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List songs by Song title | Performer | Year

You searched for ‘warm’, which matched 96 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
1000 Times  performed by Tahiti 80  2002
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

A perfect piece of contemporary pop music: uplifting and sunshiny, yet with the right dose of melancholia. The production is excellent, as well as the instrumentation with a very driving rhythm section, warm electric piano, guitars and horns. What makes this really stand out is the terrific string arrangement by Richard Hewson (A protegee of George Martin and quite busy arranging during the 70s) which is very floating, sweeping and lush.

from Wallpaper For The Soul, available on CD (Minty Fresh)




  texjernigan: Ooh yeah
37 Hours (In The U.S.A.)  performed by Raw Stylus  1995
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Raw Stylus effortlessly combined british acid jazz elements with sophisticated, elegant Steely Dan-esque american jazz/soul/funk. In fact, like on this track, the music sounds very much like a Steely Dan backing track with warm Fender Rhodes keyboards, precise horn section, funky rhythm section and jazzy guitars. Which really isn't much of a wonder when looking at the credits of the album. Let's see: The album is impeccably produced by the Dan's producer Gary Katz, features an incredible amount of fine session musicians including Steely Dan regulars (like Bernard Purdie, Randy Brecker or Hugh McCracken), has even Donald Fagen providing synths on "37 Hours (In The U.S.A.) and they even embedded some chords of "Josie" in the song. Unfortunately, despite the talent, Raw Stylus remained a one album band to this very day, kinda sad actually...

from Pushing Against The Flow, available on CD



A Family. A Tree  performed by We Are The Willows
Recommended by seike17 [profile]

Soft folk rock song. Beautiful, heartwarming, she has such a gentle voice.




After An Afternoon  performed by Jason Mraz
Recommended by Silly Goose [profile]

Jason's guitar wraps around you caresses you, making you feel like it's carrying you down a river on a warm summer day, sun shining on your face. His lyrics are true poetry, and he can communicate so many emtions. Only Jason could sing a song where all he does is read the intrument panels on his car and still sound great. Although this guy is still unsigned, his website (jasonmraz.com) has an short CD you can order and mp3's you can download. If this guys does not make it big one day then I'll....I'lll....I don't know what, but I'll do something.





Aikea-Guinea  performed by Cocteau Twins  1985
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A perfect song. I love every note. The mood is desolate, yet warm and reassuring as well. The bassline and guitar playing recall some of the great early-period New Order tracks. The track fades in beautifully with bass, drums, and guitar. The drums and bass are steady, while the effects-laden guitar shimmers over the top. Liz Fraser's vocal is at first understated, until the chorus begins. Her voice soars as a simple piano sound joins the mix. The chords are simple, almost inevitable, but the instrumentation and execution are quite stunning.

Happily, you can hear this song and see the original video at the Cocteau Twins official site: http://www.cocteautwins.com/html/media/video.html.

from the single Aikea-Guinea (4AD BAD501)
available on CD - Aikea-Guinea (4AD)



  audioadventures: Another one of my favourites of all time. Gives me goosebumps.
  leonthedog: Yes, I remember playing this EP over and over back when it was only on vinyl... Although "Kookaburra" is, in my opinion, even more heavenly! Like angels comforting you...
All I Need  performed by Air  1998
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

A beautiful track off Air's already classic debut album "Moon Safari". Actually the instrumental backing of this song is based on a track they released in 1996 ("Les professionels", later compiled on the "Premiers Symptomes" album). This one boasts such an enveloping warm analogue sound with all the vintage synths Air used (Moogs, Fender Rhodes etc.). On top of that there's the dream-like, sensual vocals by Beth Hirsch that gives it such a floating, laid-back tone. Sounds like the impression of a late summer sunset transcribed into sound. Wonderful.

from Moon Safari, available on CD



Almost Arms  performed by The Minders  1996
Recommended by two-headed boy [profile]

'Back to the Almost Arms again.' One minute, 29 seconds of pure heaven. Clapping hands, sugary-sweet bass, warm acoustic guitar, and perfectly stylized harmony demonstrate the greatness of this band. The Minders' ability to streamline their brit-pop sound into short cuts such as this says volumes of their talent. They have grasped the art of the rock strip-tease as we sit and drool and demand more of their form. A thousand and a half listens later 'I am hungry but still smiling' rings truer than ever, this is but the appetizer for their more developed works; taste this and you too will be The Minders' biggest fan!

from Cul-de-Sacs & Dead Ends (spinART / Elephant 6 spart 76 / E6-021)



Arizona  performed by Kings of Leon  2006
Recommended by chiquitagina [profile]

It's beautifully orchestrated. The first few notes set the tone of the song automatically. The introduction has guitar, and drums kick in slowly, making a punch to the ears. It makes me want to drive slowly through a desert (which I am from Arizona) while the full moon is out, windows rolled down and the warm summer air drifting through them. Amazing song. Really does hit home for me.

from Because of the Times


Baby Lemonade  performed by Syd Barrett  1970
Recommended by popgoestheculture [profile]

The best opening to any album ever. Amazing guitar solos, lagging drums, warm organs, and Mr.Barrett himself. It doesn't get any better than this.

from Barrett, available on CD



  konsu: Yeah. This song has so much ragged beauty. The whole records just a circus of deranged, delightful tracks. I also like "Maisy" ,"Wined & Dined" , & "Dominoes"...
  n-jeff: I love it too, theres a fantastic version done for one of the John Peel sessions that Strange Fruit put out in the eighties, that is equally wayward, and equally good. Considering how slight it is, and how lacking in obvious "Psychedelic" conventions, it is surprisingly my favourite Barrett song.
Babylon  performed by David Gray  1999
Recommended by LOWTONES22 [profile]

Easy lovin', reminds you of than warm fuzzy sunshine love feelings you get when with that special companion, just nice groovin' love tunes, "let go of your heart, let go of your head"





Beginnings  performed by Astrud Gilberto  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An amazingly warm and funky cover of the Chicago song 'feelings'. I know that doesn't sound like a recipe for success, but it really is very cool. The song degenerates into a huge jamming session at the end and carries on for 9 minutes. But it's storming stuff!

from September 17, 1969, available on CD



Birds And Bees  performed by Warm Sounds  1967
Recommended by BlueEyedYe-Ye [profile]

A brilliant psychedelic dance record mixing over-the-top orchestration and brilliant harmonized vocals. Plus the kind of innocent-meets-intense vocal that I find immensely attractive in pop. Pity it's not officially available on CD, but that could change...





  artlongjr: Never heard "Birds and Bees", it sounds interesting. I have a 45 by Warm Sounds that I may do a write-up on, it's called "Night Is A-Comin'/Smeta Murgaty", from 1968 on Deram Records. The reason I mention it is because it is one of the most totally "out-there" psychedelic numbers I've ever come across. Features the wonderful lyric "In my head the Grateful Dead are peering through the bars!" Unfortunately I don't think it's on CD either.
  Sadman: it's amazing! heard it from "A Walk in Alice's Garden" compilation.
blind mary  performed by gnarls barkley  200?
Recommended by jimmyhoffa [profile]

Warm fuzzy electronic-future sounds from Cee-lo and Dangermouse's collective. The song is beautiful and sticky-to-the-brain at the same time, telling a charming story that could have been told during any age of the Earth. Blind Mary, marry me...

from The Odd Couple, available on CD


Blowin’ Gold  performed by John Klemmer  1969
Recommended by mr_klenster [profile]

This is on my playlist for summer barbeque season. It's an unrelenting saxophone hurricane, with a beautiful warm sound, and great melodic soloing the whole way through. I love the tense break in the beginning that evolves into a total explosion, later punctuated with ecstatic moaning. A great groove.




Bumblebee  performed by Roman Andren  2008
Recommended by Festy [profile]

You'd be forgiven for thinking this one of Sergio Mendes' hipper tracks from his Brasil '66 or '77 period. It has that old sound to it and is really warm. It starts off breezy and builds with energy whilst Roman Andren, a young Swedish musician, composer and DJ, plays some beautiful electric piano over the top. Although it starts off with vocals over a sparse bass and electric piano combo, the vocals don't come in again until a while into the track. By the end of the track, the energy is at its most, yet still breezy, with brass, vocals and hand-claps providing a sense of a party. It's the perfect song for a summer's day or, close your eyes on a dreary winter's day and be transported.

from Juanita & Beyond : Live Studio Sessions, available on CD



Call Me  performed by Chris Montez  1966
Recommended by opl3003 [profile]

Okay. I might reveal more about myself than this terrific song in this review, but that's the way it's gotta be.

I have an unhealthy obsession with Chris Montez, and thanks to me - now my girlfriend does, too. We have many theories about Chris Montez, but I'll get to that later.

First of all, on the back of this album, Derek Taylor writes a few paragraphs about the immortal Mr. Montez. In one of them he writes of how he first heard this song.. and he thought the DJ on the radio said "Miss Montez". Ouch. I mean, we all know he sounds like a girl - but that's a cheap shot. I'm sure he's just angry because Chris gets way more bitches. Way more. Look at the front cover of this album. Three girls, one Chris Montez. Hell, the one in the front looks like she could be his mom - but that's besides the point. The point is, Chris Montez is the ultimate playboy. Don't worry, I'll explain.

Now here is where some of my theories about Chris come in. "Call Me" sounds like it's live. Call me crazy, but I think I have the entire song figured out. Chris recorded this song from his bed. In fact, I think he recorded this whole album from his bed. In one take. He belts out smooth songs so effortlessly, I just can't picture him standing in a booth somewhere doing each song over and over. Like I said, this song sounds live. I think they wheeled his bed into a club. You can hear some guy saying "Yeah, Chris" at the end of one of the choruses.. and even glasses tapping together. That's because when Chris Montez comes to town, it's a party. The claps you hear? That's the girls in his bed keeping the beat. Probably the 3 women from the cover of the album, and most likely a few more.

Now, back to the song. Written by Tony Hatch and arranged by Herb Albert - it's a winner. And it's Chris Montez telling you to call him if you need him, because he "can be so warm and tender". Need I say more? Chris Montez: the ulimate playboy.

from The More I See You / Call Me (A&M LP-115)



  Swinging London: 'That's because when Chris Montez comes to town, it's a party' So funny. So true.
  eftimihn: Missed this review the first time 'round. Very funny indeed and a thoroughly good theory for sure.
Campground Daughter  performed by School for the Dead  2004
Recommended by catmarigold [profile]

Melancholy but hopeful. This is a gentle song, with acoustic and electric guitars, electric piano, bass, drums, and voice. Excellent lyrics, terrific mood.

There's a little story here, punctuated by flashes of images and moments.

The song is written by Henning Ohlenbusch who has worked with Chris Collingwood (Fountains of Wayne), Mark Mulcahy, and Lloyd Cole. If those names mean anything to you, then chances are you will enjoy this warm track.

from The New You, available on CD


Casimir polaski Day  performed by sufjan Stevens  2005
Recommended by Branman629 [profile]

everything about this song is pure beauty.

from Illinois (Asthmatic Kitty)


Chocolate And Strawberries  performed by The Januaries  2000
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

This song really sounds pretty much like the title would suggest : Warm, lush, sweet and sensual due to the 60s retro-ish, Bacharach-esque style of the tune combined with warm, warbling electronic sounds and with a delicately sounding trumpet solo. Very nice seductive vocal delivery by singer Debbie Diamond on top of that. Yummy !

from The Januaries (Foodchain Records)



Come On Let's Go  performed by Broadcast  2000
Recommended by Mr Steal [profile]

The Midlands-based retro-futurists put this out as a single and it should have been a massive hit but, of course, it wasn't. Still, it's one of the sweetest songs I've heard in recent years, abetted by Trish Keenans's insouciant yet heartwarming vocals – and a lovely tune.

from The Noise Made By People (Warp CD65)




  tinks: i love this entire album! and they put on a great live show, to boot!
Comfort of Strangers  performed by Skin  2000
Recommended by Groucho_75 [profile]

Off the brillaint soundtrack for 'Timecode' by Mike Figgis and Anthony Marinelli, not sure who actually wrote this song but the whole album is really good. The film's pretty good as well. Skin has a great voice and this is a really moody, atmospheric song that makes me feel both warm and lonely at the same time. The Main Title track is great as well.

from Timecode Soundtrack



Complex  performed by Gary Numan  1979
Recommended by geezer [profile]

At the time a unique fusion of cold synthetic and a warmer organic fragility,following two consecitive number ones "Are Friends Electric"and "Cars" this track revealed the enormous potential of Numan,s futuristic vision.A slow piano led "ballad" with aching cello and violin parts ,sad and beautiful and if i must say utterly pleasant.

from The Pleasure Principle
available on CD - Pleasure Principle


Corcovado (Quiet Nights of Quiet Stars)  performed by Sarah Vaughn  1964
Recommended by Fig Alert [profile]

The most beautiful, sensual song I have ever heard in my life. It feels like a warm, tucked-in, comfortable sigh from a lover nestling in on your shoulder, holding you ever tighter while whispering words of love in your ear. Try to top that.

The Divine One pours herself into this number completely. Her serene confidence breathes a kind of hyper-life into the lyrics. But the way she caresses the melody and strokes it so adeptly with her brilliant vocals sends me right over the top every time.

If I ever fall in love again, the woman of my affections will, in my wildest, most fantastic dreams, melt with me on this.

Please excuse the sap...

from Viva Vaughn (Mercury SR 60941)
available on CD - The Girl From Ipanema: The Antonio Carlos Jobim Songbook (Verve)




  FlyingDutchman1971: Blossom Dearie also performs a nice version of this great song on her 1964 LP 'May I Come In'
Don’t Fade Away  performed by Dead Can Dance  1996
Recommended by Archipelago [profile]

This is one of those songs that you put on when you want to sit back, relax, and float away to somewhere warm and safe.

A friend of mine once told me that she had an out-of-body experience to this song as she was meditating.

This is a song that I put on a mixed tape to give to a lover once as a way of showing that I would be there with her through it all, accompanying her journey as you explore the realms of love and life.


available on CD - Toward the Within (4AD)


Eque  performed by Duke Ellington  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Taken from his exquisite Latin American Suite, this is an unusual sounding track to me. Mid-tempo, with an unrelenting bossa nova style beat, the action is shared between the piano and various horns and saxophones. I guess it's the strange discordant tones that take this track higher for me. They remind me of some chords I've heard in the more adventurous Brazilian pop music of the late 1960s - basically taking what is fundamentally a sweet sounding, warm chord, and overlaying notes that provide a darker, more forboding feel.

Adding to this, the punctuating horns and reeds give the whole thing a gently groovy feel that's reminiscent of quirky 60s soundtrack music. Really cool stuff, and I recommend the whole album.

from Latin American Suite, available on CD


Eurpe After The Rain  performed by John Foxx  1981
Recommended by geezer [profile]

The magical Mr Foxx begins to allow some warmth into his sound after the detached ,sometimes clinical feel of his early Ultravox records and alienated classic "Metamatic".The voice is still remote and the lyrics open to a vaugue interpretation but this sublime piece of post punk pop benefits from Spanish guitar and an almost Abba-esque piano motif .This new found warmth adds a feel of hope and optimism to a previously bleak musical landscape .

from The Garden, available on CD


Fadeaway  performed by Laika and the Cosmonauts  1990
Recommended by delicado [profile]

No one talks about this band much. Not in my experience, anyway. It's all instrumental, so I guess they're not for people who are lost without vocals and lyrics. But have a listen - to me they really seem utterly superb. I would love to see them live.

I only have a couple of albums, but they're great. This one was released in 1996 (shit - that was 9 years ago!), but recorded in 1990. Really beautiful twangy surf-pop that fits in perfectly with the whole David Lynch mood that I find so appealing. The album is an intoxicating mix of energetic surf tracks and slower, more atmospheric ones like this. Their recent 'Local Warming' album is great too. Can anyone recommend me any more of their tracks?

from Zero Gravity, available on CD



  olli: Yeah, they're certainly one of the better neo-surf acts out there. See Laika! Se Laika run! Go laika, go!
Flowers And Beads  performed by Iron Butterfly  1968
Recommended by john_l [profile]

Not everybody remembers this, but the "other" side of the famous "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida" album featured five rather terrific songs. And this one has "cool passion" written all over it, because the lyrics are straight-ahead I'm-in-love-and-I'm-almost-tongue-tied-about-it but within a medium-paced 6/8 framework rather than a frantic groove. Meanwhile the organ and the choir-like backing vocals give it a lot of warmth. So it sounds like what I'm saying is that it manages to be both cool and warm at the same time. That may not make sense, but it's a great song off a classic LP.

Incidentally, rock writer Dave Marsh in one of his reviews said "It's now garbage" about this LP. Bullfeathers! It's still a classic. It makes me wonder what Marsh thinks is not garbage these days -- misogynous rubbish about ho's and bitches perhaps?

from In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida, available on CD


Foolin' Around  performed by Chris Montez  1967
Recommended by Swinging London [profile]

'We won't do anything that shouldn't be done, only the groovy things like having fun'...& there's absolutely nothing wrong with that, in my book.

This is the title track to Chris Montez's third album with A&M, produced by Herb Alpert & it's very, very sweet, but, for some reason not sickly so. That's the magic of mid-'sixties Chris Montez.

This song was almost a hit in Britain. It was released just as the pirate radio stations were about to be banned. It was 'Record Of The Week' on Radio London the week it was shut down and sadly never grabbed it's deserved foothold after that.

A lot of people are taken aback by how high Chris's voice was when he sang, but once you get over that, his music from the A&M era (1966-8) is strangely addictive. Very warm and melodic.

He did mostly cover songs, mostly 'hits of the day', but also generous helpings of classics from the 1940's & '50's. Always giving them a brand new very mid-'sixties treatment.

from Foolin' Around (A & M)



Freio Aerodinamico  performed by Os 3 Morais  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A truly incredible vocal/jazz pop track which really has everything. Os Tres Morais were (are?) a mysterious Brazilian vocal trio. Here they tackle a great Marcos Valle song, and do such a storming job of it that this may be one my very favorite tracks EVER in the whole world ever! Honestly. Until I put a sound sample up, please accept these measly words of explanation:
1. It's bouncy and smooth and has warm strings
2. It's actually quite funky as well
3. The vocal harmonies are fantastic. I don't think there are any actual words - it's all just beautiful interwoven sound
4. Someone starts playing a scratchy electric guitar rebelliously at end of the song, completely out of context with the rest of it. It sounds cool.

from Os Tres Morais
available on CD - Blue Brazil volume 2 (EMI UK)




  tinks: i have a sneaking suspicion that os tres morais and os tres brasilieros were in fact the same group...the reason that i say this is because os tres brasilieros were a family group comprised of two brothers and a sister, whose last name just happened to be "morais". if so, have a look for the album that i've made a recommendation from. it'd seem to jive, since this comp is on emi, and the lp i have is on capitol.
  delicado: hmm, interesting. Shame there is a dearth of info available for either group... are os tres brasilieros consistently good, out of interest?
  tinks: well, the album i have is pretty standard vocal bossa & samba-type stuff, but it's not bad. very easy to listen to, and there are a few inspired moments. i'll check the liner notes to see if i can garner any more info on them.
  clmarcel: i think the correct name this band is "os tres moraes". here in Brazil, moraes is frequently a last name, while "morais" can be traduzed by "ethics", "moral".
  clmarcel: sorry, i made a mistake. The real name is MORAIS. The link to this band is http://acesso-raro.blogspot.com/ . There can be downloaded the mp3 e see the album cover.
  Luroberto: This ensemble was the best one in the end of the 60s in Brazil. The accurate voise of Jane Moraes was simply marvelous. They have been influenced by Les Swingle Singers. They began their career singing music erudite and in a second moment they joined Bossa Nova hits of Chico Buarque and Tom Jobim. They have enregistered three LPs. When Jane married Herondy and make the kitsch couple Jane & Herondy her brothers relpaced her by Ana Lucia and after one last LP they splited the ensemble for separate careers. One of them is now new as "Santo Morales", a bolero singer. One of their best hits was O Sonho (The Dream), 1968, of Egberto Gismonti.
Frozen (Stereo MCs Remix)  performed by Madonna  1998
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

A beautiful original, mixed with a great hip-hop bassbeat. This was Madonna's first album after her admittedly excellent performance in the film, 'Evita'. In preparing for the film, she had actually taken professional voice instruction where she learned to project her voice and put less strain on her vocal chords. The transformation was amazing and she has sounded so much better since. She was also on a spiritual journey as she began her role as a mother and the lyrics bespeak this journey in her use of very emotional words and the warm sound in her voice. This is not, 'like a virgin', this is a woman reborn!

from Frozen CD Single (Maverick / Warner Bros 43993-2)


frozen warnings  performed by Nico  1971
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

At first appearance, its not the most appealing of combinations, that deep flat voice accompanied by the unforgiving Harmonium alone. And it is quite stark, but at the same time strangely warm and hypnotic.
The song itself has a strong chorus and there are well played hooks. Slow, dark, magnificent. And it strangely is a pop song where the rest of the EP isn't.

from Peel Sessions (Strange Fruit SFPS064)


Getting Started  performed by Ashby  2005
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

A delicious slice of indie-pop. Very european sounding (influences by early Cardigans, Saint Etienne and Birdie spring to mind), this duo (consisting of Evelyn Pope & Bill Cowie) are actually from Boston. With all ingredients properly in place to conjure up images of a breezy summer day: Warm, analogue keyboards, horns, trumpets and some joyful flutes (played and arranged by Zé Luis) and very light and breezy female vocals.

from Looks Like You've Already Won, available on CD



Goin' Home  performed by Ike Quebec  1962
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Beautiful samba, with great mellow sax playing from one of the masters of the Coleman Hawkins-influenced tenor on his final album. The counterpoint of Kenny Burrell's guitar and Garvin Masseaux's gentle percussion with Quebec's long warm tones really make this track.

from Soul Samba, available on CD



Goodbye My Friend  performed by Susie Krauter  2006
Recommended by trunorthmusic [profile]

This is a warm and uplifting goodbye song used as a retirement song and also used in memorials. People use it for retirement slide shows and retirement parties. I love it because it honors the person who is leaving or has left - in a really special way. The song is found at : http://www.trunorthmusic.com/Retirement_Song/index.html




Goodbye My Friend  performed by Susie Krauter  2006
Recommended by trunorthmusic [profile]

This is a warm and uplifting goodbye song used as a retirement song and also used in memorials. People use it for retirement slide shows and retirement parties. I love it because it honors the person who is leaving or has left - in a really special way. The song is found at : http://www.trunorthmusic.com/Retirement_Song/index.html




ha ha  performed by mates of state  2003
Recommended by catch_her [profile]

" It's difficult to place MOS in a genre as the song structures are unique, often complex. At the same time there are always the pop elements of catchy melodies and loads of harmony. Even though there are only two of them, they fill up the space with the monster, bass-heavy organ, creative drumming, and constant dueling vocals. The music can be sweet. At other times it's spastic, but either way, you leave MOS shows with a warm feeling.



Mates of State has been described by critics as unabashed joy, honesty at its best, a two piece with balls, and a band that you must see live. " (taken from official website)







amazing.

from team boo


Hammerhead’s apartment  performed by David Whitaker  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This is a beautiful bossa-tinged theme with a great blend of strings and brass. The flute/trombone melody is accompanied by an incredibly rich and airy string sound, which swells as the melody builds. The strings alone compel me to listen to this track repeatedly – their remarkably thick, drenched sound recalls some of my favorite Ennio Morricone pieces (particularly those on the fantastic ‘Mondo Morricone’ compilation). Musically, the entire ‘Hammerhead’ score seems to have been influenced by John Barry's Bond scores, and by the less goofy parts of Burt Bacharach's ‘Casino Royale’ score. As well as being a haunting movie theme, this track has elements of that classic loungey film score sound from the mid-sixties.

from Hammerhead OST (Colgems)




  nighteye: This song is excellent! Haven't seen the movie starring Peter Vaughan yet, but the bossa sound reminds me of the early John Barry pieces. I can't stop listening to it! Thank you Jonny!
Here’s Where You Belong  performed by The Grass Roots  1968
Recommended by john_l [profile]

Mid-paced, with a heartfelt string arrangement, this is a warm and tender song that you can't not like. And, along with the totally different version by the West Coast Pop Art Experimental Band (q.v.), it makes up half of my all-time favourite pair in which the same song has been done by two artists. IMHO not even "Woodstock" or "I Heard It Through The Grapevine" come close ...

from Golden Grass (Dunhill)
available on CD - Grass Roots Anthology 1965-1975 Vol. 1 (Rhino)



  ronin: What's not to like about this whole album? Warren Entner's voice was the hook that drew me in, but harder numbers like "Where Were You When I Needed You?" and "Things I Should Have Said" are more to my taste. "Feelings" and "Hot Bright Lights" merit mention. Even "Bella Linda" with the sappy violins is a gem.
I Want Wind To Blow  performed by The Microphones  2001
Recommended by sinister [profile]

i love this song. it repeats itself without ever really repeating itself, and the melody is wonderful. it evokes images of being on a boat that is slowly leaving the harbour, gathering pace while your face is soothed by a warm breeze.

from The Glow 2, available on CD


I Will Get On  performed by Annie  2002
Recommended by SleazyListening [profile]

You may remember Annie from her/their housey dancefloor number of a year or two back "The Greatest Hit".

Well, they've come back with this, a sublime downbeat track with a lush-yet-delicate female vocal. Instrumentally, it reminds me of a slower, swinging P-funk number, quite minimal beats but funky as all hell (in a chill kinda way).

Absolutely beautiful -hard to find but worth looking.

Originally a limited-release 7" on Norwegian label Telle, and quickly licensed by UK house label Loaded -it appears on a sampler they released late 2002.


available on CD - (vinyl) (Loaded)


I Will Return  performed by Warm Ghost
Recommended by DeathandHarmony [profile]




I’ve Grown Accustomed to Her Face  performed by Stan Getz and Cal Tjader Sextet  1958
Recommended by kaptnunderpnts [profile]

this is perhaps my favorite jazz ballad. maybe the most romantic song you'll ever here. stan getz's saxaphone sounds like it came down from the clouds. it sounds so soft and warm. it's often so subtle that you here just air passing across the reed. and cal tjader's vibraphone adds just the right punctuation. the song is ethereal. romantic and ethereal are hardly words i use often, but they seem to be the best i could think of to describe this song.

from Stan Getz and Cal Tjader Sextet - San Francisco


innocent when you dream(78 version)  performed by tom waits  1987
Recommended by olli [profile]

absolutely stunning. this shanty-esque version of "innocent when you dream" is meant to sound like an old 78 record, complete with vinyl crackle and boxy sound.
the street organ(?) is what really makes the song for me, it gives it sort of a "pre-war coney island-style carnival documentary footage"-vibe, if you`re able to make any sense out of that. it really is an absolutely stunning track to close an album with.

"running through the graveyard
we laughed my friends and i/
we swore we`d be together
until the day we died/
until the day we died"

(often i`m a bit uncomfortable when it comes to posting lyric exerpts, in my opinion whether or not a lyric is great is too often dependent on the delivery of the lines and the feel of the music. to me, seperating the lyrics from the song can often lessen their emotional impact. does anyone else feel that way?)

from franks wild years


It's A Fine Day  performed by ATB f/ Miss Jane
Recommended by LOWTONES22 [profile]

It's exactly that, A Fine Day. Kinda like theose first days of Spring, people finally leave their houses and shake out the Winter Blues. Great to hear at a club and dance to. The epitome of house breaks.





keep it warm  performed by flo and eddie  1976
Recommended by plunk [profile]

I always loved the turtles so followed on to flo and eddie. this is the only song that has stuck with me by them tho. beach boys- esque paean to the lost ideals and protagonists of the 60's (sob). pretty

from moving targets/ best of
available on CD - flo and eddie best of


Kim  performed by Bertrand Burgalat  2000
Recommended by dedismo [profile]

style: pop, downbeat. Smooth, easy, just the right amound of bossa, drums, synthesizers. Kim is just a great song all around and only 7 some minutes long. But you don't ever want it to end. Keeps your head nodding. Burgalat is the master of instrumentation as much as Sean O'Hagen is to the High Llamas. He can produce a mellow, warm, lush sound like no one else at the moment.

from The Genius of... (Bungalow bung 079)



  tempted: Ah, mon dieu! I hate comparisons in general but I must say to everyone who's just bought 10 000 Hz legend by Air: get rid of it and get hold of The Sssound of Mmmusic by Bertrand Burgalat instead. He's special.
  delicado: yeah, I must pick it up. I have 'the genius of' and I love most of it.
  autopilot: One of the best things that Burgalat has ever created, and considering his incredible body of work as producer/performer, is no mean feat! It's this tune that turned me on to the whole Tricatel sound that he singularly seems to be the master of.
Kortisin  performed by Plaid  1997
Recommended by Mr Tom [profile]

A lovely triptych. Plaid keep their trademark odd noises (creaking doors and weird duck quacks in this track) more in check than usual, and the result's a little more conventional than a lot of their work, but it's also very pretty. It's tightly structured, with a happy little introduction followed by three sections marked by their different, though related, warm basslines. Each has a gentle melody of its own, and between each there's an interesting break. Warm, sophisticated, and full of beauty.

from Not For Threes (Warp)



La Discotheque  performed by Mike Rozakis  1973
Recommended by human-cannonball [profile]

This is an absolutely impossible rarity, as it has never been released out of the original master-tape (until 1 year ago)! Part of the soundtrack of a 1973 Greek psychedelic underground film with the international title 'She Knew No Other Way' (local title: Children of the Flowers). However, this is not a mad freak-beat groovy tune (which is the case for most of the rest of the tunes in the soundtrack score); instead, it's a warm, classy, mid-tempo, funky jam with wah-wah guitar & sax solos and a very discreet piano backing. As a Greek, I was astounded by the discovery of this 70s funky gem from a totally unknown composer (Mike Rozakis). A true obscurity masterpiece, seek the proper vinyl release from Greek label 'Potfleur'.

from She Knew No Other Way OST (Potfleur)



  n-jeff: Thanks for the heads up on this LP! Its a great one, I love the way its at once stumbling and psychedlic, but at the same time maintains the great groove. Good fuzz guitar and great strings, plus that lovely wayward organ. Is there any more Mike Rozakis music lurking around?
La Spiaggia  performed by Ennio Morricone  1971
Recommended by bobbyspacetroup [profile]

Another of my favorite Morricone tracks. It's a long one at over 8 minutes. As is often the case (with Morricone especially), it's so hard for me to describe the mood of this song -- warm, sexy, yet heartbreakingly sad.

from Veruschka (Point Records PRCD 111 (I, 1995))




  leonthedog: Yes, this one's rather spooky - and beautiful. I recommend the entire album!
Last Summer  performed by Lostprophets  2004
Recommended by izumi [profile]

I love music that can make you visualize in your mind what the song is trying to convey. This is one of those songs that always makes me feel nostalgic and wistful whenever I hear it - nostalgic not because it's a song from my childhood but because it talks about happy times gone by. When I hear it, I can picture in my mind a group of friends driving in a car through their hometown with an orange sunset in the sky. This is a song about happy memories which is something that everybody can relate to.

The instrumentals are nice too. I like how the guitar flares up at the chorus, and the steady beat of the drum, and how the singer's voice seems to echo throughout the song even after he's sung a word. This song might not seem very special, but it's amazing to listen to!

from Start Something (Visible Noise TORMENT32)


Late May’s Gaze  performed by Love You Moon
Recommended by arcadeatemyqrtr [profile]

evolving blues, warms the soul.




Little Eyes  performed by Yo La Tengo  2003
Recommended by Bazz [profile]

Season Of The Shark was a nice song off of Summer Sun but Little Eyes is much much better. It starts off with a penetrating beep followed by warm synths. When the beat starts you just can't refuse tapping along with your feet. And the vocals... oh my. The vocals sound as if angels are whispering in your ears. A nice instrumental break somewhere in the middle, and this song is a real gem on an album that was a big let down. Except for those two tracks.

from Summer Sun (Matador)


Lluvia de Primavera/Spring Rain  performed by Bebu Silvetti  1975
Recommended by tempted [profile]

The definition of a groovy, instrumental easy listening disco tune. Makes me wanna jump on the first plane to somewhere warm and swinging. Great piano and acoustic guitar accompaniment from this Spanish lizard with a hairy face. And that girl backing choir.. there are two single versions of this that are slightly different and a full length version which is the best.






  tempted: To correct: the "full-length version" is in fact a disco mix by Salsoul stalwart Tom Moulton. So good, man... Crazy percussive middle part galore! Available as a Salsoul 12". Tell me if you bump into one!
love with the three of us  performed by stereo total  2001
Recommended by olli [profile]

english language version of "l' amour a 3", available as a bonus track on the american release of "musique automatique".

cute electronic pop song about threesomes, courtesy of french-german electro-rockabilly-breakbeat-chanson-disco-pop sensation stereo total.
features some great moaning samples.
the ooohohouou- sound in the chorus remind me of a norwegian children's programme i used to watch when i was a kid. i just love the vocals in this version. they might not be technically perfect, but the french-german accent is really cute, and adds a lot to the feel of the song.

"it's absolutely out, i know it's hippie shit/
but i say it loud, with the three of us, i love it"

(by the way, stereo total are very nice people. they deserve your love)


available on CD - musique automatique (kill rock stars)



Lullaby  performed by Krzysztof Komeda & Mia Farrow  1968
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

And I am not just including this because it is from Rosemary's Baby, my very favourite film of all time. Well, maybe I am a little - the opening credits where Polanski guides us over the rooftops of the Bramford while Mia murmurs her "la la la"s sets up perfectly the movie heaven that is to come.

Actors usually make a hash of singing (and, of course, vice versa - Bjork is great in Dancer In The Dark but that's all I can come up with), although I've heard that Cybil Shepherd makes a decent stab. But Mia can't fail to impress with her innocent singing voice, keeping in the character of Rosemary even though she doesn't speak a word in this song. Komeda maintains his usual atmospheric wonder, with the sort of piano based joy that gave such a fruitful relationship with Polanski's films.

Lots of others have had a pop at this, usually with some degree of success as the melody is so strong (discounting a dodgy metal version of it by some chancers whose name escapes me). My favourites are Hugo Montenegro's (on Good Vibrations) and Claudine Longet's lyric-added version, Sleep Safe And Warm.

from Rosemary's Baby, available on CD




  Swinging London: I love this too! It seems to pull the whole movie into a class of it's own. I've been trying to find the Claudine Longet version for years!
Mayfly  performed by Belle and Sebastian
Recommended by Reina [profile]

Belle and Sebastian are great. This particul song is light and summery and will make you feel like you are laying in the grass on a warm, breezy summer day.

"your diary's looking like a bible with it's verses lost in time..."





  kkkerplunkkk: Hmm, yes but it smacks of someone who's listened too much to Love and Nick Drake. I'd rather listen to the Fieldmice who did that first and much better.
Meaning of Love  performed by Karin Krog  1974
Recommended by mr_klenster [profile]

What a strange and beautiful song! Cool-toned organ melodies played against a thick, warm, bass vein running through the entire song, complex drum backing, and the oddly distant, yet personally reflective lyrics of Karin Krog, combine to create a dream-like sound.






  Pal: Excellent song! Written by Steve Kuhn an american jazz musician/composer/arranger who I think lived in scandinavia in the late sixties. Besides Karin Krogh he has also worked with Monica Zetterlund. The best version of this song he has recorded himself though. Featuring Gary Mcfarland, Airto, Ron Carter & Billy Cobham!!
Meant for you  performed by The Beach Boys  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A charming little song which clocks in at around 35 seconds, opening the superb 'Friends' album. In a way which complements the superb Beach Boys track 'our prayer', 'meant for you' has a slight hint of a religious, hymn-like tone, with a prominent organ sound and uplifting words. The overall effect is a very warm, beautiful track which you keep wanting to hear again.

from Friends
available on CD - Friends/20 20




  LawrenceM: there is another fantastic version of this on the Brain Wilson s/t album to the film "I Just Wasn't Made For These Times", just Brian on piano and vocals. I can't understand why "Friends" isn't up there is "Pet Sounds" ... it's suh a great, and overlooked, album.
  hewtwit: Friends is indeed a great beach boys album, with only a few weak tracks. Smiley Smile I feel is also underrated for not being smile... It's still lovely music though.
Melody  performed by Serge Gainsbourg  1971
Recommended by eurotrashkit [profile]

Melody Nelson is probably one of the best serge gainsbourg albums.
he mumbles and sings about the fictional character Melody Nelson, a young red haired teenager.
the opening track 'Melody' would've almost been enough to fill an entire album with: it's full of bass, violins and soft drums but it never comes across as being over the top.
and that's what this album is: perfectly produced, orchestrated and beautiful...
beautiful, yet quietly disturbing.
"melody nelson" is a defining french album.

well, that's what i think anyway : )

from Melody Nelson, available on CD



  robert[o]: One of the BEST LPs ever, period, end of sentence! Also - a great lost piece of the UK glam rock jigsaw, I think. Listen to this record, then listen to Bowie's "Ziggy Stardust" or "Aladdin Sane", Roxy Music's "Stranded" or "For Your Pleasure", even "The Slider" or "Tanx" by T. Rex. Serge's fingerprints are all over those records.
Mister Love  performed by Dr. Buzzard's Original Savannah Band  1978
Recommended by PappaWheelie [profile]

Cosmopolitan Disco with a warm orchestration igniting the perfect melody, Cory Daye's vocal performance can't go wrong. Dr. Buzzard's music is unlike any other music with the battered "Disco" tag. As with most of their discography, this is highly recommended! Also try "The Gigolo and I" and "Transistor Madness-Future DJ" from their wrongly criticized "Dr. Buzzard's Original Savannah Band Meets King Pennett" album.

from Dr. Buzzard's Original Savannah Band Meets King Penett (RCA)
available on CD - Very Best of Dr. Buzzard's Original Savannah Band (RCA)




  ryder0059: I JUST WANTED TO SAY MISS CORY DAYE VOICE IS ONE OF A KIND,IT IS ABSOLUTELY BREATHTAKING,SASSY WITTY,STYLISH.I WISH SOMEBODY WOULD GET HER BACK INTO THE STUDIO AS SOMEONE WOULD MAKE LOTS OF MONEY.I DONT GET IT AS HER CORY AND ME RECORD IS OUT OF PRINT BUT SELLS FOR THIRTY DOLLARS ON EBAY AND OTHER OUT OF THE COUNTRY SELLERS LIKE ROCK HOUSE MUSIC. I REALLY BELIEVE THAT IF THEY PLAYED SOME OF HER MUSIC ON THE RADIO NOW IT WOULD SELL LIKE GOLD COME ONE SOMEONE PLEASE GET HER BACK INTO THE STUDIO THANKS FOR YOUR TIME JOHN KARVASALES
  Lemluv: Thank you for posting this. I have been enchanted by the works of August Darnell, Stony Brower and Co. in all it's manifestations. Seductive yet sophisticated, concealing a rapier and wit all the time dressed to impress (from Tropical Gangsters to Zoot Suits, y mas). They were pegged as a "disco" group, but were much more. What gets me the most is how visual their music could be. Nostalgic, contemporary, and ahead of it's time simultaneously.
My Time  performed by Telex  1980
Recommended by geezer [profile]

A wonderfully weird piece of synth pop from Belgian electro pioneers Telex ,a sublime layered ,warm pop song ,both commercial and avant ,its repetition is its strength ,the tune seemingly going nowhere but all the time rushing to the part of your brain that says "this is f---ing brilliant,it celebrates life in the moment and the mundane and cannot fail to improve your mind and your day.

from Neurovision, available on CD


Não Adianta  performed by Leny Andrade  1975
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An absolutely storming upbeat funky Brazilan pop/bossa track. I've never found anything else in the same vein by Leny Andrade, but this one is truly incredible. From the very beginning, this song is quite relentlessly uplifting. It manages to be very hip and funky, yet emotional and warm at the same time. Far more percussive than most Brazilian stuff I've recommended, this is nevertheless one of my absolute favorites.


available on CD - Blue Brazil Vol 3 (EMI UK)



New York New York  performed by Nina Hagen  1983
Recommended by Yammer [profile]

The DIY ethos of punk served to liberate performers from the obligation to have a great deal of technical ability. The unfortunate corollary was that any display of already-acquired virtuousity instantly marked one as part of the Uncool Wankerage, forcing nascent guitar gods like Andy Summers to play as though suddenly arthritic. Possibly the first artist to successfully bridge Old World training and New World raucousness was Nina Hagen. "New York New York" is the East German-trained singer's signature tune. Over a clipped, dry Morodor techno-dystopia background, the verses present Hagen recounting her then-current regimen of glamourous excess in a harsh, metallic raven's shriek. Then, as though descending from the heavens at the end of a Wagnerian opera, comes the chorus -- a meltingly warm (yet uncomfortable) wave of minor chords, then a soaring, yearning, superbly modulated mezzo-soprano...which, after a jolt of realization, is understood to also belong to Nina Hagen. And so on.

from Fearless (CBS)


Noah’s Dove  performed by 10,000 Maniacs  1992
Recommended by Yammer [profile]

For admirers of classic pop song construction, production, and performance, Noah's Dove is jaw-dropping in its perfection. The subtle piano hook, deep and dark chord changes, and the warm, dry-eyed, heartbreakingly acute singing grab your ears, while the lyrics (an unhurried, unsparing epitaph to a relationship with a cheating scumbag) clench your heart. The best part may be that it introduces Our Time In Eden, a collection of finely-crafted folk-pop songs that served as a worthy finale for the Maniacs.

from Our Time In Eden


Now There’s That Fear Again  performed by Múm  2002
Recommended by pleasepleaseme [profile]

This track begins with the sounds of a bong being puffed and the clicking of a metal lighter being flicked. This album is a winner, from start to finish. If you are a fan of the Cocteau Twins, Eno, Cluster, or Bjork, give this one a try! Perfect! Ambient Rock at its best. And very warm Electronica too! So good, you may hit the repeat button on your player more then once.

from Finally We Are No One, available on CD


Oba, la vem ela  performed by Jorge Ben  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An incredible, hard-to-describe classic from Jorge Ben. It opens with a funky, feverishly strummed chord sequence, and builds up beautifully. Warm strings come in, while the vocals become more and more manic (in a good way). I really can't do this song justice in words, but I urge you to check it out. Jorge Ben really is a genius songwriter, and his backing group, 'trio mocoto' really rock.

from Forca Bruta
available on CD - mojo club volume 4 (Polygram Germany)




  sodapop650: My favorite Jorge Ben is his work on the LP "Tudo Azul" by Ze Maria. If you are not familiar with Ze Maria he is a very hip brazilian organist. The easy comparison whould be with Walter Wanderley, but he is way way cooler with a chimelike reverbed style and a lot darker sound, almost creepy voodoo northern Brazil Bahia sound like the way "Os Afrosambas" by Baden Powell Vinicius de Moraes and Quarteto Em Cy is. A guy I work with is from Brazil and says that although just about everyone is Catholic in Brazil many practice voodoo too and that Vinicius made a pact with the Devil in return for his career - There is something distant and weird about that LP - and the Ze Maria LP as well. Anyway, I think "Tudo Azul" which is available on CD is the first versions of Ben classics Mas Que Nada and Por Causa de Voce Menina. If you go on to ebay look for a guy named Alan Bastos, he sells tons of cool Brazilian CDs cheap.
  tinks: was this recorded in '69? it's the first track on his '76 "samba nova" lp...is that a re-recording, or what? can somebody shed some light for me? at any rate, it's a great album for, uh, "lovin'". my favorite track would have to be "vendedor de bananas cosa nostra--bicho do mato", if not for its unwieldly title alone.
  sodapop651: No this LP is on Continental Label and recorded in 1963. It is available on CD. Tudo Azul, I think it means "everything Blue"
  tinks: the version i have is definitely not from 63, it's waaay too funky.
  delicado: I'm confused about the whole thing. I have no idea where I originally got 1969 from (other than that the arrangement suggested it); the song is on 'Forca Bruta', which I thought was from 1975, but I think in retrospect that's just the date of the copy my (appalling quality) LP was bootlegged from.
  delicado: Ok. It turns out there's a pretty good Jorge Ben discography at http://www.uol.com.br/benjor/disco.htm, which confirms the date of Forca Bruta as 1970. I think sodapop was talking about the (completely separate) Ze Maria album. I heard 'mas que nada' from this album, and it was indeed excellent.
  Marco-Visitante: Official and completes discography of Jorge Ben Jor is here: http://www.jorgebenjor.com.br/sec_discogra_discos.php?language=en
  sodapop650: But I've changed my mind. My new favorite Ben classic is "Carnaval Triste" of the Sacundin LP. There is also a great Ze Maria cover of it off an even earlier LP I'm not sure who penned it or recorded it first. But its meditative and chantlike and very voodoo.
Ode to Billy Joe  performed by Ronnie Aldrich  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A near-perfect take on this classic song. Ronnie dispenses with vocals, instead building a beautiful mood with some great strings, a relentless beat and percussive guitar. The bluesey melody is carried delicately by the piano. I'm not really getting it across here, but the track is astounding - astonishingly addictive and well recorded, building wonderfully to a warm and incredibly groovy climax.

from For Lovers Only (London/Phase 4)



Off Night Backstreet  performed by Joni Mitchell  1977
Recommended by mojoto [profile]

If someone would have asked me say ten years ago what artist's oeuvre I would take with me to a desert island, I would with dead certainty have answered: everything by Joni Mitchell, please. I'm not so sure anymore, although it could well be that I, when push comes to shove, would still make that choice. So it may not come as a surprise now that for a long time my all time best album was one of Joni's, Don Juan's Reckless daughter, where her cooperation with Jaco Pastorius really took off, for instance on this song where she's questioning her love for a man who's new sweety has already moved in while still keeping poor Joni (assuming the song is sort of autobiographical) on the side as his Off Night Backstreet. Jaco's warm bass carries the whole song and is almost like a second voice to Joni's singing, it blends marvelously with her cold metal guitar, some nice echoey and spacy flageolets too, great additional vocals - "Backstreeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeet!"- by JD Souther and Glenn Frey, drums by John Guerrin, subtle and tight. PS Be warned that the soundfile is quite big (500 Kb).

from Don Juan's Reckless Daughter (Asylum 701-2)



Out on the rebound for love  performed by Gangway
Recommended by moondog [profile]

Danish pop anyone ? Not that i am an expert in the genre but danish group Gangway made some fine records in the eighties in the aztec camera, prefab sprout vein. Especially this fine track with acoustic guitars that attack you like swarming bees and just the right amount of romantic longing that is the trademark of the genre.




Out on the side  performed by Dillard and Clark  1969
Recommended by lpeditor [profile]

A friend told me about this band around Christmas time, and knowing my particular musical taste, couldn't understand why I hadn't heard of them before. The LP 'The Fantastic Expedition of Dillard and Clark' is superb. Soulful country music with some stunning harmonies and mellow, warm production.

from The Fantastic Expedition of Dillard and Clark


Papaya  performed by Stelvio Cipriani  1978
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Very well arranged, fully orchestrated bossa nova piece by the otherwise rather obscure Stelvio Cipriani. Very warm, breezy,summery feeling on this one with it's light beat, lush and silky strings, great melody played on trumpet and harpsicord. It's very resembling of the Morricone sound of the late 60s/ early 70s, in fact you could easily fit this one onto the first "Mondo Morricone" compilation it's so good.

from Bossa Galore - Lounge At Cinevox, available on CD



Po’ Boy  performed by Bob Dylan  2001
Recommended by Gumbo [profile]

Just when I had almost lost all hope of ever hearing a new Dylan song which, as a combination of an engaging vocal performance and fascinating lyrics, just fill you with a strange sense of happiness - he comes up with this one. While not being like a typical Dylan classic, this one has a very, very warm feel to it + vocals which I thought he couldn't produce in 2001 anymore. After the rather cold and almost posturingly melancholy "Time Out of Mind" album, "Love & Theft" was pleasantly wise and human.

from Love & Theft, available on CD


Pure Shores  performed by All Saints
Recommended by LateBirdsInMay [profile]

I'm not just going for the 'most unfashionable song selection' award - this is a great song despite everything. As well as immediately winning me over by being about finding your own secret beach somewhere warm it also manages to be humourous ('...I'm intruiged - I'm insured...') and it's so seductively sung you can't help but be won over. More than that the song's rhythym drives forward at the chorus like a wave, and the overall effect is of being taken to the hidden shore on a rollercoaster.

from The Beach OST



Repined bastard nation  performed by Satyricon  2002
Recommended by olli [profile]

Satanist surf rock! (or a reasonable facsimile of that would sound like, anyway.)
From the land of polar bears and fjords
comes this insanely massive-sounding piece of black metal with a heavy dose of Dick Dale influences. It's quite poppy for a black metal tune, if you can see past the growling. I have to admit I've never actually listened too closely to the lyrics, i'm sure they're very misantrophic and gloomy and all, but this song feels very uplifting to me somehow. same thing as with Primal Scream's Detroit and Ennio Morricone's Magic and Extacy, i guess.
the synth effects round it out nicely, the guitars are fast and furious, and you got to love that drumming.


(One of these days I'm gonna have to make a mixtape with the world's most glaringly insane shifts of tone from one song to the next. This will fit nicely in between Dean Martin and Jean Jaques Perrey...)

from Volcano



Rose Kennedy  performed by Benjamin Biolay  2001
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

In his home country France Benjamin Biolay often is praised as the "nouveau Gainsbourg", he's a singer, songwriter, arranger, producer, orchestrator and plays various instruments. His debut album "Rose Kennedy" shows the impact "Histoire de Melody Nelson" had on him, as this is also conceived as a concept album. The track "Rose Kennedy" sounds very 60's in its instrumentation and feel, with lush, rich strings, warm Fender Rhodes keyboard, gentle and dreamlike vocals with a sparse dose of electronica and some samples thrown in.

from Rose Kennedy, available on CD




  nighteye: Can you call him the french version of Scott Walker? This song reminds me of some of Walkers songs from the '60s, and what a great song 'Rose Kennedy' is. I love the strings and Biolay's deep voice.
Rose Petals, Incense and a Kitten  performed by The Association  1968
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

This is a pretty much overlooked gem by The Association. Somewhere described as a "total pacific beach fantasy", that's exactly how the song sounds. With it's idealized lyrics, great vocal harmonies, lush strings and a very nice acoustic guitar solo you can almost feel a gentle pacific breeze, evoking a similar kind of "lost summer" mood Chad & Jeremy's "Distant Shores" provide (at least for me)...

from Birthday, available on CD




  tinks: yummy song! i love this whole lp.
Rosemary  performed by Scott Walker  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

It's another doomy orchestral vocal masterpiece! A devastating piece, this would be a depressing song if it weren't for the incredible string arrangement, which is like warm sunlight. I can't recommend this (and the album it's taken from) highly enough.

from Scott 3, available on CD




  nighteye: I feel like making a movie just based on this song alone. This is a great piece of music and probably one of Scott Walkers best achivements. I love the gloomy, rainy feeling you get listening to it, Walker's voice is incredible.
roses in the snow  performed by Nico  1969
Recommended by belphegor [profile]

wow, i mean: wow... i've been an avid nico lover for years, having acquired a deep appreciation of her via some claimed proto-goth associations. obscure subcultural praise and all that velvet underground hoop-la aside, her amazing "desertshore" was proof enough that nico was and is a uniquely powerful force in life and art. but this "roses in the snow" diddy just floored me on a first listen. the revolving, minimalist tune of her harmonium must be the loneliest, most disillusioned harmony ever played since "gloomy sunday," and the cryptically profound words the closest thing rock'n'roll ever got to the "book of job." what does this piece really mean to say? not sure really: but somehow, i think it might be something like re-reading a long-departed lover's suicide note on a warm, languid autumn day...

from the marble index, available on CD


Runaround Sue  performed by Dion & the Belmonts  1962
Recommended by fantasticsupremedeluxe [profile]

"I should have known it from the very start
This girl would leave me with a broken heart
Now listen people, what I'm telling you
keep away from Runaround Sue


I miss her lips and the smile on her face
touch of her hands and this girls warm embrace
so if you don't wanna cry like I do
keep away from Runaround Sue"


Half sad, half funky. A very groovy Doo Wop - track with a funny melody that makes it hard to believe that the guy is really blue...


available on CD - Dion Hits (1958-1963) (Ace)


Samba de mon coeur qui bat  performed by Coralie Clément  2001
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Lovely, mellow bossa nova track. Coralie Clement is the sister of Benjamin Biolay, who wrote almost all the songs on the album and produced, arranged and played a variety of instruments on it. There's a timeless quality about this song, certainly due to the fact the arrangement is simply impeccable and delicate and Coralies whispery, rather flat but warm, sensual voice sounds like a cross between Astrud Gilberto, Claudine Longet and Jane Birkin. The whole record is a quite a gem.

from Salle des pas perdus, available on CD



Sequoia  performed by Fay Lovsky  1997
Recommended by mojoto [profile]

The consistent high quality of the ever expanding oeuvre of Fay Lovsky doesn't make it easy to pick one song to examplify her work, so I'll just go by the moment and will choose my present favorite Sequoia, a humorous ode to a wooden californian characterised by a laid back bluesy pizzicato groove and tremelo glissandi especially towards the end, where they tickle the tree to a dramatic finale. All instruments on this track are acoustic (drums, bass, guitar, violins) and the sound is warm and direct as usual.

from Numbers (Basta 30-9069-2)



Sidewalk  performed by Birdie  2001
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Great soundtrack to a sun-drenched sunday afternoon. Birdie members Paul Kelly and Deborah Wykes met as tour musicians for Saint Etienne, and in fact they sound similar with Deborah Wykes sounding like a somewhat subdued, toned down Sarah Cracknell. But you can hear more influences, with all the warm instrumentation in the song (acoustic guitar, flutes, muted trumpet, various analogue keyboards) it's close to late 60s easy listening pop, Bacharach and The Carpenters.

from Triple Echo, available on CD



Smell Memory  performed by Múm  2000
Recommended by dedismo [profile]

Like children's music with break-beatish percussion, melodious and warm with a haunting ending. Elements of Aphex Twin, Autechre. I like how the ending keeps you wanting more. Each of the band's four members was in their late teens when the record was released.

from Yesterday was dramatic, today is ok, available on CD



Street Spirit (Fade Out)  performed by Radiohead  1994
Recommended by two-headed boy [profile]

If the sun would rise in a minor key, this is what it would sound like. The shadows dissolve around you in warm harmony, even death sunbathes here, in a song ripe with hope and humanity. It is a misnomer to 'Fade Out' when we are held not by darkness, but by light. The paralysis of a dreary existence is manifested in the 'Street Spirit' where 'cracked eggs, dead birds scream as they fight for life' and 'machines will not communicate these thoughts and strain I am under.' If we were to stifle the creative spirit all we would need to do is look down a suburb and notice the lack of aesthetics and individuality of the homes. 'Rows of houses all bearing down on me...all these things will one day take control and fade out again.' This is the prelude to the bigger picture found in Radiohead's songs. Sure they dwell on the robotics of Orwell's '1984', and at times they are tedious and painfully accurate, nevertheless they leave us with an indelible desire to survive. 'Immerse your soul in Love' wags it's tail at the end of the song to insure a new beginning, much like the death of night. When sung, it is a very exciting moment as Thom's voice soars above the convolutions of the incessant guitar picking and synth-strings. Not the most popular Radiohead song, but their brightest moment to be experienced.

from The Bends (Capitol CDP 7243 8 29626 2 5)


Summertime Rolls  performed by Jane’s Addiction  1988
Recommended by rooftop_holler [profile]

a major theme song during one of the first summers in which i got to experience pure slivers of life on my own terms. reminds me of billy kaiser, and still-warm, oceany air in the drive home from the beach late at night. and lying on my back looking at stars. don't know if you'll feel it to or if it's context for me...lemme know. ; )

from Nothing's Shocking, available on CD



  rooftop_holler: ok, that shoulda been "too" with 2 "o"'s...whaddya want at 3 am?
The Good, the Bad & the Ugly  performed by Luiz Bonfa  1968
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A rather warm and funky take on the Morricone classic, with harp, violins, trumpets and very cool percussive elements.

from Bonfa! (Dot)


The Last Good Day of the Year  performed by Cousteau  1999
Recommended by secularus [profile]

Lets just say I listened to this tune in repeat on my player December 31,1999. Yes, a cliche I know, but we all have our moments. Cousteau's sound can be aptly described as Scott Walker fronting the Tindersticks. Liam's strong voice seduces the maudlin trumpet and carries it away with him as the song breaks into its chorus and an instrumental crescendo. Sentimental, romantic.


available on CD - Cousteau (Global Warming Ltd)



the last good day of the year  performed by cousteau  2000
Recommended by joakimbo [profile]

hmm, well its just such a gorgeous song, mellow and warm, a bit melancholy. very evocative of those early autumn days when the sun is low and golden and everything feels a bit warm and slow.


available on CD - cousteau



  G400 Custom: We could argue all day about how this song is derivative of Scott Walker - but the fact remains that it's just a fantastic record.
theo b  performed by sunny day real estate  1995
Recommended by complacentbasement [profile]

the song starts out with three crisp hi-hat clicks, the bell of a ride, then the drums and a sweet, warm toned bass lock in for a driving, mid-tempo, beautifully melodic cut time. guitars, once in, are clean-toned and somewhat polyphonically arranged, (that is, they play alot of single-note lines that swirl around each other, harmonizing at spots, and creating counterpoint). the vocals are potentially a little hard to swallow at first, jeremy has a tendency to sing a little through the nose, but it's really quite endearing. i personally find that after a bit of exposure to it, not only does it fit the music perfectly, but i really have grown to love it, (i listen to them ALOT).
this is one of those songs that you put on when you need to feel better- a kind of resolute, "well, time to go on, and hope for the best" feel. it can also easily be listened to when in a great mood. best listened to outside, looking at the sky.
when listening to ANY sunny day real estate, you must be patient. it's patient music, and it requires a certain amount of consideration that keeps it from being good "background music."
i fucking love this stuff.

from lp2 (the pink album) (sub pop sp316b)


Tiao braço forte  performed by Marcos Valle  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A sophisticated and understated pop bossa. This song can breeze by the first time you hear it, but the unexpected hooks and chord changes make for addictive listening. There are strings, a gentle and high male vocal and a rhythmic piano. It really is heavenly. I should add that the CD compilation this appears on, 'the essential...volume 2', is really one of the very best single-artist compilations I've ever heard. The liner notes are not perfect though - this song is erroneously listed as 'Tiao branco forte'. Great compilation though, one which showed me that Marcos really is a genius.

from Viola Enluarada (Odeon)
available on CD - The Essential Marcos Valle, Vol 2 (Mr Bongo)



Tiny Dancer  performed by Elton John  1971
Recommended by cryofthecelt [profile]

The song "Tiny Dancer" by Elton John is one of my favorite songs of all time. Even though I have never been to California, it reminds me of California. When I hear that song, I think of walking down Hollywood Boulevard and staring down at the stars studding the marble floor. I think of sitting in a movie theater with James Dean and Marilyn Monroe and laughing at Charlie Chaplin reels. Elton is an extraordianary pianist and a wonderful singer, and I think that "Tiny Dancer" does him more justice than any other song that he has ever performed. This song just moves me in a very special way, and it will always be close to me.

from Madman Across the Water (Polygram Records)
available on CD - Greatest Hits 1970-2002 (Universal)



  SuzyCreamcheese: I love this song!
Warm Up  performed by Henry Mancini  1973
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Strange, plodding piece for this film about the '72 Munich Olympics. Very odd tempo (7/4 time?) with a warm cornet right up front that interplays nicely with the organ.

from Visions of Eight (RCA Victor)



Warmth of the Sun  performed by The Beach Boys  1964
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Another of my favorite Beach Boys tracks, 'warmth of the sun' is a haunting ballad, sung astoundingly beautifully (Carl Wilson does the lead vocals) over a twangy picked electric guitar. From the astounding album 'Shut down vol. 2' which also gave us 'Don't Worry Baby'! 6 years ago I thought that the Beach Boys were pretty much 'Surfin' USA and other surfer hits'. I'm glad I was able to get beyond this - there's so much to discover!

from Shut Down Vol. 2 (Capitol)
available on CD - Surfer Girl/Shut Down Vol. 2 (Capitol/EMI)



Winter Warm  performed by Bob Crewe Generation  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A great, spacey, upbeat track by music business impresario Bob Crewe. This is basically just very nicely dressed up brassy easy listening instrumental music. The arrangement has a cool 'Barbarella' sheen to it, with spacey sounds alongside the bouncy strings. A nice track from a great album.

ps. the inside gatefold sleeve of this album uses the same photo as the cover of The Smiths's 'Rank.'

from Music to Watch Birds by (Dynovoice)


Zazueira  performed by Astrud Gilberto & Stanley Turrentine  1971
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A very funky track from Astrud's final US album. Very bass-heavy and percussive, just an excellent song. Stanley Turrentine's tenor sax doesn't meld with Gilberto's voice nearly as well as Stan Getz' warmer tones did, but that's a minor flaw that doesn't detract from the overall song too much.

from Gilberto with Turrentine, available on CD


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