snobbery that the commercial success of this LP means it is therefore an inferior piece of work artistically. Remember so much of what this forum champions - Bacharach, Nancy and Lee, Serge, Dusty, etc. - was squarely middle of the road pop music. It makes me very, very happy that people are actually hearing/buying sexy, smart, pop music w/more that a little sense of darkness to it, rather than bland, processed, obvious crap that dominates the charts.
Time Out From The World  performed by Goldfrapp  2005
Recommended by komodo [profile]

Ethereal, cinematic soundscape, which builds to a predictable, but still thrilling climax.

A friend suggested that it sounds a bit like a classic James Bond theme, and I can see what they mean - it has got those gorgeous Barry-esque strings that come sweeping in at the 3 minute mark that just carry you away, shaken AND stirred!

from Supernature, available on CD



  eftimihn: Great song, i recommended this track a while back actually, seems we got a similar impression from it...
To slow things down  performed by Random Bruce  2001
Recommended by phil [profile]

More grist to my mill that there are lots of really good things going unsigned in the easy listening-folk- pop world - the fella that wrote this sits very close to me where I work. A really nicely-put together, low key pop song with a beautiful vocal melody. Available for FREE dammit at http://artists2.iuma.com/IUMA/Bands/Random_Bruce/. 'Sometimes anything' and 'had to be there' are also well worth a listen.

from - (- -)
available on CD - not currently professionally recorded



Try To Understand  performed by Lulu  1965
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Lulu has inflicted on the world many crimes against music, politics and fashion but gets into the pearly gates of musical heaven on the basis of this track. One of her early Decca sides, it's raw and heartfelt, and (despite her tender age at the time) a mature, original view of love.

from the single Try To Understand (Decca F.12214)
available on CD - The Girls' Scene (Deram)



Tuareg  performed by Gal Costa  1969
Recommended by DJ Markinho [profile]

Singer Gal Costa was born in Salvador (Bahia state). Together with other musicians from Bahia: Caetano Veloso, his sister Maria Bethânia, Gilberto Gil and Tom Zé, she moved to São Paulo in 1964. There she bacame one of the most important members of de Tropicalia movement. I consider “Tuareg” as her best song.


Pois ele é sentimental
Humano, é nobre é mouro
È muçulmano
Pois ele é guerreiro
Ele é bandoleiro
Ele é justiceiro
Ele é mandingueiro
Ele é um tuareg

“Tuareg” is from an era in which the attitude towards Muslims was a lot more positive then these days. The song is written by Jorge Ben and a fruitful mixture between Brazilian and Arabic music. I love the sound of the ud (the classical Arabic lute) and ghaita (or oboe: a double reed instrument) which Ben put together with an organ, a bass and a groovy rhythm. The song reminds me of Yusef Lateefs version of “Brazil”, Ary Barbosa’s hit. This jazz musician was also exploring and fusing musical cultures, and often used instruments of the Eastern world.




Until I Believe in my Soul  performed by Dexys Midnight Runners  1982
Recommended by geezer [profile]

All the elements that made Dexys so interesting are distilled into this spritual eoic,passion ,commitment and the awkward genius of Kevin Rowland from the album that gave the world "Come on Eileen" this is ifve minutes of beauty,sweat and belief.Commencing with a pastoral flute and quickly growing into that familiar dexys blend of brass and strings ,a rousing chorus and a lonely whistled finale .Not immediately accesible but if you're a "bit" interested you could be converted for ever.

from Too Rye Ay, available on CD


Untitled # 1  performed by Spain  1995
Recommended by Stian______ [profile]

Probably the slowest music I have I guess, from an album called The Blue Moods of Spain . Its dream-pop for evenings full of hope, or comforting music for days when all falls apart.The vocalist is not the worlds best , but because hes so natural it just adds to the mood I find. Its hard to pinpoint exactly what I like the most about it ,its just one of those songs u fall in love with and never grow away from.

from The Blue Moods of Spain, available on CD



Vitamin C  performed by Can
Recommended by Maximum_Bygraves [profile]

Trance inducing teutonic pschonaughts build patterns up with a haunting celtic feel to the instrumentation and even a touch of Brel. Otherworldly and modal in constuction with a stunningly memorable chorus.

from ege bamyasi (spoon)


Wake Up  performed by Kitbuilders  2001
Recommended by PappaWheelie [profile]

Excellently arranged, male fronted vocal Electro Pop.

from Wake Up, available on CD



Waltzing Matilda  performed by Tom Waits
Recommended by eve [profile]

Tom Waits is so cool. All of his songs do a really good job of making you feel like you remember a time and place you've never seen... his world is one of boxcars, whiskey, and five o'clock shadow. This song is much less bizarre than some of his others; it's more mournful. But it's just... nice to hear. He is a sad old man.





  Jackamaku: Great tune, although the name of this song is actually "Tom Traubert's Blues (Four Sheets to the Wind in Copenhagen)"
Watching The World Go By  performed by Joanie Sommers & Laurindo Almeida  1965
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

The title of this Sommers/Almeida album is spot on: gentle, soft arrangements by Laurindo Almeida, simple yet effective with guitar and lush strings, embellished with flutes, harps and vibes and Joanie Sommers' vocals dominantly on top of it.

from Softly, The Brazilian Sound, available on CD



We Could Be Flying  performed by The Singers Unlimited w/ Art Van Damme  1974
Recommended by Festy [profile]

This was the first version of this song that I'd heard, but have since discovered that it has been recorded many times. The song is written by Michel Colombier & Paul Williams and this version is somewhat haunting, whilst, at the same time, it's also spacey and heavenly. The lush vocals give the song its "other worldly" sound.


available on CD - Afternoon Tea Music - Clear Herb Tea (Universal Music)




  Mr Steal: I only ever heard this once - been looking for it ever since. It's truly lovely. I should say that Scott Walker does a really nice version of the song on his much-maligned (but actually pretty OK - albeit covers only) LP Any Day Now.
We Run  performed by Strange Advance  1985
Recommended by Colinator [profile]

I like this songs imagery and how it leaves so much unsaid, so the listener can relate it to themselves.
Apparently, the writer, (either Daryl Kromm or Drew Arnot, of Strange Advance) wrote this song from a dream he had. He described it as 'One of those wake up sweating dreams.'
The song is from their album 2wo, and is available on both 'Over 60 Minutes With Strange Advance' and 'Worlds Away and Back'.
However, niether of their first two albums, 'Worlds Away'(1982) and '2wo'(1985) are available on CD.

Song lyrics:

We Run

You're on your own and meet a friend
Who doesn't kill but wounds for life
The sun blinds you through the trees
While watching clues fall from the skies
And she smiles

Chorus

At the point of the knife
You never see anyone
How the strong will survive
At the end of their gun
We run...........

Frozen smiles for men returned
They never even left this place
She kissed me softly on the cheek
And a shadow cut across her face

Take heart the fountain of my life
Stone the victim to his knees
I've got scars for my mistakes
And now post atomic dreams
I dream...........

Chorus

At the point of the knife
You never see anyone
How the strong will survive
At the end of their gun
We run...........

I walked for miles and miles to the sea
we burned, the fire from the sun
I know you never tried to deceive
who can touch us when we run


available on CD - Over 60 Minutes With Strange Advance / Worlds Away and Back


What a Wonderful World  performed by Louis Armstrong
Recommended by picatoo [profile]





  delicado: Nice tune. Did you hear the Nick Cave and Shane McGowan version?
When It Was Done  performed by Walter Wanderley Set  1968
Recommended by konsu [profile]

It's rare when a song can make you cry, at least in my case. This one always seems to shake something loose inside, some glacier of residule emotions or something. Nevertheless, this song has that certain something for me. Written by the more than capable Mr.Webb,and brought to life by Walter Wanderley on electric harpsichord alongside Don Sebesky's crush-velvet arrangements.The vocalists sound like they did the whole piece in one take, without fixing anything,to give it this dreamy adolescent quality,bathed in swirling soft lights...This record is one of the best of the A&M/CTI collaborations, bringing the best of both worlds together seamlessly... Magic stuff!

from When It Was Done, available on CD




  Pal: Yes it's a wonderful track! I found a version on soulseek with Hugo Montenegro but I can't find out on which record it's recorded originally. Is it anyone who can help?
  konsu: The Hugo Montenegro LP is "Colours Of Love" RCA LSP-4273. It also has great takes on The Guess Who's "Undun" and Steams "Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye"!
Where is my mind?  performed by Pixies  1988
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I still find this song as compelling as I did ten years ago. It's simple, crisp, and beautiful, opening with an other-worldly high-pitched vocal hum which is soon joined by a picked electric guitar sound and some tight drums. It's really nothing like anything else I like, but somehow the shouted vocals and indie-rock setting really appeal to me on this track. One of 20 or 30 songs which transport me back to my late teens amazingly vividly.

from Surfer Rosa, available on CD



White Car in Germany  performed by The Associates  1981
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

Post-punk "pop" at its most gorgeous/baroque/bewilderingly extreme - and the perfect introduction to the God-like genius of Alan Rankine and the late/great singer Billy Mackenzie. A four car-pile-up between Roxy Music (circa "For Your Pleasure"), Bowie (circa "Heroes"), Scott Walker's "Scott 3" and Kraftwerk's "The Man Machine", (with King Tubby and Shirley Bassey acting as ambulance attendants), this song is both empty and lush, creepy and hilarious, ice-cold and almost embarrassingly emotional. I have loved/lived/died by this song for almost two decades, and I still can't begin to tell you what its about. It's like something from outer space - like so many of the greatest pop songs are.

from The Fourth Drawer Down (Situation Two)
available on CD - From The Fourth Drawer Down (V2)


Wicked Little Town  performed by John Cameron Mitchell (Hedwig and the Angry Inch  2001
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

A departure from the rest of the soundtrack to this cult-classic film. While the other songs are very much influenced by the glam-rock era with a nod to the songs of Meat Loaf (and why not, considering the film has quite a Rocky Horror-ish feel to it), this is a beautiful little ballad. 'Wicked Little Town' bespeaks the desperation of the character Hedwig who is stifled by circumstances and situations that she feels powerless to change. She knows that there is a big world out there and she wants to experience it and make a name for herself if only she can get out of the 'wicked little town' that she is now confined to. Doomed to remain an outcast who lives on the fringes of society in her present surroundings, she can only cling to her dream of escape and the eventual realization of her full potential.

from Hedwig and the Angry Inch - Motion Picture Soundtrack, available on CD



  yonderboy: Trivia: 'Wicked Little Town' is Trask's reflections on Grinnell, Iowa.
Wild Women  performed by The Big Three (featuring "Mama" Cass Elliott  1964
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Cass Elliott at her sassy best. A jazzy/bluesy song wherein Ms. Elliott lays it on the line. If her man doesn't do right by her she is going to send him packing!
This world is a slightly dimmer place since Cass departed...

from Live From the Recording Studio (Warner Bros Records FM LP 311)
available on CD - Live From the Recording Studio / Dream a Little Dream - the Cass Elliott Collection (Collectibles B00004YNF5 / MCAD 11532)


Wild World  performed by Cat Stevens  1970
Recommended by acidburn [profile]

from Tea for the Tillerman


Wild World (Cat Stevens)  performed by Mr. Big  1993
Recommended by acidburn [profile]

from Bump Ahead


Winkin, Blinkin and Nod  performed by The Big Three  1963
Recommended by rum [profile]

If you ask any industry bigwig right now what’s gonna be the next big thing, they’ll all say the same, “Sea Shanties”. Every one of them. You think I’m joking? Well listen up ignorami because I’m not.

You might have noticed ripples rolling in from the Indie scene on both shores of the Atlantic, as The Coral, The Decemberists, and others, have romanticised the plight of the seafarer, but now Shanties are due to hit the mainstream, and hard. As I write this Richard X is in his London studio working on the final mix of ‘Salty Seadog’, an explosive slab of “neo-shant’ purred over seductively by Rachel Stevens. Cathy Dennis, my old pal from our days changing skates at Norwich Rollerama, told me yesterday that she’s just sold three ‘Shanties’ to some “top name artists”. For legal reasons I’m not allowed to say who, but let me assure you these are white hot names. The kind of names that kids get on their knees and pray to. So, you see, Shanties are big business. I’ve also heard that Jennifer Lopez, J-Lo, ‘Loopy’ Lopez, Jell-O, whatever, never one to miss a passing fad, is rumoured to be changing her name to One-Eyed-Jenny. Make of that what you will, might just be street talk. Now what concerns me is the forthcoming release from Britney Spears. This you may have heard about. It’s called, ‘Wingin’, Blingin’ and Not!’, and it’s a ‘fresh’ adaptation of the 19th century poem/song, ‘Winkin’, Blinkin’ and Nod’ by Eugene Field. I know this song from the glorious version by Cass Elliot’s pre-fame folk trio, The Big Three. It’s less a shanty than a bewitching lullaby, intended to lull a child into restful slumber, as Winkin’ and gang sailed not in rusting trawler through the bleak North Sea, but, “in a wooden shoe/off on a river of crystal light/into a sea of dew.” And it contains some of the most hauntingly beautiful oooh ooohs and aahh ahhs ever waxed, as Tim Rose and Mama Cass harmonise the rolling waves of slumber. Nevertheless because of it’s sea-faring theme (“we’re going fishing for the herring fish/that live in the beautiful sea”), it’ll probably get caught up in the nets of the inevitable ‘Sea Shanty Fever’ cash-in compilations that will soon litter our shores like syringes and floor tiling. I wanted to draw your attention to it now before it gets beaten blue and bloody by the Spears, and rattles out over supermarket tannoys the world over.

from The Big Three



  n-jeff: Obviously Mr Scruff is well ahead of the field then, with three songs about Fish (ing) on his first LP...
  tonyharte: Yo ho ho, me hearties. Well I never. Thanks for the tip/warning Rum (where's the bum and baccy?) I predict that this year (in the UK) will belong to The Coral.
  konsu: Um... what about Weens album "The Mollusk"? That was shit was shanty-city! So, whats next? Weavers laments??
Wishing Now  performed by Glen Campbell  1974
Recommended by [email protected] [profile]

Absolutely incredibly hooky, soaring, romantic pop song, very much in the same world as some of the best Terry Sylvester solo stuff, those wonderful Mark Lindsay solo records, "Dusty in London," Peter Shelley's "Love Me, Love My Dog" etc.

from Reunion, available on CD


Wonderful  performed by The Beach Boys  1966
Recommended by Yammer [profile]

By 1965, Brian Wilson's professional and personal lives were in such a state of constant panic that it was almost inevitable that he would turn to readily available forms of rock star relief. While his self-medication (and underlying mental illness) would ultimately render him into a poster boy for an imaginary DARE campaign, the early, merely marijuanic phase of his regimen yielded a brief but vivid string of almost absurdly gorgeous pop masterpieces. While a couple of these are permanently stamped into the forebrains of all radio listeners over a certain age ("God Only Knows," "Good Vibrations"), some remain almost unknown. Which brings us to "Wonderful," found on the Beach Boys box set, and remade a few years ago as part of the Don Was hagiography. It is a curious, brief (2 minutes) tune, austere in production (harpsichord and vocal) but staggeringly rich in harmonic interest. The melody evokes pure serenity and has no noticeable roots in any previous American pop style. Van Dyke Park's lyric is typically insane; what little one can make of it seems to dovetail with Wilson's growing religiousity, yet feels entirely physical, even pagan -- a sort of boy-loves-wood sprite nature idyll making the first movement of a really great ballet with set design by Maurice Sendak. Or something.


available on CD - Good Vibrations: Thirty Years of the Beach Boys (Capitol)


World Spins Madly On  performed by The Weepies
Recommended by softindierocker [profile]

I love this song! So sweetly depressing. However, it is surprisingly upbeat for a depressing song! You've just gotta love those paradoxes!! :)




World Without You  performed by Emma Bunton
Recommended by charlybabez [profile]

Typical girlie ballad by ex-spice girl.




Worlds Away  performed by Strange Advance  1982
Recommended by john_l [profile]

Lush, languid progressive new wave with synthesizers, from Vancouver, that seemed to arrive out of the blue in '82. They have a number of other good songs, my personal favourites are "Just Like You" and "Alien Time".

from Worlds Away
available on CD - Worlds Away & Back (EMI)



  Colinator: You like 'Just Like You', and so do I, so here are the lyrics: Just Like You She closed her eyes and spoke to me Said 'If you could have seen the things that I have seen' I've walked the desert of lost souls Well the moon was late for me last night But the dawn and I are still alive She said 'Tell me things I want to hear Now you're safe and sound and the coast is clear' I saw her body move with her blue dress on While the sun cut through venetian blinds I was her last frontier when she said 'You're mine' Chorus We'll love until tomarrow Chained to your heart I'll follow And what you ask I'll do Today I'm just like you On razor edge you're falling You're new ice age is calling I know just what this means Today you're just like me I think I've gone too far this time And I feel that I should change my point of view Time fades like shadows in the sun While I stand outside in the pouring rain If I had the chance I'd do it all again PS-There are some beggining lyrics not shown that appear only in the remix version, available on the compilation 'Worlds Away and Back'.
Worldwide choppers  performed by Tech N9ne
Recommended by manasnegi [profile]

The Rap is very good




You remain an Angel  performed by Danny Wilson  1987
Recommended by geezer [profile]

An eighties incarnation of the epic sadness and yearning that the Walker Brothers did so well with the songs of Jaques Brel and Bob Gaudio(Sun aint gonna shine Anymore).This band was a rare thing at this point ,they had aspirations to write great timeless songs when drum machines ruled the world.On this ,they suceeded ,the songs heartbreaking climax could make a man cry,awash with brave brass and orchestral tears leaving a man broken in two and drowning in his own tears by the time the song fades into an eerie percussive silence .

from Meet Danny Wilson, available on CD


You Used To  performed by Distant Cousins  1990
Recommended by geezer [profile]

We all know a song whose brilliance seemed to avoid the rest of the worlds attention but "You Used To" is genuinely brilliant .Released at the start of the 90,s in the midst of Mad-chester and all that!,this soulful,mournful swirling orchestral epic sank without trace soon after .I found a copy a few weeks ago and its brilliance has not been dimmed by the passing of time in fact it now seems more relevant in the wake of Massive Attack,Morcheba and Duffy .You may find it hard to find but if you have it let someone else hear it NOW!!!!!!!!!!

from Distant cousins
available on CD - Distant Cousins/You Used To cd single


Young, Alive, In Love  performed by Flipper’s Guitar
Recommended by snafkin [profile]

Japanese group from the early 90's where Cornelius first made his name. This track and especially the album Dr. Head's World Tower are fantastic, bizzare, exciting pop.





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