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search results for “melancholy”
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List songs by Song title | Performer | Year

You searched for ‘melancholy’, which matched 81 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
#41 (Live at Luther College version)  performed by Dave Matthews Band  1996
Recommended by sunev45 [profile]

great acoustic guitar, haunting lyrics... One of the best from this band

from Crash, available on CD


"Solitude"  performed by Black Sabbath  1971
Recommended by booblikon [profile]

lilac and deep blue/velvet symmetry where all emotions are filtered thru sound to encase the listener in suffocating oblivion; i drown in good music like i do in a crowd of people, but for different reasons

from Master Of Reality, available on CD (Vertigo (UK); Warner Bros. (US))


(Quicksilver Daydreams of) Maria  performed by Townes Van Zandt  1970
Recommended by andrew76 [profile]

This is (for me) one of the greatest songs of love ever written. The song describes the appearance of a goddess among women and is pure (if at times naive) poetry. The arrangement is simple lead and rhythm guitars and bass with an organ giving a more filled out feeling from the second verse and violin in the fourth. The tone is melancholy but happy, as if the singer is basking in the light of this most beautiful woman. It must have been written for someone, someone lucky to be thought so beautiful. But there is sadness in that the singer may be singing of his unrequited love. Some of the alliteration is fantastic too.

from Townes Van Zandt, available on CD (Pppy Records)



  booblikon: there is a great story in the documentary film "Be Here To Love Me", as told by Guy Clark: this song apparently came to Van Zandt in a particularly peak morning of inspiration, when Clark describes finding Townes uncharacteristically fit and alert. after making his bed to military specification, he played Clark a new song (this one), which he intended to perform at an appearance that same evening. i may have rendered parts of this story incorrectly, so i definitely recommend the movie if you are a fan; even if not, as it is sad but quite revelatory.
100,000 Fireflies  performed by The Magnetic Fields  1990
Recommended by nicegeoff [profile]

Possibly one of the greatest pop songs I've heard. A minimal arrangement of synth bells and piano over a distorted & looped drum beat.

from Distant Plastic Trees


1979  performed by smashing pumpkins  1995
Recommended by callgirlscene [profile]

Loud drums and simple recurring guitar riffs are the setting for a melancholy, but rocking look back on a special time. Billy Corgan manages to sound like Mick Jagger. There's a kind of regretful feeling Smashing Pumpkins evoke that I felt in the movie "The Last Picture Show".


available on CD - Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness (Virgin)


All My Friends Who Play Guitar  performed by Starflyer 59
Recommended by Kilbey1 [profile]

Melancholy jangle tune with sweet, haunting melody; discussed the trials and tribulations of those little bands that slip under our musical radar, however worthy. Reminiscent of garage band struggles, all who picked up a guitar in school in hopes of making it big. For those who make it big, hundreds - no, thousands - of bands are still waiting to be heard.

"And never thought it'd go this far / We never thought that / We'd ever go far / Like all my friends who play guitar / Know who we are? / We never go far / Like all my friends who play guitar"

(btw, I had no idea these guys were Christian; never sounded like any Christian music I heard!)

from Leave Here a Stranger


Are kisses out of fashion?  performed by Sudeten Creche  198x
Recommended by olli [profile]

Brilliant melancholy synthpop trac. from a bootleg compilation with tracks from the german 80's new wave magazine Flexipop, wich used to come with flexidiscs and tapes.
Been trying to dig up information about the band, without much luck. from the minimalist sound of this song it may even be just one person.

It's a simple song, (complete with a preset 80's synth drumline)
yet it's very effective in conveying a romanticised sense of loss and dread. It's a good song. You can listen to it on sunday afternoons.






  Erky: What do you want to know about Sudeten Creche? I can probably help ya out.
  olli: well, just about anything would be nice, actually:)
  glorious: Oh I can tell you volumes about that group. I received my first kiss while that song was playing.
  glorious: What would you like to know about the band?
  markwarner: I am surprised anyone has heard of us. It's been 24 years since we split. We only recorded 2 12" EP's. I will be happy to answer any questions.
  Henke: I remember the song "are kisses out of fashion?". It used to be my favourite in the early eighties (and still is one of my favourites together with New Orders "Blue monday" and ODWs "Lawnchairs") and I tried to get it but couldnt find it in sweden in the early eighties. I dated a girl who had a compilation with the song on it, unfortunately i didnt get the right upportunity to steal it.... Did "Sudeten Creche" record any more songs? Any chance that they could be found on the internet? I guess the records are not easy to find.... Who were the members? Where are they now? Did they play live?
  markwarner: Website http://www.sudetencreche.com
  Henke: Thanx, cool sleeves, I now recocnize the EP I wanted to steal from my ex-girlfriend (Europe in the year Zero) but please give us some more info. What about the name? What does it mean???? Do I have to visit all these underground vinyl shops to try to get the songs? I have "are kisses out of fashion?" on an old cassette from around 1984 (its getting noisy)
  markwarner: Henke, At the moment your best bet is probably Ebay. Most of these are seriously rare. For more information bookmark the website http://www.sudetencreche.com , be patient, all your questions will be answered and many more!
  Henke: I hope so, I ve heard that answer too many times on the net :-( Has SC reformed? Will they tour this summer???? Arvikafestivalen in Sweden would be THE place for a reunion concert!
  markwarner: Henke, We are about to release more information via the Minimal Wave web site http://www.minimalwave.org and also East Village Radio http://www.eastvillageradio.com and we will also provide News as well via http://www.sudetencreche.com . Plans for new (and old) releases are under discussion as well as possible one-off concert in 2007. Our web site will grow from its small start and information will be added as it becomes available. I am sorry to seem vague but many of your questions are answered in our interviews for MW and EVR. You are welcome to subscribe to our mailing list for our news letter. Please send an e-mail to [email protected] with more information about Arvikafestivlen (ATB Sudeten Creche.
  Henke: www.arvikafestivalen.se The synth and goth festival in Sweden (well there is a lot of other music too... but mainly synth) BTW your homepage seems to be working out fine, i just sent an email to your mailing list
  olli: wow, there´s been a lot happening here since the lat time i logged in! thanks for the info mark, it´s really nice to hear that you guys may be doing more in the future!
Are You For Real  performed by Astronaut Wife  2003
Recommended by MoeShinola [profile]

This is from "Flying Saucer", which for me is the record of the decade. It's electronic synth-pop w/ 2 female vocalists. There's an youthfulness and innocence about the music that makes me think it'd be a good soundtrack for a manga. There's some grown up melancholy there, too, on some of the songs.

from Flying Saucer (Susstones)


Atlas  performed by Emm Gryner  1996
Recommended by mitchiavelli [profile]

Emm Gryner is a Canadian woman now resident in Los Angeles.

Her songs tend to be melancholy and confessional and can become a bit much after a while. Nevertheless, I think she is a great talent who will continue to mature.

'Atlas' is more upbeat than most of her work...if you get a chance to see her perform do so, she's very dynamic.

Here is her website: http://www.deaddaisy.com/ - you can order CDs directly from her.

from Dead Relatives, available on CD (Dead Daisy Records)


Autumn Leaves  performed by Grace Jones  1978
Recommended by geezer [profile]

A perrenial sesonal classic given a veneer of French disco sophistication,its appeal lies in retaining the melancholy of the songs intent whilst infusing the proceedings with something more up beat and Parisienne ,so the song runs at am exhaustive 8 minutes but leads you out of a forboding autumn and takes you nearer the optimism of spring. All achieved through the genius of arrangement and Miss Jones empathy with the song

from Fame, available on CD


Babe, I’m Gonna Leave You  performed by Led Zeppelin
Recommended by Killswitch099 [profile]

The song is a slow melancholy song with a hint of vengeance building up in the beginning. The song then switches to a breakdown, including screaming "baby" by Robert Plant the singer, gives you goosebumps.




Big Saturday  performed by The Jazz Butcher  1985
Recommended by Yammer [profile]

Pat Fish of Northhampton, England, is not a rock star for reasons which might include his naturally reticent and embarassed nature, excessive amounts of Oxford education, and the vagueries of the marketplace, but would not include his songwriting talent, which is massive, if perhaps a wee bit limited in scope (no weird chords, all songs about heartbreak, drunkenness, or cannibalistic fantasies about the Prime Minister). "Big Saturday" is a rousing near-rock number in Pat's heartbreak mode. His singing is liquid, soulful (but not shouty), tender, and helpless in the face of love...a love that MUST remain unrequited for the good of other friendships and sundry considerations of duty and fidelity. At least, I think that is what is going on in this simple, yet devastating tune. For more info, see http://www.jazzbutcher.com/htdb/albums/sex.html

from Sex and Travel (Glass)


Blowin' Bubbles  performed by Call and Response  2001
Recommended by ronaldo [profile]

Just a perfect, perfect pop song. Makes you wanna dance and groove along, but at the same time it's soo unbelievably sweet and a just a liitle melancholy. It starts with a drum beat, and then there's this bass-and-drums groove for a few seconds. Then a little sweet electric piano line enters, just before the voice begins singing the melody: "I'm drinking stars up in the sky, you know where you are / I'm driving cars around your house, it seems so fun". When it's time for the chorus ("So listen to my bubble go pop / I'm coming in, I'm coming over the top"), the main voice sings over a backing vocal doing an "ooh" harmony, and then there's absolute genius backing vocal, where the word "pop" becomes "papapapa". After that, a little guitar riff/solo, along with a very cool electric piano line. Then it just repeats everything all over again one more time, for infinite happiness. The time for a middle break has arrived. A new funky bass groove with lots of different "papapa"s harmonizing together. Now, go back to the first bass-and-drums groove, with a jazzy, relaxed guitar solo, and then it's just grooves and grooves and heavenly harmonies, "Blowin' bubbles".




Campground Daughter  performed by School for the Dead  2004
Recommended by catmarigold [profile]

Melancholy but hopeful. This is a gentle song, with acoustic and electric guitars, electric piano, bass, drums, and voice. Excellent lyrics, terrific mood.

There's a little story here, punctuated by flashes of images and moments.

The song is written by Henning Ohlenbusch who has worked with Chris Collingwood (Fountains of Wayne), Mark Mulcahy, and Lloyd Cole. If those names mean anything to you, then chances are you will enjoy this warm track.

from The New You, available on CD


Colors Bleed  performed by Call And Response  2004
Recommended by MoeShinola [profile]

It's in waltz time, with a strummed electric guitar intro followed by female vocals, bass & drums. There's a short female vocal counterpoint part, then the louder chorus. Towards the end the song changes key with a solo guitar figure, joined then by bass, then the the synth & drums enter in a musical explosion that's really cool.
I did'nt like this song at first, liking the rest of the album("Winds Take No Shape") better but the song has grown into one of my favorites on this record.
The full album is one of my favorites of the decade, second only to "Flying Saucer" by Astronaut Wife.

from Winds Take No Shape (Badman)


Desire Lines  performed by Lush  1994
Recommended by parlop [profile]

So beautiful and quietly emotional as a lot of shoegazing is. One of their longest songs... it starts out with the wailing guitar melody that's repeated throughout and accented by Miki Berenyi's calm and melancholy vocals, but the instrumental parts are really the most prominent parts of the song. The best part is at around 3:53 when the guitars go crazy. the whole thing seems very representative of sadness and getting to that point where you just can't hold it in anymore and you start weeping hardcore. it's a good song... the only one that can make me cry over and over again.

from Split (4AD)


Dining Alone  performed by Carla Bley
Recommended by mr_klenster [profile]

The balance of beautiful, introspective lyrics (which are mostly spoken rather than sung), and lonely instrumentation combine to create a top-notch stunner. As a whole the album Dinner Music is a very eclectic and interesting assortment of songs. I wish "the lights wouldn't turn low and it wouldn't be time to go", but the way this song captures the feeling of yearning and melancholy is absolutely perfect.





Drowse  performed by Queen  1976
Recommended by Ozmala [profile]

Not sure what to say about this one. It makes me feel sick. In a good way. It's very beautiful, especially when you listen to the lyrics, and … well, it just makes me feel like I've had too much candy, or like I'm bloated on wistfullness. His (Roger Taylor's) voice is very emotional. The slide guitar is lovely, too.

from A Day at the Races (Hollywood Records)


fell in love at 22  performed by starflyer 59
Recommended by olli [profile]

I'm not usually too big on this kind of indie pop, but this is just gorgeus. Melancholy lyrics, slow picked guitar, piano, church hall ambience...This could have been just about a zillion bands, yet it manages to have a voice of its own.
Just a great song for me right now.

Sounds eerily similar to Magnet, though.






  Ricard: Christian Rock... aaaggghh!
  olli: Yeah, i know, they're christian.. So was Johnny Cash. it's not like they're spreading propaganda or anything,and this happens to be a minor classic. The fact that I don't share the personal beliefs of the artists involved has never stopped me from listening to interesting music.. I'm not too narrowminded to shy away from music by buddhists, nazis, italians from the 80's, satanists, mooncat-worshippers or even christians, and neither should you be.
  rum: I agree olli. Good music is good music whoever's playing it. Narrow-mindedness will only lead to bitterness in old age, bemoaning all the great things you missed out on. I must confess though, ages ago I did once judge little known 80s Bristolian band, the Waxing Gibbons on their MoonCat worshipping beliefs. A mate of mine was really into them, but I was having none of it, wouldn't listen to their, "mumbo jumbo music". Then one time he played some stuff without me knowing who it was, and I was like, "woah, what is THIS?!" I couldn't believe what I was hearing. Absolutely awful.
  Ricard: Hmmm. You sound like some sort of preacher to me Olli... a Christian Preacher!!! Using the innocent world of Musical Taste to spread your sinister "Italians from the 80's" message to society's more susceptible elements. Despicable
  olli: Magnificent creatures, mooncats. Indeed. Take a look for yourself: http://www.mooncatstudio.com.tw/fu.jpg
Grey Day  performed by Madness  1981
Recommended by geezer [profile]

After two years of insatiable and irresistable clowning around Madness slowed down.Grey Day is an ode to urban drudgery and the terrors of city living distilled into three minutes of downbeat melancholy but with all the Madness trademarks ,melody,humour and acute social observation .Such was their appeal at this time that the public simply moved with them into their new maturity and made this a top 5 hit in 1981

from 7/Seven (Stiff)
available on CD - 7 or Greatest Hits


Guess Who I Saw Today?  performed by Eartha Kitt  1975
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

The fabulous Ms. Kitt pours out her heart on this track in a way not usually heard in her songs. She puts away the diva and brings out the tender and emotional woman within as she sings of witnessing a budding romance between two people only to reveal at the end that one of them is her man whom she saw with another woman.

from For Always (Stanyan Records SR 10040)


hello walls  performed by Faron Young  196?
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

Probably the most chipper song of heartbreak I've ever heard. Young takes Willie Nelsons melancholy words, adds a bouncy beat, cheesy call and response chorus and that delightful early sixties country and western sound.

"Hello Walls"

"Hellooo, Helloo"
.
Along with his very fruity delivery it just makes this song sheer genius. Yet another song I first heard on the late John Peels show. And an unexpected example of why he was such a great DJ.




Hiding  performed by Simon Warner  1997
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Simon Warner sings beautifully orchestrated and heartfelt songs with a mixture of 60s (e.g. Scott Walker) and modern pop (e.g. Julian Cope) sensibilities. Most people ignored his album when it came out in 1997. Apparently he recorded a second that even his record company ignored. I was lucky enough to see the great man a few times live in 1997. He's an incredible performer, with a slightly rough but very tuneful voice. The compositions, all his own, are also first-rate. This is my favorite track from the album, a melancholy pop tune with piano, guitar and bass, and later a full orchestra.

from Waiting Rooms, available on CD




  Eden Marmalade: Yes, Hiding is a superbly melancholy and well crafted song - also one of my favourites, though it depends what mood I'm in. Thankfully, Waiting Rooms has a song for almost any mood (including irritation at slobby flatmates; inappropriate lust; drunken joy et al). I can't actually think of another songwriter as talented as this guy - writing the lyrics and the music and bringing them together so cleverly. Makes ya sick!
  understudy constantine: It strikes me that the music world just isn't ready for someone as eccentric and talented as Simon Warner... who bothers with lyrics these days? Does anyone really appreciate a good witty tale, smattered with drama and an edgy charm? No. Does anyone long for real music, as opposed to a monotonous beat overlaid with a dull mantra? No. But this shouldn't stop the creation of brilliant songs. Simon, you're not the only one swimming against the tide. If you're happy doing it then that's all that matters. Oh, and it looks like you've picked up a few fans along the way - despite the lack of media support!
Holes  performed by Mercury Rev  1998
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An intense and beautiful epic, this track is the opener on the band's superb 1998 album, 'Deserters Songs'. I'm quite fickle, and usually prefer two to three-minute songs, but this track is so brilliant that it seems short at 6 minutes. It builds up beautifully, starting with just an echoey string aura, with vocals, synth (a Supertramp-like wurlitzer sound) and guitar coming in one by one. The music finally explodes after a couple of minutes, with full drums and eerie oscillating noises. It's incredibly beautiful and dense, and the song has a melancholy air that is very affecting. Mercury Rev have a habit of putting incredible tracks at the beginning of their albums. I'm glad they are now getting more of the attention they deserve.

from Deserter's Songs, available on CD


how’ s it going to end  performed by tom waits  2004
Recommended by olli [profile]

one of my favourite tracks from the new album. it's one of his dark plucked string- ballads, quite a simple melody really, but the subtle brass and the mournful moaning of the background vocals makes truly beautiful. and then there's the lyrics..

"behind a smoke coloured curtain, a girl disappeared
they found out that the ring was a fake
a tree born crooked never grows straight
she sunk like a hammer into the lake"
stunning.

i am SO going to buy this album when it comes out, even though i've got the mp3's (sorry mr waits!). a part of me hoped that this album wasn't going to leak, so that i could get the whole package with the liner notes and all at once, but then again some things are just too good to wait for..

(hope they avoid the glossy plastic paper of the alice booklet this time. that was just plain wrong. didn't fit the subject matter at all..)

from real gone


I’m 18  performed by Alice Cooper
Recommended by inbloom44 [profile]

Melancholy,nice smooth rocking groove.




India  performed by The Psychedelic Furs  1980
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

The leadoff track of the Psychedelic Furs' 1980 self-titled debut LP takes the lead of Brian Eno's influential work with David Bowie and his own Roxy Music and merges it with the energy, attitude, and bombast of punk rock. After a stark and sublimely beautiful synthesizer-soundscape introduction, Vince Ely's drums abruptly pound in with echoing tom toms. The rest of the band launches into a one- or two-chord assault that gives little indication of the poppier direction the group would take on later records. But the power demonstrated here on "India" remained as an undercurrent of almost all of the band's later work, even if only implied at times. And if one listens closely, there is even a bit of melody amidst the Fall-like (and by extension, Stooges and Can-like) rhythmic pummeling. Producer Steve Lillywhite was already enjoying an early peak in his recording career with this album and U2's 1980 debut, Boy, forging a sound that bridged late-'70s punk with 1980s shine and texture.
(AMG)

from The Psychedelic Furs, available on CD


innocent when you dream(78 version)  performed by tom waits  1987
Recommended by olli [profile]

absolutely stunning. this shanty-esque version of "innocent when you dream" is meant to sound like an old 78 record, complete with vinyl crackle and boxy sound.
the street organ(?) is what really makes the song for me, it gives it sort of a "pre-war coney island-style carnival documentary footage"-vibe, if you`re able to make any sense out of that. it really is an absolutely stunning track to close an album with.

"running through the graveyard
we laughed my friends and i/
we swore we`d be together
until the day we died/
until the day we died"

(often i`m a bit uncomfortable when it comes to posting lyric exerpts, in my opinion whether or not a lyric is great is too often dependent on the delivery of the lines and the feel of the music. to me, seperating the lyrics from the song can often lessen their emotional impact. does anyone else feel that way?)

from franks wild years


Judy and the Dream of Horses  performed by Belle and Sebastian  1996
Recommended by gopeeinafridge [profile]

This is my favourite song of all time. I can really identify with a song about a girl who wants to sleep all the time and dream about horses. Whenever I'm feeling down, I listen to this song and the trumpet line always makes me feel a bit better.

from If You're Feeling Sinister (Matador)


Just Melancholy  performed by Roy Montgomery  1994
Recommended by LawrenceM [profile]

A beautiful, melodic ode to sadness, from reclusive New Zealand guitar genius Roy Montgomery. (His first band, The Pin Group, released the first ever single on the now-legendary Flying Nun Records.) Lyrically and melodicly, this song would fit neatly into the canon of either Joy Division or The Smiths, although Monthgomery's beautiful guitar playing owes more to Tom Verlaine than Johnny Marr. Probably the best sad song ever written by a New Zealander .... maybe anyone.

from 324 E. 13th Street #7, available on CD


King Heroin  performed by James Brown  1972
Recommended by mr_klenster [profile]

This song is stone-cold, ultra-serious, odd, and mesmerizing. It's James Brown recounting a strange, anecdotal poem about a dream, in which he experiences the personification of heroin delivering a sermon. He rhymes accompanied by a subdued and melancholy backing band, playing lingering horn drags, and slow, lazy bass and drums. This is not your typical James Brown material, but it has an powerfully surreal and painful effect.

from There It Is


Kortisin  performed by Plaid  1997
Recommended by Mr Tom [profile]

A lovely triptych. Plaid keep their trademark odd noises (creaking doors and weird duck quacks in this track) more in check than usual, and the result's a little more conventional than a lot of their work, but it's also very pretty. It's tightly structured, with a happy little introduction followed by three sections marked by their different, though related, warm basslines. Each has a gentle melody of its own, and between each there's an interesting break. Warm, sophisticated, and full of beauty.

from Not For Threes (Warp)



Late Goodbye  performed by Poets of the Fall  2003
Recommended by wlodi [profile]

This great song made its first appearance in the hit game "Max Payne 2: The Fall of Max Payne" (released October 2003) and instantly became a hit - people were asking for this song everywhere they could, they were sending emails, trying to buy it. It has an indescribable atmosphere. The song was released in June 2004 as a single and then on the first Poets of the Fall's debut album that hit the road 19th January 2005.

from Signs of Life, available on CD


Let New Days Dawn  performed by A Cautionary Tale  2006
Recommended by aggryle [profile]

Beautiful composition and production with a darkly uplifting, somber mood and feel. Definitely will make you stop and focus on it as you are filled with melancholy feelings, though once the song ends, you feel better than when it began. Hard to find album, but you can listen to the song on myspace.com/acautionarytale.

from Let New Days Dawn, available on CD


Lights In The Sky  performed by Nine Inch Nails  2008
Recommended by SamHall [profile]

You can't go wrong with NIN, and you certainly can't go wrong with NIN and a piano.

The soft piano element and Trent Reznor's voice make for a beautiful combination, underscoring a melancholy contemplation of self. The song, like much of the album, is a very reflective examination of Reznor in his older years. I think it's powerful stuff, especially when the song trails off into the rhythmless void of "Corona Radiata."

from The Slip, available on CD


Little One  performed by Beck  2002
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

Melancholy and haunting. This song overwhelms me.

from Sea Change (Universal)



Lost in the Supermarket  performed by The Clash  1979
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

Melancholy, lonely and beautiful. Proof of the versatility and intellligence of the Clash's music.

from London Calling (Epic)


Lying is the most fun  performed by Panic at the Disco  2005
Recommended by sparkling.inferno [profile]

it's not the most beautifully written song -or the most appropriate, for that matter- but i love it for the way it was performed, the way Brendon's sometimes high-pitched vocals harmonize so well with the instruments, and its memorability. this song stuck with me for a very long time, however i am also very attached to it on account of more personal reasons.
the intellectual aspects are also what struck me as being meaningful- how often do you hear the word 'harlequin' or 'testosterone' in a song? i enjoy listening to tunes with at least some signs of intellect, rather than hearing a string of curses or slang in an entire three minutes. although there are some profanities in Lying, it's not as bad as many other songs out there, that's for sure.

however, there is a sad aspect to the song as well. apparently, it was inspired by guitarist Ryan Ross' recent breakup with his girlfriend on account of her cheating. he stated:
"At the time it felt like the world had ended. I hated everything. It affected that whole album. I guess it's good that I wrote it down. I might have stabbed somebody."

overall, i think it's a great composition, with an enjoyable melody and a catchy chorus, despite its melancholy roots.

from A Fever You Can't Sweat Out


Ma Jeunesse Fout le Camp  performed by Francoise Hardy
Recommended by ladonnaoscurata [profile]

I adore Francoise Hardy. Her music may be a bit too sweet for some, but this song is a favourite of mine. It's nostalgic and melancholy, and strangely comforting. My French isn't perfect, but I believe the song is about the loss of innocence and youth.

from 36 Grandes Succes


made first  performed by tahiti 80  2000
Recommended by daidai [profile]

this song is similar to hideki kaji's works. a sense of melancholy engulfs the listener, recalling kaji's works. 'made first' is best listened to after/before'we were so much in love'.

from puzzle (minty fresh)



Mary’s Prayer  performed by Danny Wilson  1987
Recommended by MoeShinola [profile]

I saw a video of this a couple times on MTV and never forgot it. I finally caught up with the album "Meet Danny Wilson" years later, in a used bin. None of the three members are named Danny Wilson; it's named after a Frank Sinatra movie. They dress like Sinatra fans as well, and the music's influenced by that era, but it's pure new-wavy piano pop. Reminds me of Joe Jackson, but softer, more romantic. "Lorraine Parade", "Nothing Ever Goes To Plan", and "Steamtrains To The Milky Way" are also album highlights.

from Meet Danny Wilson (Virgin)


Melody  performed by Serge Gainsbourg  1971
Recommended by lilly747 [profile]

Stunning melancholy and wonderously modern opener to Gainsboroug's concept album about jailbait love, road accidents & brightly coloured rolls-royces - a masterpiece...

from L'Histoire de Melody Nelson (Mercury)


Miracles  performed by Soulounge  2003
Recommended by lenny [profile]

Regularly I fall in love with songs that have a harmonic, perfectly tuned voice chorus like "miracles". The Fender Rhodes keyboard and a moderate bass-line completes the relaxed mood.
I immediatly feel this bittersweet mixture of good times memories and melancholy.

from Home



More Today Than Yesterday  performed by Spiral Starecase  1969
Recommended by fost\'r [profile]

Released in 1969; peaked in the US in 1970. I always thought it was by Stevie Wonder, but as it turns out, it's by a white California group. You've probably heard it: "I love you more today than yesterday / but not as much as tomorrow..."

A great combination of upbeat lyrics and music with a slight tinge of melancholy, as if the singer is recognizing that tomorrow isn't quite here yet and there's always the chance that his plans will be derailed...

Great horns on this and several of their other singles (e.g., "No One For Me To Turn To"), but I read somewhere that the band's lack of a concert horn section led to their demise... apparently Pat Upton (writer of this track and lead singer) has also blamed poor management or record-comany politics. Too bad.

Also check out a cool Ska version by Goldfinger on the WATERBOY (late 90s) soundtrack.





  konsu: Bout' time someone handed this one in. I guess I take it for granted like most americans who still like AM radio... right up there with "Lovin' You" for songs that you can't sing along to without looking like a fool.
  thewilyfilipino: It is indeed one of those unabashedly ecstatic, so-in-love songs that plaster a foolish grin onto your face.
  Arthur: Much covered song - versions by Barbara McNair, Sam Fletcher , Barbara Acklin and Richard 'Groove' Holmes spring to mind. Pat Upton's solo stuff is very similar and if you like this one look out for anything by Robert John too.
  Swinging London: Oh yes, a great song. Reminds me of when I had my first transistor radio. All I've got is a very scratchy 45...time to remedy that. This sort of reminds me of Blood, Sweat & Tears.
My Weakness  performed by Moby  1999
Recommended by lionson76 [profile]

Instruments are piano and strings (I think). The music is hypnotic; it overwhelms me with a profound sadness yet simultaneously instills a sense of complete joy and satisfaction. The track is entirely too short, which justifies the execution of Moby for such an act of cruelty.

from Play, available on CD




  javaviolet: I love this song. Though I could never explain to anyone to what full extent. The music speaks volumes to me, and makes my heart just melt away.
Natacha  performed by Czerkinsky
Recommended by avalyn [profile]

simply because it's gentle, chiming and so full of yearning. i'm a sucker for that.




ne’re do well  performed by young people  2003
Recommended by olli [profile]

not really much into indie music, but this song struck a chord with me. comes across as a sort of retro-but-not-really-retro california rainy day sunflower melancholy lo-fi pop version of broadcast, if you can make any sense out of that.
short and sweet at 1:44.


available on CD - war prayers



number of the beast  performed by the djali zwan
Recommended by olli [profile]

beautiful
-yes-
beautiful acoustic cover of the campy iron maiden song. nice driving beat. great melancholy vibe going on, it manages to give the überstupid lyrics some sense of metaphorical meaning.. I first heard it on the soundtrack to the film "spun" by jonas åkerlund, where it plays during the opening credits. however, i don't think there's an official soundtrack out there, but it's pretty easy to find on various file-sharing networks.





Once Upon a Summertime  performed by Blossom Dearie  1958
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

A very ethereal song that is perfect for the lilting girlish voice of Blossom Dearie. She is also an accomplished pianist and plays on every song she sings. She is backed by a standard jazz trio on this track and they play in a wonderfully subdued manor that allows her voice and the words to be the focal point of this song. Originally written by a french songwriter, Blossom Dearie heard the song while living and performing in France in the mid-1950's. Upon her return to the United States, she asked her friend, songwriter Johnny Mercer, to write english lyrics to the wonderful melody. The words he wrote tell a beautiful story of love lost, but fondly remembered thru a familiar smell or sound. A standout track from the marvelous LP of the same name. Give it a listen the next time you go to your local music store.

from Once Upon a Summertime, available on CD


Pacific 202  performed by Acid Brass (The Williams Fairey Brass Band)  1997
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

Theres something beautifully melancholic about the best British (Early) house music, and of course, theres nothing quite as melancholy as a Brass Band. I haven't heard the whole LP, but this track off teh 12 inch single brings a tear to my eye everytime I hear it.

Whoever it was that thought of doing this cover was a genius, I'm sure they thought it would be solid cheese, but instead its one of those moments of inspirational magic. I'd love to hear their version of "Strings of Life".

from Acid Brass 12 (Blast First)
available on CD - Acid Brass


Paper Thin Hotel  performed by Leonard Cohen  1977
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This sounds very different from most of what I've recommended. In fact, there are days when I wouldn't want to listen to this song at all. It is pretty incredible, however. I like it both for its remarkable mood and instrumentation (this is a Phil Spector production), and for its lyrical content (a melancholic but resigned tale, remembering a love affair). Leonard sings 'A heavy burden lifted from my soul/I learned that love was out of my control', with a reverb effect on his voice, accompanied by a sweet string arrangement and a faint, echoey backing choir. His delivery is casual, yet committed - a style that definitely influenced Nick Cave.

from Death of a Ladies' Man, available on CD


Past, Present & Future  performed by The Shangri-Las  1966
Recommended by 4givemyNglish [profile]

Haunting melody inspired by the Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata.
Lyrics are truly depressing for a so called "girls band" and this song so unique has been qualified as one of the saddest ever made in the sixties. The Shangri-Las is a fascinating and under-rated band that deserves to be re-discovered. Quick list of recommended songs : Remember (Walkin' in the Sand) -yes they did this too!-, I Can Never Go Home Anymore, Give Us Your Blessing, Leader of the Pack, etc...


available on CD - The Best of the Shangri-Las (Polygram)




  delicado: This song is utter genius. 'just don't try to touch me... because that will never happen again'. They are indeed under-rated. It's strange really. There are CD compilations out there, but they all seem to marketed in a budget kind of way.
  jeanette: There's hot debate as to what this song means... I've read that it's about a rape survivor which kind of makes sense but I think it has too much mystery to it to define completely. George "Shadow" Morton surpasses even the greatest hopes for girl-group trash-drama. As to the compilations, there's a great one on RPM called "Myrmidons Of Melodrama". Strangely, its available in two different covers, with slightly altered tracklisting (a few songs on one not on the other and vice versa) but either one contains all their best tracks and some amusing "Radio Spots" with Mary Weiss (lead singer) giving tips on how to behave on a date. "Don't barge on ahead like a baby elephant" she advises; "you'll get attention all right, but it won't be favourable".
  milhouse-paris: The two different versions of "Myrmidons of Melodrama" are quite different, not only because of the tracklisting, but also becouse the most recent one(2002, by RPM) has stereo versions of 5 songs. I'm not sure that these songs sound better in stereo than in mono...
  delicado: I now have the newer 'Myrmidons' comp. So many great tracks. My favorite bit of this song is right at the end when she says "I'm all packed up and I'm on my way - and I'm going to fall in love ... but at the moment, it doesn't look good ... At the moment, it will never happen again."
Penetration  performed by Pedro The Lion  2002
Recommended by Herr V [profile]

I could recomment almost any song Pedro The Lion has recorded, but this recent song embodies most of what PTL stands for: quiet, folky, melancholy lyrics but also angry, hard and bitter. You can download this song from the label website: www.jadetree.com

from Control, available on CD



Po’ Boy  performed by Bob Dylan  2001
Recommended by Gumbo [profile]

Just when I had almost lost all hope of ever hearing a new Dylan song which, as a combination of an engaging vocal performance and fascinating lyrics, just fill you with a strange sense of happiness - he comes up with this one. While not being like a typical Dylan classic, this one has a very, very warm feel to it + vocals which I thought he couldn't produce in 2001 anymore. After the rather cold and almost posturingly melancholy "Time Out of Mind" album, "Love & Theft" was pleasantly wise and human.

from Love & Theft, available on CD


Reaching out from Here  performed by The Boo Radleys  1994
Recommended by geezer [profile]

A Band doomed by the vagueries of fashion ,too late for the Madchester boom and too early for Britpop,despite consistantly great records like this ,a melancholy ,sixties influenced piece of perfect pop,never quite breaking into glee but a memorable chorus and a fine economic restrained pop song.A band worth looking back on in small doses

from Wake Up!, available on CD


Redemption Song  performed by Johnny Cash and Joe Strummer  2003
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

Three dead men. An acoustic guitar and two dead mens voices sing a dead mans song.
I play this to make grown men weep at the end of the evening.
It was included in the cd box set that American recordings put out after Johnny Cash died. Fortunatly for me someone has cherry picked that set and bootlegged the results onto more playable and affordable vinyl. Although I suspect there are many more songs I'd love in that set, this one I knew would work so well.

from The devils right hand


Ripple  performed by The Church  1990
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

The lead single from one of the Church's all time highs, the dark, powerful Priest Aura, "Ripple" was much like the album it came from - lengthy, with an emphasis on artistic impact rather than radio-friendly ease, charged with a feeling of impending, unnerving threat. The initial guitar chime and Steve Kilbey's singing may provide a familiar feeling for long-time listeners, but the edge of spite and conflict in the words carries through in the performance - Kilbey's not so much blending into the mix as suddenly slicing through it. The full arrangement almost has a touch of film noir threat to it, but not as much as the amazing chorus. Starting with a soft, almost sighed overdubbed vocal part like a mysterious signal, it literally does ripple up in the mix, sneaking up on the listener instead of turning into any kind of a singalong. It's the same approach as with "Under the Milky Way," but the air here is less elegant melancholia and more unsettling electric charge, extra guitar feedback carving arcs through the arrangement, instrumental breaks providing only short, temporary relief.
(AMG)

from Priest=Aura, available on CD


Roskilde Song  performed by Henry Sails  2005
Recommended by mickotoole [profile]

This is a song that was written in Denmark by a very good friend of mine, it starts of with a piano solo accompanied by a harmonica. It is a very simple yet very deep and effective song. You can listen to it on www.myspace.com/henrysails or on www.henrysails.com

from Untied (Unsigned)


Samba Pa Ti  performed by Santana  1970
Recommended by kaptnunderpnts [profile]

a great, great song. emotional. beautiful. starts out melancholy, develops into a celebration.

from Abraxas


Scatterbrain (As Dead As Leaves)  performed by Radiohead  2003
Recommended by trixlation [profile]

Once again a very melancholy song, which make you thoughtful. The voice from the lead singer Thom Yorke is special and touch the soul.

(I hope, you will understand, what's my message is xD)

from Hail To The Thief, available on CD


Skeleton Key  performed by Margot and the Nuclear So and So’s
Recommended by clubs42 [profile]

I've been really connecting with this lately. It's mellow and easy to listen to, melancholy.

from The Dust of Retreat



  music.man.925: This is a great song, this band was recommended to me by a good friend. Great choice
Skinned  performed by Blind Melon
Recommended by Gwendolyn [profile]

the intro to this song is on a kazoo. the rest is guitar and awesome lyrics.. "i'll make a shoehorn out of your shin" ... my only complaint is that this song is too short

from Soup


somliga går med trasiga skor  performed by cornelis vreeswijk
Recommended by olli [profile]

it's about time i recommended some vreeswijk. after all he's one of my very favourite artsts, and pretty obscure outside scandinavia. it's hard to decide wich song to post, as i guess you'd have to be scandinavian to enjoy the masterful, deceptivly simple lyrics. the best way to describe the man is as kind of a swedish crossbred of serge gainsbourg, tom waits and bob dylan.
this is one of his best-known songs, a qusasi-joyous melancholy number about death and hopelessness.
i once heard someone say something that summed up the power of this guy pretty well: "I don´t understand swedish, however I do understand Cornelis Vreeswijk"


the best place to start if you're interested n an initial taste, is probably the new 2-cd set. if you're like me, youll soon advance to the original lp's and the 5-cd set "master cees memoarer".

lyrics:
Somliga går med trasiga skor, säg vad beror det på?
Gud fader som i himmelen bor kanske vill ha det så.
Gud fader som i himmelen bor blundar och sover sött. Vem bryr sig om ett par trasiga skor när man är gammal och trött?
Vem bryr sig om hur dagarna går? Dom vandrar som dom vill.
Medborgare, om ett hundra år finns du ej längre till.
Då har nån annan tagit din stol, det vet du inte av.
Du känner varken regn eller sol ner i din mörka grav.
Vem bryr sig om hur nätterna far? Jag bryr mig inte ett spår. Bara jag får ha mitt ansikte kvar dolt i min älsklings hår.
Jag är en tvivelaktig figur, duger ej mycket till. Bakom ett hörn står döden på lur, han tar mig när han vill.
Somliga går med trasiga skor tills dom har slutat gå. Djävulen som i helvetet bor får sig ett gott skratt då
a very, very bad and rushed translation of the lyrics,most of the humor and finer points are lost but at least you'll know what's it about:

some walk around in bad shoes, say, why is is it so?
maybe the good lord up in the sky wants it that way.
the good lord up in the sky sleeps calmly now.
who cares about a pair of bad shoes when they are old and tired?
who cares how the days pass? they go the way the want.
fellow citizen, in a hundred years you will no longer exist.
someone else will have taken your chair, but you won't know about that.
you'll feel neither rain nor sun, down in your dark grave.
who cares how the nights pass? i don't care at all.
as long as i get to keep my my face tucked in my love's hair.
i'm a questionable character, not good for much.
behind a corner death lurks, he'll take me whenever he wants.
some walk around in bad shoes/ until hey walk no more
the devil, who lives down in the hell/ will have a good laugh then.






  daniel: Hello, I don´t like your translation of "somliga går med trasiga skor", You have changed alot in the lyrics, If you like the song you should work on it and translate it corectly. Daniel
Starlings  performed by Elbow  2007
Recommended by komodo [profile]

Recommended to congratulate them on winning the Mercury prize this year. Irrelevant I know, but you can't help feeling pleased for them - nice guys sometimes win!

This is the opening track from the winning album, and whilst it ticks the "epic" and "melancholy" boxes often associated with Elbow, it is also a startling track, with it's hypnotic, careworn sound punctuated by jagged blasts of brass. Then there's Garvey's bruised but beautiful voice. A cracking start to a cracking album.

Well done lads!

from The Seldom Seen Kid (Polydor B0013F2M52)


Sunshower  performed by Dr. Buzzard’s Original Savannah Band  1976
Recommended by ambassador [profile]

This one fits well with with my previous reccomendation in the melancholy/eerie vein. I read somewhere that the song was in the African JuJu style, but discofied of course given its 1976 production. It was this song that proved to be the Dr. Buzzard . . . was not your average disco band. Cory Daye's vocals are beautiful and harken back to an earlier era of classic jazz vocals, like Ella and Billie. The children's backup vocals are what gives it the spooky quality, probably because the intrumentation is dark, like seeing those cute (but scary) kids come out of the corn fields in Children of the Corn. The last chorus just sends chills down my spine as Cory digs into the lyrics and dances around them as the everything sort or brightens up, like the sun coming out after a summer rain. This makes the title all make such perfect sense.

from Dr. Buzzard's Original Savannah Band, available on CD



  Festy: You know what makes the last chorus for me (or choruses from after the kids singing only accompanied by percussion)... as simple as it may sound... it's the handclaps. They add so much and I always look forward to them coming along. I became obsessed with this song about 6 months ago and bought the CD, which, as I expected, doesn't contain so many fantastic songs on it, but, still an enjoyable CD. I really enjoy your recommendations!
Tear It All Away  performed by The Church  1981
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Following shortly on the heels of Of Skins and Heart, "Tear It All Away" still was the picture of a developing band, but one already more comfortable with the studio, able to use subtlety and quiet drama to inform its cool, soothing yet tense take on post-punk filtered through psychedelic touches. The familiar Byrds-derived guitar and Bowie-tinged lyrical regret and sighing crop up as they so often would in the earliest days, but there's a clean, blue tinge to the whole performance, something that feels inexpressively like an eighties recording rather than a sixties throwback. Call it the space in the mix, the gentle keyboards here and there, or the substituting of folk and country roots for something more urban and faster-paced. The lovely mid-song solos show the Marty Willson-Piper/ Peter Koppes team still well within its element, and the whole composition has a rich, lush feeling to it that's most attractive.
(AMG)

from Of Skins and Heart, available on CD


Tell Tale Heart  performed by Gavin Friday & The Man Seezer  1989
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

The former Virgin Prunes member, Gavin Friday, recorded his first solo album in 1989, "Each Man Kills The Thing He Loves". After leaving the Prunes in 1986, he abandoned the music business to paint for a year and a half, returning to the fray after teaming up with pianist Maurice Roycroft (whom Friday renamed the Man Seezer). This debut album, "Each Man Kills the Thing He Loves", found him making unexpected moves into a sort of modern-day cabaret style, albeit with all the Bowie-isms of his vocal delivery intact. And this song, "Tell Tale Heart", is near to country sounds and also could come right from Nick Cave "Your Funeral My Trial".

from Each Man Kills The Thing He Loves, available on CD


The Holy Filament  performed by Mr. Bungle  1999
Recommended by Tangento [profile]

This is a truly unique song, from a beyond unique band. Mr. Bungle has a rabid, almost cult-like following, and songs like this are the reason why.
This band has always drawn on many different, widely varying influences, including ska, grindcore, jazz, and funky beats, to name just a few.
This track displays a whole new direction for the band, with dreamy, ethereal bass and piano interplay, retro-vocal harmonies, and an almost rapturous climactic sequence, followed by a melancholy fade-out.
This is a work composed by Bassist Trevor Dunn, (a true talent) and I feel it is more than worthy of a place on this list.
The album is a classic, I highly recommend it for people with just about any kind of musical taste.
I am providing a review/ option to purchase:
HERE

from California, available on CD


the last good day of the year  performed by cousteau  2000
Recommended by joakimbo [profile]

hmm, well its just such a gorgeous song, mellow and warm, a bit melancholy. very evocative of those early autumn days when the sun is low and golden and everything feels a bit warm and slow.


available on CD - cousteau



  G400 Custom: We could argue all day about how this song is derivative of Scott Walker - but the fact remains that it's just a fantastic record.
The Unguarded Moment  performed by The Church  1981
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

That the Church's initial breakthrough song would yet become a millstone around its neck might not have been clear at the time, but one understands pretty easily why the band was anxious to escape its shadow after subsequent efforts clearly showed the tune as the building block it was. But "The Unguarded Moment" isn't a disaster at all - indeed, for a young band to come up with such a great effort early on and get some airplay and attention for it was as clear a sign as any that something really special could yet result. Marty Willson-Piper's flat out lovely introductory guitar and the sinewy blend of his and Peter Koppes' instrument on the main melody sets the tone, while the stripped down verses and quiet rhythm changes throughout give a great taste of the band's incipient ambitions and tweaking of an established formula. Steve Kilbey's quietly rueful but still clear and strong lead vocal adds a nice air of calm melancholia, while coming up with some fun lyrical images here and there ("Tell those friends with cameras for eyes…").
(AMG)

from Of Skins And Heart, available on CD


Threshold Of Transformation  performed by Isis  2009
Recommended by SamHall [profile]

The 9:52 long track immediately blasts you off your feet with a ethereally heavy series of riffs and Aaron Turner's rough vocals. Keeping it interesting, the structure continues to evolve, and drifts downward into a more dreamy movement which stays dense and builds the tension for the following verses. About halfway in, the song reaches the first climax that (I think) embodies the "Threshold" in the song title. After which, it moves into a more contemplative section, smoothing out the turmoil and tension brought on by the first half, while building its own. Beautifully, it succeeds in building yet another crescendo, only to end in free fall, with guitar and bass fantastically accenting the mood. The bass in this song is truly something to behold, wavering and powerful in its tone.

What I like about this song reflects on why I like Isis' music in general: it's complex, atmospheric, emotional, intricate, and smart. It truly is "thinking man's metal." Isis is all about themes and atmospheres, emotions and vibes, rather than clear ideas and lyrics. It's visceral, raw, and transcendent. And in some ways, I think this song embodies everything that makes them great.

from Wavering Radiant, available on CD


Tive Razao  performed by Seu Jorge  2004
Recommended by ambassador [profile]

So anyone who's seen The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou or City of God will recognize Seu Jorge as the handsome, dark-skinned actor with the gravelly voice. In Life Aquatic he plays Pele, the Brazilian safety officer on board Zissou's boat and the bard that plays Portuguese language covers of David Bowie songs. Although this is changing, even in Brazil he's better known as an actor than a musician. His second solo album (he used to be in a band called Farofa Carioca), Cru, was released last fall in France and was impossibly hard to find until recently. Tive Razao was the first release from this album and is fairly representative and is the shining peak as well. Based around an acoustic guitar riff and Seu Jorge's multi-tracked vocals, the song just floats in this melancholy haze like some of the best Chico Buarqu de Hollanda ballads. The production on this song (and the album) is much more sparse than the previous album, but much more original as well. Jorge even uses what I think is a theremin to add a slight spookiness to the preceedings. The lyrics mean something like, "I had an excuse" or "I had a reason."

from Cru, available on CD



  ambassador: I since found out that the title means "You were right." makes a bit more sense that way.
Tres Cosas  performed by juana molina  2002
Recommended by fiftyfootgirl [profile]

This is an absolutely magical song! Juana Molina is a singer/songwriter from Argentina. I first heard her on KCRW (Santa Monica radio station) when I was living in Los Angeles. Her music is totally captivating; it's melodic, ethereal, quirky, whimsical, a little melancholy sometimes, very very sweet. She often uses acoustic instruments (guitar, piano), but what makes her music unique is her use of electronic elements. It often sounds like she is recording in the middle of the rainforest. Tres Cosas, from the album of the same name, is a very up-beat, sparkly little song. Her live performances are archived on the KCRW website: http://www.kcrw.com/ (do a search for Juana Molina in the "Find it!" feature), and you can purchase her music at:
Gourmet Musical http://www.gourmetmusical.com

from Tres Cosas, available on CD


Way Form 3 (If You Ever)  performed by Elegia
Recommended by Mr Tom [profile]

A slice of unbelievably sweet, lush electronica from Elegia. An insistent, original, clattery percussive line and the most enormous heart-rattling sub underlie a sparingly used, sweeping string riff and a vocal which you can't quite make out--I think that's to the good in this song, since Elegia are no Paul Simon--except in fragments. It's sung with strength and melancholy, perfectly structured and as moving as any six minutes I know.


available on CD - Megasoft Office 98 (F Com)



We Belong Together  performed by Rickie Lee Jones  1981
Recommended by komodo [profile]

An American tale with references to Brando, Dean and Natalie Wood, and characters like "Johnny the King". A series of melancholy snapshots of hope set to a jazz inflected soundtrack. Top-notch, both musically and lyrically.

With the companion piece (in my eyes, anyway) "Living It Up" (introducing us to "Eddie", "C***-finger Louie" & "Zero") which directly follows it on the album, it represents the pinnacle of Rickie Lee Jones career.

The rest of the "Pirates" album has its moments, such as the title track, as well as some less successful songs, and is well worth a listen if you get a chance.

I’ve listened to quite a lot of other stuff by Rickie Lee Jones and sadly it seems she has never come close to reaching the heights achieved by these two fine tracks, IMO.

from Pirates, available on CD


When I Am Gone  performed by Sparrow House
Recommended by softindierocker [profile]

I know this is incredibly cliched, but words cannot describe how beautiful this song is. So sad and sweet. Especially the lyrics. It's love the way the guy doesn't lay any blame, even though he's heartbroken.

This song didn't really stick out to me at first, but I read the lyrics and listened to it a bit more. Now, I totally love it!

If you've listened to this song but don't particularly like it, you should definitely give it another shot!




When Will the Rain Come  performed by The Troggs  1968
Recommended by tinks [profile]

This is an absolutely incredible song. It's a melancholy, minor-key brooder much in the vein of the Zombies' more experimental work, and it really showcases how underrated the Troggs were compared to many of their British Invasion contemporaries. This appeared as a b-side to their second biggest US hit, "Love is All Around".

from Love is All Around (Fontana)
available on CD - Archaeology 1967-1977 (Polydor)



Where did you all go  performed by Thirteen moons  1987
Recommended by moondog [profile]

One of these songs that i never tire of, that sounds as fresh and moving as the first day i heard it twenty years ago. Thirteen moons were like no other swedish band i have heard before or after.A haunting melancholy sound that in lesser musical hands would have sounded unbearably pretencious. If scott walker were to sing the swedish books of psalms in a folkjazz setting you are close but nah. This track though is instrumental and have one of the most powerful stringarrangemnts i have ever encountered.

from Origins (Wire)
available on CD - origins/little dreaming boy


who needs forever  performed by astrud gilberto  1966
Recommended by coffman [profile]

This exceptionally haunting and lyrical song by Quincy Jones has received its definitive interpretion by Astrud Gilberto with arrangement and accompaniment by the Brazilian organist Walter Wanderley. The melancholy urgency of the piece resonates well with the dark/sad tonality that pervades so much of Bossa Nova music, though its character is also reminiscent of certain otherwise very different pieces from the bebop era, which had a formative influence on Quincy Jones' music. There is definitely the remote influence of Charlie Parker and especially Dizzy Gillespie. It's truly a completely unique piece. The drifting melody which seems to skirt over the chord changes has a beautiful inevitability. Only a very gifted and skilled musician could have contrived such a beautiful work. So Quincy Jones deserves especial credit for crafting this song from the film "The Deadly Affair."

Astrud's delivery, so typically limpid and restrained, only serves to heighten the intensity of this darkly passionate song. The subtle but somehow fierce organ playing of Walter Wanderley acheives a sizzling romanticism that perfectly complements the reading of Astrud's apparently detached fatalism.

In my opinion, this track is a true musical masterpiece. Its remarkable economy of means is a testament to the skill of the composer as well as the artistry of the performers. In fact, it's a nearly perfect combination of expressive means and poetic intent. The beautiful resolution, with Astrud's perfect striking of the high B-flat over the half-diminished F-minor seventh, is a moment of sublime dramatic intensity, though profoundly understated, as is typical of her finest artistic moments. One is reminded of Miles Davis. Her poetic skill is rooted in subtlety.

I have listened to this extraordinary track hundreds of times, and always experienced chills rising up on the back of my neck. How amazing that this incredible musical gem was omitted from the original album A Certain Smile, A Certain Sadness. Perhaps it was too intense, too heavy; whatever the case, it's a truly remarkable piece of music.

I'm truly grateful to have discovered this great albeit minor musical masterpiece. There's really nothing else quite like it! The sizzling but subtle sensitivity of the rhythm section (Claudio Slon on drums, possibly Joao Gilberto on guitar and Jose Marino on bass) adds an intensity to the piece which helps project the almost existential tone of the song.

I'm really swept away by this obscure and neglected work, which attains -- for me at least -- to a peak of poetic intensity really rare in music. As is usual with Astrud at her best, it accomplishes its artistic ends with what seems like the most minimal of means. But subtlety is always the avenue to the most profound of artistic experiences. I think this is a remarkable example -- one of the greatest -- of the wedding of popular music and high art. It is a truly perfect performance. In my opinion, its greatness increases rather than diminshes with repeated listenings. There is only one word for that -- it's magic!

from A Certain Smile, A Certain Sadness, available on CD



  rio: you must pick-up the quincy jones soundtrack (released with the score to "the pawnbroker") with astrud singing "who needs forever". The lush quincy jones score is hauntingly beautiful, and astrud never sounded better. This version is the real deal for me..
  rferus: Amazing guitar on this piece.
Wild Horses  performed by The Sundays  1992
Recommended by genebean [profile]

This song has a folk-based sound on guitars and pop melodies. Its an awesome song for those who are into slow music. Those of you who are familiar with The Sundays can understand the sweet voice of Harriet Wheeler.

from Blind, available on CD


you were the last high  performed by the dandy warhols  2003
Recommended by angelica [profile]

the dandy warhols are particularly skilled at making songs that are simultaneously moody and dance-y, so you can listen to most of their output no matter what direction your mood is swinging in. this song is a perfect example of just this skill, being both tinged with melancholy and yet resolutely upbeat. in my mind, this is the best song off their last album (which was produced by nick rhodes of duran duran). like the other tracks, it has more of a synth-y electro feel than much of their previous output, but unlike the rest of the album, this is a strong song very much in character.

from Welcome to the Monkey House, available on CD




  olli: i really like the dandy warhols. too bad only about 1/3 of the songs on each of their albums are worth paying attention to. An eventual "best of" album released in about ten years time is going to be absolutely essential.

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