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search results for “Happy”
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List songs by Song title | Performer | Year

You searched for ‘Happy’, which matched 130 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
"feels like heaven"  performed by fiction factory  1984
Recommended by kohl [profile]

great song. uplifting and catchy. the intro itself is sheer new wave goodness. makes you happy, makes you dance. one perfect 80s tune.


available on CD - throw the warped wheel out



  Mike: Nice to see this one here - great piece of 80s Scottish pop. It was recently re-used with comically altered lyrics in a UK tv advert.
(Quicksilver Daydreams of) Maria  performed by Townes Van Zandt  1970
Recommended by andrew76 [profile]

This is (for me) one of the greatest songs of love ever written. The song describes the appearance of a goddess among women and is pure (if at times naive) poetry. The arrangement is simple lead and rhythm guitars and bass with an organ giving a more filled out feeling from the second verse and violin in the fourth. The tone is melancholy but happy, as if the singer is basking in the light of this most beautiful woman. It must have been written for someone, someone lucky to be thought so beautiful. But there is sadness in that the singer may be singing of his unrequited love. Some of the alliteration is fantastic too.

from Townes Van Zandt, available on CD (Pppy Records)



  booblikon: there is a great story in the documentary film "Be Here To Love Me", as told by Guy Clark: this song apparently came to Van Zandt in a particularly peak morning of inspiration, when Clark describes finding Townes uncharacteristically fit and alert. after making his bed to military specification, he played Clark a new song (this one), which he intended to perform at an appearance that same evening. i may have rendered parts of this story incorrectly, so i definitely recommend the movie if you are a fan; even if not, as it is sad but quite revelatory.
2002 - A Hit Song  performed by The Free Design  1969
Recommended by rum [profile]

Despite '2002 - A Hit Song's insistent chorus of "it's gonna be a hit, hit, hit!", by the end you're not convinced, "it's not gonna be a hit is it Free Designers?" "No… I'm afraid not Rum. To be honest it hasn't a hope in hell. Oh yeah we're bitter, of course we are, but, you know, when you're in the idiom of soft rock you can't get away with angst, you've got to maintain this 'pleasing' façade, so that's why we sound so jolly, so 'up' on this song. But yeah, it's hard..." Yes, they may, as they sing, have "sealed it with a kiss" but the cracks show. And it's that that makes this song particularly memorable. It's fascinating to see the rips in their Peter Pan wonderland, a place where they usually spend their time flying kites, blowing bubbles, befriending dolphins. And so this palpable excitement you hear in their heady harmonies is not fuelled by a surefire optimism of success but by an almost delirious desperation, "hit, hit, hit, sure to be a hit, hit, hit, gonna make a hit, hit, hit" they sing, panting, shaking nervously, craving that big fix. The track is a flip-side to the Byrds' 'So You Wanna Be A Rock'N'Roll Star'. Both are bitter recipes for pop success but whereas the Byrds are pissed off that any talentless buffoon can follow their recipe to success get a hit, the Free Design are pissed that "We did all this last time, and it did not work!". I guess you have to suffer for your art, and maybe the Free Design were having too happy a time. Or maybe their hair didn't swing right or their pants weren't tight.

from Heaven/Earth, available on CD (Project 3)



  olli: heh..brilliant commentary.
  konsu: Wow. I never thought of that song as such an exploded schematic. But it does shed light on their own self awareness even if unintentional at the time.
Alas I Cannot Swim  performed by Laura Marling
Recommended by DearPrudence [profile]

One of her sweetest songs. So simple and yet so happy sounding. Laura Marling is intelligent beyond her years, but this song transmits some innocence and it's simply a "pretty" song, that always leaves me with a smile.




All Men Play On Ten  performed by Manowar  1985
Recommended by rum [profile]

There is something magic about a song like ‘All Men Play On Ten’ in this post-Spinal Tap Metal world. Such an earnest rock anthem, in such an irony saturated market… You’ve got to have respect for Manowar. Is it a mark of defiance or of ignorance and stupidity? Hard to tell. Maybe both. But then this song is essentially about doing things their own way, and not listening to anybody. So who cares anyway? Well, it’s worth listening to Eric Adams for 4 minutes at least. He has a message for us all. He’s no puritanical, know-it-all, he’s a reformed character preaching a rock’n’roll gospel. Believe it or not brothers, he too has fallen. There was a time when he did it for the money, yes that’s right, he sold his soul to the loud music-hating devil. And the devil said hmmm Mr Adams, for your money I have some things I need you to do for me, adjustments as it were. Eric said, well okay, what do you suggest? The devil demanded that he turn down his amps, “why be proud, don’t play so loud, be like us and get a sound that’s real THIN”. OK, I reckon I could do that, just a bit, said Eric, a little put out. But the demands didn’t end there, Eric was pinched and plucked for his silver dollar, “wear a polyester suit, act happy, look cute, get a haircut and buy small gear.” And inevitably it all got too much. Eric’s no pigeon weaver, and he got real mad, and he turned to the devil and said, “HOLD IT, RIGHT THERE!” And good for him. For this is a great track. Very catchy.

from Sign Of The Hammer



  frmars: Tried your recommandation. Very poor music. Erased it.
  rum: hmmm... such a painfully earnest rock comment, in such an irony saturated market. I think you may have missed the point somewhat. Lighten up kid, and broaden your scope.
All The Way  performed by Billie Holiday  1959
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

This is Billie Holiday at her absolute best, or worst, depending on your point of view. I personally consider it her best. She sings this song with a feeling of absolute devotion and love. With only months to live, Billie Holiday made her final recording for MGM records in March 1959. Years of abuse thru drugs and bad relationships had left both her voice and body only shadows of their former selves. However, what she no longer retained vocally, she more than made up for emotionally. Her battered voice and life experience allowed for the feelings to shine thru in a way that she couldn't have possessed in her younger years and for this reason, I fall into the group that prefers her latter recordings over the earlier ones. I am the happy owner of a 10-cd boxset of her complete recordings for the Verve and MGM labels which includes outtakes and incomplete tracks recorded between 1945 and 1959. It's one of the few things I will grab if I have to evacuate my apartment in an emergency...

from Billie Holiday (MGM E 3764)
available on CD - Billie's Best / the Complete Billie Holiday on Verve 1945-1959 (Verve-Polygram 513943 / 314 513 859-2)



  scrubbles: This is one of my favorite Billie Holiday songs as well. Her voice is absolutely haunting here.
Are you happy ?  performed by Microdisney  1985
Recommended by whoops [profile]

During the summer of 1985 Microdisney had already lost all illusions about their potential commercially speaking. This second album was not what people would called a long awaited one. Recorded in a chaotic way (the drum part was the last thing to be put on the tape), this is a true masterpiece from track 1 to track 10 and "Are you happy ?" is its epicenter.
Cathal Coughlan (who at the time renamed himself Blah Blah and claimed to play keyboards and plastic pubis)is now a solo artist and still one of the most beautiful voice in england. Sean O'Hagan have finally achieved success through the High Llamas and Stereolab.

from The clock comes down the stairs, available on CD (Virgin)



  felonius: I have to agree. This is one of the most poignant, plaintive tracks I have ever heard, O'Hagan's soaring Telecaster solo launching it into orbit far above the mire of other 80's indie rock. (I think it might have been influenced by Stephen Stills' solo on 'Bound to Lose' from the Manassas album - another guitar solo to make you weep).
At My Most Beautiful  performed by REM
Recommended by javaviolet [profile]

This song is such a happy one, without being overly pop oriented. Just Michael Stipe's voice, a piano, simple percussion and the kindest words.

"I read bad poetry
Into your machine.
I save your messages
Just to hear your voice.
You always listen carefully
To awkward rhymes.
You always say your name,
Like I wouldn't know it's you,
At your most beautiful."





  FlyingDutchman1971: Mike Mills and Peter Buck orchestrated the music on this track as an homage to Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys. One of the best REM songs in recent years!
Baby You’ve No Eyes  performed by The Kazoo Funk Orchestra  2006
Recommended by peterbruff [profile]

Available for free download from www.kazoofunk.co.uk/music.html along with the rest of the album 'Midnight Finger Painter'...

from Midnight Finger Painter (Planet Groucho Records PGR-KF-01)


Babylon  performed by David Gray  1999
Recommended by LOWTONES22 [profile]

Easy lovin', reminds you of than warm fuzzy sunshine love feelings you get when with that special companion, just nice groovin' love tunes, "let go of your heart, let go of your head"





Beer Song  performed by Mustard Plug  1997
Recommended by SchlazzGraft [profile]

If you haven't heard of this band, they're a ska band that's been around for a little while. This song is incredibly energetic and well written. It makes me happy every time i listen to it!

from Evildoers Beware (Hopeless Records)


big sur  performed by the thrills
Recommended by licoricewhipped [profile]

happy, nostalgic. reminds me of my two homes, ireland and california, at the same time.




Bring on the Love   performed by Gloria Jones  1978
Recommended by geezer [profile]

From a time when soul was shaking hands with disco,on this beautiful midtempo ballad the two genres are happy to live in a harmony.This is a track that is allowed to build upon a soft disco beat layer by layer ,a deceptive melody allows optimism to drip drip then flood your senses,leaving you feeling good about life and for once a song that is as long as you want it to be.A song that somehow takes you high without leaving its musical ground .

from Windstorm, available on CD


By the time I get to Phoenix  performed by Dorothy Ashby  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

The idea of a funky jazz harp rendition of this classic Jim Webb song is probably cheesy to some people, but trust me, this one works brilliantly. The opening shimmers delightfully with fender rhodes piano, strings, and a huge breakbeat. Dorothy's harp then takes over, and we move into a nice pop/funk/jazz take on the song. The relentless beat is pretty funny when you compare this version to others (e.g. the Glen Campbell hit version, also Nick Cave's classic stripped down version from 'Kicking against the pricks'), but it is really very charming, happy stuff. A similar funk/pop hybrid occurs on her version of 'Windmills of your mind' - highly recommended.

from Dorothy's Harp (Cadet)



Carry Me  performed by John Lodge  1976
Recommended by john_l [profile]

John Lodge's "Natural Avenue" was overall the best of the Moody Blues' solo ventures of the mid-1970s, being almost up there with the "Blue Jays" effort on which he collaborated with the band's guitarist Justin Hayward (whose own solo LP "Songwriter" was the biggest disappointment of the lot). This track has a wonderfully exotic feel to it, what with lyrics like "Show me your island of a thousand names" as well as orchestration including strings, oboe and bassoon, and some kind of bubbling thingy which may be a synthesizer. On a darker note, some of the other lyrics seem to indicate the alleviation of an addiction to certain substances, e.g. "Paint all the clouds the colour of 'No'" and "Gone is the white horse that carried us home", but hell, every band was addicted to stuff back then and I'm happy that 99% of them seem to have survived intact. Anyway, it's a lovely exotic song that if you haven't heard it, it's about time you did!

from Natural Avenue, available on CD (Threshold)


Chorou, Chorou  performed by João Donato  1973
Recommended by Festy [profile]

It has been argued that Joéo Donato was the first to play a bossa nova rhythm on a recording (playing the accordian on "Eu Quero Um Samba" with Os Namorados), but whilst his contemporaries from the early years of bossa, such as Gilberto and Jobim, were happy to expand on the traditional bossa sound in later years, Donato went a number of steps further. The first track "Chorou, Chorou", from a fabulous album titled "Quem é Quem" is not even the best track off the album, but the opening bars give an idea of what the whole album is about. It's playful in melody, often subtly funky in rhythm and over all, a great album. This particular album also contains my favourite interpretation of "A Rã" by Donato. I'll have to recommend more songs from this album at a later time, because it really is great.

from Quem é Quem (Odeon)
available on CD - Quem é Quem (Odeon/EMI)




  konsu: He was always revisiting his compositions. He did this one in the mid sixties as well. Also check out the mad versions on his "Bad Donato" LP he did for Blue Thumb in 70', his take on The Frog is amazing.
  Festy: I recall reading somewhere that "A Rã" was his most favourite track that he had written. I haven't heard a bad version of it by him or anyone else. The "Bad Donato" album never grabbed me either, for some reason. Lots of people love it. I think I need to have another listen to it. ;)
  ambassador: i had the pleasure of interviewing maestro donato a couple summers ago as he was celebrating his 70th birthday. I recently went through the interview again for a forthcoming article about the man and he admitted that "A Bad Donato" was his "noisiest" album. hard to disagree with that and I think that's why some people love it and others are turned off. Sometimes there is just too much going on with it and his later versions of some of these songs are much more refined and better in my opinion. regarding his regularly recording previous songs, he is a HUGE Stan Kenton fan and kenton also recorded his songs dozens of times. my two pennies.
Close to Me   performed by The Cure  1985
Recommended by geezer [profile]

The Cure meets Tamlla Motown ,well sort of, the ideas in Robert Smiths head celebrated the sound of black America yet still kept their fledgling gothic credentials intact.A syncopated bass line and drum pattern is supported by a persistant but low fi organ ,the song goes from sinister and unerving to joyous and euphoric in just a couple of minutes thanks to some well timed horns and hand claps whilst the original rhythym never misses a beat.A time when any band could try any thing and occasionally meet with a happy accident.

from Head on the Door, available on CD


colour me in  performed by of montreal  2004
Recommended by olli [profile]

short, bouncy cover of the broadcast song.
it's interesting because it removes all the dissonant electronics that make up the "broadcast sound", leaving a much purer-sounding piece of 70's style pop-psych.
in a weird way, this now feels like the alternative universe original version, and the original song the cover.
i love the giddy woooh-ing in the chorus.





Come Back Suzanne  performed by Bill Wyman  1981
Recommended by geezer [profile]

A surprisingly accurate slice of new wave from Wyman,s solo album which contained his only hit "Je Suis un Rock Star" ,this was the follow up.While the Stones moved towards an increasingly stodgy over produced sound at this time ,Wyman was happy to acknowledge the prevalent new wave sounds ."Suzzane" is an upbeat and catchy vignette not a million miles away from Squeeze,s "Cool for Cats".This confirms a lot of peoples opinions that Wyman was always the most quirky and inventive Stone.

from Stone Alone An Anthology
available on CD - Stone Alone


Crooked Teeth  performed by Death Cab for Cutie  2005
Recommended by HelterSkelter [profile]

Very nice sound to it, you got your basic instrument set in this one, I like it because of the lyrics.. They're not totally simple. It's easy to understand today's pop and stuff like that, but Deathcab actually puts some more effort into their music.

from Plans (Atlantic)


cut here  performed by the cure
Recommended by katastrophic [profile]

its 80's happy, and yet, profoundly motivating. The lyrics are about meeting up with an old freind, perhaps even someone with whom you've had a relationship, and some how drifted but not finalized. And you blow the oppertunity to make the person something more in your life, because of the way you use time. It happens. and its a good reminder to go and get what you want. also use time in a way that won't be regretted.




Darn That Dream  performed by Petula Clark  1959
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Many people think that Petula Clark first came to the US when the song 'Downtown' topped the charts in 1965. However, she actually came to Los Angeles in 1959 and recorded an album of Jazz songs. Among the many treasures produced during these sessions is 'Darn That Dream'. She sings this great song with all the innocense and charm of a hopeless romantic whose desired love is just out of reach. Her resignation to unrequited affection for her unavailable romeo is interrupted briefly by a soaring interlude from the orchestra. The sweeping melody almost suggests that she is dreaming of being held in "his" arms as they dance across the floor of a dimly lit ballroom. In the end she must come back down to earth and awake to the reality that she will never have the man of her dreams, however she refuses to give up the hope that one day she will get her happy ending. I know I'm rooting for her!!

from This Is Petula Clark! (Sunset/Liberty SUM 5101)
available on CD - Jumble Sale-Rarities & Obscurities / In Hollywood In Other Words (Sequel-198 / Castle Music NEMCD389 (UK))


Descarga  performed by Gerardo Frisina  2001
Recommended by secularus [profile]

Upon first listen to this tune, I was sold! Available so far only on 12", the track starts off in a traditional congas ala samba vibe with dashes of upright bass. Then the simple but colorful piano melody kicks in and your booty is ready to move. Although this is a modern dancefloor stormer you cannot help but hear its nod to a bygone era in Latin music. If it wasn't for the quick tempo I would think this fine example of a dancefloor delight was created in the late 60s, early 70s.


available on CD - Break n Bossa 4 (Schema)



  delicado: Frisina also compiled the excellent 'Up' compilation on Schema. Great early 70s instrumentals with a hard groove - highly recommended!
Devil, Devil, Go Away  performed by Little Marcy  1973
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Ever felt there was a hole in your life that only a religious ventriloquist's dummy could fill? Then look no further. One of pop's bona-fide eccentrics, Marcy Tigner, voices Little Marcy in a thoroughly winsome way. The song, nay the whole album, encourages all young children to renounce the devil. However, if the devil were to see the scarily-bad drawing of Little Marcy on the cover, he would correctly deduce that no child is likely to listen to the ravings of a freaky end-of-the-pier doll voiced by an even stranger adult woman.

"Marcy wants you all to know how happy she is singing songs about Jesus" relate the sleevenotes. And, gee Marcy, we sure are glad to hear them!

Please don't think I recommended this song simply to mock it. I genuinely think it's a priceless piece of recorded gold and am more than pleased this site, and the world, is big enough to accommodate special talents like that of Marcy Tigner.

Out of Waco, Texas.

from Happy Am I (Word K-721)




  olli: aah, little marcy. i find her oddly touching. i adore the effect where the guitar seems to be meowing on "i love little pussy", it makes the song even more appealing than the questionable lyrics. "guitar festival of gospel songs" by little marcy's guitarist, bob summers is the current downloadable album over at basichip.com right now, by the way. snatch it while you can!
Diffrerent Stories  performed by I Am The World Trade Center  2004
Recommended by MoeShinola [profile]

Synth-Pop candy. Starts out with strummed clean-tone electric guitar, then the electronic beats come in w/ Amy singing in her languid way. The chorus brings Dan in answering her back. It's one of the best songs on The Cover Up, which was their break-up record. Really good contrast of drama-laden lyrics and happy pop.

from The Cover Up (Gammon)


Disco 2000  performed by Pulp
Recommended by daniela_por [profile]

Happy dance-pop song about a high school love.




Don’t Be Cruel  performed by Cheap Trick  198?
Recommended by sallyfosho [profile]

A delightfully poppy cover of Elvis's Don't Be Cruel. Although it is undeniably an 80s tune, it's not dated at all. Just a fun song to sing along to, and a great cover.




Don’t Go Breaking My Heart  performed by Wilson Neves e Seu Conjunto  196?
Recommended by sodapop650 [profile]

This whole LP will make all you Ed Lincoln fans happy. It is a group led by Wilson Neves, the percussionist on a lot of major Bossa releases including all the Eumir Deodato LPs released on Equipe. This track is not the Elton John Kiki Dee version but the earlier Burt Bacharach version. The whole LP is loaded with great organ heavy instrumentals and dance-floor-burners performed by an extremely tight combo. Best of all its available on CD as part of the Odeon 100 Anos series. A lot of groups on the Parlophone label could crank out the cheesey sixties-organ sound and Bacharach covers but not many could match the rythms of Das Neves. How do they say it - ritmo calliente!

from Juventude 2000, available on CD



  delicado: Funny - I just compiled this track the other day. The album sounds great, but my copy is an extremely scratchy Colombian pressing; I'll have to pick up the CD.
Don’t Talk to Me About Love  performed by Altered Images  1983
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

By late 1983, when Altered Images' third and final album, Bite, was released, Altered Images were already dead in the water. The group had never made any particular headway in the US, where their blend of Siouxsie and the Banshees and the Monkees (not to mention Claire Grogan's bizarre, baby-talk hiccup of a singing voice) was just a little too weird for mainstream tastes, and in their native UK, their colorful look and bubblegummy 1982 singles "I Could Be Happy" and "See Those Eyes" had forever typecast them as a kiddie-pop band. Grogan was already branching off in her second career as an actress (she played the title role in Bill Forsyth's 1982 cult classic Gregory's Girl), and Bite seemed like a mere contractual obligation. For the most part, it sounds like it, too, but the brilliant single "Don't Talk To Me About Love," which led off side two, was a welcome surprise, and possibly the best song they ever did. Mike Chapman's production recalls his work with Blondie, while the disco-tinged electronic beat, chicken-scratch electric guitar part and rubbery, melodic bass part all sound closer to New Order's "Blue Monday" than Bananarama's "Cruel Summer." Grogan herself is in an entirely different mood than usual, with her newly-lowered singing voice (and slightly improved enunciation) displaying a rueful, almost petulant edge that suits the cranky lyrics. Only at the very end does she shoot into her usual helium-pitched unintelligibility, with an air of "See, I can still do this, I just choose not to anymore." Coupled with the most indelible chorus of the band's entire career, it all adds up to a minor masterpiece. Sadly, however, nobody wanted to know.
(AMG)

from Bite (Portrait 25413)
available on CD - Bite...Plus (Edsel)


Don’t Try Suicide  performed by Queen  1980
Recommended by Ozmala [profile]

A very cheerful song, with some great piano. The lyrics are funny, if you're into that kind of thing. (I am.)

from The Game


Even If You Dont  performed by Ween  2000
Recommended by Gwendolyn [profile]

This is such a fun song.. the lyrics outline this crazy relationship "I was happy this mornin/ you finally got yourself dressed/ eating raw bacon/ it's okay I was still impressed" It's got a happy beat w/ piano in the background. Love it.

from White Pepper


Everything’s Gonna be alright  performed by Sweetbox  1997
Recommended by Mike [profile]

Ridiculously happy-sounding re-working of Bach's Air on a G string. The girl has a rather pleasant recorded voice, particularly while repeatedly assuring us that she'll be there when we wake up (comforting, isn't it?).

This release earned extra points for openness and honesty by including a credit to JS Bach, something that Procol Harum and a quite a few others have failed to do over the years.




fell down the stairs  performed by tilly and the wall  2004
Recommended by lexie [profile]

geeetars, synthesizers and tap dancers + pop-ish happy sound=amazing. what more is there to say? this song was lovely live, as well.

from Wild Like children


find a new way  performed by young love  2006
Recommended by Moriah [profile]

it's fun, has a dancy vibe and dan keyes has great vocals.




Five Colours in her Hair  performed by McFly  2004
Recommended by Issie [profile]

It's funny. It's quite catchy. It's, um, loud and happy.






  jeanette: Yeah, you gotta love a bit of McFly. And the single came out on 7" picture disc too, which shows a bit of effort.
  olli: no offense, but it sounds pretty bland to me. then again, i'm not really into that blink 182 "happy teen sunshine punk" kind of thing.
  Mike: The chord sequence is very Pet Shop Boys.
Float On   performed by Modest Mouse  2004
Recommended by ErinRae24 [profile]

This song is labeled "Indie Rock". It always cheers me up. No matter what happens, we'll make it through.

from Good News For People Who Love Bad News (Epic Records)


Float On  performed by Modest Mouse  2004
Recommended by ErinRae24 [profile]

This song is labeled "Indie Rock". It always cheers me up. No matter what goes wrong, we'll make it through.

from Good News For People Who Love Bad News (Epic Records)


Frozen Orange Juice  performed by Peter Sarstedt  1969
Recommended by john_l [profile]

Best known for "Where Do You Go To My Lovely", which is a sad French or Italian-sounding song, the followup "Frozen Orange Juice" is a delightfully happy Spanish-sounding song, i.e. the exact opposite (lyrics of both songs reference the European nations listed above). It lopes along in 6/8 time with orchestral flourishes galore, particularly on strings, although horns, woodwinds and harp are also evident. Brilliant!


available on CD - Update


Giro  performed by Elis Regina  1969
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

The MPB goddess breaks free from her previous samba-jazz orientation towards a more pop vibe in keeping with the Age Of Aquarius, via a short-n-sweet Adolfo-Gaspar composition.

from Elis, Como & Porque, available on CD



Gods Cop  performed by The happy Mondays   1990
Recommended by geezer [profile]

This one track alone contains all the swagger and danger that made The Mondays musics public enemy number one ,a bunch of bad boy Mancs led by two brothers years before that other bunch of bad boy Mancs led by two brothers ,rockin and funky and joyous .

from Thrill Pills and bellyaches
available on CD - Thrills PIlls and Bellyaches


good music  performed by the roots  1993
Recommended by ricoeva27 [profile]

jazz-like instrumentals. I like it because it's laid back, yet upbeat. Fun, yet fluid lyrics

from organix


Groovin With Mr. Bloe  performed by Mr. Bloe  1970
Recommended by tempted [profile]

With the likes of Buzzsaw by The Turtles and Dance With The Devil by Cozy Powell, Groovin' With Mr. Bloe is one of my favourite late 60's-early 70's groovy "novelty" pop instrumentals.
Beginning with a tight drum beat that carries on throughout the song and followed by one of the fattest basslines ever, this is a real dancefloor gem for hip crowds. Best of all is the harmonica lead by Mr. Bloe himself, a session musician by the name of Harry Pitch. Groovin'...became a surprise top ten hit but the best credit to the song is that it allegedly still enjoys club play by Richard Searling, the legendary northern soul deejay.

from Groovin' With Mr. Bloe (DJM)



  n-jeff: I take the opportunity to play it out whenever I can, it's a belter of a record, and still relatively easy to find in UK charity shops. Good choice!
hand grenade  performed by team dresch
Recommended by licoricewhipped [profile]

happy and sweet.




happy go lucky me  performed by paul evans  1960
Recommended by olli [profile]

probably the most uplifting song ever recorded. very basic and simple, but genuinely endearing. paul evans has a nice laugh, the boyish quality of it really makes the song for me.
the song was sort of a theme song for john waters` film "pecker", by the way.




Happy Together  performed by Hugo Montenegro  1969
Recommended by konsu [profile]

I can't believe how great this is! Really part of Hugo's best period, when he was using some of his best players, and best ideas! The track starts out with this plunky Carol Kaye like bass line, alongside funky harpsichord, and the vocal begins in his typical "choral" style. Really faithful to the turtles original, with all the twists and turns of his crazy arrangements. Check out the vocal effect on the chorus, where he runs the tracks through a Leslie speaker! Crazy stuff.

from Good Vibrations, available on CD


Happy, Happy, Joy, Joy  performed by Wax  1995
Recommended by malpt [profile]

I love Ren and Stimpy. This is an killer version of the song from my favorite episode. (Stimpy's Invention) My sister and I danced along when that episode aired.
Can you smell the nostalgia?

Though, the whole album (Saturday Morning Cartoons' Greatest Hits) rocks.


available on CD - Saturday Morning Cartoons' Greatest Hits (Mca)


Hate Me  performed by Blue October  2006
Recommended by OliviaOctober [profile]

Just compleatly filled with strong emotion and absolute dominating power...

from Foiled


Heroes And Villains Pt. 1  performed by The Beach Boys  1967
Recommended by jespis [profile]

from SMILEY SMILE
available on CD - SMILEY SMILE/WILD HONEY


Hobart Paving  performed by St Etienne  1993
Recommended by geezer [profile]

A lesson in how to make despair sound appealing and seductive. An under played female vocal relays the vision of an unhappy soul to surreal lyrics and lush orchestration and all distilled and inspired into the name of a building firm seen on the side of a van "Hobart Paving" ,a real building firm still in existence .
Reminiscent of Brian Wilson and The Zombies at their most reflective and a french horn solo that will give you a lump in the throat .

from the single Hobart Paving
available on CD - Smash The System



  delicado: Alright geezer? Yes - a really lovely track. It took me several years to be converted to the band but I'm hooked now.
  psansom: Hi - I have been seeking the Hobart Paving track, specifically as you mention, the one with the lovely french horn solo. I bought the St Etienne \"So Tough\" CD but the version of Hobart Paving on that has a different solo, a really wishy washy harmonica type event. Are you able to let me know please on what specific St Etienne CD is that best version of Hobart Paving with that french horn solo? Many thanks - Peter (email: [email protected])
hung up  performed by madonna  2005
Recommended by metrino [profile]

It makes me want to dance. The instrumentation is pretty simple, but it works.

from Confessions on a dance floor



  delicado: the instrumentation is by abba! I have nothing against madonna, but I was surprised when I found out this track was by her.
  metrino: i know it's from abba, but overall it's fairly repetitive.
  nighteye: I wonder how much they had to pay to clear that sample. It's from "Gimme Gimme Gimme" by Abba, a classic hit from the late 70s. And yeah, I'm from Sweden so I 'oughta know.
  delicado: I guess all I was saying here is that it seems bizarre to me that someone who has produced as many great songs as Madonna should feel the need to take a riff from a really famous song and do a kind of 'la la la ' over the top of it. To anyone who is familiar with 'Gimme gimme gimme', the song surely sounds a bit ridiculous? I have absolutely nothing against sampling, but when it's sampling from SUCH a famous song I just find it a bit distracting. A few years ago Danni Minogue did a song that was just like this except the song it sampled was Madonna's 'Into the Groove'. I thought that was pretty ridiculous as well! But like you say Metrino, it makes you wanna dance, which is totally cool and I guess answers my question about why she did it.
  Mike: I actually don't mind what Madonna and her producers have done with this song, which is to take the most interesting elements from the Abba song, repeat them, and overlay them with a catchy melody of (I presume) her/their own. The long opening with the filtering-in works, too. I think I find it less than bizarre as to my mind, most of Madonna's better records rely particularly heavily on writing input from people other than herself...Mirwais, Orbit, and Rogers come to mind.
I decided - Pt. 1  performed by Solange knowles  2007
Recommended by trixlation [profile]

its a soulmusic track with a little bit of pop.
The melodie makes you happy, and that is why i like it so much!!
The hole new album "Sol-Angel And The Hadley St. Dreams" is very good and speciall.

from Sol-Angel And The Hadley St. Dreams, available on CD


i don't want another man  performed by the feminine complex  1969
Recommended by e [profile]

this a nice song, slightly out of character to the rest of the album ,"Livin' Love"(which is more traditionally sixties pop) this has a big energetic beat and a rousing chorus. perhaps not the most sophisticated composition in the world, but it makes me happy anyway...


available on CD - livin' love (teenbeat)



If We Can Land a Man on the Moon Surely I Can Win Your Heart  performed by Beulah  1999
Recommended by tman555 [profile]

Just a catchy song. It's from the Bay Area indie scene.
It starts off as sort of a love song, but turns into a conversation with the listener.

from When Your Heartstrings Break (Sugar Free Records)
available on CD - Yes (Yes)


Junk of the Heart (Happy)  performed by The Kooks
Recommended by lhirsch92 [profile]




Just Allow  performed by Fishbone
Recommended by Gimpsters [profile]

This song has always grabbed me. The whole album (The Psychotic Friends Nuttwerx) is a favorite of mine, but this is my favorite track.
The thing that gets me every time is the harmonies sung over the guitar solo in the bridge.

from The Psychotic Friends Nuttwerx, available on CD


Just In Time  performed by Blossom Dearie  1959
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Blossom bounces her way thru this happy song about perfect love that has arrived just at the moment the end of the rope had been reached. She sings with a sense of joy and relief and you can't help but feel that things are going to be better going forward. Blossom's years of cabaret performing have given her a perfect piano playing style that accompanies her voice to a perfect fit. Kudos to Verve for dusting off this great recording, shining it up and putting out in a deluxe CD package!!

from Blossom Dearie Sings Comden and Green, available on CD


Keep Yourself Alive  performed by Queen  1973
Recommended by Ozmala [profile]

The first song on their first CD, and a great one it is. It's hard to listen to it without feeling happy and … energized. And not in a superficial way, either. It's just so happy, and so powerful, and SO HAPPY. Honestly *happy*, too, not just cheerful. It's wonderful.

from Queen (Hollywood Records)


King of the Rodeo  performed by The Bamboos feat. Megan Washington  2008
Recommended by Festy [profile]

This is a cover of the Kings of Leon song done by a band from my hometown (Melbourne, Aus) who are riding the funk, soul revival (a la Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings). I knew this version before hearing the Kings of Leon version and much prefer it. When I've played it to those who know the Kings of Leon version, a few of them haven't liked this version. It's uplifting, funky, and a 'feel good' version. I don't think the lyrics are great, but vocals are handled well by Megan Washington. Let the good times roll!

from Side-Stepper, available on CD



Kortisin  performed by Plaid  1997
Recommended by Mr Tom [profile]

A lovely triptych. Plaid keep their trademark odd noises (creaking doors and weird duck quacks in this track) more in check than usual, and the result's a little more conventional than a lot of their work, but it's also very pretty. It's tightly structured, with a happy little introduction followed by three sections marked by their different, though related, warm basslines. Each has a gentle melody of its own, and between each there's an interesting break. Warm, sophisticated, and full of beauty.

from Not For Threes (Warp)



Landslide  performed by The Smashing Pumpkins  1994
Recommended by Archipelago [profile]

Okay so it's a cover song. Fleetwood Mac re-released it a few years ago when the original members get back together. Then there was the recent popularity of the Dixie Chicks version. Now, I will admit that it is tough to beat the original version.

But this one's *real* close.

This song came out of left field. From a group whose first work was primarily long, drawn-out, sometimes cacophonous chords, this song was like a splash of cold water in the face. The CD itself is a B-sides compilation that fits like a "lost chapter" to the Pumpkins early work.

Keep in mind; this is not a happy song. It was not supposed to be. That's why Billy Corgan's version stands well above the Dixie Chicks’ version, His voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar is able is capture the abject heartache of the song’s words and rhythm.

Which makes it a great cover song.


available on CD - Pisces Iscariot (Virgin Records)


Last Summer  performed by Lostprophets  2004
Recommended by izumi [profile]

I love music that can make you visualize in your mind what the song is trying to convey. This is one of those songs that always makes me feel nostalgic and wistful whenever I hear it - nostalgic not because it's a song from my childhood but because it talks about happy times gone by. When I hear it, I can picture in my mind a group of friends driving in a car through their hometown with an orange sunset in the sky. This is a song about happy memories which is something that everybody can relate to.

The instrumentals are nice too. I like how the guitar flares up at the chorus, and the steady beat of the drum, and how the singer's voice seems to echo throughout the song even after he's sung a word. This song might not seem very special, but it's amazing to listen to!

from Start Something (Visible Noise TORMENT32)


Les Girls  performed by Dan Terry Orchestra & Chorus  1969
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Man! You really have to get up early in the morning to find tracks like this. LA big band funk, banks of brass, electric bass throbbing away, and the hard hitting Jimmy Gordon on drums! But the best part is the vocals, done it a way that makes it sound like an Odeon recording from late 60's Brazil!... Stunning. The rest of the LP is no slouch either though, and reminds me a lot of Quincy's late 60's work and the Project 3 era Enoch Light stuff.

Highly recommended to lounge DJ's and fans of mod rarities.


from Lonely Place (Happy Tiger MT 1005)



Little Bit  performed by Lykke Li
Recommended by tied.to.a.melody [profile]

This song has a very interesting sound using steal drums among other things to create a steady and bright beat. The artist's voice is beautiful and light, combinig perfectly with the song's meaning and the instrumental parts.




Look After You  performed by The Fray
Recommended by TheTromboneNinja [profile]

I love this song because it is so romantic, sweet, and perfect. There is Isaac Slade on vocals, along with back vocalist Joe King (<3). There's a piano, cello, and drumset. It's a beautiful song, happy and passionate, perfect to sing along to, Isaac has a great voice, and lyrics are beautiful.

from How to Save a Life (Epic)


Look Away  performed by Eternity’s Children
Recommended by Mr. E [profile]

First of all let me say that I have been violently blindsided by this group! ...they very quickly entered my favorite 60's pop group stratosphere and have not budged from my rotation for months now. I first got "From you unto us", the singles collection which is good for what it is, but I think the best introduction to the band is the albums themselves, original ordering of songs in this case is vital to the listening experience.
I liked the singles collection OK, but my first impression was muted and okish until I noticed a couple songs later on sticking in my head for hours... picked up the first album on CD (Wondering the whole time if I should be doing this as I have most of the tracks on the comp, CD right? I like the original ordering BEST! Glad I did, no regrets at all...) and have played little else for some time...

I just got Timeless and I'm choosing one off their second album because the first album is one of the few immaculate pop albums of all time IMO and choices there are easy favorites... the second album seems to be less popular, but there are some serious gems here too and It's also a stone cold favorite...

I am choosing Look Away because I think the most distinctive sonic quality of Eternity's Children are these wonderful uplifting bouncy organ driven songs... ET have several tracks that deliver a great song, beautiful and original atmospheric production, great performances in a deeply satisfying way that is rare... This song is pure pop bliss from the opening notes to the end. I honestly can't think of a better compliment than that this song makes me glad to be alive.

For those of you who played in the band and stumble across this:
From the bottom of my heart THANK YOU!

from Timeless
available on CD - Y (Rev-Ola)



  Mr. E: Eternity's Children. Somehow the name got messed up and I can't edit it so I'm posting this correct spelling to help the search engine.....
  artlongjr: Eternity's Children are a fantastic group...I remember when I first heard "Mrs. Bluebird" and was blown away. That was around 1985 and just last year I picked up their singles collection on CD. Thanks for recommending their individual albums, I definitely want to check them out.
  Mr. E: I can't recommend the first album highly enough ... it's a pop masterpiece... My introduction to ET was through that singles package, which is good enough for what it is, but trusty me the first album really needs to be heard in the original order with all the tracks.
  scatdaddy2002: I had the great experience of working with Mike "the Kid", Linda, and Charlie. you oughta hear linda do 5th Dimension live ot Mike kick it with a keyboard. First worked with some of them in memphis with Tommy Cogsbill. Linda was present-we were friends socially in '69 and then again with Mike, Charlie, drummer Johnny Thomasie from N.O.,sometime later. I can't remember the Guitar player's name-maybe Norman or something like that. We were doing the "B" side to a single of mine at Robin Hood Bryan's studio. All of us lived in Baton Rouge at the time and worked respectively for Crocked Fox Prod.(but this session was maybe a solo adventure with co-member of the production team, Guy Bellello [[R.I.P.]}since only he was present-who knows.) The "A" side was done at one of my sessions at American Studios, Memphis and featured the Memphis Horns, the Sweet Inpirations as female back ups, Cimmaron as writer/male harmonies. Elvis had been there the week before (recorded In the Ghetto, I think)and Neil Diamond was due the following week there in Memphis. I felt like such a nobody with life-sized pics of Elvis everywhere and everybody making their comparisons of Alex from the "Boxtops" and me. Pinning a VU meter the same way Alex did was not exactly the feedback I was looking for. Anyway, I guess I am saying we spent a little time together, I miss listening to and working with them. If anyone hears from them, it would be great to STS again. I started back playing professionally a couple of years ago and still consider them the gold standard in terms of harmony and think that the Hammond B3 has "the Kid's" name on it. As an update, Guy died an untimely death about 10 years ago and I only wish I could find Bubba Anthony if living, a sometimes ET drummer and any of that crowd. Kindest regards, Scatdaddy2002
lost summer love  performed by lorraine silver  196x
Recommended by olli [profile]

60's piece of female vocals wall-of-sound power pop.
it's got handclaps, it's got tambourine, it's catchy as hell. it's just the wrong side of kitch.
I love it.


available on CD - casino classics



Love so fine  performed by Roger Nichols and the Small Circle of Friends  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

It's hard not to smile when you hear this lovely, rousing late 60s number. Roger Nichols is the composer (along with Paul Williams) of many late 60s and 70s hits for, amongst others, The Carpenters. He wrote this song with 'Pet Sounds' lyricist Tony Asher, and they created a beautiful combination of sunny soft pop sounds (handclaps, brass, group harmonies) and pleasing, happy words. Musically, it is superior and extra-catchy, with nice Bacharach-esque touches and great instrumentation. The lead vocal also deserves a mention for sounding almost supernaturally brilliant (far better than it sounds in the sound sample). The singer is Melinda Macleod; her voice is lovely anyway, but here it sounds as if 3 perfect takes have been somehow overlaid on top of each other to produce an incredibly rich, soothing effect. It's over quickly - in just over two minutes. At which point I normally listen to it again a few times.

from Roger Nichols and the Small Circle of Friends (A&M)
available on CD - Complete (Polydor Japan)




  PappaWheelie: I couldn't agree more. This is the epitome of what Pizzicato Five were trying to recreate in the early 90's.
  klatu: I didn't realize someone had picked this one already! I spelled it "&" instead of "and". Excellent choice!
Lover I Don’t Have to Love  performed by Bright Eyes
Recommended by 37piecesflair [profile]

Words can't express how much I love this song. I go through stages with it..sometimes it makes me cry, sometimes it makes me happy, sometimes it makes me wistful. Just an all-around favorite.




magic and ecstacy  performed by Ennio Morricone  197x
Recommended by olli [profile]

In a Morricone mood today...just a quickie.
From the soundtrack of The Exorcist 2, this insane little ditty sounds like a fifty-fifty mix of the Batman theme and library music "black metal", with added harpsichord and italian-style wordless screaming. There's also a middle eastern thing going on in there, and the whole ting is just madly energetic.
This song makes me happy in ways it probably wasn't supposed to.


available on CD - the exorcist 2:the heretic.



Marry Me  performed by Train  2009
Recommended by kaketaca [profile]

I love the heartfelt lyrics, pretty guitar,

from Save Me San Francisco


Meet Me At The Love-In  performed by Love Generation  1967
Recommended by masayo [profile]

Everytime I listen to their songs, I feel something pressing on my chest. Ahh, I can't express my feeling very well... The boys and girls mixed choirs on fantastic melodies always make me happy. I love " Meet Me At The Love In" so much, especially whisper on their choirs, horn on the bridge, etc. They were actually a follower of The Mamas & The Papas but their tunes are more cheerful and energetic!

from The Love Generation (Imperial 12351)



Miss Broadway  performed by Belle Epoque  1977
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Belle Epoque (or La Belle Epoque as they were billed in the UK, presumably to further Francophy them) get shoved in that black hole of Eurodisco, based on the evidence of their perky 1977 cover of Black Is Black. Were I not a Eurodisco weirdo who is more than happy to delve into the careers of various sequin-chested nobodies I would never have learned the truth.

This song is as glam-rock as they come. The sound of Miss Broadway is that of a female Noddy Holder, complete with that talking-over-a-hairdryer voice. The orchestration is crunching and stomps all over the disco beat holding it all together.

In short: Silver Convention's older sisters who secretly like Wanda Jackson.

from the single Miss Broadway (Carrere S-54021)




  umbrellasfollowrain: This song fast became the song of my summer nights. I play it to preen to in front of the mirror, before I step out for the night, then hum it as I my feet step out the door and into the night and the streets unspool before me. See, how lyrical the song makes me?! Belle Epoque is ferocious. Jeanette, I think you're so cool. Thanks for bringing dis track to my attention. You always have my attention.
Mother we just can't get enough  performed by New Radicals  1998
Recommended by LateBirdsInMay [profile]

A really really great pop song by dint of the fact it just refuses any categorisation other than 'Ace'. But I'd better give it a go. 'Mother' is a very nineties mix of genres; Gospel-ey piano, driving pop beat, terrible vocals, and great pop lyrics that soars, taking in scat, madchester, falsetto and more before exhausting itself - I can't think of any other song that could conceivably have worked as a blueprint for 90's pop - if we'd worked from this instead of 'Baby one more time' things could have been much different. Re. the song - two things then - 1. it's a fantastically catchy 'choon' with guts and attitude, 2. it's a bit revolutionary, as all good pop should be.

from Maybe you've been Brainwashed Too



Mrs. Bluebird  performed by Eternity’s Children  1967
Recommended by tempted [profile]

A fabulous acid-pop masterpiece featuring one of the most intriguing intros in pop history. Everything I love about psychedelic pop made in the US in the late 6t's comes together in Mrs. Bluebird: the softly mythical, escapist feeling that the harmony and orchestration bring into this music. I frequently use it as a getaway. I think indulging in this music is not sad but it shows you've got the means to make you happy. This song is a Curt Boettcher (The Millennium, Sagittarius) production that cannot have been made while under the influence of drugs!!

from Eternity's Children (Tower)
available on CD - Best of Eternity's Children




  493440: I appreciate the nice comments about "Mrs Bluebird." My name is Bruce Blackman and I wrote Mrs Bluebird. I was the founder of Eternity's Children in 1966. We did not survive because of incredibly bad management. Our two managers had the middle names of "Karl" and "Marion." After I left the group, they tried to cheat me (unsuccessfuly) out of any credit. A few years after Eternity's Children I formed my group Starbuck and we scored a top 3 with my song "Moonlight Feels Right." Three of the members of Eternity's Children were with me in Starbuck.
  john_l: I agree, this is a wonderful song! The organ keeps the beat (after the dreamy intro), the harmonies are great and there's that heavy psychedelic guitar solo in the bridge, although I believe that was edited out of a 45 or radio edit version.
  royjudywhi: In response to Bruce Blackman's comments under response 493440, he is absolutely correct about his penning of Mrs Bluebird. It was a great song off a great album. He is a talented songwriter but a lousey historian. The group was formed by Roy Whittaker when he was at Delta State College in Cleveland Mississippi. Bruce was an important part of the group but failed to survive the rigors of bad management. Bruce and Johnny Walker were the only members of Starbuck who were part of the original Eternity's Children group.
  tbrown: I too am a long time Eternity's Children fan. Grew up in Biloxi, played in a local band in high school. Used to go hear the Children at the Biloxi Hotel and at the Vapors in about 1967. Along with Little David and the Giants, they were the hottest groups around at the time....great memories. I see messages here by Bruce, and it looks like Roy maybe, and also saw one from Charlie Ross. Would love to hear from any of you guys just to find out what you are all up to these days.
  jwalker: Thought you Eternity's Children fans might like an update on another member. Johnny Walker played lead guitar and I believe was the lead vocalist on "Mrs Bluebird". He was also a member of Starbuck with Bruce Blackman later. Johnny's my brother and anybody that wants to contact him may do so through me. He lives 2 miles from here and has no internet access but I'm sure he'd like to hear from anybody out there that remembers Eternity's Children so please feel free to post and date your messages and we'll see that he gets them. Oh, by the way, Charlie Ross, another original member of the Children, is and has been for many years a founding member and the bass player/lead vocalist for the Krackerjacks, a kick-ass band in Greenville, Mississippi, the hometown of Johnny, Charlie and Bruce Blackman. My husband was also their keyboard player for several years.
  luna: For jwalker: Where in the world are you two these days? How's Johnny doin? I'm the other k-board player. Tell Johnny DDD said hello, also hello to your husband.
  trucol: For jwalker: Thanks for the compliment about the KrackerJacks. I have been the drummer since about 1983. Tell Johnny that T.C. said hello. He's one of most incredible guitar players I have ever heard. I first met him in P'cola. He was with another kick-ass band, Lazy Day.
  tempted: Hey guys, have you realized that there's a new 'Children "Lost Sessions" record out on Gear Fab Recs. Congrats!
  tempted: To John_I: the guitar solo remains there on the single version, too. It still gives me shivers.
  musicmars: Hey Bruce, it's an honor to post on a board that you read. I've loved Starbuck since I was 12 or 13. Moonlight Feels Right really is one of the best pop songs of the 70's. All three albums were great. I still have to find the Korona album. Anyway, Mrs. Bluebird, what a song. One of the best pop songs of the 60's. I first heard the remake a few years back from the UK? studio band Sunshine Day. It was a great remake but then my psychedelic record collecting led me to Eternity's Children and their version is even better. I only recently realized that it is the same Bruce Blackman that was in both bands. I'd love to hear some new music from you Bruce.
  luna: For tbrown: I don't you, but I was in Substantial Evidence in the late 60's on the coast.Do you know where Mark Simon,Pat Gill,Ray Zoler,Ted Tearse,Artie Desporte or any of these guys may be? Any info appreciated.
  jscarbo4: Does anybody have pictures of the entire Eternity's Children group? It was always irritating that only four of them were used on the album cover. I'd also like some update info on Roy Whitaker if anyone knows..........Also, does anyone know if Bruce Blackman ever recorded "For Crying Out Loud"? I heard him do it live at Dock-of-the-Bay, and was knocked out by it. Would love to have the recording if it's available.
  jscarbo4: Hey Luna, I wasn't aware of a 6th member of Substantial Evidence...tell me more so that I can add to my site: http://www.artist-murals.com/images/Pictures/Joel_Scarborough/Ray_zoller.htm
  tbrown: to Luna: Drop me an email at [email protected] and I will tell you who I am. WE probably know each other if you were with Substantial Evidence.
  ThomasInPlano: To Charlie Ross: During late '66 and '67 sessions at The Vapors me and some of my Biloxi USAF buddies used to chat with you between sessions talking music and it's direction. I was from Houston so we talked a lot about the Thirteenth Floor Elevators. At the time I didn't know much about acid so we talked like it was a pretty cool thing. I hope that didn't create any problems for you. I later got a tape of one of your reel-to-reel amateur recordings made at The Vapors. Later I was sent to Las Vegas ('67)and then Vietnam('68) so I lost track of how you guys were doing until I came back and was stationed north of Memphis. In '69 Eternity's Children did a TV performance in Memphis and I went to catch that performance on Saturday, only to find that it was taped earlier. I so much wanted to re-establish contact with you and catch up on what had been happening to you while I was away. Well, that was all for not but I hope maybe this will tell you how much your music that we knew back in late '66 and early '67 as Eternity's Children meant to us. Not everyone makes it to the very top, but it doesn't mean that they didn't have a wonderful effect on peoples memories. Your wonderful covers of so many types of music and your great originals will always remain in many peoples hearts. Someday I hope to get to chat with you by phone or email as we did at The Vapors Lounge. Mostly I remember you and Johnny Walker (who was such an inspiration on guitar) and Roy Whittaker. I hope that all of you are doing well as we have all had so many years go by and time starts to take it's toll on the body. Best regards, Thomas
  JKing2: I too am a big fan. I followed the band from Biloxi to Baton Rouge. Why no mention of Linda Lawley? Does anyone know what happened to her and/or her career?
  Roy5: I'm glad so many people remember Mrs Bluebird. I haven't even heard the song since 1968, when it charted, but I haven't forgotten it. I remember staying up one night waiting for our local station to play it. Finally it did--I think about 2:00 in the morning. But it was worth the wait. And I saw them perform on It's Happening, the summer replacement rock show from '68 hosted by Mark Lindsay and Paul Revere. Everything about the song is top of the line. Especially the organ, guitar and the vocal harmonies.
  JohnB: I've been a fan of Eternity's Children since the late 60's when they played the Vapors. Still have an original LP of theirs. God where have the years gone- that was music, and why they didn't go right to the top, well somebody made a big mistake not publicizing them properly. And where is Linda Lawley? Beautiful voice and a beautiful girl.
  dpinsd: In the summer of '68 I had just graduated and was leaving the country during the Vietnam War. I remember Mrs Bluebird by Eternities Children as being the last song I heard in San Diego before I left for New England then on to Portugal. I remember hearing this great song when I was in Rhode Island. I never forgot it. Apparently it is no longer available. I checked on Napster and it is not there either. I really want this song in my music library. It was good to read other comments from others that were also touched by this song that unfortunately did not go high on the charts. Dan in San Diego
  txsdrmr: To all, I grew up in greenville, MS in the 60's and went to Greenville High School with Charlie Ross, Bruce Blackmon and Johnny Walker. Before they hit the big time in the late 60's and 70's they were in some very tight group groups and played gigs in the MS delta almost every weekend. Charlie's original group was the Phantoms while Johnny and Bruce were in the Lancers. Another Greenville native to make the big time was James "Bud" Cockrell, founder of the San Francisco group, Pablo Cruise. If you count Joe Frank Carolla of Hamilton, Joe Fank & Reynolds who was from Leland, MS just 7 miles away, the Delta produced some really great talent. Those of us lucky enough to be there enjoyed some fine music. I've been fans of all these guys ever since and have collected all their 12" vinyls I could find. I'm in Houston, Texas now but still listen to Eternity's Chidren, Starbudk and H,JF, & R to take me back to those great days. -pope-
  raymar: My friends and I used to see Eternity's Children at a club called Jamie's in New Orleans every Wednesday night in 1967-68. We idolized this band and, of course, we were in love with Linda Lawley. It's so great to see that others remeber this group as weel.
  mac: My name is Mike McClain and I played organ with Eternity's Children right after Bruce Blackman left the group. We recorded lots of good music but never really got the push from Tower Records that we needed. I was thrilled when all our stuff that was in the can was released in that album from Europe. It was fun to hear all the old songs again. Wish I knew how to get in touch with Linda. Anyone know?Hey Charlie, Johnny,and Roy,as well as Bo Wagner the great vibe/marimba man that also played on Moonlight Feels Right...(he could also tap dance like crazy..no kidding)What fun those days were..
  luna: I was in substantial evidence briefly in the summer of 1969, after Ted T. quit and went with Flower Power(think that was the name of the group).I sang lead, before the hurricane destroyed everything.Wonderful summer. I now play and sing in the Krackerjacks.
  luna: A few more facts: I've been in touch with Ray Zoller, he's in Colorado. Also, Charlie Ross is our bassist in the KJ's. There was aband in '68' at the Fiesta, called The Omen; the group consisted of;Bruce Blackman on keyboards,Bud Cockrell on bass, Roy Whitaker on drums, Bo Wagner on vibes and percussion,a guy named(believe it or not)David Jones sang lead(should of been me Bruce dammit!),and I think Julie Landry may have been the female vocalist.Lots of known people in lots of groups in those days!I was also in the Lancers' latter days(middle 60's)Ray Z. is doin well.Anyway, just some tid-bits.
  cks6: Does anyone know where I can buy a copy of the Krackerjack's album entilted "Rockin' in the Delta"? Please contact me at [email protected] if you have any information. Thanks!!
  coochiekisser: The band was great. Sista Linda Lawleys rendetion of Hush may be one of the best versions since Billy Joe Royal
  h2obug: jwalker: Were you at anytime ever referred to a 'Fuzzy Walker'? or do you know who may have been? I have a Gibson Custom guitar with a name plate embossed "Fuzzy Walker". Trying to find out who actually owed this guitar before me. email me at [email protected] Thanks P.S. I was a teenager when 'Moonlight Feels Right' hit the air. I seen the group in concert at Six Flags in St. Louis, MO and had photo's with the band members. I loved that song.
  Outlaw: Some Substantial Evidence info from the mouth of Artie Desporte... of the first (5) original band members, Ted Tearse was the first to leave the band. David Dodd took his place as the singer. David was discovered by Substantial Evidence while he was preforming at a club called the Fiesta. The band members approached David and offered him a spot in their band and he accepted. According to Artie, David was with the Band for about 5 or 6 months and for whatever reasons he left the band, and Ted Tearse rejoined. Substantial Evidence eventually added a 10 piece horn section and became known as Substantial Evidence Showband. They had quite a following but none as strange as 4 girls that called themselves " The Fearsome Foursome. " These girls kept journals on all the members of Substantial Evidence. Somehow they knew everywhere they went, what time they arrived and left. Anyway, about the time the Vietnam War broke out, the band members started to come and go. Eventually the band split up and everyone went their seperate ways. The City of Biloxi offered to pay all expenses to have the Band reunite and play at the Gulf Coast Coliseum for a charity event. The offer was extended by Gerald Blessey who also was our Mayor at the time and who played in a band called The Rocking (Rock'n?) Rebels. By this time everyone had their own lives, family and children. The reunion never took place.
  luna: For Outlaw: What's new putty kat? That's for Artie, if you're not him. The reason I used David as my first name was because they already had a guy named Doug! Great memories, great group!
  luna: Hey Artie; Do you remember when we took a train from Stamford Connecticut to Boston? We played in Rhode Island at a club called "The Edge".Anyway, I met a guy in the Army that heard us there.He lives in NJ.The reason I got out of SE was because my draft # was 3!!!(and big daddy Brad, aka Herchel, didn't like my rebellious ways)! The KJ's will be down that way probably this summer, and I'll give you a call.Did Pat and Carol get married??? She has a bunch of pictures I'd love to see.OutLaw, if you're not Artie, please pass this along to him. Thankx
  jumphigher: hi this is to luna pat gill from substatial evidence still lives on the coast and is not married to carol newman and he still owns a cigar shop in the mall.
  luna: for ck6;We did a double cd for our reunion last yr. and "Rockin In The Delta" was included on it along with some other songs from over the yrs. If you go to thekrackerjacks.com, you can contact us for info. Also our last cd "Timeless" is available.
  luna: For jumphigher: What is the name of your dad's store in the mall, and which mall is it in. I'll call him. Tell him I am David from '69. He'll know me. Thanks
  Outlaw1: Luna, Been a while since visiting this site. Forgot my PW and changed email Address. Had to change my username a bit. I am Artie's sista'-n- law. Now that he has a computer, I am sending him this site. Maybe he will stop by and you can talk over old times.
  luna: For Outlaw1: FINALLY, Im on the right trail to some S.E. players. Thank you for revealing yourself. If you see or know where Mark and Pat can be reached, please let me know. I've been in touch with Ray....Thankx--Luna(David)
  mike mcgann: Bruce...I played Mrs. Bluebird over and over at WLOX in Biloxi when I broke into radio in 1968. Saw the group at The Vapors one night that summer...Often wondered what happened to you, then Starbuck hit...I'm about to play 'Moonlight" on the air in a few minutes at WJAS (on 3-7PM) in Pittsburgh, PA. Thanks for the tunes and best of luck Mike
  Denny: Tower Records sure had an amazing roster in its six year existence and Eternity's Children was one of its hottest prospects! As I am writing this, I am listening to side 2 of the LP. "Mrs. Bluebird" has been a favorite of mine since I was a kid growing up in the 70's. With its unique mixture of mellow and upbeat, along with a stun gun guitar solo for the bridge, it should have gone much higher than its #69 peak on Billboard; at least it made the Top 40 on KQV Radio's survey from my hometown of Pittsburgh. I never heard it on radio itself, but if I ever get my own radio show, I guarantee that Eternity's Children will be among my playlist (none of that "same 50 oldies" stuff here). I'd sure love to see some of EC's televison appearances also, particularly "American Bandstand" and "Happening". Perhaps a DVD could be in the works in the future. And like many, I'd also like to know what has become of the lovely Linda Lawley.
  bwagner: bwagner: My name is Bo Wagner member of Eternity's Children and Starbuck. First of all I would love to thank all of our fans for all of their support and wonderful comments over the years. I know all of the band members appreciate it very much. I have been out of contact with everyone (all the band members for a long time)except for Bruce Blackman. We always seem to semi keep in touch. I send best wishes to all of the band members: Johnny, Linda, Charlie, Roy, Bud, Julie, Davie, and one that is never mentioned Bobby Dominquez (the best man at my wedding), all the other Starbuck members and especially Mike Kidd McClain. Mike I have been trying to find you for years. Would love to hear from you as well as all the other members if any of you would like to reconnect. I have read many versions over the years of who was in the band and how things happen and I feel there has been some mistakes. I would like to give my version. This will have to be lengthy, so please excuse the long story in advance. I don't know how else to do it.I was a LA studio musician and former drummer with the Fifth Dimension and currently a member of Lewis and Clark Expedetion with Michael Martin Murphy when I was hired to play drums, vibes, marimba and percussion for the 2nd Eternity's Children album "Timeless" who I was a big fan of. Having been with the Fifth Dimension I truly appreciated their fine vocals and great music. I played drums on every song on the "Timeless" album and added vibes and marimba on many of the songs. The instruments I played fit well with the Children's songs and I truly loved playing with them and we really took to each other.I had always wanted to feature vibes and marimba within a rock format and it worked well with the Children. Roy had left the band and the group asked me to join them. So I left Lewis and Clark and joined the Children. We added another Mississippi musician Bobby Dominquez to play drums so I could play vibes etc. Bruce and Johnny had left the band earlier and I sort of took the place of a guitar player since they had not replaced Johnny. (How can you ever replace Johnny Walker!!!)I sold everything (my car, home, everything ) and moved to Baton Rouge, LA and we all lived in one apartment. We constantly played gigs all over Louisana, Mississippi in every little town there was and I got very familar with the south very quickly and fell in love with the whole southern lifestlye and music scene. It has been written on sites like this over and over again and on our album, CD sleeves that I wasn't a member of the Children, only a studio player. I don't get that. I move to the south, lived with the band, practiced everyday and performed at every gig, tour, TV show as a full fledge member for quite awhile (almost a year), how can I not be considered a member. No I was not part of the original group but I certainly was a member from the beginning of the 2nd album. I was very happy playing with them and proud to be a member and would like to be considered one. I know if you ask Johnny, Bruce, Mike McClain, Bobby, Charlie or Linda they will tell you I was a full fledge member. I'm not sure who is writing the info on the group but my picture is on the front of the "Timeless" album. That should speak for itself. During this time I had met Bruce and Johnny and became good friends. Because of the bad management that had cause Bruce and Johnny to quit, Bobby Dominquez and I quit too. At first everyone was going to quit but back out and Johnny, Bruce and I decided to form our own version of the group and Roy rejoined us on drums at this time too. Bobby joined another group and worked across the street at the Vapors and we added Bud Cockrell and Julie and started working as the Omen at the Fiesta in Biloxi. We were a carbon copy of the original group. I brought in a friend of mine from LA who was a great Canadian singer, Davie Jones, and we had one hell of a good group. We worked very hard to develope new original songs and I feel we came up with really great material. We moved to Pensacola, FL to work with the producer Papa Don and one by one the other members left the original group and joined us. Finally everyone was there and we had double everything and was trying to work out who was going to do what. We were about to sign a new record deal and the bad managers showed up with fake contracts and prevented us from gettint a new deal and we had to dispand. So a year or less went by and Bud Cockrell called me and wanted to get back together and we did and tried to put a group together in Texas. We soon added Bruce to the group but it didn't quite work out so Bruce and I went back to Biloxi and reformed another group with Johnny Walker, Bob Gauthier and Tommy Allred. It lasted for awhile but again didn't gel for what we were really looking for. Again we separated and another year or so past and again Bruce, Johnny and I got back together (now in Atlanta, GA) and formed "Mississippi" and recorded an album in Nashville with Gary Paxton the producer of the Children's "Timeless" album. A great group but to many lead male vocalist. Couldn't really find our own sound. So Johnny went back to Florida and Bruce and I joined up with Elgin Wells,a guitar player and lead singer, a bass player and once again Bobby Dominquez on drums and the first "Starbuck" was formed. It never did click at all. So we broke up again and I went to Disneyworld. Couldn't handle that gig so came back to Atlanta which is where we had formed "Mississippi" and "Starbuck", and rejoined up with Elgin, keyboard player Sloan Hayes, drummer Brian and added bass player Jimmy Cobb. Very soon I was playing drums and we really wanted to do it right this time so I rented a farm and we all lived there and wrote and recorded songs in the daytime and played at clubs in the evening as "Extravaganza". We added David Snavley on drums and after a year added Bruce back to the band. Bruce had been writing songs all the time we were getting strong as a group and it was a good merger. So in a short time we became "Starbuck" once again. Elgin left and we hire Ron Norris for vocals and guitar and Tommy Strain as lead guitar. Finally we were back in the studio and recorded "Moonlight Feels Right" with Bruce as the lead singer. In all these years he had never sang, maybe a little backup. He sang on our demos and the recorded company like his voice and overnight he was our front man. We released "Moonlight Feels Right" and Bruce and I hit the road and went to radio station after radio station separately for a month. Moonlight got play but didn't take off. We broke up again I move back to CA. and the following spring I get a call from Bruce that "Moonlight" had taken off and we had a hit. So I quit the band I was in, in one second, drove straight thru to Atlanta and joined the rest of the guys who had gotten back toghter and we recorded our album straight thru. We were on a roll and didn't stop. "Moonlight" became a hugh hit with Bruce singing and I finally got to feature my marimba as a solo instrument (the reason I joined them in the first place years and years ago) and it worked. I must thank Roy Whittaker for helping to promote "Moonlight Feels Right". He was head of a major radio station in Florida and promoted and played the hell out our song. He helped us a lot. Thanks Roy. After our second album, Johnny Walker rejoined us and we were on tour all the time and lots of TV shows. We ran into Bud Cockrell all the time when he was with Pablo Cruise and did TV shows with him too. Small world. We started our third album and had a few differences and I left the group. They finished the album without me and the following year the group broke up completely. Bruce and I got back together in '84 and recorded two songs "Another Beat of My Heart" and "The Full Cleveland" just the two of us and released them and they were doing well but we decided not to continue. So that is my story. The whole story involves the same players over and over again so that is why I told all of it. I have never responded to one of these sites in all these years but felt compelled to do so now. So I made all of my comments at one time to get it over with. The real moral of this story is never give up. We were persistent and it finally payed off. Again I thank the fans for supporting us all these many years and it is really nice that people are still enjoying and buying our music even though a lot of it is badly mixed and under ground. Bruce and I talked last year and he said there was interest in "Starbuck" getting back together and doing "Where are they Now" or one of those TV shows. I would love to do it. So who knows, maybe we will do it one more time. I live in LA and am now a doctor and have a natural healthcare clinic and make nutritional products. I can be reached at [email protected] Hey Johnny, Mike and any of you that would like to catch up let me hear from you. Thanks everyone for listening to me.
  luna: It is with a heavy heavy heart that I must inform all "The Children" fans that Johnny Walker and Linda Lawley,both, have passed away; both after long illness' that I can't elaborate on. I don't know the details,but I do know to all us who knew and loved them, it is shock and there will be 2 voids in my world.Johnny passed away in Florida a few months back, and Linda in CA.thanksgiving wk'end. Two great people and singers and players.GOD rest them, they will never be forgotten.
  Centerfield: The drummer for Eternity's Children used the name Frank Stevens when he was a DJ for us at WTIX New Orleans in the early 70's. I think his real first name was Roy. What was his last name? Thanks. Bob Walker
  funkypoormusician: Hi folks! My name is Ken Hilley and I am a former resident of the MS Gulf Coast. I ran across this site and this post just by chance while thinking about Juli Landry (the search lead me here). At any rate, I was enjoying the read and thinking of good old days until I read about Johnny Walker and Linda Lawley passing... Just couldn't believe it! What a loss of great talent! I remember Johnny playing that Gretsch guitar and making it sound so wonderful... that coupled with his powerful voice my, my, my! Linda of course was a beautiful lady with the look and the talent to impress anyone. I saw Linda once back in the early 70's at a club above the Fiesta in Biloxi one night. We sat and talked and partied (imagine that) for hours. As I remember we said goodbye early the next morning as the sun came up over the parking lot. I also saw Johnny about that time on several different occasions. He was living in Pensacola, FL and was playing music there. His wife Sue was a friend of mine. I introduced them many years back when Johnny and I lived in the Biloxi Hotel. Anybody remember that place? ha... Charlie Ross where are you! Anyway, those days were great cause there was so much great music, the times were a changing! Just in case you should read this I'd like to say hello to Bruce Blackman, Charlie Ross, Roy Whittaker (sister Sue too), Bo Wagner (wow what a dancer) and all the old friends from those times. A special prayer for Johnny and Linda and their loved ones! I now live in Nashville, TN and am still playing and writing music here. You can catch up with me on my website www.funkypoormusician.com and/or see my video's on youtube at www.youtube.com/funkypoormusician Peace
  lbwdog: Eric Watkins here: Great blog folks!! I see some old friends here. In 1969, I left the MS coast to join one of the last incarnations of "The Omen" with Johnny Walker in Pensacola. Bud Cockrell had left and Johnny came to Biloxi looking for a replacement. At that time, the band consisted of Johnny, Billy Haynes on Hammond, & Ralph Nolan on drums. Looking back, I relished the experience working with Johnny and learned a lot (as I was only 17/18 yrs. old). That band was almost a Procol Harum tribute band, as we did most of the first album, several selections from "Shine On Brightly", and some from "A Salty Dog". I'll never forget Walker singing these great compositions, especially "A Salty Dog", not to mention his great playing. This lasted about a year, and as young people will do, I decided to move on to something else. In late fall of 1970, I was called to join a band in Jackson, MS, which was comprised of Bo Wagner, Bruce Blackman, Tommy Aldridge (Later of Black Oak Arkansas, Ozzy Osborne, Whitesnake, etc.) Darell Gunter, Sara Fulcher, and Danny Lancaster who is the most soulful white singer I know (as well as my soul brother). The band was named Om Shanti (I think by Bo) and debuted at B.J.'s to a packed house. After a couple of months there were some musical differences and the band downsized to a four piece (Danny, Tommy, Darrell, and myself) called "Milk & Honey". We played around the south for about a year and went our own ways, some to reunite at times. Anyway, I recently heard of Johnny's passing and somewhere in the back of my mind, I always wished to do a real "Procol Harum" tribute with him. Well....some things are not to be. Let me leave you with a Johnny W. anecdote. I moved back to P'cola in '74 when he played with "Lazy Day". Went to visit at Johnny & Sue's apartment. If you knew Johnny, you'd know he hated cats!! I walk in to his house, and there are four or five Persians lounging around. I said "Walker, I thought you hated cats!" He says " I did, till I found out you could sell the damned things!!" RIP, J.W. and hi to Bo, Bruce, Ken Hilley, et al.....Many thanks E. W.
  lbwdog: Oh, BTW, to answer a four year old question...... [Quote]/03 Apr 04 ·jscarbo4: ..........Also, does anyone know if Bruce Blackman ever recorded "For Crying Out Loud"? I heard him do it live at Dock-of-the-Bay, and was knocked out by it. Would love to have the recording if it's available.[quote] I was the bassist for Jerry Fisher & The Music Company at Dock of the Bay in Bay St Louis from '81-'98, Jerry was with B,S,&T in the mid seventies. We recorded an album called "In and Outa the Blues" in '92 and several tracks were written by Greg Barnhill who wrote "For Cryin' Out Loud", but don't know that B.B. performed it at The Dock of The Bay.....for the record....EW
  Telewacker: I met Johnny Walker in Atlanta in 1979. He joined a band I was leaving called Misty Morning. I played bass in the group, & the drummer, guitarist, & I left to form our own group with a keyboard player we knew. I will never forget the night he sat in,
  Telewacker: I was blown away! What a great guitarist! And that voice! OMG! I later rejoined Misty Morning, & had the pleasure of sharing many a stage with Johnny. Later, after leaving the group again & switching to guitar, I used a lot of what I heard Johnny do
  Telewacker: To form my style. I\'ll never be as good as he was, he was just a natural, but whenever someone compliments my playing, I tell them about this guy I knew named Johnny Walker & the inspiration he was to me. If they said they\'d never heard of him, I\'d
  Telewacker: think to myself, \"Your loss\". Before I go, I\'ll leave you with an example of his amazing voice. We got a request for \"Danny Boy\" at a club on St Patricks Day, & Johnny said he could sing it, so we said go for it. He did the tune solo, just his guitar
  Telewacker: and voice. From beginning to end, the joint was silent. No one made a sound, mesmerised by his performance. At the end, applause erupted for what sermed like forever.
  Telewacker: I was actually moved to tears, only time that has ever happened to me on stage. If I live to be 100, I doubt I\'ll ever hear anything like it again. I was heart broken by his passing. R.I.P. Johnny.
Mushaboom  performed by Feist
Recommended by melpomenex [profile]

This is such a sweet little song. Listening to it always makes me happy. It's quirky and just plain adorable.




My Happy Ending  performed by Avril Lavigne  2004
Recommended by KTtheRacoon [profile]

from Under My Skin (Arista/BMG)


New Partner  performed by Palace Music
Recommended by umbrellasfollowrain [profile]

Memory's a funny thing. Especially romantic memory.
The first time I heard this song was two days after the first time I fell in love. Everywhere I went, I sang its earnest chorus "And you are always on my mind" in my head, thinking about the one I was in love with. In the shower staring at a bottle of hair conditioner, I sang, "You are always on my mind". On the subway, trying to ignore a potential fistfight about to break out, I sang, "You are always on my mind". In the supermarket produce section, holding the perfect shape of a lemon in my hand, I sang, "You are always on my mind". I was giddy and happy and the song understood. "Hey!" the song said, "Hey!" Will Oldman sang, "I got a new partner now!"
But jacket weather set in and things grew colder and we broke up and I was miserable and I stored the CD away on a top shelf with other memorabilia of that love who's happy power was really freakin' painful for me to think about now.
Things weren't always so bleak and I got me a new love and some years later, when I listened to the song again, I noticed something about the lyrics I hadn't before. See, in reality, the song isn't joyous at all. Will Oldman is singing about a past love, a love who is always on his mind when all the time he is seeing another girl, a different girl from the one always on his mind. He can't be with that girl. He has a new partner now. What I thought was a song about new joy was a song about nostalgic loss.
I didn't see how it was possible that I had suppressed that true meaning for as long as I had, considering how often I sang the song and how much it meant to me at the time. I knew the lyrics like the back of my hand and when I listen to music I dredge up all I can get from the lyrics like I'm a devout scribe interpreting the bible.
One of the beauties of pop songs is that they take on the flavour of your life at the time you listened to them and carry that flavour on to whenever you listen to the song again, while meanwhile you're morphing and changing and discarding what songs you don't want to remember that you loved and making mixed Cd's for long cartrips of the songs you do you do want to remember. This song is weird in that IT seemed to be the one that was morphing the next time I heard it and not me, like it was a person that had changed over time that I was encountering again.
Besides which, what a fucking lovely song it is.

from Viva Last Blues



  olli: now THAT's what i call a recommendation. I´m gonna have to find and soak this up now...
  olli: beautiful song. i've been a sporadic fan of will oldham related stuff for some years now, but hadn´t heard this until now. thanks! hmm. on a side note, this is the 666th american release that has been recommended here. i might be a bit childish, but i was hoping that number would go to some really, really bad contemporary pop music. Hey, you can't always get what you want:)
  fjell_strom: This song was the soundtrack to my incorrigible devotion to a lovely young girl when I myself was a bit younger. I used to listen to this tune repeatedly in my tiny little newly discovered room in the immensely overwhelming new land in which I found myself during the adventure which was to last the next four years, wandering Europe by my heartstrings. This was the song. I used to drink gin martinis to it. And eat the olive. And shudder because winter had come to my little home, and she was always, at least as often as the song played, on my mind.
Nice Folks  performed by Fifth Avenue Band  1969
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

Two and a half minutes of infectious, sunny folk-rock with extra added jazziness in the changes. The FAB were a Lovin' Spoonful spinoff of sorts, produced and overseen by the troika of Jerry Yester, Zal Yanovsky (RIP) and Eric Jacobsen. Bassist Kenny Altman, who wrote this gem, later wrote "Feelin' Blue" which was memorably recorded by Earth, Wind & Fire and today apparently is in the restaurant business. Too bad he's not still cooking up delicious tunes like these!

from The Fifth Avenue Band (Reprise RS 6369)



  JoNZ: I totally agree. Hands down, one of the hottest tracks ever put to wax. It sends me.
nice weather for ducks  performed by lemon jelly
Recommended by licoricewhipped [profile]

this song reminds me of ireland. its so goofy & happy.




Northern Sky  performed by Nick Drake  1970
Recommended by genebean [profile]

Nick Drake's style is probably catagorized under British folk rock. This song is smooth with the happy keys jumping around and the organ in the background. Best if played while driving with the windows down on a cool morning.

from Bryter Layter, available on CD



  eftimihn: A song of plain, pure beauty. It's emotionally moving, especially when he sings "Would you love me through the winter/Would you love me 'til I'm dead"
Ocean Man  performed by Ween  1997
Recommended by mattishere [profile]

wonderfully happy and goofy song




Oh Happy Day  performed by Quincy Jones  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A great soul jazz track with one of the most beautifully spare and groovy introductions I've ever heard. Featuring Bernard 'pretty' Purdie on drums, Ray Brown on bass, and Quincy Jones on Fender Rhodes, it really is irresistible. The track explodes with a huge vocal choir about half way through; it ends up sounding almost like a gospel song, before slipping back into the cool funky instrumental sound from the introduction

from Walking in Space, available on CD



Ordinary Joe  performed by Terry Callier
Recommended by snoopy313 [profile]

Absolutely class, Terry singin his heart out in a kind of ba ba be da be da da kind of way how he's "seeen a sparrow get hiiigh and waste his time in the sky-yyy" and that "each little bird in the sky-yyy is just a little bit f-reee-er than I (He's a mys-ter-ry) - ba daa da daa dum be be dum be da ba ba ba de da de dum beda ba de daaa..." a really happy song about being really happy about who you are even if your just a lazy so and so.





  snafkin: This song doesn't rock...it bounces!
Palace Station  performed by Melody Club  2002
Recommended by AndreasNystrom [profile]

David Bowie goes Glamrock. Great song of a new swedish group, who mixes brilliant riffs, with a catchy lyric. I love the small Roland Juno60 riffs they play on the synth :)
Very upbeat and i get happy by listening too it.





Percussion Gun  performed by White Rabbits
Recommended by melrose89 [profile]

if youre happy and feel like screaming




Photobooth Curtain  performed by School for the Dead  2004
Recommended by catmarigold [profile]

Poppy Rocky Indie. This song is kind of funny but also kind of sad. Power-pop instrumentation with lots of harmonies. Great lyrics and melody, very cool arrangement.

from The New You, available on CD


Pizzicato Five X (remix by Pandart Sashoona)  performed by Pizzicato Five  2000
Recommended by opl3003 [profile]

This is an almost 12 minute remix of tons of different Pizzicato Five songs by the Tokyo DJ duo Pandart Sashoona. It's quite amazing and very danceable. If you're never heard Pizzicato Five, it can be a bit overwhelming, but it's a good start! Give it a listen, you won't be disappointed!

from Decemebr 24th (single) (******** records, tokyo COCA-50429)
available on CD - December 24th (******** records, tokyo)



Please Let Me Wonder  performed by the Beach Boys  1965
Recommended by tinks [profile]

To me, songs like this best express the genius of Brian Wilson. Listen to the tender lyrics and vocal on this...this is the happiest he has ever sounded. (Given the time that this was recorded, it's almost depressing...this was probably also the last time in his life that he was truly happy. What the more poetic call bittersweet?) Yet, this is so mellow and unassuming. It's blissful, joyous - and above all else, madly in love, as evidenced by the spoken "I love you." at the end. The writing credits lists Wilson-Love, but all I can hear is Brian here. Mike Love was never this genuine.

As for the arrangement, it hints at what was to come with "Pet Sounds". Fender bass! Tambourines! Harpsichords! It's a beautiful thing, and Sonny Bono built his career off of it. Sleep well, sweet Congressman.

from The Beach Boys Today! (Capitol T-2269)
available on CD - The Beach Boys Today!/Summer Days! (And Summer Nights!!) (Capitol)


Poema Ritmico do Malandro  performed by Sonia Santos e Zito Righi  1969
Recommended by DJ Markinho [profile]

This is the first track from the album Aluciunolandia van Zito Righi e Seu Conjunto, a very rare record. Original copies are sold for $ 350,-. I am very happy with the reissue. This song is like a early Brazilian rap (1969). All in Portuguese of course. It starts with a funky piano and spoken words by singer Sonia Santos. When she has finished her introduction, there is some cheering by the musicians and after the whistle has blown a very rhythmical samba starts. Sonia Santos starts rapping and rhyming. The words from title poema ritmico are well chosen. It sure is a very rhythmic poem! I havent been able yet to understand what it is all about, but this rap is about um malandro, a rascal.




Restons Groupés  performed by Alexandre Desplat  1998
Recommended by nighteye [profile]

Does it get any more happier and sunnier than this? This is a true sunshine pop / jet-set lounge piece with a fast paced beat, lush strings, woodwinds and a catchy melody. The style reminds me of Bacherat's 'Pacific Coast Highway' and Alan Hawkshaw's 'Girl in a Sportscar'. Just imagine your self beeing on the French riviera, crusing around in your sportscar with a beautiful girl at your side and you are the king of the world as you drive into the sunset.

I can be very wrong here, but it seams that this is the title song for the movie with the same name, made in 1998. I could have sworn that this was a piece from the 1960s, the sound, the arrangement, the instruments, sound incredibly accurate and realistic. I found this song on the excellent 'Jet Set Society' compilation from our own eftimihn on this site, a brilliant pick.


available on CD - Mondo Lounge Vol.1 - Jet Set Society




  eftimihn: Excellent description, for me the track evokes similar scenes when listening to it. And you're not wrong, the track really is from 1998, but sounds absolutely late 60s/early 70s. Well, the whole compilation ain't that bad either i guess :-) If anyone is interested: http://www.artofthemix.org/FindAMix/getcontents.asp?strMixID=84985
  nighteye: This song alone almost makes me want to see the movie! I wonder if the whole soundtrack is like this? Btw. I almost got a eargasm at 2:15 minutes into the track. :)
Section 22 (Running Away)  performed by The Polyphonic Spree  2007
Recommended by mattishere [profile]

wonderful song. happy. upbeat. makes me smile. hopefully it does the same to you.




Shooting Star  performed by Les Baxter  1958
Recommended by nighteye [profile]

As Delicado said in one of his track recommendations: "Les Baxter's work is under-represented on this site". To try and change that here's a recommendation of another of my favourite Baxter songs.

Get in your space-ship and get ready for your first space cocktail. The mood of this song truly represents the 'Space-Age' everybody was anticipating in the late '50s and early '60s. We've got a happy fast paced beat, with bright strings, pianos, vibraphones, flutes and what not. Not that unfamiliar to the KPM library music from the '50s. I can't stop listening to this song, I only wish it was a bit longer.

from Space Escapade (Capitol Records)
available on CD - Ultra-Lounge Volume 8: Cocktail Capers



Since I Left You  performed by The Avalanches  2001
Recommended by secularus [profile]

This Melbourne, Australia 6 piece manages to mix dance beats and easy listening/soul samples in a much more interesting and moving way than recent artists working with similar ingredients. This track is sample happy, sampling the likes of the Main Attractions "Everyday," Klaus WUnderlich's "Let's do the Latin Hustle," and "By the Time I Get to Phoenix." I immediately recognized the Hustle's melody, acting as a primer for the wonderful 60s soul vocals. This is no doubt a feel good song!

from Since I Left You (XL Recordings/Beggars Banquet XLCD 138)
available on CD - Since I Left YOu (XL Recordings/Beggars Banquet)




  delicado: yeah, this is great, I agree! Nice - and unusual - for a song to mix disco and easy listening in quite the way this song does. The one complaint which could be levelled is that the song isn't all that musically varied. As you say though, a feelgood number...
  geishalass: I bought this album last week and I'm in love with it! Stellar stuff, the Holiday sample is such a teaser though!
Sister Ray  performed by The Velvet Underground  1968
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Since I've been recommending on this site for a while, I came up with a new idea in January. A lot of my all time favourites are on here now, so what I thought I would do now is to recommend a track every week that has had most resonance for me over the past seven days.

A bit of background: I've been having an unhappy time at work lately. I sometimes work shifts and don't get in until 11pm. As I have been so stressed with my daily grind, I've been finding it very difficult to wind down at the end of the day.

This song, this week, is suddenly making sense to me. It's calmed the jumble in my head every night by understanding that the world isn't an ordered place. I've been coaxed out of my rigid state by these 17 minutes. It's not my favourite Velvet Underground song - that would be The Murder Mystery - but after years of always thinking Sister Ray was a self-indulgent filler, I think I finally grasp what its purpose is. Or, at least, I now know there are only certain, bloody awful, weeks in which I can find the beautiful oyster inside this track.

I will return to normal service next week with my usual gay disco or girl group love.

from White Light / White Heat, available on CD



  stupidwall: i always thought sister ray was one of their most overrated songs. it mostly just sounds like nonsense. i guess i'll just wait till im unhappy or just in the right mood.
  n-jeff: Sounds like a fairly straight description of some sailors having a heroin and sex orgy with a bunch of transvestites to me.
If such a thing can be said to be straight....

Skinned  performed by Blind Melon
Recommended by Gwendolyn [profile]

the intro to this song is on a kazoo. the rest is guitar and awesome lyrics.. "i'll make a shoehorn out of your shin" ... my only complaint is that this song is too short

from Soup


Sorry About The Noise  performed by jessica fletchers  2000
Recommended by karlmort [profile]

this song makes me happy. it's got all the great 60s elements. they're from the norwegian city drammen. you can find the song on freetrax.no: http://www.freetrax.com/cgi-bin/pointgo.cgi?url=http://195.92.248.80:1331/u02/freetrax/prd_0000001535/01_Track_1.mp3

from sorry about the noise ep 7" (two zero)


spronston green  performed by the charlatans uk  1990
Recommended by frosch [profile]

pure manchester sound, quick, fast, simple, happy.
hammond, guitars, precise/ious voice..............
ideal to decide get out for a walk

from some friendly (beggars banquet)


Stay Here  performed by Mike Golden and Friends  2009
Recommended by jelias1 [profile]

A really great sounding band from Chicago that knows what it means to have to have soul. There's a sing for everyone in their 2 EPs that they have release that are FREE of charge if you visit their website. www.mikegoldenandfriends.com

Happy listening =]

from Trees pt. 1 (indipendent)


Step On  performed by Happy Mondays  1990
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

What happens when a record company dusts off an old obscure folk song from 1970 and hands it over to a British electronica band? Greatness! With an irresistable dancy beat and a great bass line, the Happy Mondays put a great spin on this old "sandals-and-granola meets Billy Jack" relic without insulting or demeaning the original song. The 1991 remix is sure to twist your melon... and the colored girls sing, "he's gonna step on you again!"

from Pills, Thrills, And Bellyaches, available on CD


Story Of a Girl  performed by Nine Days  2000
Recommended by Carrie [profile]

And while she looks so sad in photographs,
I absolutely love her, when she smiles


Amazing lyrics.


from The Madding Crowd, available on CD


Sugar Magnolia  performed by The Grateful Dead
Recommended by Reina [profile]

Possibly the greatest song of all time...or at least my favorite. If someone were to take the season of summer and magically turn it into a song, this would be it. Free, happy, beautiful...embodies the fresh feeling of summer. A must have.

"Head's all empty and I don't care..."




Sunshower  performed by Dr. Buzzard’s Original Savannah Band  1976
Recommended by rasand [profile]

This song features a wonderfully simple instrumentation with strings and hawaiian guitar on a soft disco rhythm. Makes me long for some deserted island beach.


available on CD - Dr. Buzzard's Original Savannah Band



  Festy: I've commented on the other recommendation of this track, but I have to reiterate how great it is. Pseudo african rhythms, kids singing and happiness. It sounds like smiles. :)
Suzy  performed by Caravan Palace
Recommended by Gimpsters [profile]

I just found Caravan Palace a while ago. They're amazing! They play a mix of gypsy swing and dance techno with some jazz thrown in there and a little bit of hip hop sprinkled over top.
This track is great because it showcases all their influences. Also the guy scatting over the song is awesome!

from Caravan Palace, available on CD


Talk Show Host  performed by Radiohead  1996
Recommended by penelope_66 [profile]

Super-dark-sexy...This song is an honest portrayal of the paradoxes involved with desire; happy/sad, pleasure/pain, love/hate...etc. I find it terribly gloomy yet wonderfully uplifting at the same time. Just beautiful.


available on CD - Street Spirit (Fade Out) EP


Te Ofrezco Mi Corazón (Make It With You)  performed by Roberto Jordan  1971
Recommended by RCA76 [profile]

This is a very cool, sultry and funky Spanish version of Bread's "Make It With You". Of course the vocals are definately not par to the original, but I like it. This guy has like a million other translated 60's and 70 rockabilly tunes; La Chica De Los Ojos Café (Brown Eyed Girl), Uno, Dos Y Tres ¡Detenté! (1, 2, 3, Red Light), Rosa Marchita (Cracklin' Rose), Juntos Felices (Happy Together), Ven A Darme Amor (Come And Get Your Love), Estos Ojos (These Eyes). Check 'em out!

from Rosa Marchita (RCA)
available on CD - Lo Mejor De Lo Mejor De RCA Victor (RCA Victor)


Te Quiero Tal Cómo Eres (Just The Way You Are)  performed by Jose Jose  1977
Recommended by RCA76 [profile]

This is an "excelente" version of Billy Joel's version of "Just The Way You Are". This album was recorded in 1977, beginning his era with BMG/ Ariola records. The executives, happy to have a performer like JOSE JOSE, provided him with the best musicians, numbers and producers of the time. Included in this album are 2 numbers by Mexico's greatest: Juan Gabriel ("Ya lo pasado, pasado" & "Ahora No !"). Among others credited are Napoleon ("Lo que no fue, no sera"), Adan Torres("Almohada"). Of the 10 numbers included, 7 were top ten hits in Mexico, Colombia and the U.S. Leaving disco to other performers that needed to launch their productions to the international market, Jose Jose's album is just pure old-fashioned latin love songs, songs still heared today.

from Lo Pasado, Pasado, available on CD


Telling Stories  performed by The Argonauts  2004
Recommended by chris kane [profile]

Acoustic summery song. Very 60's sounding with great harmonys and really odd guitar out of one of the speakers. A must hear for fans of Teenage Fanclub




Temptation  performed by New Order  1982
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Although far less well known than the 12" version and the 1987 'substance' rerecording, I'm utterly in love with this 7" version. I think perhaps the band hate it, since it doesn't seem ever to have appeared on CD, and was not even on the recent 'Retro' box set. At a little over 5 minutes long, it just seems much more focused and affecting to me than the overlong 12" version and the scrappy 1987 version.

It opens with that hypnotic beat/synth sound that has become famous since the song was used in various film soundtracks (most famously, Trainspotting, and most recently, 24 hour party people. Both used the later, rubbish version though). On this version, there's a twangy guitar sound added over the top of the introduction. The other main difference from other versions is vastly improved vocals (particularly over the 1987 version), and that wonderful early New Order guitar sound, as witnessed on other classic tracks like 'Ceremony' and 'Procession'. Like a handful of other tracks I've recommended, it's hard for me to be completely objective about this one, because I've adored it since my mid-teens. But having just bought an extra copy of the single, I'm happy to report that it sounds as brilliant as ever.

This recording showcases a raw and under-appreciated New Order/Joy Division sound that mixes early synth sounds and beats with punky guitars in a really beautiful and affecting way. I still enjoy their later stuff, but it's tracks like this that really attract me to the band.

from the single Temptation (Factory fac63)




  n-jeff: I've not heard the 7 since I was at college in 82, but there is also a version about 15-20 minutes long on one of the first "Touch" cassettes, where they have cut it with an interview. The whole thing seems to have been a lengthy Jam, edited differently for different releases. So the 7 would give you the most focused version. Compare the 7 and 12 edits of the KLF's "3am Eternal" for the enhancing effect of a great edit.
  Genza: I totally agree with everything delicado says. Early New Order rocks. Everything after and including Blue Monday is more poppy - and I can live with that. But most of their albums are very patchy - with half the tracks good and the other half almost unlistenable. But Temptation is an utter, utter classic. And I just love Dreams Never End, Cries and Whispers and In a Lonely Place. Well, any early New Order - it all that has tinny dance-music quality but still holds that desolate Joy Division sound.
That’s The End Of That  performed by Trixie’s Big Red Motorbike  1983
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Whenever I am accused of cynicism in my daily life, I just point to my deep and unabiding love for this ditty, which manages to out-twee even The Free Design. Cute-as-a-button girl vocals and light guitar make you want to drink squash and wear a hairslide.

from The Intimate Sound Of Trixie's Big Red Motorbike (Accident DENT 1)



  unathanthium: I climb in my tweemobile and Trixies soothe my nerves as I trundle through the London streets,smiling inanely at rage-fuelled motorists.In Timbuktu is the song that puts that smile there.When you go to Timbuktu,do as the Timbuktuans do,Trixies advise.And rhyming Niger with Tiger,even Ted Hughes never managed that.
  grimnir: an all-time classic! EXCELLENT! A typicallly-lush-John Peel type of track. AAHHHH! Summer and listening to Peel with the windows wide on a warm night. If anyone knows where to get more TBRM then post a reply.
The Cutter  performed by Echo & The Bunnymen  1983
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

On ”The Cutter” fellow Liverpool natives, Echo and The Bunnymen successfully wed the Eastern influenced psychedelic sounds made famous by hometown heroes, The Beatles. Crafting Eastern influences into a new post-punk hybrid that was sweeping England in the Early 80’s. It was songs like ”The Cutter” that would help define the newly coined Neo-psychedelic sub-genre, practiced by such group’s of the period as The Chameleons U.K., Psychedelic Furs and Simple Minds amongst others. The track opens with a keyboard approximation of Indian strings, whirring briefly before the band kicks into a percolating groove of popping bass, driving straight drums and chinking guitar accents. Ian McCulloch adds another layer of ’60 nostalgia, employing his expressive, slack-jawed vocal delivery that conjures aural images of the late Jim Morrison as he unfurls lines that drip with apprehension “Who’s on the seventh floor? / Brewing alternatives / What’s in the bottom drawer? / Waiting for things to give”. The Eastern strings re-enter at strategic points, filling in space between verses and McCulloch’s esoteric pleas to “spare us the cutter!”, which sounds like a good idea in any case. The arrangement also veers into epic territory quite unexpectedly in the second half, signaled by a sweeping wave of keyboard and McCulloch’s more subdued delivery as poses a string of rhetorically poignant questions, “Am I the happy loss? / Will I still recoil? / When the skin is lost / Am I the worthy cross? / Will I still be soiled? / When the dirt is off” -as the music swell behind him. Like any good single, the track never looses steam, cruising through each section with power and grace. A nod is in order for Ian Broudie, who’s smooth production helped The Cutter become Echo and The Bunnymen’s first top ten single in Britain and a linchpin track for the Neo-psychedelic movement.
(AMG)

from Porcupine, available on CD


The Difference  performed by Wallflowers  1997
Recommended by CaitlinSpelledWrong [profile]

I just had to recommend this song when I saw that no one had even recommended one song by them. There's something about the song that makes me so happy. I really don't know what it is about this song that makes me feel happy and excited , but maybe if you listen to it you can tell me.


available on CD - Bringing Down the Horse


The Evenings Young  performed by YELLO  1981
Recommended by beautifulmutant [profile]

Dieter Meier is a hero of mine. Some say I resemble him. If only I had as much suave and cool in my whole body as he possesses in one note, I would be happy. This is synthetic underground dance music at it's finest. They kep on producing albums which may tread familiar territory, but which are never stale or old. I first saw the video for "The Evening's Young" on USA Networks "Nite Flite" TV show and was hooked by the throbbing synths and odd vocal delivery. I became hooked on Yello. This is a quintessential song IMO

from Claro Que Si (Polygram / Mercury)


The Happy Phantom  performed by Tori Amos
Recommended by xicanti [profile]

I always want to dance to this song, and it's great to sing along to. It reminds me of "Wednesday" in a lot of ways; I just love how the tone changes from upbeat and cheerful to somewhat dark, then back again.

from Little Earthquakes


the holiday song  performed by frank black  2004
Recommended by olli [profile]

In an easy listening mood today.
From the oft-panned disk two of the frank black francis release, comes this brilliant reinterpretation of the holiday song from the Pixies' glory days.
This version is driven by dubby, spacy trumpets and echo effect, with a lone guitar taking the back seat. I like how Frank's voice is mixed way in front, and the overwhelmingly happy tone of the whole thing. The Pixies for cocktail parties.


available on CD - frank black francis



The Key of C  performed by Jim Noir  2006
Recommended by geezer [profile]

The psychedelic sound of modern day Manchester , a nursery rhyme slice of beatlesque fun with the humour of a Happy Monday,reminiscent of the Lightening Seeds ,a great tune with a great summer feel .




The Riviera Affair  performed by Neil Richardson  1969
Recommended by nighteye [profile]

Amazing song from the 1960's blending powerful luscious strings with a fast paced catchy melody. One might think that you have landed in the middle of a international crime affair in the French Riviera. Would work amazingly good as a theme-song for a TV-series (maybe it has been used that way already?)


available on CD - The Sound Gallery (Scamp)



The Way that I Found You  performed by Ladytron  2000
Recommended by tempted [profile]

It's no matter what you do but how you do it! This is a darker song in the Ladytron repertoire and electro disco pop at its very best. Very synth bass heavy yet melodic thanks to these people who understand the recipe of making me happy! Ladytron succeed in making their highly synthetic music sound very organic. Just like Kraftwerk have always done. Apart from Kraftwerk this reminds me of... The Human League. But with a modern touch, leaving the trademark 8t's echoes out. Get up on the dancefloor!

from 604, available on CD



The year of the rat  performed by Badly Drawn Boy
Recommended by inbloom44 [profile]

This song makes my soul happy.




Triste  performed by Pizzicato Five  1995
Recommended by johannp [profile]

This song has a simple but effective instrumentation; piano, drums and bass for the most part, and brass here and there. It manages to be catchy and interesting because of the melody and chords in my opinion. It's hard to point at something specific, yet the song in its entirety just has a certain, very definitive appeal, especially the ending where it almost has an improvised feel.

This song is from what one could think of as the 'middle period' of Pizzicato Five; they had acquired Maki Nomiya as a singer, and not yet ventured into the experimental things they did in the late 90's. Another, shorter version of it is on "Big Hits & Jet Lags '94-'97'", and that's about the only difference between the two.

from Romantique '96, available on CD


Two Shots of Happy, One Shot of Sad  performed by Nancy Sinatra  2004
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Nancy Sinatra joined the Attack Records family with the 2004 self-titled release, "Nancy Sinatra". She contacted artists that she and her daughters admire such as Morrissey, Jarvis Cocker, and Thurston Moore among others and found that these artists were also fans of hers and were eager to collaborate with her on the new album.

This song is U2's contribution to the album. Bono and The Edge wrote the song and Adam Clayton and Larry Mullen provided bass and drums on the recording.

The song is a beautiful slow jazzy ballad in which the lyrics compare the good things in life as shots of "happy" and the harsh moments as shots of "sad".

from Nancy Sinatra, available on CD


Velouria  performed by The Pixies  1990
Recommended by wendyloohoo [profile]

This song is a great sing-a-long song while still really rocking!! Kim Deal's contrasting vocals really pop! I love this song!

from Bossa Nova, available on CD


Vicious  performed by Lou Reed  1971
Recommended by Gwendolyn [profile]

This happy-tuned song has that up-beat sound of the late sixties/ early seventies. Although Lou Reed doesnt have the best singing voice, he makes up for it with quality lyrics... much like Bob Dylan. Great guitar in this one.

from The Best of Lou Reed and The Velvet Underground



  n-jeff: It's on Lou Reed's "Transformer" LP so that would be 1971, I think. Not that it probably wasn't written before then. And possibly the coolest LP Rick Wakeman played on. If you only know this song from the greatest hits you should check out Transformer itself, a quality record. In fact all the Velvets LP's individually, including 1969 and everything Reed did solo up to, say, 1975.
  Mike: The coolest LP Rick Wakeman played on (apart from the Six Wives of Henry VIII and the Yes oevre, of course) - Hunky Dory.
  schlick: Transformer was released in 1972, and Rick Wakeman played on Lou\'s first solo album released earlier in that year, not on Transformer, just wanted to clear things up.
Walk Away Renee  performed by Orpheus  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A really lovely version of this song, which was more famously recorded by The Left Banke. The introduction nicely recalls the melody of The Association's 'Never my love'.

The instrumentation has a folk flavour, with a nice strummed acoustic guitar. The production is superb, with great, slightly distant sounding vocal harmonies and occasional sparkly percussion sounds. Overall, it's a sound not millions of miles away from groups like Spanky and Our Gang, but it has a melancholic edge to it that makes it more listenable to my ears. Something has happened to me over the last couple of years, and some of the more lightheartedly happy music I used to like appeals to me much less.

from Ascending (MGM MGM 4569)
available on CD - The Very Best Of Orpheus (Varese)




  executiveslacks: I had just finished recommending Belle & Sebastian's "Piazza, New York Catcher" when I came across this recommendation. They namecheck "Walk Away Renee" in "Piazza..." I haven't heard this song, but now I want to hear it!
  WayCool: Orpheus' version of "Walk Away Renee" is a classic example of how this group effortlessly applied their distinctive sound to material by other bands. I enjoyed the original version by The Left Banke but always thought the wimpy vocals could have used some testosterone. The Orpheus version is without fault and I'm totally puzzled why it failed to eclipse the original.
  jeanette: I hear the legendary Pink Lady have also recorded a version - what a treat! Anyone heard?
  delicado: Having heard several versions of this song (most recently, The Blades of Grass), I'd just like to reiterate that this for me is THE rendition of the song - I'm with WayCool on this one!
  artlongjr: I have a 45 of this by the Four Tops...I like their version, it sounds very mature the way Levi Stubbs sings it, compared to the youthful innocence of the original! I have the Orpheus version and it's great, but I will always like the Left Banke original best...I wonder if anybody ever covered "Pretty Ballerina"?
Walkabout  performed by Noah Lennox feat. Atlas Sound
Recommended by ianmalcolm2 [profile]



Doesn't everybody love a good collaboration? It turns out Noah Lennox's beachboy-inspired vocals fit in nicely with the sound-collage electronica of Bradford Cox's offbeat side-project, Atlas Sound. The tight vocal harmonies, and childlike sampled groove compliment each other perfectly.

Nothing too deep in terms of vocal content. It's one of those songs where the chorus is repeated about 800 times, but you can never remember the words.

Instead, this song is all about atmosphere. I'm a sucker for that bleached-out, 70's technicolor vibe lately, and this song captures it more effectively than most. The lo-fi skuzziness, however, only enhances its pop-perfection.

Enjoy before summer ends! This is the perfect doobed-up jam for driving to the beach on a day where you can see the heat. Happy listening.




Wasteland  performed by Dan Bern
Recommended by Reina [profile]

"And those who had money looked good but weren’t too happy
And those who didn’t have money didn’t look so good and weren’t so happy either
And in a city of 3 million, 269 thousand, 984, everyone was lonely..."




Whatta Man  performed by Salt ’N’ Pepa featuring En Vogue  1993
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

This has to be my favourite song ever about being happy and in love. No piece of music gets it across just how damn happy you can be with the right person, when everything just falls into place.

Salt 'N' Pepa have one of the most consistently great back catalogues of any pop group. They just, seemingly effortlessly, wheeled out killer tune on top of killer tune in an era when pop-rap (pop-hop?) was at its apex.

My man has all the attributes the seven ladies describe here, alongside a willingness to put up with my Claudja Barry and Dolly Dots records. But don't take him for a sucker, cos that's not what he's about...

from Very Necessary, available on CD



Willow Tree  performed by Thomas J Speight
Recommended by daniela_por [profile]

This happy love song was produced by Tim Rice-Oxley and Jesse Quinn, two members of Keane. It's really nice. Speight's voice is not powerful, but it's sweet and very well used in this song.

from Willow Tree


Yesterday when I was young  performed by Blossom Dearie  1970
Recommended by mattias [profile]

This song is just one of the great songs from the Fontana album "Thats just the way I want to be". The song is written by Charles Aznavoir and this is the definitive version of it. Blossom is singing i front of a huge orchestra and her voice is clearer than ever as she sings this sad song to the happy bossa nova arrangements. Very nice!
See my website for more info: http://www.angelfire.com/jazz/blossomdearie/blossomdeariediscography.html

from That's just the way I want to be (Fontana)
available on CD - Whisper for you



  delicado: I love this version too, but oddly enough I once played it to someone I met on a plane who was a huge Aznavour fan. She felt that Blossom's version deprived the song of its drama. I agree with you that the contrast of the sad song and the light, happy bossa arrangement works very well.
Your Love is my Drug  performed by Ke$ha  2009
Recommended by xroughstuffx [profile]

It's just such a carefree song, I love it.

from Animal


Zuhalterbässatle  performed by Harald Paulsen & Lotte Lenya  1930
Recommended by james [profile]

It seems unlikely to be able to pick one song from the threepenny opera that stands out above the rest since the thing in itself is so honed to perfection (and never moreso than in the very early recordings). But as a microcosm of the whole this track (track 8) encapsulates perfectly the balance between the borrowed idiom of the popular musical style and the squalor of the lyrics. there is a jaunty middle section in which Mac recalls how he would slip out of bed to let one of the whore Jenny's clients in, mix them a drink and treat them well. Then comes a duet and they sing together of how they long to return to that whorehouse and to those happy times. At the end the music lingers with added, disconnected percussive sounds, in which time the ambivilance and ironies all resonate, creating a moment of perfection for the work as a whole, where all meaning vanishes and mere rhythm persuades.

from Die Dreigroschenoper Berlin 1930 (Telefunken)


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