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List songs by Song title | Performer | Year

You searched for ‘emotional’, which matched 73 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
After The Dance (Instrumental)  performed by Marvin Gaye
Recommended by mr_klenster [profile]

I don't know if this has already been recommended. When you think Marvin Gaye, it's the gut-wrenching, highly emotive vocal style and incredible lyrics that immediately come to mind. This song is curious, yet not unique to Marvin in that it manages to capture those same Marvin-qualities in a purely instrumental track. The vocal version of this song is great too, and I don't mean to imply that the vocal version is somehow inferior, however the vocal and instrumental versions leave me with completely different emotional impressions. The vocal version is so much more overtly full of desire and pure lust, the instrumental version by comparison feels so much more uncertain, longing, and subtle. For me, it's the subtlety and grace of this instrumental version that make it so compelling.





All The Way  performed by Billie Holiday  1959
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

This is Billie Holiday at her absolute best, or worst, depending on your point of view. I personally consider it her best. She sings this song with a feeling of absolute devotion and love. With only months to live, Billie Holiday made her final recording for MGM records in March 1959. Years of abuse thru drugs and bad relationships had left both her voice and body only shadows of their former selves. However, what she no longer retained vocally, she more than made up for emotionally. Her battered voice and life experience allowed for the feelings to shine thru in a way that she couldn't have possessed in her younger years and for this reason, I fall into the group that prefers her latter recordings over the earlier ones. I am the happy owner of a 10-cd boxset of her complete recordings for the Verve and MGM labels which includes outtakes and incomplete tracks recorded between 1945 and 1959. It's one of the few things I will grab if I have to evacuate my apartment in an emergency...

from Billie Holiday (MGM E 3764)
available on CD - Billie's Best / the Complete Billie Holiday on Verve 1945-1959 (Verve-Polygram 513943 / 314 513 859-2)



  scrubbles: This is one of my favorite Billie Holiday songs as well. Her voice is absolutely haunting here.
Anyway  performed by Barbara Lewis  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Barbara Lewis was famous earlier in the sixties for 'Hello Stranger.' This is simple, soulful pop music with a very cool production: crisp drums and nicely orchestrated woodwind on top of rhythmic guitars. Somehow the charm of the recording overrides any feeling that the chord sequence is slightly obvious. Barbara's voice is beautiful here: emotional, yet understated. A small female choir comes in to accompany her at various points. The song is remarkably tight and catchy, with a prominent bass part driving it on. The producer at Stax for this record was Ollie McLaughlin, and I'm now looking out for more stuff that he worked on.

from Many Grooves of Barbara Lewis, available on CD (Stax)




  Arthur: Ollie McLaughlin was a prolific producer. Look out for 45's on the Carla and Karen labels. They where both his labels
As it is, when it was  performed by New Order  1986
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A classic 80s pop song, with New Order trademarks such as a super heavy bassline, strong drums and some frenetic guitar work. The lyrics aren't too bad for Bernard Sumner either - it's a touching (if not entirely coherent) story about lost love. A great song which fills me with nostagia.

from Brotherhood, available on CD




  frmars: No melody, poor voice, binary drums, rough and gritty instrumentation, It is a very bad song.
Ballad of Billy the Kid  performed by Ricky Fitzpatrick  2007
Recommended by jmalthew [profile]

Ricky Fitzpatrick's song "Ballad of Billy the Kid" is a 3 minute class in songwriting.

A compelling story filled with unexpected references, internal rhymes, interesting characters...not to mention his beautiful voice. His single acoustic guitar is the perfect backdrop for this tragic and beautiful story. A couple of four-letter words, but nothing that doesn't fit appropriately into the song as a whole.

Ricky's comment on the mystery of the song has always been "Never judge a man til you've walked a mile in his shoes".

I am a fan and always will be. I suggest checking Ricky out while he's still available as a "local" artist at www.rickyfitzpatrick.com.

from The Same Only Different, available on CD (RFM Music)


Borderline  performed by Jane  2003
Recommended by SimonB [profile]

Close Up And Reak is a lovely album but this is my favourite track. It's a bittersweet tale of a person's (possibly Jane's), gradual loss in humankind. The song opens with a wailing violin which then introduces a soft, acoustic blanket of intsrumentation topped with Jane's wistful vocals.

from Close Up And Real, available on CD (Tomboy Music Group)


Caroline, No  performed by Nick DeCaro  1969
Recommended by bobbyspacetroup [profile]

Glad to see all of the Nick DeCaro recommendations here. I'm going to jump on the bandwagon and recommend my favorite DeCaro recording.

DeCaro interprets the "Pet Sounds" classic in a jazz style which recalls Chet Baker more readily than Brian Wilson.

A suprisingly emotional track which stands on its own.

Good Beach Boys covers seem to be a rare thing. This is easily the best I've heard. Any recommendations?

from Happy Heart (A&M SP-4176)



  konsu: Claudine Longet did a great version of "God Only Knows" on her Let's Spend The Night Together LP from 1972 (BR-15001). Although her version is not what i'd call jazzy, more like meadow-flower California country? Nick Decaro arranged a lot of her 60's albums.
  bobbyspacetroup: I've actually been looking for that LP. It seems to be one of the less common Claudine records... Thanks for the recommendation!
  konsu: I was recently introduced to Four King Cousins version of "God only Knows", also an A&M product from 1967... It's more faithful vocally to the original arrangement, only it's four girls doing the harmonies!
  Mike: James Warren (of The Korgis and Stackridge) has recorded a version of "Caroline, No" which I'd be very interested to hear.
  artlongjr: I have this 45 by Nick DeCaro. What's weird is I heard it before I heard the Beach Boys original, which I first listened to in 1996.
Children Of The Sun  performed by Dino Valente  1968
Recommended by Swinging London [profile]

A rather beautiful, melancholic song. Very West Coast 1968 sound, at it's emotional, sensitive, melodic best.



This song and artist should be and should have been far more well known.






  artlongjr: Dino Valente is one of those singers that people seem to either love or hate. I really like him overall and have his 1968 solo album on both LP and CD, and I also like many of the Quicksilver tracks he sang lead on, especially "Goodbye My Lady Love". He came out of the Greenwich Village folk scene and performed onstage with another of my favorites, Fred Neil. I hear he was a real character, though!
Chocolates  performed by The Aluminum Group  1997
Recommended by tempted [profile]

This is a song that has made me cry twice. The first time was when I first heard it. The second...

"Am I bringing you down/when I'm giving you candy/all I want is the best for you tonight"

Burt Bacharach would be proud of this song had he written it. It reminds me a lot of his work.
The Aluminum Group are truly unique in the world of pop music today. With help of Jim O'Rourke among others they've created celestial music.

from Plano, available on CD (Minty Fresh)




  musicmars: I agree. The Aluminum Group are incredible and "Chocolates" is their best song. Talk about Sophistipop. The new cd "More Happyness" is a masterpiece. I really thought "Happiness was alright but More is ... definitely MORE. I was lucky enough to see them live last year and they put on a wonderful show. the Navin's have unique music, voices and personalities - very funny, beautiful people.
  tinks: i djed a show with them and parker & lily a while ago...they're really nice guys and have impeccable taste in music.
  eftimihn: Perfect song, really with gorgeous, bittersweet melancholia. From the songwriting to the production and arrangement, this is truly impeccable.
  moondog: yeah, really great song, but i think they completely lost it after the plano cd. I thought "pedals" should be their masterpiece after the promising two first cds but remember how disapointed i was after hearing it.
Come Pick Me Up  performed by Ryan Adams  2000
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

This song is quite possible the greatest break-up song ever written. "Come fuck me up/Steal all my records" Wry, and emotional and bitter. Ryan Adams proves why he's a brilliant songwriter.

from Heartbreaker




  CaitlinSpelledWrong: YOu're exacltly right and I just had to say that the lyrics are extremely forword and out there but there's still something beautiful about it. Ryan Adams is full of nothing but truth.
Cough/ Cool  performed by The Misfits  1976
Recommended by Kriswell [profile]

This is by no means a new release, but I've recently gotten back in to it. Most people have a misconception about The Misfits. Yes they have recorded some very 'crap' songs, and the newly re-vised band and almost everything Danzig has done lately is complete garbage in my eyes, however the original Misfits early recordings, circa 1975-77 are simply amazing. 'Cough/ Cool' is a Hammond/ Fender Rhodes driven, atmospheric masterpiece. Danzig croons like Jim Morrison in this emotionally charged ballad(?). Granted, the lyrics are kind of dark, "scent of blood when you cough, cool, cool, cool, cough, cool ", and most of the other words are relatively indeciphrable, yet shockingly 'pretty'...at least in their tonal quality. The song is very scaled-down and under produced (organ, electric piano, bass and drums), but this is a good thing, it's part of its charm. The amount of reverb and slap-back echo on Glenn's voice is brilliant. So, I urge anyone who has never listened to The Misfits due to the forementioned reasons to get off their collective 'high horses' and give it a listen, they have some really great songs. Other good tracks from the same era include; "Return of The Fly", "She", "Hybrid Moments", "Come Back", "American Nightmare", etc...

from the single Cough/ Cool (Caroline)
available on CD - Coffin Box Set (Caroline)




  yoakamae: Ya I'd have to say, the Misfits were an amazing band during the 70's. Their old work was all so original, I can't get a feel for Danzig's new material with his current band. Last Caress is a great old track as well, one of my favourites with that awesome guitar riff, circa '79?
cut here  performed by the cure
Recommended by katastrophic [profile]

its 80's happy, and yet, profoundly motivating. The lyrics are about meeting up with an old freind, perhaps even someone with whom you've had a relationship, and some how drifted but not finalized. And you blow the oppertunity to make the person something more in your life, because of the way you use time. It happens. and its a good reminder to go and get what you want. also use time in a way that won't be regretted.




December Will Be Magic Again  performed by Kate Bush
Recommended by umbrellasfollowrain [profile]

This is a strange song and it hits me in a strange place. The melody is very pretty, yet complex and unexpected and there are odd washes of moog at times. It's a Christmas song and has a Christmas feeling but not the familiar fireside one. Instead it's the cold alien blank expanse of snow and that pulse of stars. Kate Bush is a genius at creating this precise, complicated emotional terrain. Also, being a genius requires you to risk making a fool of yourself and Kate Bush certainly isn't afraid to do that. She's like that eccentric high school drama teacher I never had. In this song she turns herself into the snow that falls over the white city. "Jumpin' down with my paraCHUTE! Oh see how I fall."





  jeanette: I always think that this kind of christmas song just isn't done enough. It is a great song anyway, but what makes it even better is that it has this unusual view of the festive season - that it's not just about being jolly / feeling downbeat / singing about how "so much has happened in a year" etc etc. Kate Bush of course is mistress of the offbeat lyric and it's nice that she found a way to marry it to a christmas tune.
Desire Lines  performed by Lush  1994
Recommended by parlop [profile]

So beautiful and quietly emotional as a lot of shoegazing is. One of their longest songs... it starts out with the wailing guitar melody that's repeated throughout and accented by Miki Berenyi's calm and melancholy vocals, but the instrumental parts are really the most prominent parts of the song. The best part is at around 3:53 when the guitars go crazy. the whole thing seems very representative of sadness and getting to that point where you just can't hold it in anymore and you start weeping hardcore. it's a good song... the only one that can make me cry over and over again.

from Split (4AD)


Desiree  performed by The Left Banke  1968
Recommended by tempted [profile]

If romantic, dramatic, emotionally fragile and beautifully orchestrated baroque pop with woodwinds moves you then you're blessed... by me.


available on CD - Complete Recordings (Mercury)




  gaymod: is this a cover of the old doo wop standard ? which Zappa was involved in
  tempted: No, it's a Left Banke original.
  Swinging London: Haven't heard that for years! Nice to be reminded of it. My fave by them is 'Pretty Ballerina'. As far as I know, they never had a hit here in England.
Don’t Say A Word  performed by Phantom Limb
Recommended by daniela_por [profile]

A simply beautiful song. Such a wonderful voice...




Drowse  performed by Queen  1976
Recommended by Ozmala [profile]

Not sure what to say about this one. It makes me feel sick. In a good way. It's very beautiful, especially when you listen to the lyrics, and … well, it just makes me feel like I've had too much candy, or like I'm bloated on wistfullness. His (Roger Taylor's) voice is very emotional. The slide guitar is lovely, too.

from A Day at the Races (Hollywood Records)


Emotional Rescue  performed by Rolling Stones
Recommended by sjkln [profile]




first sleep  performed by cliff martinez  2001
Recommended by olli [profile]

deceptivly simple, eerie melancholic electronic piece from the soundtrack to the (frankly disappointing) soderbergh remake of "solaris".
half clinical, half emotional. pretty good stuff.
sounds a bit like something off radiohead's kid a, only more reflective and less pretentious.


available on CD - solaris original soundtrack



  frmars: The piece is not "simple". For minimalist music lovers, this is a pure gem. The whole soundtrack is a mesmerizing variation around the same notes. And I was frankly NOT disappointed by the remake of Solaris. It is an "ambient"' movie, that made me think of Brian eno's solo music (music for airports for ex). Very elegant, very slow, very subtle.
  olli: well, in my opinion the soundtrack was the best thing about the film. though I like and deeply respect soderbergh as a director( I'm intrigued by "the limey" for the same reasons you appreciated solaris), i feel his vision for solaris was too rushed compared to the soviet original(wich admittedly is a bit TOO slow in places), and I felt it didn't give enough of a fresh angle on the subject to warrant a remake. (yeah, i know they thought of it more as an adaptation of the book rather than a remake of the film, but people just aren't going to get that) Still, the word dissappointment was used a bit relatively here, as it WAS one of the better studio films out that year..it's just that the original has a special value to me. (hmm.just realized that this might not be the ideal forum for discussing films, what with the lack of the word "movie" in the domain name and all. So I'll leave it here.) Still, I agree that i phrased my description of the piece a bit ackwardly, it really should have said simple. There, fixed it.
Frozen (Stereo MCs Remix)  performed by Madonna  1998
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

A beautiful original, mixed with a great hip-hop bassbeat. This was Madonna's first album after her admittedly excellent performance in the film, 'Evita'. In preparing for the film, she had actually taken professional voice instruction where she learned to project her voice and put less strain on her vocal chords. The transformation was amazing and she has sounded so much better since. She was also on a spiritual journey as she began her role as a mother and the lyrics bespeak this journey in her use of very emotional words and the warm sound in her voice. This is not, 'like a virgin', this is a woman reborn!

from Frozen CD Single (Maverick / Warner Bros 43993-2)


Further  performed by Longview  2003
Recommended by izumi [profile]

I first heard this song on MTV, back when nobody knew who Longview were. The music (guitar, bass, drums) is great and the melody is awesome. The lyrics are simple and poetic at the same time and I get really nice images in my head when I hear this song, partly because it's very vivid and also due to the fact that they made a really cool video for it. Some people think this is a religious song just because it mentions God, but that's completely irrelevant. I can't say I know what it's about but I know it's a good listen.

from Mercury (14th Floor 5046762032)
available on CD - Further


Good Fruit  performed by Hefner  2000
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I've come to really like this band, but when I first heard them, I wasn't so keen. Like many great bands, Hefner feature a highly distinctive singer, who can take some time to grow on you. This simple 3 and a half minute pop song has an engaging arrangement, in which the piano, drums and guitar are superbly complemented in the chorus by synth, brass, and some great backing vocals. The chorus is quite glorious, with a chord sequence that somehow reminds me of the group Mercury Rev's very best songs. The words go very well with the emotional music as well: 'Lost feelings of love come flooding back/Every time you cry/ you give me little heart attacks/Love seems strongest when it's new/but that's something I can't prove/I can't prove that I love you...'

The only other reference point that occurs to me is Pulp - as the song builds, lead singer Darren Hayman's delivery becomes ever more exhuberant, like that of Jarvis Cocker in the best Pulp songs. Looking at the CD, I notice that the excellent backing vocals are by Amelia Fletcher, who if I remember correctly did some Wedding Present backing vocals, and was the singer in the Sarah records band 'Heavenly'. Anyway, this is a really infectious track, highly recommended.

from We Love the City, available on CD




  kkkerplunkkk: Good taste my friend! That is one of my favourite Hefner songs. Should have been a huge hit, it only made number 50 in the UK charts for 1 week. It did go straight in at 1 in the indie charts though!
Guess I’m Dumb  performed by Glen Cambell  1965
Recommended by gaymod [profile]

To look for the blue print for the emotional expression and sonic arrangements for what was to be "Pet Sounds" look no further than this 7 inch, as written & produced by Brian Wilson in 1965.


available on CD - glenn campell - the capitol years (emi)


Guess Who I Saw Today?  performed by Eartha Kitt  1975
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

The fabulous Ms. Kitt pours out her heart on this track in a way not usually heard in her songs. She puts away the diva and brings out the tender and emotional woman within as she sings of witnessing a budding romance between two people only to reveal at the end that one of them is her man whom she saw with another woman.

from For Always (Stanyan Records SR 10040)


Hold Me in Your Arms  performed by The Black Keys  2003
Recommended by bluemas [profile]

Dan Auerbach plays slide guitar in this raw and emotional song. Simple yet moving. The Blues comes out in all of us in one point in time.

from Thickfreakness (Fat Possum)


Holes  performed by Mercury Rev  1998
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An intense and beautiful epic, this track is the opener on the band's superb 1998 album, 'Deserters Songs'. I'm quite fickle, and usually prefer two to three-minute songs, but this track is so brilliant that it seems short at 6 minutes. It builds up beautifully, starting with just an echoey string aura, with vocals, synth (a Supertramp-like wurlitzer sound) and guitar coming in one by one. The music finally explodes after a couple of minutes, with full drums and eerie oscillating noises. It's incredibly beautiful and dense, and the song has a melancholy air that is very affecting. Mercury Rev have a habit of putting incredible tracks at the beginning of their albums. I'm glad they are now getting more of the attention they deserve.

from Deserter's Songs, available on CD


I Don’t Know How To Love Him  performed by Shirley Bassey  1971
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Thanks to robert[o] for bringing this song to my mind. This is my favorite of all of Shirley Bassey's recordings. Her powerful voice is perfectly suited for this deeply emotional track from the hit musical "Jesus Christ Superstar". Backed by lush orchestrations, Shirley hits the notes perfectly and her fabulous vibrato captures the feelings of the song.

from And I Love You So (United Artists UAS 5643)


I Say A Little Prayer  performed by Aretha Franklin  1968
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Ms. Franklin tears into yet another great song and delivers a performance that is second to none! Poor Dionne Warwick's version doesn't stand a chance against the queen of soul!! Aretha sits at the piano and turns out a beautiful and emotional hymn to love. Hallelujah, sister soul!

from Now (Atlantic 8186)
available on CD - Aretha Franklin: Queen of Soul, the Atlantic Sessions (Box Set) (Atlantic R2 71063)



  Flippet: My favourite recording of Aretha's. An awesome song and an awesome recording!!
I Want You  performed by Elvis Costello  1986
Recommended by elfslut [profile]

This is the classic stalker song. It's also one of the most emotionally charged Costello songs from the album Blood and Chocolate. It's a long one, over 6 minutes for the full version, but worth every second.

from Blood and Chocolate (Columbia)



  umbrellasfollowrain: I'm a fan of this song too. It's got a hypnotic, level devotion set to crack and freak any second. It reminds me of the Jarvis Cocker of This is Hardcore.
innocent when you dream(78 version)  performed by tom waits  1987
Recommended by olli [profile]

absolutely stunning. this shanty-esque version of "innocent when you dream" is meant to sound like an old 78 record, complete with vinyl crackle and boxy sound.
the street organ(?) is what really makes the song for me, it gives it sort of a "pre-war coney island-style carnival documentary footage"-vibe, if you`re able to make any sense out of that. it really is an absolutely stunning track to close an album with.

"running through the graveyard
we laughed my friends and i/
we swore we`d be together
until the day we died/
until the day we died"

(often i`m a bit uncomfortable when it comes to posting lyric exerpts, in my opinion whether or not a lyric is great is too often dependent on the delivery of the lines and the feel of the music. to me, seperating the lyrics from the song can often lessen their emotional impact. does anyone else feel that way?)

from franks wild years


Iris  performed by Goo Goo Dolls  1998
Recommended by Carrie [profile]

You're the closest to heaven that I'll ever be,
And I don't want to go home right now..


This song always leaves me feeling emotionally shaken, but in a good way. The lyrics are really powerful.

The sound is amazing; the guitar sounds great.
One of the other instruments used is a mandolin.

Definately one of my favourite songs.

from Dizzy Up The Girl
available on CD - City of Angels Soundtrack



  CaitlinSpelledWrong: I always wondered exactly what was the instrument in that song that I loved. I thought maybe it was a violin but it must be a mandolin. It's so beautiful and it just adds to the beauty of the lyrics
It’s Dangerous Business Walking Out Your Front Door  performed by Underoath  2004
Recommended by Biscuit [profile]

Driving, melodic, hardcore emo Christian sound, with screaming vocals on top and behind melodic vocals. There are a few vocal breaks, pauses, and major crescendos. It is just an amazing emotional song, and it also has amazing lyrics.

from They're Only Chasing Safety (Tooth and Nail)


Jesus Wash Away My Troubles  performed by Sam Cooke & The Soul Stirrers  1956
Recommended by antarctica [profile]

Pure gospel as only Sam Cooke can achieve. His soulful vocalization carries this song into heavy spiritual and emotional territory. Its beauty cannot be fairly defined.





Julia  performed by Eurythmics  1984
Recommended by Mike [profile]

This is my favourite Eurythmics track by some considerable margin, though I also rate some others on the album quite highly. I consider "Julia" to be a classic of 80's electronica, with a rather haunting chord sequence underpinning an effective vocal line with extensive use of vocoder on Annie Lennox's voice. There is a bridge section (heard twice) which is rather derivatve of Vangelis's "Chariots of Fire" theme, but as the track progresses and builds up texturally, there is an undeniable emotional impact, and I always enjoy the various instrumental melodies and counter-melodies that appear.

from 1984, available on CD



  delicado: A fantastic track. It definitely rises above a lot of other songs of the period, even though it does feature an extremely cheesy guitar solo. And I still have the 12 inch of it that you sold me in 1987!
  Mike: Hold onto that 12"... a lot of great work was done in rock and pop during the 1980s. Rather like 1960s British housing, much of it has yet to reach classic status, but for some of it at least, its time will surely come!
Julie With...  performed by Brian Eno  1977
Recommended by bugbarbecue [profile]

Picture yourself in a boat on a river.

Actually, in this case it happens to be the middle of the ocean. Just drifting any direction. No land in sight, nothing else on the water, not even any clouds. No distractions. Just you, the boat, and the water.

Oh, and Julie -- she's there -- with her open blouse, gazing up into the empty sky.

What's so powerful about Eno's "Julie With..." (and this is perhaps representative of his entire career) is that he gives you an experience in perfect detail, as if reading a book.

Even if you discount the lyrics, which, although not exactly Shakespearian, are clear and unambiguous, there is no escaping the image that Eno is presenting.

Casting aside any overanalysis, what we're left with is an outstanding bit of relaxing, but emotionally evocative chillout music. Completely beatles, the instrumentation is typical Eno: pad synthesizers, minimoog and guitar with heavy chorus. Not something you'd throw on at an afterparty, but great for a sunset in solitude.

from Before And After Science, available on CD


Just A Little Lovin’  performed by Dusty Springfield  1969
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

As a rather casual Springfield listener i didn't discover this track until recently. While the "Dusty In Memphis" album boasts better known songs (e.g. "Son Of A Preacherman" of course), this one is an underrated gem. A soothing, relaxed opening turnes into an emotional, soulful finale drenched in swirling strings, horns and driving drums and bass.

from Dusty In Memphis, available on CD



King of the Carrot Flowers Prt. 1,2 & 3.  performed by Neutral Milk Hotel  1997
Recommended by two-headed boy [profile]

A perfect segue into a perfect album, King of the Carrot Flowers is a masterpiece. This is the way songs should be written, performed, and produced. Jeff Mangum strums the catchiest 3 chords on his acoustic guitar while his piercing vocals spill lyrics of psychedelic sophistication. I can still remember the first time I heard him sing the lyric - 'and your mom would drink until she was no longer speaking, and dad would dream of all the different ways to die, each one a little more than he would dare to try' - in a rising climax. The energy and power is then sustained into a C drone from an organ, followed by an amped acoustic guitar being plucked clumsily. And like a street preacher we again hear Jeff, he belts 'I love you Jesus Christ' while the rest of the band hit fuzzed-out power chords F and C until a storm swells with cymbals, horn, bass, guitar, Jeff's voice and another rising movement to yet another climax. Propelled by an electric frequency that chops like a helicopter blade inches over-head we are lead into Part 3, often referred to as 'Up and Over'. This last part explodes into fuzz rock in all it's garage-roots glory with lyrics like - 'I will shout until they know what I mean, I mean the marriage of a dead dog sing, in a synthetic flying machine'. As the fuzz is sustained heavily the song ends with 1 last climax; the one-note piano brings us to a close.

King of the Carrot Flowers Part 1 introduces the theme of 'loss of innocence'. The narrator, addressing his lover nostalgically, compares the emotional deterioration of the older parents with the emotional and sexual discovery of their youth - 'your mom would stick a fork right into daddy's shoulder, and dad would throw the garbage all across the floor, as we would lay and learn what each other's bodies were for.' This motive returns later in the album, as does his 'Jesus Christ' theme. Jeff Mangum alerts the listener in his lyric sheet that he believes what he sings, and that this 'Christ' theme is but the spiritual light he finds within everything. The album further treats themes like the Holocaust, death of loved ones, visions of ghosts, and all the horrors of man with this light. It is a beautiful and terrifying experience unlike any rock record to date. Personally, my favorite song of all time.

from In the Aeroplane Over the Sea (Elephant 6)


Late Again  performed by Judie Tzuke  1982
Recommended by Mike [profile]

A beautifully clear female voice emerges out of a rich synth backing of subtle harmonies provided by Bob Noble. Judie Tzuke (best-known for "Stay with me till dawn" of 1979 which was a minor UK hit) recorded a number of excellent tracks over the years. A reviewer on Amazon describes her as the "fifth biggest selling British female singer between 1980 and 1985", but I'd almost forgotten about her until I stumbled across one of her albums on CD in a shop the other day, prompting a return to some of my LPs and tapes.
This particular track has long been a favourite of mine for its emotional depth, but for whatever reason it's been a long time since I heard it. It would have helped had I been able to buy it on CD - unfortunately it doesn't appear to be available on any current disc.

from Shoot the moon (Chrysalis)


Let’s Get Lost  performed by Chet Baker  1955
Recommended by yugo [profile]

It's most romantic music that I've ever heard! I don't think Chet Baker is well at singing a song, but his way of singing & playing is very emotional & to be moved. Above all, this tune is the best one of all his works, I think. Swingy & very positive melody. I feel as if I'm in the heaven on the earth. Why don't you try it if you wanna be romantic.

from Chet Baker Sings And Plays, available on CD



  Sem Sinatra: I totally disagree with you about Chet Baker's singing. I think he has one of the smoothest, sexiest voices of any Jazz singer. Check out his version of 'The more I see you' and 'Do it the hard way'.
Let’s Go to the Dark Side of the Moon  performed by Original Love
Recommended by johannp [profile]

One of the best songs from the cd 'Sunny Side of Original Love' and one of my favorite songs by Original Love. The instrumentation is typical of this cd: Organ, a driving bass line, drums, a funky guitar riff, brass and a very interesting flute. (Why don't western bands use flutes more? Japanese bands surely seem to realize how they can enhance the mood of a song.)

I love the chords and harmonies in this song. Together with the instrumentation and the suggestive title they make this song very strongly emotional. I can almost feel myself leaving the dull everyday life, escaping to the dark side of the moon as I listen to this song. Oh, and Takao Tajima's vocals are as good as ever.

If you like this song, you may also like 'Sunshine Romance' from the same CD, although this one is the better of the two in my opinion.


available on CD - Sunnny Side of Original Love


lose yourself  performed by eminem
Recommended by ashley14 [profile]

this song is probably one of the best songs eminem has written, although everything he writes is amazing :) its more emotional and serious than his other songs which is cool. plus, i really like the beat, backround music,and of course, the lyrics


available on CD - curtain call, etc


me japanese boy  performed by Pizzicato Five  1996
Recommended by king8egg [profile]

pizzicato five have recorded several versions of this bacharach composition in both japanese and english. i like all of them but prefer this version from great white wonder. i believe it comes from a rehearsal. this version has a more traditional or lounge feel. almost as if you were in a club witnessing the rehearsal for yourself. because of this it also feels more intimate and carries a greater emotional impact than some of the other versions.

from great white wonder, available on CD




  delicado: I enjoy this song very much as well, although I think I've only heard P5's more dancey versions. I would recommend an obscure version by 'The Young Generation', a group of English children recording in the early 70s.
  tinks: the only version of this i know is the one on the "five by five" ep, which i believe is earlier? great song nonetheless.
  delicado: I just found out that my 'Young Generation' LP containing this song is a notorious ebay rarity, selling for around $100. Damn - I gave the record away to a thrift store after taping the songs I liked...!
Motel Blues  performed by Loudon Wainwright III  1971
Recommended by magicsteven [profile]

anyone who loves emotional songwriting with inspired lyrics will be blown away by this song, one of the best i've ever heard.

from Album II (Atlantic SD8291)
available on CD - The Atlantic Recordings (www.rhinohandmade.com)


Não Adianta  performed by Leny Andrade  1975
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An absolutely storming upbeat funky Brazilan pop/bossa track. I've never found anything else in the same vein by Leny Andrade, but this one is truly incredible. From the very beginning, this song is quite relentlessly uplifting. It manages to be very hip and funky, yet emotional and warm at the same time. Far more percussive than most Brazilian stuff I've recommended, this is nevertheless one of my absolute favorites.


available on CD - Blue Brazil Vol 3 (EMI UK)



Never Let You Go  performed by Thirstbusters
Recommended by MrMusiqism [profile]

So emotional and beautiful piano line with incredible voice and chords and lyrics and the way the whole band fits together. Absolutely perfect and inspiring. PLEASE LISTEN TO IT!


available on CD - Time you awake


Otherside  performed by Macklemore and Ryan Lewis  2010
Recommended by ilah [profile]

Macklemore is an underground hip-hop artist out of Seattle. His lyrics are very charged and emotional. The beat remixed featured by fences is a great touch recreated by Ryan Lewis.




Passenger Seat  performed by Death Cab For Cutie  2003
Recommended by shakebear [profile]

'Passenger Seat' is slow, beautiful and envokes many emotions. It's definitely my favourite song by Death Cab For Cutie, it is the kind of track that you can listen to whether you're sad and need to cry, or hyper and need to calm down :)

from Transatlanticism (Barsuk Records)


People Who Died  performed by The Jim Carroll Band  1980
Recommended by schlick [profile]

Roaring, emotional, somewhat autobiographical rocker in which Jim writes and sings about the deaths of some close friends from earlier in his life.

from Catholic Boy, available on CD


Round & Round  performed by New Order  1989
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

"Technique" is widely regarded as New Orders best album and i surely second that opinion: No fillers, all killers and the balance between "live" sounding songs and balearic, synthesized songs is just perfect. "Round & Round" falls in the latter category: Energetic, multi-layered, sequenced synth stuff going on, with some guitar by Sumner and, for me most importantly probably, Peter Hook's distinctive, emotional bass sound. I guess it's Hook's hooks i dig the most in the New Order soundscape, always delivering a consistency in their sound over many musical changes during the years. It's unmatched for me how that man evokes such emotions and melody out of a bass guitar.

from Technique, available on CD




  kohl: yes. awesome song.
Run Mascara  performed by The Exciters  1965
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Now THAT'S a title. Honestly, I so wish I was a teen in the sixties. You got to gloom along to the highest-quality pop-soul instead of the early 90's alt.rock that was de riguer in my tender years.

The Exciters are one of the most enduring of the 60's "girl" groups (there's one boy in there). No matter how polished the production was, they remained overwhelmingly vital thanks to the harsh vocal power of Brenda Reid, their main singer. They found mucho favour on the Northern Soul circuit, but I think their stuff is substantially more individual than a lot of the platters on offer in that scene.

"Run Mascara" is about a boy who knows how to hurt and make the tears flow, but gives just enough sweetness to keep Brenda in love. Your classic emotionally-abusive relationship. You would think with a voice like hers Brenda would just wallop him. Or shout at him. That'd shut him up.

Musically it races fast, with the other group members yelling to keep up with the breakneck speed. An outstanding few minutes.

from the single Run Mascara (Columbia DB 7606)
available on CD - Something To Shout About! (Sequel)



Samba Pa Ti  performed by Santana  1970
Recommended by kaptnunderpnts [profile]

a great, great song. emotional. beautiful. starts out melancholy, develops into a celebration.

from Abraxas


See You Soon  performed by Coldplay
Recommended by tartpops [profile]

Definitely one of my favorites by Coldplay. Very calming and emotionally powerful- about love, in general.




St. Teresa  performed by Joan Osbourne
Recommended by xicanti [profile]

There's something unbearably beautiful about this song. Like most of my favourites it's got a desperate streak to it, and I consider it one of the best first tracks ever. Joan Osbourne is a woman who really knows how to use her voice; she raises it to the heavens and really communicates on an emotional level with her music. Listening to her is always a draining experience, but this song makes me eager to be drained.

from Relish


Stop  performed by Julie Grant  1965
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

A powerful, emotional, sophisticated song, the kind that Brit-girl Julie does the best. Without resorting to mawkish affectation, the sheer hush and force of her voice can make tears well up. This was her final single for the Pye label, and a fitting tribute to one of the most consistantly good careers of all the 60's UK female singers.

from the single Stop (Pye 7N.15884)
available on CD - Count On Me! (RPM)



Sweet Lips  performed by MONACO  1997
Recommended by beautifulmutant [profile]

The best New Order song New Order never recorded (bt which features Peter Hook).
Excellent lyrics, sing-along chant / chorus...
I would've though I'd've outgrown this song after 7+ years, but I still get emotional for some reason when I hear this song. It struck a nerve I cannot explain. Beautiful song.

from Music For Pleasure (Polydor)



  eftimihn: Yeah, i still remember this really hooked (kinda lame pun, i know) me when it came out. At the time the prospect of New Order ever coming together again was very unlikely, so this was a welcome substitute at least for me. The first single off "Music For Pleasure", "What Do You Want From Me", was equally New Order-esque with Potts' voice sounding strikingly similar to Sumners'.
That was Yesterday  performed by Foreigner  1984
Recommended by Mike [profile]

One of the best classics of the Foreigner back catalogue which I know has so many adherents here at musical taste. A superbly emotional track with a great chord sequence and a mainly synth-based backing.

from Agent Provocateur



  delicado: amazing - I knew this recommendation was from you even before I saw your name! So, no 'cold as ice'?
  Mike: "Cold as Ice" is a great number, too, of course, you're quite right. Watch out for more recommendations soon!
The Drapery Falls  performed by Opeth  2000
Recommended by Metalvangelist76 [profile]

Lyrics:

Please remedy my confusion
And thrust me back to the day
The silence of your seclusion
Brings night into all you say

Pull me down again
And guide me into pain

I'm counting nocturnal hours
Drowned visions in haunted sleep
Faint flickering of your power
Leaks out to show what you keep

Pull me down again
And guide me into...

There is failure inside
This test I can't persist
Kept back by the enigma
No criteria demanded here

Deadly patterns made my wreath
Prosperous in your ways
Pale ghost in the corner
Pouring a caress on your shoulder

Puzzled by shrewd innocence
Runs a thick tide beneath
Ushered into inner graves
Nails bleeding from the struggle

It is the end for the weak at heart always the same
A lullaby for the ones who've lost all reeling inside
My gleaming eye in your necklace reflects stare of primal regrets
You turn your back and you walk away never again

Spiraling to the ground below
Like Autumn leaves left in the wake to fade away
Waking up to your sound again
And lapse into the ways of misery.

This song is the embodiment of Opeth's sound, and one of the most powerful to me from an emotional perspective in the entire catalog.

from Blackwater Park, available on CD


The Lament Of Pretty Baby  performed by Cursive  2000
Recommended by malpt [profile]

This is a powerful and deep song. I love it. It moves me. Every time I listen to it, it moves me.

from Domestica, available on CD


The Love Parade  performed by THE DREAM ACADEMY  1986
Recommended by beautifulmutant [profile]

Almost ethereal in delivery, The Love Parade or The Dream Academy for that matter, never fit into the period it was happening in. Too early for the sixties revival, too different from new wave and MTV pop, the Dream Academy found fame with R.E.M. and college fans... just a little bit.
This is a very emotional piece of soft pop from 1986.

from The Dream Academy


This Is What She’s Like  performed by Dexys Midnight Runners
Recommended by LawrenceM [profile]

Am amazing song ... 14 minutes of pure passion. I think Kevin Rowland is one of the few singers of the past few decades who has real soul. The man MEANS IT and this song just makes my soul soar. The way it starts off with the dialogue, and the accapala singing, and then how the band just kicks in at the same moment, and your heartbeat just rises, and keeps on rising as Kevin just takes the songer higher and higher ... and sevem minutes in, just when you think it's going to finally finish, it changes completely and runs on for another seven minutes. I always feel exhasted after the song has ended ... it's such an emotional rush.

from Don't Stand Me Down, available on CD


Threshold Of Transformation  performed by Isis  2009
Recommended by SamHall [profile]

The 9:52 long track immediately blasts you off your feet with a ethereally heavy series of riffs and Aaron Turner's rough vocals. Keeping it interesting, the structure continues to evolve, and drifts downward into a more dreamy movement which stays dense and builds the tension for the following verses. About halfway in, the song reaches the first climax that (I think) embodies the "Threshold" in the song title. After which, it moves into a more contemplative section, smoothing out the turmoil and tension brought on by the first half, while building its own. Beautifully, it succeeds in building yet another crescendo, only to end in free fall, with guitar and bass fantastically accenting the mood. The bass in this song is truly something to behold, wavering and powerful in its tone.

What I like about this song reflects on why I like Isis' music in general: it's complex, atmospheric, emotional, intricate, and smart. It truly is "thinking man's metal." Isis is all about themes and atmospheres, emotions and vibes, rather than clear ideas and lyrics. It's visceral, raw, and transcendent. And in some ways, I think this song embodies everything that makes them great.

from Wavering Radiant, available on CD


Tiao braço forte  performed by Marcos Valle  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A sophisticated and understated pop bossa. This song can breeze by the first time you hear it, but the unexpected hooks and chord changes make for addictive listening. There are strings, a gentle and high male vocal and a rhythmic piano. It really is heavenly. I should add that the CD compilation this appears on, 'the essential...volume 2', is really one of the very best single-artist compilations I've ever heard. The liner notes are not perfect though - this song is erroneously listed as 'Tiao branco forte'. Great compilation though, one which showed me that Marcos really is a genius.

from Viola Enluarada (Odeon)
available on CD - The Essential Marcos Valle, Vol 2 (Mr Bongo)



Tinseltown In The Rain  performed by The Blue Nile  1983
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

The Blue Nile must be one of the most enigmatic and fascinating bands of all time. Formed in Glasgow in 1981 they released just 4 albums in 23 years with 6 years between the debut "A Walk Across The Rooftops" (1983) and their sophomore effort "Hats" (1989), 7 years between this and their third album "Peace At Last" (1996) and an 8 year break until their latest record "High" was released in 2004. That sums up to a mere 33 album tracks in almost a quarter of a decade, but what they lack in quantity they make up in quality. While "Hats" is undoubtedly their masterpiece, "Tinseltown In The Rain" may be their strongest single track. Backed by a strong, funky bassline combined with jazz-like piano chords and incredibly lush strings the track shines with a wonderfully clear, sophisticated arrangement and production. Paul Buchanan delivers wonderfully emotional, heartfelt vocals to it that tinges the song in a melancholic and uplifting mood at the same time.

from A Walk Across The Rooftops, available on CD




  ronin: "Tinseltown in the Rain" brought BN to the DC airwaves, as also did "Stay." A band not based on 3 guitars, and I actually liked it! "Easter Parade," also on lp, is a very slow, detailed description of an event, loaded w/haunting atmospherics, coming to an understated climax. (To me "Hats" is their least exciting work.) "Peace at Last" and "A Walk Across.." are the most exhilarating... electronics/Linn drum machines aside, it's the magic of Paul Buchanan's incredibly moving voice. His heart's on his sleeve... a big sleeve. Emotion drips from every syllable. These get constant airplay at home.
To Live to Tell  performed by Madonna  1986
Recommended by callgirlscene [profile]

Madonna can be many things. This song conveys an epic story of love, truth and regrets. I don't quite know what it's about, but I find myself being swept up in a profound tale she is telling. Maybe that's secondary. The song is just as much about what a great voice she has. A lot of her other music doesn't convey this. She has various musical guises but she has a glorious voice not always obvious in her other songs. Also, the arrangement is neat in how the song comes nearly to a stop in the middle, and then starts up again, reaching an emotional pitch a second time. It has great synthesizer too.


available on CD - Something to Remember (Maverick/Warner Bros.)


Traps  performed by New Musik  1981
Recommended by Mike [profile]

A little like Kraftwerk but with extra emotional input and more musical interest. The music reflects the atmosphere of the lyric very effectively. Geek pop? Maybe, but it's damn good!

from Anywhere, available on CD


Trzeba Wracać  performed by Novi Singers  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Listening again to a compilation I made almost four years ago, I heard this magical track, which really had a big effect on me. It's probably not for everyone. Meandering and rather wistful, it's not at all funky like some of their later work, but I find it utterly compelling.

As you might have heard, Novi Singers were an incredibly talented quartet of vocal singers recording in Poland in the late 60s and 70s. They did several amazing records. This is taken from what I think was their first, Bossa Nova. But rather than renderings of songs like 'One note samba' and 'Desafinado', the album consists of a delightful and varied collection of originals in a related mood. The result is like bossa nova from a parallel, slightly more melancholic universe.

The accompaniment is a slow, gentle bossa played by a small jazz group, with some rich strings dropping in and out, and the vocals (all wordless/scat) take centre stage. The chord sequence is staggeringly beautiful, and at times the vocalists take slightly extravagant scat solos.

It sounds strange to say it, but this is really one of those tracks that seems to tell an enormous, emotional story, in spite of the fact that it doesn't contain one word! It would make a fantastic soundtrack to a silent movie.

from Bossa Nova (Polskie Nagrania)
available on CD - Bossa Nova/Torpedo (Polskie Nagrania)



  delicado: just to reiterate, this IS the best song ever!
Two Star  performed by Everything But The Girl  1994
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

To me, Everything But The Girl are one of the most memorable bands of the 80s and 90s. What always strikes me is how their sound evolved from jangly, jazzy-pop in the beginning to polished, rather slick sophisti-pop in the late 80s/early 90s to sample-heavy, drum & bass/trip-hop influenced, house-embracing electronica at the end of their recording history in the mid/late 90s. Despite the change in sound they always managed to capture a consistency in the feel of the music, always revolving around the same themes over the years, dripping with melancholia, unrequited love, self-pity, romantic disillusionment etc. "Two Star" is a delicate, yet emotionally bleak ballad. Acoustic in sound, with piano, double bass and a wonderful string arrangement by Harry Robinson plus some cor anglais embellishments by Kate St. John.

from Amplified Heart, available on CD



What your made of  performed by Lucie Silvas  2004
Recommended by Issie [profile]

An emotional song. I like the tune but I don't know why.




What Sarah Said  performed by Death Cab for Cutie  2005
Recommended by nospmohtetak [profile]

This song is a very sad revelation of what it means to truly love someone. Gibbard is telling a story of what it's like to be awaiting bad news in a hospital. The piano reflects the sad realization that at some point, the person you love will die, and if you're really going to be there for them, you have to watch them. The best lyric is "but I'm thinking of what Sarah said: 'love is watching someone die.'" It's a very well written, thought-provoking song.

from Plans (Atlantic Records)


Where is my mind?  performed by Pixies  1988
Recommended by Groucho_75 [profile]

The 'Best Of' album, 'Death to the Pixies' is full of classics, but if I had to choose one it would be Track 14 'Where is my Mind?'. Its haunting and uplifting at the same time, its got that epic feel to it which makes it seem like more than just a song, plus it kicks arse simply as a rock song! Not sure if I understand entirely what its about, but heh, music is also just about an emotional experience.


available on CD - Death to the Pixies


Whistle for happiness  performed by Peggy Lee  1969
Recommended by mattias [profile]

A selldom heard song from Peggy Lee's most famous album, but probably one of the best. It is a sad song although she sings "whistle for happiness and it will come..." sad, emotional and great

from Is that all there is? (Capitol)
available on CD - Is that all there is/A natural woman


White Car in Germany  performed by The Associates  1981
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

Post-punk "pop" at its most gorgeous/baroque/bewilderingly extreme - and the perfect introduction to the God-like genius of Alan Rankine and the late/great singer Billy Mackenzie. A four car-pile-up between Roxy Music (circa "For Your Pleasure"), Bowie (circa "Heroes"), Scott Walker's "Scott 3" and Kraftwerk's "The Man Machine", (with King Tubby and Shirley Bassey acting as ambulance attendants), this song is both empty and lush, creepy and hilarious, ice-cold and almost embarrassingly emotional. I have loved/lived/died by this song for almost two decades, and I still can't begin to tell you what its about. It's like something from outer space - like so many of the greatest pop songs are.

from The Fourth Drawer Down (Situation Two)
available on CD - From The Fourth Drawer Down (V2)


Yesterday Is Here  performed by Tom Waits  1987
Recommended by Fig Alert [profile]

When I think of my favorite stuff by Tom Waits, I always look back to the time when the writing and arranging of his songs were more playful, avant pop exercises, colored by a range of intense and deep emotional swatches, yet always with humor. My favorite stretch in his catalog of work is from Swordfishtrombones to Franks Wild Years (Marc Ribot?). Songs were always off-kilter, tenuous, unpredictable...far-away organs played against a punchy latin rhumba beat...oh, here comes the circus, jolted by a bended-note/feedback guitar part. Wha?

I heard a lot more characters in his voice, too. The sideshow barker, the Ironweed hobo, the cocky but sensitive playboy, or the frustrated, suburbia-warped freespirit looking to make a break.

This track off Franks Wild Years feels like an old, worn out, spaghetti western-inspired guitar shuffle. Its whispered from the lips of a grizzled shopkeeper in a soon-to-be ghosttown, telling his concerned companion the need to reach for where your dreams dwell: "out where your enemies lie." There's little consolation against what most likely will be an exercise in futility, but necessary nonetheless, to carve out some sort of happiness. Get used to it.

Somehow it seems to fit these times very well...

from Franks Wild Years (Island 7 90572-2)



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