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List songs by Song title | Performer | Year

You searched for ‘lovely’, which matched 94 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
"Calloway"  performed by The High Llamas  2003
Recommended by pleasepleaseme [profile]

Was already a fan of the LP "Gideon Gaye" with its lovely mix of Beach Boys meets Steely Dan production. Sean O'Hagen is a Genius. He's really outdone himself with this record! SUBLIME!

from Beet, Maize & Corn, available on CD (Drag City)


a coral room  performed by Kate Bush
Recommended by moondog [profile]

The album is a huge disapointment (12 years for making an album that sounds like rejected b-sidesmaterial to hounds of love) but this lovely, moving piano ballad about her mothers death shows why there really is no one else like Kate Bush.

from aerial, available on CD


Across The Universe  performed by Cilla Black  1969
Recommended by Mister C [profile]

A lovely version of this Beatles song which appeared on a 1969 album by Cilla. When it appeared on a compilation CD recently Q maga in the UK raved about it.

from Sweet Inspiration (Parlophone)


Always Late (With Your Kisses)  performed by Lefty Frizzell  1951
Recommended by tapler [profile]

Opens with a gratuitously twangy pedal steel guitar and Frizzell's creamy melimsa vocals. A really lovely example of early 50s honky tonk music.


available on CD - Look What Thoughts Will Do (Columbia)



At Once You Fall In Love  performed by Birgit Lystager  1970
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

Birgit Lystager is incredible, a Danish cross between Astrud Gilberto and Karen Carpenter with really artily written and composed pop songs. It's hard to choose just one tune from this magnificent and scarce album, but I'm often unable to get that "Eyes and hair and legs, oh what a sight/She's a flash of light in darkest night...." chorus out of my head for days at a time. To the above two chanteuses I might also add a dash of Joni Mitchell because of the conversational lyrics and melodic savoir-faire (maybe I should also mention Francoise Hardy right about here as well!). The arrangement is lush and expansive with more than a hint of Bacharach (whose "Another Night" is covered spectacularly on the same album). All this is already more than enough, but lovely Birgit also opted to go the extra mile and pose stark naked on the gatefold LP cover, tastefully exhibiting her considerable assets. (Heh heh, he said "assets.") In any event, this song, and the album it comes from, would be completely brilliant no matter what she looked like. Extremely hard to find, but WELL worth the search. I recommend Soulseek.....

from Ready To Meet You (Artist)



  criz: Yes, we are talking about a real rare album, worth searching for. Filled with unexpected chords and abosutely anti-typical for that era of Danish popular-music, or should I state it: Compromise-lessness. Compared to Bacharach's music, I myself find the pieces on this album more sophisticated - not saying that Bacharach finds the "easy way out!" "I'm Waiting For A Bus", the opening tune of the album is truly my favourite. May I also recommand the Birgit-album "Love's Labyrinth", also worth a search. Here you will find Elton John's break-through "Your Song" in a version of international class, among other fine pieces. Arrangements made in the same style as Ready To Meet You. And yes, also with a nice-looking picture on the cover. Go look for it - but not in my house!
  tempted: You guys share my thoughts on this 100%. A friend of mine from Stockholm made me a copy of Ready To Meet You just at the doorstep of summer '01. That summer I barely spent a day without enjoying that record. I'd been a passionate fan of 60's soft pop and psych (and Bacharach) but had never heard anything like Birgit Lystager. The adventurousness of the compositions and the colour of Birgit's voice are what sets this record totally apart from other stuff from that era. It's great that you guys have found this, too!
  tempted: ...but please guys, if you have until know somehow managed not to get a glimpse of the cover of Ready To Meet You then don't. It will shatter every pretty thought that you may have about the chanteuse. It's totally rude. But this is just my opinion...!
  criz: Latest news...In Denmark a 7-CD-set has just arrived, with 76 Birgit Lystager-tunes, including the two English albums - and very fair priced. Have a look at www.lystamusic.com - and be guided to the places to buy it on the internet (link-page). Just a recommendation from one who knows!
August Day Song  performed by Bebel Gilberto  2000
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Bebel Gilberto had quite a musical career before her debut album was released in 2000 and, of course, stems from a famous family (her father is Joao Gilberto, Miucha is the mother with stepmother Astrud Gilberto and uncle Chico Buarque de Holanda). This is a very lovely, soothing, gentle track, a duet with Nina Miranda (from "Smoke City"), sung in english and portuguese.

from Tanto Tempo, available on CD (Six Degrees)



Blue Hill Day  performed by Chris Dedrick
Recommended by moondog [profile]

If only life could be like this. Taken from The free designs head honcho Chris Dedricks soloalbum "Be free" this is the best cut on an album that is 50 percent quite awful (free design meets prog rock, not so good) 50 percent quite lovely (free design meets simon & garfunkel, much better) Well, particulary this track that gets closest to that simon and garfunkel comparision.

from Be Free
available on CD - Wishes (Beatball)


Bon-Jour  performed by Ed Lincoln  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

When I heard this album by the Brazilian organist Ed Lincoln, I really wasn't expecting a tune like this. It's a beautiful, tender vocal, sounding like something from a Francis Lai soundtrack, with lovely male-female alternating vocals and an exquisite Morricone style trumpet blending well with the guitar/organ/percussion instrumentation. An absolutely stunning track - playful but slightly sad at the same time, with some spooky laughter/sighing from the female singer towards the end.

from Ed Lincoln, available on CD (Savoya Discos)




  n-jeff: Thats the thing with Lincoln, its not just the cheese, he played alongside the best Jazz musicians in Brazil. He could cut a pretty funk when the occasion demanded, and his "Seu piano eletrico" album ranges from african tinged stompers to mid sixties style vocal cuts. IMHO opinion underrated as a producer as well, he seems to have been active on the cutting edge of Brazilain music from the late fifties right through to the late seventies. I intended to use this track as the payoff for a compilation I did for a cd trading ring, but I don't think I had the space. He was in hospital just before Christmas (2003), not sure how he's doing now.
  delicado: I have to say, I'm pretty blown away by his work. I know you've been harping on about him for years, so I wish I had listened earlier!
  sodapop650: Ed Lincolns best work is the recordings he did with Orlann Divo becasue he is a little more low-key and the arrangements are just plain better. I love O Ganso cause its so damn crazy and his recordings under the name Claudio Marcelo are pretty good too. A rcord seller in Brazil actually got me his autograph as a present because I bought so many of Ed Lincolns LPs. But I gotta tell you, someone like Sergio Carvalho or Eumir Deodato are much more powerful on the Hammond and Ely Arcoverde, Juarez Sant'ana Ze Maria I think are all more mature organists. I put Ed Lincoln with Walter Wanderley a little heavy on the cheese.
Borderline  performed by Jane  2003
Recommended by SimonB [profile]

Close Up And Reak is a lovely album but this is my favourite track. It's a bittersweet tale of a person's (possibly Jane's), gradual loss in humankind. The song opens with a wailing violin which then introduces a soft, acoustic blanket of intsrumentation topped with Jane's wistful vocals.

from Close Up And Real, available on CD (Tomboy Music Group)


Carry Me  performed by John Lodge  1976
Recommended by john_l [profile]

John Lodge's "Natural Avenue" was overall the best of the Moody Blues' solo ventures of the mid-1970s, being almost up there with the "Blue Jays" effort on which he collaborated with the band's guitarist Justin Hayward (whose own solo LP "Songwriter" was the biggest disappointment of the lot). This track has a wonderfully exotic feel to it, what with lyrics like "Show me your island of a thousand names" as well as orchestration including strings, oboe and bassoon, and some kind of bubbling thingy which may be a synthesizer. On a darker note, some of the other lyrics seem to indicate the alleviation of an addiction to certain substances, e.g. "Paint all the clouds the colour of 'No'" and "Gone is the white horse that carried us home", but hell, every band was addicted to stuff back then and I'm happy that 99% of them seem to have survived intact. Anyway, it's a lovely exotic song that if you haven't heard it, it's about time you did!

from Natural Avenue, available on CD (Threshold)


Caught in a moment  performed by Sugababes  2004
Recommended by godnose [profile]

As well as being a lovely slow, dreamy romantic song it is one of the most heartbreakingly beautiful tunes I've ever heard.




Chelsea Girl  performed by Simple Minds  1979
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Simple Mind's second single, "Chelsea Girl", was an apt follow-up to its predecessor "Life in a Day", an epic chant, a shimmering melody, and a sing-along chorus that paid spell-bound homage to Velvet Underground chanteuse Nico, in her role within Warhol’s movie of the same name.

Producer John Leckie gives "Chelsea Girl" a lovely delicate quality, especially across the long, tinkling keyboard intro, an aura that barely dissipates even when drummer Brian McGee and bassist Derek Forbes's kick in with their thumping rhythm. The band were proving to be masters at these juxtaposed styles, creating rock solid bases and overlaying them with much more fragile and elegant melodies and atmospheres. Here, those latter are close to effervescent and, as the band shift down into the long bass-driven, overlapping tag teamed vocal outro (a playful lift from Roxy Music’s ”Mother Of Pearl”, but no matter), absolutely crystalline.

On album and onstage, ”Chelsea Girl” remained fans' favorite, on 45 though, it inexplicably crashed and burned, and didn't even reach the UK chart.
(AMG)

from Life In A Day, available on CD (Zoom)


Chinon/Eleanor’s Arrival  performed by John Barry  1968
Recommended by ronin [profile]

This song comes from the stellar soundtrack to 1968 film "The Lion in Winter," my first outing w/J. Barry. Wow. The whole album edged out all rock music at parties. This song has a lovely rocking boat-on-water undercurrent to it (Queen Eleanor is being rowed upriver in a barge), with soaring turns-taking female /male voices singing in Latin. It has a little, quiet horn bridge to it, but then the waves of sound come back and die out. Gorgeous. Defintely a winter-feel album (the story takes place at Christmas, too).

from The Lion in Winter, available on CD ()


Clouds  performed by The Go-Betweens  1988
Recommended by john_l [profile]

The song with the heavenly lilt! It gets into a groove and chugs along merrily, with those lilting guitars in the background and some lovely light fretwork in the bridges and at the end. Excellent!

from 16 Lovers Lane, available on CD (Beggars Banquet)


Come On Let's Go  performed by Broadcast  2000
Recommended by Mr Steal [profile]

The Midlands-based retro-futurists put this out as a single and it should have been a massive hit but, of course, it wasn't. Still, it's one of the sweetest songs I've heard in recent years, abetted by Trish Keenans's insouciant yet heartwarming vocals – and a lovely tune.

from The Noise Made By People (Warp CD65)




  tinks: i love this entire album! and they put on a great live show, to boot!
Comin’ Home Baby  performed by Claus Ogerman  1965
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This track wasn't what I expected. My previous favorite version of this song (although I have many) was probably the one by Mel Torme on his 1962 album 'Right Now'. And since that version was arranged by Ogerman, I had expected this version to be simply an instrumental version like Torme's recording - a cool, finger-clicking, jerky pop number. In fact, there's something much cooler and more sophisticated about this version.

The tune is picked out first by an organ, and then by the brass and woodwinds before returning to the organ, which then jams around the main tune. A really beautiful string section comes in early on, creating some unusual chords that really add to the song and work very well alongside the 'cool' effect of the organ and rhythm. I wish Claus had recorded more songs with this mixture of percussion, jazzy instrumentation and lovely thick string parts. A few tracks on one of his other 60s LPs, 'Latin Rock,' come close, but I'm not sure any of them are as nice as this one.

from Soul Searchin' (RCA LPM 3366)



cosmic dancer  performed by t rex
Recommended by licoricewhipped [profile]

lovely.




Creature Fear  performed by Bon Iver  2008
Recommended by kukukondwa [profile]

Lovely melody, heart-achingly poignant lyrics with a rush-of-blood chorus.

from For Emma, Forever Ago


Desire As  performed by Prefab Sprout  1985
Recommended by Genza [profile]

Steve McQueen is an almost faultless pop album. The first five or so tracks are quite awesome. Desire As comes in later down the album play list and it's got a lovely laid back groove. It builds slowly and Paddy McAloon's vocals are sweet. It's a nice track, make no mistake.

from Steve McQueen (Kitchenware Records)



  Mike: I love Prefab Sprout and Paddy is a great songwriter. Having said this, I do think I would love the band and their output even more were Paddy's vocals LESS SWEET! I mean, just about everything in their entire output seems to be bathed in honey, syrup, or treacle from his sugar-lined voicebox.
  kkkerplunkkk: Yes but isn't that the point of Prefab Sprout? That it was the sweetest pop you could taste. The best love song writer I've ever heard.
Dinnertime  performed by Spiderbait  1999
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

Its 4 tracks into the CD, and after one of the fluffy pop numbers, so it quite takes you by surprise when a guitar kicks in of such rawness that it feels like small blisters are erupting over your eardrums.
In come the bass and drums, and the girly vocals (Janet presumably) with a nice sarcastic tone. The sarcasm seems to be a feature of the band.
Threres also a triffic 1980 style disco remix on the extra CD, for extra amusement. To be honest I love the whole LP, it has nice fat drums, lovely rolling bass, and they aren't afraid to use the technology, it was hard to pick one song out, but this one had the edge for Janets voice and that ruff guitar. God I love Fuzz.

Oddly the person who played the CD to me first dismissed them as just another Oz-Rock band. Nah, way off the mark.

from Grand Slam, available on CD (Polydor (Australia))




  n-jeff: My 4 year old daughter worked out enough of the CD player controls to play the disco remix back to back about twenty times over this weekend. Still sounds great.
Distant Shores  performed by Chad and Jeremy  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A beautiful piece of soft pop. Ok, it's corny - the chord sequence is kind of soppy and the lyrics are kind of obvious, but the arrangement and singing are so lovely that I can listen to this song again and again. Opening with a catchy picked acoustic guitar riff, the arrangement soon thickens with with a full orchestra. The singing is deadly serious and amusingly precious throughout the song, and the orchestral arrangement, heavy on oboes and flutes as well as strings, is anything but hip. Still, the song’s simplicity and innocence are really quite charming. I never really got into any of Chad and Jeremy's other songs nearly so much as this one, so any recommendations for similar songs would be welcome. Do me a favor and listen to this and tell me if I’m crazy to love it so much.

from Distant Shores, available on CD (Columbia)




  tempted: Oh yes, it is pure gold. I can recommend anything by The Left Banke, Scott Walker, Margo Guryan, New Colony Six, Sagittarius, The Millennium... Gary Usher from the last two mentioned was the producer on many of C & J's songs.
Don't Go Breaking my Heart  performed by Roger Nichols and the Small Circle of Friends  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A beautifully gentle and textured version of this song, led by some great group harmony vocals. These are backed by a gentle bossa nova beat, electric harpsichord, and strings which sweep in and out. Gentle and addictive listening.

from Roger Nichols and the Small Circle of Friends (A&M)
available on CD - Complete (Polydor Japan)




  rum: Oh there’s certainly no denying it, this track has an irresistibly seductive melody but there’s no chance I’d be seduced. Oh rum, you’re just being silly, she’d say, “don’t make a mountain out of a grain of sand…” silly?! I caught you in bed with the Mayor of Pensacola, Florida… this is no grain of sand my dear! But rum, it was just one time, a silly mistake, “one drop of rain doesn’t make the sun run away”, does it? Are you mad? What kind of reasoning is that? 17, 18… eighty-seven drops of rain wouldn’t either. So what are you trying to tell me? Am I to hold out for a rainstorm of two-timing before getting in a huff? The summer of love ended last September. This is 1968, the year of revolution, of fighting in the streets, of… but then she’d put her finger on your lips, “DON’T… go breaking my heart…” and look up at you with the innocence of a wee lamb. Oh, you so want to forgive her. Maybe I’ll give her just one more chance, it is such a beautiful melody… “I’ll love you till the sky falls down, even then… you’ll remain in my heart” Ahh, no, no, I’m not falling for that. I’m not an idiot, that’s impossible. Now I know you’re having me on. I’m not getting caught in your web of lies you, you, you… Your melody maybe sweet but your argument stinks. Go on get out, strumpet! “…come to my arms, forever…” No, no, clear off. “…teach my heart how to smile?...” OUT!
Dreamboat  performed by Mirah  2001
Recommended by mattishere [profile]

lovely indie song by Mirah





Drowse  performed by Queen  1976
Recommended by Ozmala [profile]

Not sure what to say about this one. It makes me feel sick. In a good way. It's very beautiful, especially when you listen to the lyrics, and … well, it just makes me feel like I've had too much candy, or like I'm bloated on wistfullness. His (Roger Taylor's) voice is very emotional. The slide guitar is lovely, too.

from A Day at the Races (Hollywood Records)


Eat Yourself  performed by Goldfrapp  2008
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

My favorite track from the latest Goldfrapp LP.
The song takes AM-Radio sunshine pop and exposes the concept to English psychedelic folk at its most radioactive.
The resulting mutation is both sexy and ominous.
The groove is languid, but insistent.
The samples and the synths sound dusty/dirty.
The strings/guitars/harps brood luxuriously.
And then there is Allison's lovely/creepy voice/melody: all woozy sex appeal and little girl menace.
It sounds like that image from the film "Blue Velvet" - lovely summer lawn under which throbs thousands of huge bugs.
Wonderfully slurred....

from Seventh Tree


Faith Hope and Charity  performed by Tony Kingston  1973
Recommended by john_l [profile]

An absolutely lovely smooth soul/pop ballad, and I'm someone who usually hates such things (if it's from the last couple of decades anyway). Did I mention it was smooth? His vocal especially. No idea where to find it, but a series called "Vintage Canadian Music" has released his other single "I Am The Preacher" (which I once saw Deep Purple do under the name "Hallelujah" on the tube) on one of their CDs, so I am hopeful ... hint, hint!




fell down the stairs  performed by tilly and the wall  2004
Recommended by lexie [profile]

geeetars, synthesizers and tap dancers + pop-ish happy sound=amazing. what more is there to say? this song was lovely live, as well.

from Wild Like children


Fim de Semana em Guaruja  performed by Os Tres Brasilieiros  1969
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A lovely, gentle samba with wordless three-part mixed harmonies, gently swinging organ and subtle percussion.

from Brazil: LXIX (Capitol ST-301)




  delicado: I still don't have this album (and it just sold for a whopping $79 on ebay!) but from the picture on the back cover, I'd say this is definitely the same group as Os 3 Morais.
  tinks: 79 bucks! i paid a quarter! i listened to the clip on your morais recommendation, and it definitely sounds like the same people. mystery solved!
Fly High  performed by Cotton Casino  2004
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

A solo single from a member of Japanese space rock collective Acid Mothers Temple. For them she plays Synthesiser (a nice old Roland) Cigarettes and Beer. On this she also sings.
Its a strange sounding thing, theres no bass or even much lower mid range. Echo'd synthesiser, a very old sounding drum box, and vocals all occupying the same accoustic space to very psychedelic effect. But yet, very poppy, the vocals stay with you for ages.
Lovely stuff.

from its a single
available on CD - we love cotton (silly boy)


For Years And Years (Cathy)  performed by Tai Phong  1975
Recommended by john_l [profile]

This must be the epitome of French progressive rock, a (mostly) languid song made by piano and organ on top of the usual rock instrumentation. There is a short fast/noisy bit just before the middle that jars a bit, but basically you want to just lie back and relax while listening to this track, it's so mellow and lovely. Also recommended: "St. John's Avenue" and "The Gulf Of Knowledge" from their second LP "Windows".

from Tai Phong (WEA)


Frozen Orange Juice  performed by Peter Sarstedt  1969
Recommended by john_l [profile]

Best known for "Where Do You Go To My Lovely", which is a sad French or Italian-sounding song, the followup "Frozen Orange Juice" is a delightfully happy Spanish-sounding song, i.e. the exact opposite (lyrics of both songs reference the European nations listed above). It lopes along in 6/8 time with orchestral flourishes galore, particularly on strings, although horns, woodwinds and harp are also evident. Brilliant!


available on CD - Update


Get a Room  performed by Jim O’Rourke  2001
Recommended by hewtwit [profile]

One of the finest songs to come from o'rourke's bacharachisation. Lovely changes, brilliant lyrics and an epic ending which is as depressing as it is funny.

from insignificance


Golden Lights  performed by Twinkle  1965
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This is a simple but rather bitter pop song, although on the surface it sounds quite sweet. If I recall correctly, it was written about the singer that Twinkle was seeing at the time. The gentle arrangement features acoustic guitar and some brass. It's not hard to hear why Morrissey liked this song enough to cover it with The Smiths.

Twinkle has a lovely clear voice, and much as I respect Moz, this version towers above the one done by The Smiths, which suffers from a strange mix of production styles. That said, I have a strange mix of emotions on hearing the song, since I heard the Smiths version at 14, but only got into this one in the last few years.

from the single Golden Lights
available on CD - Twinkle (RPM)



Good Night Sweet Night  performed by Jason Falkner  1999
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A beautiful Brian Wilson-type ballad. "Though I try to understand you/I don't know who you are/because I haven't heard a thing about the boy." Falkner sings lovely multi-tracked harmonies with himself on this, and it's just another reason that I love his solo work a lot more than I ever liked Jellyfish.

from Can You Still Feel?, available on CD (Lovitt)



Gordon's Gardenparty  performed by The Cardigans  1995
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A lovely, sugary piece of easy-pop, with a nice flute, some subtle strings, fingersnaps and terrific lyrics. "We were swinging oh so nice/bubbly pink champagne on ice"...plus a few "la la la doobie doobie doo"s for good measure.

from Life, available on CD (Minty Fresh)



He Used To Be A Lovely Boy  performed by Keane
Recommended by daniela_por [profile]

Perfect combination between a piano and Tom Chaplin's voice. Very simple song, but still wonderful.




Here, there and everywhere  performed by Claudine Longet  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A lovely light bouncy version of this song, from a superb album. One of my favorite Beatles interpretations.

from Claudine (A & M)
available on CD - Very Best Of (Varese)



Holy are you  performed by the electric prunes  1968
Recommended by Maximum_Bygraves [profile]

The Devil has the best tunes they say. God's got a fair few mind. Witness this. Creamy orchestrations and big supple breakbeats meshed together artfully with vocals that are never too mannered. Production is in the familiar axlerod vein. Lovely.

from Release of an oath


How Can I Be Sure  performed by Dusty Springfield  1970
Recommended by Mister C [profile]

This should have been massive for Dusty in 1970, a lovely arrangement including accordian, it only reached the mid 30's in the UK. Amazingly David Cassidy had a big hit with it only 3 years later, it was nowhere near as good as Dusty's.

from The Silver Collection (Philips 834 128-2)



  robert[o]: A good friend of mine has this theory that the greatest pop songs are ultimately about states of joy. I don't know I if agree, but this song is supports the arguement really well. St. Dusty @ her most god-like. Great choice.
  rio: aptly put indeed; "spooky", another case in point with dusty..
  Flippet: Have to disagree with the comment on David Cassidy's "How Can I Be Sure". While Dusty gave the song her own sensitive interpretation, David's version is totally memorable and is a true pop classic of the 70s. The production quality of the track and David's amazing vocals deservedly took the song to #1.
  konsu: Hmmm... It's almost as if The Young Rascals didn't exsit.
  Swinging London: I always thought the Young Rascals' version was terribly produced, though I can't remember why. I was always hearing them on the oldies channels in New York City when I lived there...apart from 'Groovin'' they're practically unknown in England.
Hug My Soul  performed by Saint Etienne  1994
Recommended by LawrenceM [profile]

A lovely, soulful, poppy dance song. I've never understood why a band like Saint Etienne aren't serious chart contenders. They make intelligent pop music, have great tunes, have a beautiful lead singer with an amazing voice. And yet "the kids" prefer manufactured acts like Kylie Minogue. (sigh). The Saints have released so many brilliant pop songs, but this is my favourite.

from Tiger Bay, available on CD


I Use Her  performed by Tony Kosinec  1971
Recommended by snafkin [profile]

A really beautiful acoustic song that I just can't get out of my head. The rhythm track consists of handclaps/taps or comething similar, it has a lovely, light guitar line and some beautiful piano. The gasp at the beginning is great too!

from Bad Girl Songs (Sony Japan)




  artlongjr: I have an LP of Tony's from 1969 called "Processes". Seeing your post jogged my memory on it...he sort of sounds like another of my favorite artists, Emmitt Rhodes.
I want to kiss the Bangles  performed by The Saw Doctors  199?
Recommended by mattypenny [profile]

Great Lost Punk Single #1

...well actually part of an E.P. called, I think, Wake Up Sleeping. I totally take on board what some other guy says about not just typing in the lyrics to songs, but these are too funny. It's a noisy, good humoured racket, 'though not very pc.

I wouldn't kiss Liam O'Maonlai,Guns & Roses or Muddy Waters.
I wouldn't kiss Brian WilsonOr his lovely yankee daughters.
And Shane McGowan is not my type Because his teeth are green and mangled
But Jesus Christ Almighty, I'd love to kiss the Bangles.

from Wake Up Sleeping EP, available on CD


It’s A Lovely Game Louise  performed by The Cyrkle  1969
Recommended by konsu [profile]

I'm always suprised by this group. The freshness of this song is hardly questionable, mainly because the soundtrack is a hidden gem recently unearthed. And for Cyrkle fans like me, it's a dream come true. The song is a spare bossa-tinged affair, done as sort of a stripped down folky interlude. But the track stands on it's own amongst their better known tracks like "The Visit", of which it bears a resemblance. It sounds like Tom Dawes took the reigns on this project, arranging and producing the whole thing to make one of the more memorable and interesting soundtracks I have.

Fans of Elliot Smith should check this one.

from The Minx (Flying Dutchman Amsterdam AMS 12007)
available on CD - The MInx


It’s Hard To Say Goodbye  performed by Claudine Longet  1968
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

I absolutely love Claudine Longet, especially her 60's A&M records due to the consistency in arrangement and production (all A&M albums were arranged by Nick DeCaro and produced by Tommy LiPuma). This is a great Roger Nichols/Paul Williams tune and the arrangement and production, with lovely strings, is just wonderfully done.

from Love Is Blue (A&M SP 4142)



I’ll keep it with mine  performed by Nico
Recommended by Gwendolyn [profile]

I believe this song was written in the late 60's by Bob Dylan, however it was performed by Nico, whose original band was The Velvet Underground before she went solo. This track has a lovely up-beat combination of piano and violin to acompany Nico's deep, melodic voice. I love it because of it's artistic without being depressing or too complex.

from Chelsea Girl


Jack Names the Planets  performed by Ash  1995
Recommended by hedgehog [profile]

Sweet lyrics about a teenage crush, with spiky bursts of guitars. Quite lovely.


available on CD - Trailer (Reprise)


Jellypop Perky Jean  performed by Julian Cope  1991
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A lovely little pop song, Jellypop perky Jean uses a standard Julian Cope trick - having a nice little repetitive musical phrase running in the background throughout the whole song. He then builds things up with a simple organ sound. The effect is very gentle and ambient and wonderful. At one point late in the song, Julian stunningly stops singing and starts talking. Here the real genius cuts through, and I start wondering why more people don't rant on about this guy as much as I do.

from Droolian
available on CD - Floored Genius (Sony)



Just Ah  performed by The Blades of Grass  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Deeply awesome! It's a slightly psychedelic pop song from the late 60s. Delectable instrumentation and vocals. Strings and a bit of sitar on top of a regular guitar band. Lots of moaning in the vocal. Really lovely stuff. A compilation CD is available on Revola. It hasn't arrived yet but if it's all up to this standard I'm excited!


available on CD - The Blades of Grass Are Not For Smoking (Revola)




  eftimihn: I'd like to second that, absolutely terrific song and i must say nothing on "Are not for smoking" can match this gem for me.
Kortisin  performed by Plaid  1997
Recommended by Mr Tom [profile]

A lovely triptych. Plaid keep their trademark odd noises (creaking doors and weird duck quacks in this track) more in check than usual, and the result's a little more conventional than a lot of their work, but it's also very pretty. It's tightly structured, with a happy little introduction followed by three sections marked by their different, though related, warm basslines. Each has a gentle melody of its own, and between each there's an interesting break. Warm, sophisticated, and full of beauty.

from Not For Threes (Warp)



Latitudes  performed by Ollano  1996
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

This track is delicately built upon a sample from the first opening bars of "The End Of A Love Affair" by Julie London, a song i absolutely love (and was recommended by delicado somewhere else on this site). Further on Ollano add a gentle bossa nova rhythm to the track and light, breezy vocals (in french) by Helena Noguerra. Evokes a feeling of a mild, sunny day at a lovely seaside.

from Ollano, available on CD




  jeanette: Oooo, I've recently come to really admire this. I have it on a not-that-great Bungalow compilation, Atomium 3003; it's kind of hidden somewhere in the middle and I didn't pay much attention to it when I first bought the CD a few years ago. But thanks to the wonders of mp3 shuffle technology it came up on a playlist last week - I thought, "what is this?" - and played it several more times on the trot. Marvellous stuff.
Like to get to know you  performed by Spanky and our Gang  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This lovely late 60s pop track is wistful and atmospheric. The instrumentation is exquisite (vocal group with a delicately strummed/picked acoustic guitar, strings), and there is a cool false ending. The result is a very rich sound, evocative of lost summers. A sound which I'm very fond of...

from Like to get to know you (Mercury 61161)
available on CD - Spanky’s Greatest Hit(s)




  tempted: I just found the original album of the same name this song is on. It's beautiful with just the right kind of softly psychedelic artwork and some crazy, groovy spoken word passages on some tracks. "Like to Get to Know You" stands out as the definitive song and remains one of the most mesmerizing soft pop tunes in the world.
  gregcaz: It's also worth noting that the single version, found on the 1969 "Spanky's Greatest Hit(s)" album, is the definitive one, free as it is from the pickup-line chatter that obscures the intro on the original album, as well as featuring the gorgeous coda which is included separately on the "LTGTKY" LP.
  artlongjr: This is my favorite Spanky and Our Gang tune, a gorgeous and wistful number. I also have the original LP, which features a different version from the 45 as gregcaz mentioned. There is a video of the band performing this on Youtube that I think originally aired on the Smothers Brothers. I saw Spanky and the Gang a number of times on TV as a kid.
Love so fine  performed by Roger Nichols and the Small Circle of Friends  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

It's hard not to smile when you hear this lovely, rousing late 60s number. Roger Nichols is the composer (along with Paul Williams) of many late 60s and 70s hits for, amongst others, The Carpenters. He wrote this song with 'Pet Sounds' lyricist Tony Asher, and they created a beautiful combination of sunny soft pop sounds (handclaps, brass, group harmonies) and pleasing, happy words. Musically, it is superior and extra-catchy, with nice Bacharach-esque touches and great instrumentation. The lead vocal also deserves a mention for sounding almost supernaturally brilliant (far better than it sounds in the sound sample). The singer is Melinda Macleod; her voice is lovely anyway, but here it sounds as if 3 perfect takes have been somehow overlaid on top of each other to produce an incredibly rich, soothing effect. It's over quickly - in just over two minutes. At which point I normally listen to it again a few times.

from Roger Nichols and the Small Circle of Friends (A&M)
available on CD - Complete (Polydor Japan)




  PappaWheelie: I couldn't agree more. This is the epitome of what Pizzicato Five were trying to recreate in the early 90's.
  klatu: I didn't realize someone had picked this one already! I spelled it "&" instead of "and". Excellent choice!
Lovely Allen  performed by Holy Fuck  2004
Recommended by whitelight [profile]

Electronic music made and performed without the use of laptop computers. great string sample from sigur ros. Holy Fuck is an amazing group

from holy fuck


Lovely Head  performed by Goldfrapp
Recommended by tuktman [profile]

This reminds me of Portishead but it's not as downright depressing. There's a really cool whistle/mellotron hook in it.




Lovely, But Dangerous  performed by Bruno Nicolai  196?
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A song that lives up to it's name. On the surface, a very easy-going trumpet, harpsichord and xylophone flutter about over a very tense rythm that hints as something sinister. An excellent use of contrasting elements to set a particular filmic mood.

from Agente Speciale LK, available on CD



Manon  performed by Serge Gainsbourg  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A lovely, dark, haunting song with an intricate string arrangement; this really got me hooked on Gainsbourg as soon as I heard it. Musically, the song dazzles me - the arrangement flows beautifully and sounds very original (to me, anyway; if I'm wrong, please help steer me in the direction of more recordings like this!). Serge is a great vocalist here as well. At times he whispers, but some lines he really spits out - 'a quel point je HAIS......ce que tu es...' The guy was a genius.

from Jane Birkin & Serge Gainsbourg, available on CD




  Mike: I must agree with you (it seems pretty appropriate to do so as you introduced the song to me yourself a few years ago) - this is a very beautiful song, very beautifully and expressively sung, and the arrangement is frankly stunning. This is definitely one of those Gainsbourg tracks which really hits the heights in every department. Surely worth a listen, even to those who can't stand the bulk of Serge's output.
  tempted: Scott Walker has some similarly haunting orchestral arrangements but as a singer he's a sheep whereas Serge's a wolf. A great sheep, though.
midtown  performed by the sea and cake
Recommended by licoricewhipped [profile]

it reminds me of the ocean & foggy days. lovely.




Moss garden  performed by David Bowie  1977
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Somehow this one had passed me by before. A really lovely ambient soundscape that I could listen to on repeat.

from Heroes (RCA)
available on CD - RCA


My Love’s A Monster  performed by Clea Bradford  196?
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

A cool portion of that underated genre, easy soul. Bradford's vocals (a less roaring Shirley Bassey is the nearest comparison I can think of) complement the light arrangement perfectly. Fits in with that whole John Schroeder Orchestra vibe. Sometimes you just want a lovely vocalist singing a nice song.

from the single My Love’s A Monster (Cadet 5602)



My Name Is Anthony Gonsalves  performed by Kishore Kumar & Amitabh Bachchan  1977
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

How best to describe such a tableau as this? Another Indian gem imprinted into my brain from my recent holiday.

Parts of this song are so much like the Grease 2 soundtrack in spirit it's untrue. Mix that with the kind of Hindi film beats that have become close to my heart over the last couple of months and you're talking about the kind of song which will keep me awake thinking of its greatness.

The female backing vocals are the cherry on the crumble. You can just picture the wide eyed lovely saying "An-thony GONSALVES!!"

from Amar Akbar Anthony, available on CD




  Issie: Just listened to the song- i think its great!
  olli: heheh, have you seen the scene where this song is used in the film? it`s amazing! best slow motion running ever.
  tinks: ridiculously brilliant.
Nao Bate O Coroçao  performed by Astrud Gilberto  1967
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A lovely version of this Deodato-penned number, and it's one that truly swings. Plus, it's got those ba-da-dum vocals that I love more than life itself!

from Beach Samba, available on CD



  delicado: I love this one too! Definitely one of Astrud's groovier tracks. This track also be found on one of the excellent 'Mojo club' compilations from Germany.
New Partner  performed by Palace Music
Recommended by umbrellasfollowrain [profile]

Memory's a funny thing. Especially romantic memory.
The first time I heard this song was two days after the first time I fell in love. Everywhere I went, I sang its earnest chorus "And you are always on my mind" in my head, thinking about the one I was in love with. In the shower staring at a bottle of hair conditioner, I sang, "You are always on my mind". On the subway, trying to ignore a potential fistfight about to break out, I sang, "You are always on my mind". In the supermarket produce section, holding the perfect shape of a lemon in my hand, I sang, "You are always on my mind". I was giddy and happy and the song understood. "Hey!" the song said, "Hey!" Will Oldman sang, "I got a new partner now!"
But jacket weather set in and things grew colder and we broke up and I was miserable and I stored the CD away on a top shelf with other memorabilia of that love who's happy power was really freakin' painful for me to think about now.
Things weren't always so bleak and I got me a new love and some years later, when I listened to the song again, I noticed something about the lyrics I hadn't before. See, in reality, the song isn't joyous at all. Will Oldman is singing about a past love, a love who is always on his mind when all the time he is seeing another girl, a different girl from the one always on his mind. He can't be with that girl. He has a new partner now. What I thought was a song about new joy was a song about nostalgic loss.
I didn't see how it was possible that I had suppressed that true meaning for as long as I had, considering how often I sang the song and how much it meant to me at the time. I knew the lyrics like the back of my hand and when I listen to music I dredge up all I can get from the lyrics like I'm a devout scribe interpreting the bible.
One of the beauties of pop songs is that they take on the flavour of your life at the time you listened to them and carry that flavour on to whenever you listen to the song again, while meanwhile you're morphing and changing and discarding what songs you don't want to remember that you loved and making mixed Cd's for long cartrips of the songs you do you do want to remember. This song is weird in that IT seemed to be the one that was morphing the next time I heard it and not me, like it was a person that had changed over time that I was encountering again.
Besides which, what a fucking lovely song it is.

from Viva Last Blues



  olli: now THAT's what i call a recommendation. I´m gonna have to find and soak this up now...
  olli: beautiful song. i've been a sporadic fan of will oldham related stuff for some years now, but hadn´t heard this until now. thanks! hmm. on a side note, this is the 666th american release that has been recommended here. i might be a bit childish, but i was hoping that number would go to some really, really bad contemporary pop music. Hey, you can't always get what you want:)
  fjell_strom: This song was the soundtrack to my incorrigible devotion to a lovely young girl when I myself was a bit younger. I used to listen to this tune repeatedly in my tiny little newly discovered room in the immensely overwhelming new land in which I found myself during the adventure which was to last the next four years, wandering Europe by my heartstrings. This was the song. I used to drink gin martinis to it. And eat the olive. And shudder because winter had come to my little home, and she was always, at least as often as the song played, on my mind.
Oh Well, I'll never learn  performed by Morrissey  1987
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Clocking in at around 2 minutes, this B-side is very simple, but beautiful. It was something of a 'holy grail' to me as a young Smiths fan, hidden as it was on the rare 'Suedehead' single (cassette and CD singles only!). I managed to procure a tape of it via my brother, and was instantly entranced. Morrissey has recorded many songs which are catchier and more intense than this, yet it has a unique power. The lyrics are entertaining - 'I found the fountain of youth and I fell in', and the accompaniment is delicate and sparse, with some great guitar playing from Vini Reilly. It ends with something rather lovely - it's nothing really, but it's one of those little details which when I was young, I used to pick on in songs - as Morrissey repeats 'I'll never learn', a spooky, echoey sound comes in and envelopes the entire song. Such little things used to please me...

from Suedehead (single) (HMV)
available on CD - My Early Burglary Years



  FlyingDutchman1971: I couldn't agree more! Having purchased the US 12 inch of 'suedehead' which didn't include this track, it was such a nice surprise in 1994 when I purchased the 13-cd british singles box set and found this track. Moz sings this song with such a great since of joyous naughtiness that you just want to tweak his delinquent little nose.
peace  performed by plastics  1981
Recommended by olli [profile]

lovely feelgood song from the borderline brilliant japanese new wave band plastics. a break from their often minimalistic intrumentation. oddball lyrics, nice guitar, harmonica and extremely enthusiastic singing.
i love the way the male vocalist seems to be holding his nose while singing in the beginning of the song.


waiting for the taxi
standing in the snow white
newspapers falling on the ground
it's cold and cold and cold

new york is frozen steak
teddy bear and kitty cat
fireplace and candles
all you need is weapon

this is peace
this is funny fairy tale

green green green peace
high high high heel
inside is outside
world is nonsense

dream of the tide wave
my peace is your peace
peace by the people
peace for the peace

this is peace
this is funny fairy tale

all i see is green green
grave yard of lily white
sleeping beauty laying there
with dots and symbols

marmalade evening
fur coats and venus
venus and mighty dragon said
all you need is weapon

this is peace
this is funny fairy tale

from welcome back plastics (island)



Rainin thru my Sunshine  performed by The Real Thing  1978
Recommended by geezer [profile]

All the lavishness of Bil Withers "Lovely Day" but with the sentiments turned upside down,the sun is still there but clouded wiith tears .This beautiful soul/funk ballad is for some strange reason,almost unheard but rates along side their biggest hit "You to me Are Everything".This is what you find if you keep digging and delving.

from Best of
available on CD - Best of or Late Night Tales_jamiriquai


Romance  performed by Beth Gibbons and Rustin Man  2002
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

A great track from the excellent "solo" LP by the Portishead vocalist (actually it’s a collaboration with Paul Webb - one time member of sublime 1980's pop group Talk Talk - calling himself Rustin Man for some reason.) The arrangement suggests a low-key take on one of Bacharach/David's statelier ballads, (like say "Aprils Fools" or "Trains and Boats and Planes"), which develops a wonderfully sad groove on the chorus. There are lovely strings, a great, woozy horn solo, and some inspired use of subtle, dissonant electronic textures and spooky female background vocals (both very Ennio Morricone.) Meanwhile, Gibbons does her most stylized take on Billie Holiday at her most stylized - which really shouldn't work, but somehow ends up being just right. Strong song from a very strong album.

from Out of Season, available on CD



  bobbyspacetroup: Agreed. This track and "Drake" are my favorites from the album -- especially "Drake." Good recommendation.
Samba de mon coeur qui bat  performed by Coralie Clément  2001
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Lovely, mellow bossa nova track. Coralie Clement is the sister of Benjamin Biolay, who wrote almost all the songs on the album and produced, arranged and played a variety of instruments on it. There's a timeless quality about this song, certainly due to the fact the arrangement is simply impeccable and delicate and Coralies whispery, rather flat but warm, sensual voice sounds like a cross between Astrud Gilberto, Claudine Longet and Jane Birkin. The whole record is a quite a gem.

from Salle des pas perdus, available on CD



San Francisco  performed by Butterfly Joe  1999
Recommended by m.ace [profile]

The opening line may be, "I left my heart in San Francisco," but from there it deviates into its own song, a lovely and unsettling ballad of love gone awry. A haunting melody and swelling, Spector-like production (strings, accordion, chimes, etc) make this one to listen to repeatedly.

from Butterfly Joe, available on CD


Sensational Gravity Boy  performed by Guided By Voices  199?
Recommended by Stian______ [profile]

One of my favourite bands .
They play music that is mostly simply produced , sometimes of lazyness i suspect , but most often cause it suits the songs and makes them stand out from the crowd. This is a 2 minute rocker that i totally fell in love with some weeks ago. Its incredibly catchy,rocky and got a lovely distorted vocal on it .

Its found for free on their official homesite too, go check it out :)

http://www.guidedbyvoices.com/ go to Music section , then mp3 , enjoy..

from non album track


Shearwater  performed by Pete Kennedy  1993
Recommended by Harch [profile]

A lovely, melodic, pensive guitar and piano piece.

from Shearwater: The Art of the Unplugged Guitar, available on CD


Slide Show  performed by Travis  1999
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

A beautiful, stripped-down acoustic ballad, the final song on Travis' finest album. This song has one of the most amazing chorus' I've ever heard, a comment on the messages of music in life: "There is no design for life/There's no devil's haircut in my mind/There is not a wonderwall to climb or step around" Smart, and lovely.

from The Man Who (Sony)


Soma  performed by Smashing Pumpkins  1993
Recommended by Gwendolyn [profile]

I just love this song. The first time I heard was while I was in high school... My english class was studying A Brave New World and my teacher played this song. It's so peaceful at the beginning and takes a lovely turn at the end when the peace is shattered.

from Siamese Dream


Some of your lovin'  performed by Dusty Springfield  1965
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This song is a little more....soulful.. than lots of the stuff I listen to. I find it utterly charming though. Dusty was a goddess, and singing this lovely, simple Goffin/King song she completely slays me. It's a slow arrangement in which Dusty is accompanied by piano, light, gospel-style backing vocals and unobtrusive strings. There's nothing complex or especially clever here; just beautifully executed and perfectly distilled pop.

from the single Some of your lovin'
available on CD - Silver Collection (Philips)




  Mike: Nice pun on "slays" and "executed" there.
  Swinging London: Dusty said that this was the only song she sang that she actually took home after recording it and played it over & over.
sunset over malibu  performed by the capricorns
Recommended by licoricewhipped [profile]

this makes me smile! lovely zippy synth fun.




Tear It All Away  performed by The Church  1981
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Following shortly on the heels of Of Skins and Heart, "Tear It All Away" still was the picture of a developing band, but one already more comfortable with the studio, able to use subtlety and quiet drama to inform its cool, soothing yet tense take on post-punk filtered through psychedelic touches. The familiar Byrds-derived guitar and Bowie-tinged lyrical regret and sighing crop up as they so often would in the earliest days, but there's a clean, blue tinge to the whole performance, something that feels inexpressively like an eighties recording rather than a sixties throwback. Call it the space in the mix, the gentle keyboards here and there, or the substituting of folk and country roots for something more urban and faster-paced. The lovely mid-song solos show the Marty Willson-Piper/ Peter Koppes team still well within its element, and the whole composition has a rich, lush feeling to it that's most attractive.
(AMG)

from Of Skins and Heart, available on CD


The birds are leaving  performed by Boo Hewerdine  1999
Recommended by Mike [profile]

This simple song has a kind of wan beauty and a lovely piano and strings backing. The relationship lyric is a good one which seems an ideal foil to Hal David's "Why do birds..." from "(They long to be) Close to you".


available on CD - Thanksgiving (Black Burst)


The Face I Love  performed by Chris Montez  1968
Recommended by heinmukk [profile]

nice one! i discovered chris montez lately and i like what he has done.
this song is a cover of astrud gilbertos song from the album "beach samba" (which i didn't recognize until reading it at allmusic.com) and begins with a nice organ-melody as an intro. i especially like the sound of that organ, it's a very sweet and not to heavy one. so that it fits perfect into the mood of this song and giving it a little more sweetness.
as always chris montez sings like a woman and if one doesn't know this it wouldn't be necessarily clear to one. (correct english....?)
while searching for chris montez stuff i came across "the more i see you" performed by montez which was covered last year by a onehitwonderband here in germany and you couldn't escape to hear it at least twice a day no matter where you were leaving and going. the cover was very strict arranged along montez' version. i wonder how i would think of the montez original if this onehitwonder band wouldn't have done this cruelty?!
anyway, last years summer was great anyway...(sex every day...)
and now, you go and listen to that montez guy!!

from watch what happens
available on CD - Digitally Remastered Best


The Land / Rainy Sunday Evening  performed by Ramatam  1973
Recommended by john_l [profile]

Ramatam, who walked the earth in the early '70s, were an annoying '50s-influenced hard rock band who nevertheless managed to kick off their second LP with the mostly acoustic two-parter listed here. The first half is slow, slightly off-kilter and full of sharp harmonies, while the second part is the most wistfully resigned paean to lost love this side of the late John Phillips. The whole thing is string-drenched and utterly lovely.

from In April Came The Dawning Of The Red Suns (Atlantic)


The Look Of Love  performed by Dusty Springfield  1967
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

A great song that describes the joy in reuniting with the one you love after being separated. Two versions of this song were recorded. This version appeared on Dusty's album of the same name, and the other version was used in the film 'Casino Royale'. This album version is superior simply for the fact that the sound engineer put a slight echo into the vocals and it gives this song a haunting sound that makes the beautiful words even more lovely than before.

from The Look Of Love (Philips PHS 600 256)
available on CD - the Dusty Springfield Anthology (Box Set) (Mercury 314 553 501)


The music played  performed by Matt Monro  1968
Recommended by mattias [profile]

Woe, these string arrangements is way too much wich make this song lovely song amazing, very close to pathetic and still great. The sentimental lyrics "when I lost you love the music playd..." sung with Monros deep sinatra-like voice is thrilling, and again, the strings, the strings...




The River(live)  performed by Bruce Springsteen  2000
Recommended by giant [profile]

Ok, Ok, cut it out, we all know Bruce went ultra commercial and slightly "rock n roll artificial" there in the eighties but what the mainstream listener doesn't know, is that Springsteen has some very powerful songs tucked under his belt. Similar to the Beach Boys, Bruce is widely known on the weight of his biggest commercial succeses, ie. "Born in The USA", however he has written some incredibly moving songs, most of them acoustic on such albums as "Nebraska" and "The Ghost of Tom Joad." Here is Bruce in the vein of our great American folk singers like Willie Nelson and Johnny Cash(who has covered a Springsteen Song)in one of the most tender and haunting songs, sung live, Harmonica by bruce as well, and it is called "The River" This concert was also televised, and the tear I noticed in his eyes as he performed this lovely and sad song further shows how much he brings and to what depth he is able to express.

from live in New York City
available on CD - live in New York City



  phil: Hm - a very good friend of mine is really into Bruce Springsteen, and out of the respect I hold him in I have tried listening to the Boss' stuff. And I really began to like this one - I have a live version of this from Barcelona which is really very moving, in which Bruce talks about failing his medical for the Vietnam draft.

It always strikes me as - er - outdoor music, quite different from the hair-splitting, neurotic, urban stuff I usually listen to. Definitely worth a listen if you have previously sniffed at the springsteen but are willing to have another go - as giant says, it's real great american folk singer stuff.

Incidentally, while recording my band's last demo, the rest of the band described a solo I played as 'sounding like bruce springsteen'. A small chill ran down my spine.

The Underdogs  performed by Rialto  1998
Recommended by john_l [profile]

A majestic, dark, and glorious song. It has a horn in the background through most of it, and lovely strings interjecting at appropriate places. Actually it reminds me of Gary Puckett and the Union Gap's '67 classic "Woman Woman" crossed with the Walker Brothers. The weakness is in the lyrics, which weren't Rialto's strong point, but with music this wonderful, I for one can overlook that ...


available on CD - Rialto (China)


The Unguarded Moment  performed by The Church  1981
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

That the Church's initial breakthrough song would yet become a millstone around its neck might not have been clear at the time, but one understands pretty easily why the band was anxious to escape its shadow after subsequent efforts clearly showed the tune as the building block it was. But "The Unguarded Moment" isn't a disaster at all - indeed, for a young band to come up with such a great effort early on and get some airplay and attention for it was as clear a sign as any that something really special could yet result. Marty Willson-Piper's flat out lovely introductory guitar and the sinewy blend of his and Peter Koppes' instrument on the main melody sets the tone, while the stripped down verses and quiet rhythm changes throughout give a great taste of the band's incipient ambitions and tweaking of an established formula. Steve Kilbey's quietly rueful but still clear and strong lead vocal adds a nice air of calm melancholia, while coming up with some fun lyrical images here and there ("Tell those friends with cameras for eyes…").
(AMG)

from Of Skins And Heart, available on CD


Things you´ll keep  performed by The Apartments
Recommended by moondog [profile]

A life full of farewells, everything´s given to be taken away, thank you for making me beg. With song titles that rivals Morrisseys Australias Peter Milton Walsh remains one of pops best kept secrets. Only putting out four albums in 20 years he could be described as the missing link between the more doom laden melodrama of The Triffids and the popstrumming of Go-Betweens. Maybe he is a bit too self absorbed to reach a wider audience but this lovely track, complete with trumpets, finds him in his best form.

from A life full of farewells
available on CD - a life full of farewells (Hot)


Trojan Horse  performed by Luv’  1978
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Others go to Amsterdam for the sex and the drugs - on my trip there I was intent on discovering a hit of the purest Europop. And it came in the form of three lovely ladies who had millions of number ones in 1970s Netherlands.

Luv' (the apostrophe is not a typo - perhaps any Dutch grammar scholars reading this would care to tell me of its purpose) combine drums, bagpipes, cliche and corn in one bejewelled package. They have made many great records but this is their majesty, their Great Gatsby.

And the CD cited below is a 2CD anthology of Dutch 70s and 80s girl pop. My idea of heaven and the rest of the population's burning purgatory.

from the single Trojan Horse (Philips 6012 858)
available on CD - We Cheer You Up (Hunter Music)



Un tempo bello  performed by Stelvio Cipriani
Recommended by texjernigan [profile]

From what I've heard Cipriani's melodies are often predictable, but lovely, with progressions not unlike the Gloria Gaynor's I will survive, but his instrumentation, perhaps you'd call it the italian style, give it a kind of bright sound.





Walk Away Renee  performed by Orpheus  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A really lovely version of this song, which was more famously recorded by The Left Banke. The introduction nicely recalls the melody of The Association's 'Never my love'.

The instrumentation has a folk flavour, with a nice strummed acoustic guitar. The production is superb, with great, slightly distant sounding vocal harmonies and occasional sparkly percussion sounds. Overall, it's a sound not millions of miles away from groups like Spanky and Our Gang, but it has a melancholic edge to it that makes it more listenable to my ears. Something has happened to me over the last couple of years, and some of the more lightheartedly happy music I used to like appeals to me much less.

from Ascending (MGM MGM 4569)
available on CD - The Very Best Of Orpheus (Varese)




  executiveslacks: I had just finished recommending Belle & Sebastian's "Piazza, New York Catcher" when I came across this recommendation. They namecheck "Walk Away Renee" in "Piazza..." I haven't heard this song, but now I want to hear it!
  WayCool: Orpheus' version of "Walk Away Renee" is a classic example of how this group effortlessly applied their distinctive sound to material by other bands. I enjoyed the original version by The Left Banke but always thought the wimpy vocals could have used some testosterone. The Orpheus version is without fault and I'm totally puzzled why it failed to eclipse the original.
  jeanette: I hear the legendary Pink Lady have also recorded a version - what a treat! Anyone heard?
  delicado: Having heard several versions of this song (most recently, The Blades of Grass), I'd just like to reiterate that this for me is THE rendition of the song - I'm with WayCool on this one!
  artlongjr: I have a 45 of this by the Four Tops...I like their version, it sounds very mature the way Levi Stubbs sings it, compared to the youthful innocence of the original! I have the Orpheus version and it's great, but I will always like the Left Banke original best...I wonder if anybody ever covered "Pretty Ballerina"?
Waltzing Matilda  performed by Tom Waits
Recommended by eve [profile]

Tom Waits is so cool. All of his songs do a really good job of making you feel like you remember a time and place you've never seen... his world is one of boxcars, whiskey, and five o'clock shadow. This song is much less bizarre than some of his others; it's more mournful. But it's just... nice to hear. He is a sad old man.





  Jackamaku: Great tune, although the name of this song is actually "Tom Traubert's Blues (Four Sheets to the Wind in Copenhagen)"
Way to Blue  performed by Nick Drake  1969
Recommended by Mike [profile]

Lovely, sombre song whose excellent string arrangement (no other backing is used) contributes greatly to its success.

from Five Leaves Left
available on CD - Way to Blue


We Must Be Doing Something Right  performed by Gordian Knot  1968
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

This track is pure, unadulterated soft rock/sunshine pop heaven. This could easily be mistaken for a lost Association gem with beautifully arranged vocal harmonies by Hi-Los'Clark Burroughs, who, in fact, also produced "Never My Love" and "Windy" (and the rest of the "Insight Out" album for The Association). Combined with a slightly baroque sounding harpsicord, organ, xylophone embellishments and highly idealistic lyrics it makes a lovely piece of sunhsine pop.

from Tones (Verve V6-5062)



We´re here  performed by Guillemots  2006
Recommended by moondog [profile]

I can´t remember the last time i was so excited by an english band. Guillemots seem to have everything that´s been lacking in a british pop band for the last couple of years. we´re here is a stringladen,anthemic pop song and when i´m listening to it everyone from a-ha, prefab sprout,scott walker is evoked but in the end it sounds only like the guillemots. Seriously lovely

from through the windowpane



  moondog: Oh, and look at the lovely video here ;www.youtube.com/watch?v=1n6uV9wqpuU&mode=related&search=
Wishful Thinking  performed by China Crisis  1984
Recommended by john_l [profile]

This is an utterly lovely song with synthesized strings and organ (and a real oboe) which actually made the Top Ten on the east side of the pond, the side where more people have "musical taste" it would seem. The bowed strings back much of the song, while the plucked strings and the oboe make some nice fills between vocal lines. And the line "I sat on the roof", out of context, sounds exactly like the identical line in Elton John's "Your Song", although that one continues "and kicked out the moss" while this one continues "and watched the day go by" ...

from Working With Fire And Steel
available on CD - The China Crisis Collection (Virgin)


Yesterday and Today  performed by YES  1968
Recommended by geezer [profile]

Sweet and simpler than this groups future output ,a piano,acoustic guitar ballad ,with angelic vocals and unusual chord progressions which make it sound less repetitive than it actually is .This was Yes,s first album and gave little sign of their future prog direction this track has more in common with The Beatles than than the wigged out fantasy jams that filled future albums .Short ,sweet and lovely

from YES!, available on CD


You’ve Come This Way Before  performed by Nancy Priddy  1968
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

Shakespearean actress and mother of Christina Applegate, the lovely Ms. Priddy only made this one album, but what an album it is. This, the title track, shows her to be somewhat more than an ingenue. Over a stark arrangement centered around a spare bassline and DJ-enticing drum break, she sings lyrics far beyond the usual pop-romantic platitudes. Why hasn't this fantastic record been reissued yet?

from You've Come This Way Before (Dot DLP 25893)



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