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List songs by Song title | Performer | Year

You searched for ‘swing’, which matched 82 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
16 Toneladas (Sixteen Tons)  performed by Noriel Vilela  1971
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

This, friends, is the swingingest and most bizarre version of this chestnut you will ever hear. Having recently left the Cantores De Ebano (Ebony Singers), sort of a 60s Brazilian version of Sounds Of Blackness, Noriel Vilela, possessor of an impossibly deep, rumbling basso profundo capable of blowing your speakers, embarked on a brief yet fondly-remembered solo career. This witty reworking of the Tennessee Ernie Ford original replaces the country-western-pop of the original with a rollicking samba-rock rhythm and Portuguese lyrics extolling how much fun samba is, sung by a voice from deep in the crypt that swings like crazy. It stops everybody who hears it dead in their tracks and is the guaranteed highlight of any party. What Messrs. Ford and Travis would have made of it is anybody's guess, but this version refuses to die, having recently become a hit in Brazil all over again, 30 years after its first release. I've heard many, many versions of "Sixteen Tons," but believe me, this one truly runs away with the prize!!

from 7 (Copacabana)
available on CD - Samba Rock (Compilation)




  konsu: I stand corrected. It's just a matter of getting in line for some of this stuff , ya'know? Soo much music, so little time...sigh...
  Festy: São Paulo group "Funk Como Le Gusta" have a wonderful version of this also from their 1999 album "Roda de Funk". It's in the same style that Noriel Vilela did, but tighter.
  sodapop650: If you get a chance - try and track down a copy of Juarez Sant'ana's first LP it has a super-cool version of "Ghost Riders in the Sky" to complete the bizarre brazilian western covers.
2002 - A Hit Song  performed by The Free Design  1969
Recommended by rum [profile]

Despite '2002 - A Hit Song's insistent chorus of "it's gonna be a hit, hit, hit!", by the end you're not convinced, "it's not gonna be a hit is it Free Designers?" "No… I'm afraid not Rum. To be honest it hasn't a hope in hell. Oh yeah we're bitter, of course we are, but, you know, when you're in the idiom of soft rock you can't get away with angst, you've got to maintain this 'pleasing' façade, so that's why we sound so jolly, so 'up' on this song. But yeah, it's hard..." Yes, they may, as they sing, have "sealed it with a kiss" but the cracks show. And it's that that makes this song particularly memorable. It's fascinating to see the rips in their Peter Pan wonderland, a place where they usually spend their time flying kites, blowing bubbles, befriending dolphins. And so this palpable excitement you hear in their heady harmonies is not fuelled by a surefire optimism of success but by an almost delirious desperation, "hit, hit, hit, sure to be a hit, hit, hit, gonna make a hit, hit, hit" they sing, panting, shaking nervously, craving that big fix. The track is a flip-side to the Byrds' 'So You Wanna Be A Rock'N'Roll Star'. Both are bitter recipes for pop success but whereas the Byrds are pissed off that any talentless buffoon can follow their recipe to success get a hit, the Free Design are pissed that "We did all this last time, and it did not work!". I guess you have to suffer for your art, and maybe the Free Design were having too happy a time. Or maybe their hair didn't swing right or their pants weren't tight.

from Heaven/Earth (Project 3 LITA005CD), available on CD (Project 3)



  olli: heh..brilliant commentary.
  konsu: Wow. I never thought of that song as such an exploded schematic. But it does shed light on their own self awareness even if unintentional at the time.
all for swinging you around  performed by new pornographers
Recommended by licoricewhipped [profile]

excellent!




As Strong As Samson  performed by Procol Harum  1974
Recommended by john_l [profile]

Best known for their organ-drenched debut 1967 hit "A Whiter Shade Of Pale", Procol Harum continued for quite a long while and in fact have re-formed in recent years. A lot of their 1970s songs seem to have an odd jerkiness about them, but "As Strong As Samson" is the one in which they put it all together properly, 'cause it's smooth, heavy, and it swings! With organ, piano, and pedal steel guitar all pitching in, surely this is high up somewhere in the 1970s top ten songs.

Produced by Chris Thomas, who later did "Back On The Chain Gang" for the Pretenders and the "Different Class" LP for Pulp, so that's quite a line of quality there.

from Exotic Birds and Fruit (Chrysalis)
available on CD - The Chrysalis Years (Chrysalis)


Bandstand Boogie  performed by Barry Manilow  1979
Recommended by ajhorse21 [profile]

A very 50's feel with fun lyrics. I'm not a big fan of Barry Manilow, but this one song gets me dancing.

from Ultimate Manilow, available on CD


Batman and Robin Swing  performed by Sun Ra and the Blues Project
Recommended by djfreshmoney [profile]

Sun Ra does a kind of classically themed mambo blues thing here. Great stinging guitar work, mambo (cha cha) beat and then he launches into classical themes on organ. Not as wierd as it soungs - it all works perfectly.

from Batman and Robin, available on CD



Big Town Boy  performed by Shirley Matthews  1963
Recommended by john_l [profile]

This is a very lively track that was produced by Bob Crewe, of Four Seasons fame (and who just might be my favourite producer of all time). It utilizes piano triplets, horns, clattering drums, and great lead and backing vocals to make a typically tight '60s track where not a moment is wasted. And it's in 6/8 time, which means it can sound straightforward but with a bit of "swing" to it, meanwhile some of the drum fills can hit on every second beat rather than every third one. There really hasn't been a better song out of Canada in these past 40 years ...


available on CD - Made in Canada Vol. 1 1960-1970 (RCA)


Birthday  performed by Swampdawamp  2006
Recommended by chipster [profile]

Southern Rock ala Lynyrd Skynyrd, Allman Bros. This new band reminds me of late 70s Southern Rock.

from Swampdawamp (Big Penny Entertainment 820869007329)
available on CD - yes (yes)


black room  performed by jun mayuzumi  1968
Recommended by olli [profile]

totally amazing, swinging piece of japanese vocal-centered 60's big band sound. i´m especially fond of the tarzan-esque way her voice bends at about 2:54, and the uh! ah! sounds of the backup singers. this needs to get its own movie scene ala the big dance number in sabu's "monday", if anyone's seen that.

from angel love capitol 7" cp-1027 (capitol)




  Sem Sinatra: I totally agree with the above. It's by far the best song I've heard by Jun Mayuzumi. Her later songs veer dangerously into Enka (Melodramatic and melancholy but largely very dull Japanese popular song)
  sardonicsmile: oh, i own this 7" too! both sides are great, and so are her gutsy and fun vocals.
Blues for Hari  performed by Dave Mackay & Vicky Hamilton  1969
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Groovy! groovy! This is one of the better versions of Tom Scott's indo-jazz swinger, and has been compiled a lot over the years. It has this great buzzy sitar played by Bill Plummer, and some sweet flute by Ira Schulman, who's presence on the album just sets the whole thing off! Dave Mackay's the blind pianist behind a lot of great west coast jazz like Don Ellis & Emil Richards, and his touch is just effortless. The two harmonize on the best tracks, like this one, sounding an awful lot like Jackie & Roy at times! Also, Vicky does a great Gismonti-inspired piece called "Moon Rider" and there's a version of Mackay's moody "Here" that's just sublime. A winner all the way, and must for J&R fans for sure.

from Dave Mackay & Vicky Hamilton (Impulse! AS 9184)


Blues Jumped A Rabbit  performed by Bonnie Dobson  196?
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Not usually a great folk lover but this has such a beauty to it. In terms of texture its flawless, swinging between the fluctuating notes of Dobson and two guitars. A very pure sound darkened in a positive way by Dobson's lyrical treatments.

Certainly one to put on if you wake up in the middle of the night.

from Dear Companion (Prestige 14007)



Booty Swing  performed by Parov Stelar
Recommended by willowtree [profile]

This scratchy track sounds like an old record, which is what I like about it. Although the lyrics are muddled and sped up, it doesn't detract from the song's appeal.




C.A.T cat mane billi  performed by kishore kumar  195x
Recommended by olli [profile]

50's bollywood song with sort of a tin pan alley vibe.
Kind of intense, really swingin'. Dig the sassy-sounding deliveries beween Kumar and his female vocal partner, and the typically bollywood insane-yet-non-obtrusive bridges.

cat mane MIAOW!

i really want to mix this with "trick me" by kelis.


available on CD - the prodigy



Call Me Irresponsible  performed by Bobby Darin  1964
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Bobby Darin - truly one of the smoothest singers the US has ever produced, and there's nothing that showcases this pop-cabaret style like his tenure at Capitol. A singer of great versatility, he swings effortlesly on this album, having great technique and even greater rhythmic feel.

Call Me Irresponsible, something of a standard really, is my favourite. Darin's vocals make you fall in love with his irresponsible, unreliable, unpredictable charm. Accompanied by finger clickin' good Richard Wess big-band sounds. Wow. Whatta man.

from From Hello Dolly To Goodbye Charlie (Capitol T2194)
available on CD - Oh! Look At Me Now / From Hello Dolly To Goodbye Charlie (Capitol)



Call Me Irresponsible  performed by Stephen McCarthy  2006
Recommended by edhurst [profile]

This is the title track from Stephen McCarthy's debut album. It features Piano, Bass, Drums and Sax with Stephen providing the vocals.

It shows the upbeat version of Stephen McCarthy's voice ... he also does some really slow mournful tracks on this album as well.

One of the reasons I like it so much is because Stephen made the album independently of any label.

from Call Me Irresponsible, available on CD


Can’t Help Loving That Man  performed by Trudy Richards  1957
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

I originally came across this recording on the soundtrack to the film 'the Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert' and I have been thanking my lucky stars since! Taken from the rare and out of print LP 'Crazy In Love' (which you should purchase on sight if you ever come across it!) Ms. Richards throws a good swing into this exquisite torch song and brings down the house with the help of Billy May and his orchestra! I am forever indebted to the person or persons who compiled the 'Priscilla' soundtrack and led me to this great song and the original LP from which it was taken!

from Crazy In Love! (Capital T 838 (British pressing))
available on CD - the Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert - Soundtrack (Mother/Island)


Captain Jack  performed by Ken & Beverly  1968
Recommended by konsu [profile]

One of the far too few originals on this great underrated LP.The duo has a familiar west coast pop-jazz sound,much like their labelmates Bud Shank & Joe Pass.Except where as those two have way too much generally lackluster output,this duo has tons of talent packed into one exciting session! Ken plays an icy alto & soprano not unlike Paul Desmond and Beverly sings with all the grace and soul of ladies like Lena Horne and Dinah Shore. In this track, one of the most energetic on the LP,the group swings in a brisk 5/4,with Ken blowing a soulful line and alternating into creshendos with Beverly paralelling in a sassy vocalese. Wonderfully breezy,and just the kind of peppy bossa-like lounge tune you'll listen to over & over & over...They also do great versions of"A Man & A Woman"(with Ken adding some tasteful vocals himself)and "Eleanor Rigby"! A tough record to find, and no compiled tracks are anywhere to be found.... sad.

from Watch What Happens (World Pacific WP-1862)



cemetery shuffle  performed by Stretcher Case  2001
Recommended by Earl Grey [profile]

The recording may be raw, but this song reeks of pure insane genius. 60's-inspired organ-fueled sleaze. The band boasts the former organist of "The Voluptuous Horror of Karen Black". This is one of many instrumental numbers consisting of guitar, organ, shakers and what sounds like an old drum machine. Shamelessly derivitive, lo-fi and spooky. It's one part surf and equal parts garage and swing. Henry Mancini-meets-The Mummies-meets-The Stray Cats.


available on CD - cassette (no label)



  jwmoz: Dude, everyone knows "Cemetery Shuffle" is by The Isolators. Get your facts straight man. I mean really, people read these things you know.
  Kriswell: Actually, The Isolators used to go by the name Stretcher Case, before they broke. So, both of you are actually right. Good call though "Moz".
  jwmoz: Listen man, we can't "both be right". You seem to think we live in a magical happy-world with gum drop streets and candy cane lamposts. Last time I checked outside, I saw a bum peeing on the street, and it wasn't into a champagne river, if you know what I mean (and I think you do). So although we can't both be right, you and Earl can both be wrong, and I would venture to say that you are. Wrong. Utterly wrong.
  Kriswell: Listen here, Pal. I use to be friends with those guys. So, I think I know what I'm talking about. Granted they stopped talking to me after I began dressing like the old bass player and started walking around town in a grey wig, claiming to be him. The shit really hit the fan when I locked him in a bathroom and tried to get on stage with the band. He got a restraining order against me. Rumor has it that's why he left the band. I think he was flattered though. But I hear they have a new bass player and have actually changed their name back to Stretcher Case, so look out, I'm getting my wig out of the closet.
  jwmoz: I don't blame you dude... that guy had an ass like butter.
clair  performed by Singers Unlimited  1975
Recommended by klatu [profile]

A nice a capella version of my favorite Gilbert O'Sullivan song, in a very full arrangement reminiscent of the Swingle Singers, with whom they share a member. Lyrically, the song is an antidote to the sleazy feeling I get from Rod Stewart's "tonight's the night". I used to think they shared a theme of pedophilia until I listened closer. I got this on a Japanese collection put together by Toru Hashimoto, probably the greatest compiler ever. He puts together all the Cafe Apres Midi (perfect!) and Free Soul (quite nice) collections. They can be had for $25 a pop from the Dusty Groove site, which seems high for a single disc, but they are all close to eighty minutes and packed with great songs which have lead me to several thousands of dollars worth of related purchases in the last few years. Gilbert O'Sullivan's stuff is worth looking into if you have an ear for it, and there is a nice cheap two disc collection on JVC Japan.

from A Capella II (MPS)
available on CD - MPS for Apres-midi Grand Cru (MPS/Jasrac (Japan))


Day Without Love  performed by The Love Affair  1968
Recommended by Swinging London [profile]

This is one of the best British pop singles of 1968.

Love Affair had already had a Number One hit with 'Everlasting Love' & a top five hit with 'Rainbow Valley' and went on to have a few more hits, including this one, before changing their lead singer from Steve Ellis in 1970 and slipping into oblivion.

Their sound was quite influenced by 'The Phil Spector Wall Of Sound', but with a 'Swinging London' slant.

Great melody. Great lyric. Tremendous pop orchestral arrangement. Wonderful lead vocals from Steve Ellis, who sounded like a sort of British Len Barry.

I think this song is probably one of the best pop singles I've ever heard.

It never happened in the USA and after it fell from the charts was rather forgotten in the UK, overshadowed by the groups more famous 'Everlasting Love', but, in fact, this was their strongest single.

Very much of its time, but what a tremendous time it was, musically and otherwise.

from Everlasting Love Affair (CBS)



det sista äventyret  performed by sagor & swing  2003
Recommended by olli [profile]

dreamy, ultrascandinavian mellow forest music played on drums and electric organ. beautiful. simple melodies that make me think of mist, small cabins in the woods, owls and little lakes.
try listening to this when you're far from civilization. it's amazing.


available on CD - allt hänger samman (hapna)



Devilette  performed by Dave Pike
Recommended by lilly747 [profile]

Super organ led (Herbie Hancock no less) Swinging jazz dance number... Buy the album, if only for this track and the Brilliant cover!

from Jazz for the Jet Set (Atlantic)
available on CD - absolutely


Don’t Make Waves  performed by Vic Mizzy & Orchestra  1967
Recommended by singjohn [profile]

A swingin' 60's soundtrack gem for the 1967 movie of the same name. Mizzy is probably most famous for his theme for the Addam's Family (snap, snap). "Waves" just cooks from start to finish! A freakbeat bass and blaring horn section do a wild frug while swirling strings hover above. I can't sit still when I hear this song!

from Don't Make Waves (MGM MGM E-4483 )
available on CD - Vic Mizzy Suites and Themes (Percepto Records)


Drunk Trumpet  performed by Kid Koala
Recommended by timbotones [profile]

This is a strong piece of turntablism. Kid Koala scratches a wicked trumpet solo over a nice swing tune.





ELEANOR RIGBY  performed by KIM WESTON
Recommended by callgirlscene [profile]

Originally sort of a mellow song, here is someone really belting it out. With a swinging big band, Kim, (who I've thought of as a soul singer mainly)
really rocks.

from THIS IS KIM (MGM)



  Arthur: Kim can really belt 'em !
Elle a... elle a pas...  performed by Michel Legrand  1965
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A very cool and swinging jazzy pop vocal. Michel's range is quite remarkable, and there are some cool backing vocals too. About halfway through of the song, some completely over the top scat vocals kick in, and two different vocal Michels carry out a nonsensical scat 'conversation' until the end. Definitely an unusual way to complete a song, but it works fantastically.


available on CD - Le Meilleur de Michel Legrand (Philips France)



Entre e Ouca  performed by Ed Motta  1992
Recommended by ambassador [profile]

I didn't entirely get Ed Motta until I listened to this album. For me this is his perfect mix of sacred and profane styles, his soul and his jazz. Only his third album and his first two employ retro styled instrumentation, it sounds like a 1970s session from Luther Vandross without the glitzy disco production. Ed's voice sounds so great paired with the Fender Rhodes which dominates this album. The arrangements are complicated, unpredicatble but entirely accessible. Entre e Ouca, which means "Enter and Listen," has a mid-tempo disco feel with a bouncing bass line, sharp guitar lines and that rhodes. I like his newer, more challenging albums as well, but this sound immediatly speaks to me like the best crafted pop songs.

from Entre e Ouca (WEA)
available on CD - not that I know of


Esperanca  performed by Trio Mocoto  1971
Recommended by pleasepleaseme [profile]

Ben is one swingin' cat. Mocoto rock his Composition. Infectious piano & tamborine!

Very Perfect LP. Outstanding performing, nicely recorded, nicely paced. And a fine list of composers. Tim Maia, Antonio Carlos & Jocafi, Erasmo Carlos/Roberto Carlos & Jorge Ben.

from Muita Zorra!, available on CD



Esta Noite Serenou  performed by Fernanda  1977
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

Just one of many gems on the wonderful "Simplesmente" LP. A fairly stripped-down arrangement and recording, but which still allows for the song's bright verse and chorus melodies to shine forth. The track is built from acoustic guitar, bass, drums and a hint of (what else?) percussion, which pulse gently along on the verses in a rhythm that reminds me of dancehall reggae somehow, while still being obviously a branch of the bossa nova tree. Fernanda's sweet croon and instinctive sense of swing navigate this terrain effortlessly. Who is Fernanda? Where has she gone? On the strength of this LP, she definitely had quite a bit to offer. But it was tough, back then, being Elis Regina's competition.......

from Simplesmente...Fernanda (Copacabana)



  n-jeff: Thats funny, I was talking only recently abou the similarity of the Baion rhythm to the pulse of the ragga beat. Along with "Its not unusual" having a Baion rhythm, its a neat way of tying up Tom Jones, Shabba and Marcos Valle.
Fim de Semana em Guaruja  performed by Os Tres Brasilieiros  1969
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A lovely, gentle samba with wordless three-part mixed harmonies, gently swinging organ and subtle percussion.

from Brazil: LXIX (Capitol ST-301)




  delicado: I still don't have this album (and it just sold for a whopping $79 on ebay!) but from the picture on the back cover, I'd say this is definitely the same group as Os 3 Morais.
  tinks: 79 bucks! i paid a quarter! i listened to the clip on your morais recommendation, and it definitely sounds like the same people. mystery solved!
Fried Bananas  performed by Benny Golson  1967
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Freakishly cool jet-set jazz from the great Benny Golson. A Gary Mcfarland tune that he wrote for his "In Sound" LP, and I must say his version seemed pretty hard to top,until this. A mindblowing mix of styles from the period are included in this one track:Gary Mcfarland's easy-latin swing(complete with whistles),The elecrtrified sax sound of Eddie Harris, and a swirling vocal ensemble thats almost in a Hugo Montenegro mode! Wild!!

from Tune In, Turn On, available on CD


Function at the Junction  performed by Ramsey Lewis  1966
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A very swinging, groovy Latin jazz take on Shorty Long's Motown classic finds Lewis at the height of his form. As expected, Richard Evans turns in an astounding arrangement, utilizing handclaps, studio chatter and a magnificent horn chart.

from Goin' Latin (Cadet)



Geronimo  performed by Victor Feldman  1968
Recommended by konsu [profile]

One of the greatest session men ever goes overdub mad with a studio full of instruments. This track is a nice slice of american exotica with tons of swing... a bit too short though. He also does Voce E Eu & Sunshine Superman!

from Plays Everything In Sight (Pacific Jazz PJ-10121)


Goodnight Moon  performed by Shivaree  2002
Recommended by Lubi [profile]

A blend of Mexican, a sprinkling of country and a dose of Southern soul "Goodnight Moon" is a track off the album "I Ought to Give You a Shot in the Head for Making Me Live in This Dump" : classy!

When a song hits me - I will play it like it's going out of fashion, or in this case, coming into fashion!

Until four days ago I knew nothing about this band - I happened to be surfing around looking for inspiration and accidently came upon this song, the singer whom I now know as Ambrosia Paisley has a sultry, quirky voice and given to this song makes it feel like It should be played acoustic in some smoky bar with swing doors, and a bar man called Hank offering neat JD's.

Although that's probably not too far from reality it is being played world wide thanks to Mr Tarrantino who has used this track in his movie soundtrack - Kill Bill 2 - which kind of makes sense to me granted that my original search on Google four days ago started with Nancy Sinatra, which I also found out "Bang Bang my baby shot me down" (another recommendation should I add!) was lent to the Kill Bill 1 soundtrack.

Regressing, I do not know if any other tunes on this album are worthy but Goodnight Moon now firmly has a place in the soundtrack to my life.

from I Ought to Give You a Shot in the Head for Making Me Live in This Dump, available on CD


Gordon's Gardenparty  performed by The Cardigans  1995
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A lovely, sugary piece of easy-pop, with a nice flute, some subtle strings, fingersnaps and terrific lyrics. "We were swinging oh so nice/bubbly pink champagne on ice"...plus a few "la la la doobie doobie doo"s for good measure.

from Life, available on CD



Here in heaven  performed by Sparks  1974
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Just unbelievably awesome stuff!

It's a song about a suicide pact gone wrong. Amazing falsetto (and non-falsetto) vocals. Great glam production. Fantastic guitar solo at 1:40.

It's hard to choose just one track to recommend by this group, but I've settled for this one for now. 'Thank God it isn't Christmas' was a close runner up.

(weirdly, there are a few tracks by them that I would really rather never hear again in my life. Like 'Get in the swing'. Have you heard this track? I have serious trouble with it!)

Anyway, 1974 - great year!

from Kimono My House (Island)




  Mike: Sparks have indeed produced some good and some extremely bad material. I may still own - somewhere - this LP, though the most-played track on it was always "This town ain't big enough..." 1974 - yes, an incredible year which also brought us such marvels as the Glitter Band's "Angel Face".
  geezer: only Sparks could be comfortable with such subject matter there is humour in everything they do like Tryouts for the Human Race a song for sperm everywhere
I Got Rhythm  performed by Ethel Merman  1940
Recommended by Melms [profile]

NO ONE ELSE could belt it out like that. When she finishes the first chorus,instead of reprising the melody for a second time through, she simply belts a single note (a high C) for an entire 32-bar chorus. Her voice COMMANDED audiences the world over to applaud that song. Celine Dion's got nothing on Ethel. Nothing!

from There's No Business Like Show Business: The Collection, available on CD


I love being here with you  performed by Diana Krall
Recommended by jazzman [profile]

hot, swinging jazz at its best. Diana Krall with an incredible talented ensemble, John Clayton - Acoustic bass, Jeff Hamilton - Drums and Anthony Wilson on guitar. On this recording Krall shows her full potential, amazing technical skills on the piano combined with an exceptional vocal interpretation.
She also made a studio recording of this song which is good, but nothing compared to this version. However, if you are interested in buying this song I strongly recommend buying the DVD, then you get 2hrs+ of top quality entertainment.

from Live In Paris (Verve)


I Will Get On  performed by Annie  2002
Recommended by SleazyListening [profile]

You may remember Annie from her/their housey dancefloor number of a year or two back "The Greatest Hit".

Well, they've come back with this, a sublime downbeat track with a lush-yet-delicate female vocal. Instrumentally, it reminds me of a slower, swinging P-funk number, quite minimal beats but funky as all hell (in a chill kinda way).

Absolutely beautiful -hard to find but worth looking.

Originally a limited-release 7" on Norwegian label Telle, and quickly licensed by UK house label Loaded -it appears on a sampler they released late 2002.


available on CD - (vinyl) (Loaded)


In the Name of Love  performed by Kenny Rankin  1975
Recommended by human-cannonball [profile]

My track of choice in the excellent Silver Morning 1975 LP of this distinguished singer/songwriter. To the best of my knowledge, this is not a cover version, but a shining original. It comes in swinging 3/4 time, it's the most jazzy of the LP's tracks, it has a kinda dramatic soundtrack feel, it's simply great!

from Silver Morning (Little David)



  konsu: Great album. I love the versions of "Penny Lane" & "Berimbau" as well! James Taylor, eat your heart out!
Intermission Riff  performed by Bert Kaempfert  1978
Recommended by lenny [profile]

Wonderful (nearly) instrumental Big Band arrangement, short but with a dynamic plot with gently humming singers and powerful horns. In my opinion a great and swinging piece of art, it makes me think of the gone era of great gala shows.

from Vol 4.: Swing



It Don’t Mean A Thing If It Ain’t Got That Swing  performed by Duke Ellington w. Ivie Anderson  1932
Recommended by jaflapper [profile]

This song has probably been done a thousand times, but this version is definitely worth listening to. To me this is pure music. Ivie Anderson's voice fits just perfectly with The Duke's music, it's as if she was meant to sing his songs.




It’s Love  performed by Trudy Richards  1957
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Taken from her rare full length LP (many 45's and 78's are floating around out there) this wonderful track is perfect for Trudy's full, slightly husky voice. She is accompanied by the Billy May orchestra and he knows how to frame her voice with just the right arrangement! This fabulous composition by the great team of Comden and Green swings with all of the joy and enthusiasm you feel when you find your soulmate. Sadly, this album is out of print and somewhat rare. If you can get your hands on it, God has smiled on you and you should rush to the checkout counter without delay!

from Crazy in Love! (Capital T 838 (British pressing))


It´s my life  performed by Paul Anka
Recommended by moondog [profile]

Yes, it´s Bon Jovi´s hit. And yes it is Paul anka doing a swingjazz number of it that actually works very well. If you can bear that it is a bit cheesy Anka actually elevates the song to a whole new level and also manges to bring a sense of drama that suits the lyric very well.

from rock swings


I’m Hip  performed by Blossom Dearie  1979
Recommended by missewon [profile]

This has been recorded by several others, including versions by both Dave Frishberg and Bob Dorough, the composers, but Blossom's version is the best! It swings!

fave part:
I dig! I'm in step.
When it was hip to be hep, I was hep.
I don't blow but I'm a fan.
Look at me swing. Ring a ding ding.
I even call my girlfriend "man," I'm so hip.

from Needlepoint Magic, Vol. 5 (Daffodil)
available on CD - The Diva Series - Blossom Dearie (Verve)



  mattias: yes, she's hip. There is a great version of this song on Blossoms album simply called 1975 (Daffodil, vol. II),, unfortunally not reissued on CD.
Let’s Get Lost  performed by Chet Baker  1955
Recommended by yugo [profile]

It's most romantic music that I've ever heard! I don't think Chet Baker is well at singing a song, but his way of singing & playing is very emotional & to be moved. Above all, this tune is the best one of all his works, I think. Swingy & very positive melody. I feel as if I'm in the heaven on the earth. Why don't you try it if you wanna be romantic.

from Chet Baker Sings And Plays, available on CD



  Sem Sinatra: I totally disagree with you about Chet Baker's singing. I think he has one of the smoothest, sexiest voices of any Jazz singer. Check out his version of 'The more I see you' and 'Do it the hard way'.
Lluvia de Primavera/Spring Rain  performed by Bebu Silvetti  1975
Recommended by tempted [profile]

The definition of a groovy, instrumental easy listening disco tune. Makes me wanna jump on the first plane to somewhere warm and swinging. Great piano and acoustic guitar accompaniment from this Spanish lizard with a hairy face. And that girl backing choir.. there are two single versions of this that are slightly different and a full length version which is the best.






  tempted: To correct: the "full-length version" is in fact a disco mix by Salsoul stalwart Tom Moulton. So good, man... Crazy percussive middle part galore! Available as a Salsoul 12". Tell me if you bump into one!
Love For Sale  performed by Annie Ross  1964
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

This is such a great recording! Ms. Ross starts out as if she is going to whimper her way thru this sad little tale of a prostitute's life, then wham-bam (pardon the expression) she takes on the persona of Natalie Wood in 'Gypsy' and swings the song as if she is playfully strutting across the stage and smacking you gingerly with her long silky glove. She soon has you believing that she is going to drag you by the scruff of the neck back to her abode to give you a Russ Meyer-ish smackdown! Johnny Spence's orchestra provides her with just the right weaponry to bring you to your submissive knees all at no additional charge.

from Annie Ross Sings a Handful of Songs (Globe/Ember (Japanese pressing} SMJ 7175)
available on CD - Annie Ross Sings a Handful of Songs / Club Verboten (Box Set) (DCC-626 / DZS(4)-135)


Man With The Hex  performed by Atomic Fireballs  1999
Recommended by Betto_Colombia [profile]

This Neo-Swing Song from the American Pie soundtrack. Kinda blues, kinda rock... Pretty cool. And John Bunkley's voice!! Wow it's really something. This song cheers me up a lot.

from Torch This Place, available on CD


Miss Allen’s Blues  performed by Ernestine Allen  1961
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Maybe it's just me getting older, but I lap this kinda stuff up these days. I can't get enough of ol' style R&B, jump blues or a song like this: swingin', heartbreaking and outstandingly sung by a woman who is undeservedly just a footnote in musical history.

Ernestine (who sometimes recorded under the name Annisteen) works her smooth chords to a blues vocal with light jazzy backing. Almost Peggy Lee like in places, but with the benefit of King Curtis' sax and an amazing rhythm section that Ernestine obviously connects with.

The lyrics are beautiful, too: "You cry so hard, you cry like you never cried before; you moan and you groan so sad, you give the blues to your neighbour next door."

from Let It Roll, available on CD



Mrs. Robinson  performed by The Ray Bloch Singers  1970
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Wow. This is just...wow. I've just gotta say that I have an absolutely unnatural attraction to this group. Imagine if you will, a chorus of super-square middle-aged white folks, swinging it's way through the rockin' hits of the day, only performing them all with absolutely perfect diction & grammar. The mastermind behind this way one Mr. Ray Bloch, who, according to the back cover to every one of the LPs that I own, was the musical director for the Ed Sullivan Show. All I know is that anything the man touched was gold! Check out his versions of "Penny Lane" and "Light My Fire" on the "Hits of '67" LP, or his absolutely quizzical take on the ENTIRE soundtrack from "Hair".

from Hits of '68 (Ambassador)



  konsu: Too true... I love the cover too. With the spunky teens shopping and sippin' on ice cream sodas in a flower montage.
  tinks: i'm glad i'm not alone in my unholy obsession!
Nao Bate O Coroçao  performed by Astrud Gilberto  1967
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A lovely version of this Deodato-penned number, and it's one that truly swings. Plus, it's got those ba-da-dum vocals that I love more than life itself!

from Beach Samba, available on CD



  delicado: I love this one too! Definitely one of Astrud's groovier tracks. This track also be found on one of the excellent 'Mojo club' compilations from Germany.
Natural To Be Gone  performed by Anita Kerr Singers  1970
Recommended by konsu [profile]

A real up-beat number for a very cerebral tune! All AK's records are full of wierd moments and odd delights, this is the one from the set that aim's to please! It starts out with the groups signature harmonies in a acapella almost swingle-like mode, and then kicks in to a hybrid pop groove from heaven, with castanets clacking away ... And the lyrics are wild ! :..." What's the difference being different when it's difference now that looks alike, you say i'm changing and i'm not so sure it's wrong..." " It's just that centerline on this highway runs up my banjo neck, and I feel somehow that it's natural to be gone..."

Written by John Hartford. A name i've seen before, but i'm not familiar with his work. I'd like to know more if anyone knows his definitive recordings!

from It's Anita Kerr Country (Dot DLP 25976)




  rio: John Hartford was a regular on The Glen Campbell television showof the late 60s, he wrote "Gentle on my mind" among other pop hits done by other artists.. talented writer and musician..
  artlongjr: Hartford was a favorite of mine as a kid, I used to see him on the Smothers Brothers and Glen Campbell shows, where he was somewhat of a regular. He was a celebrity back then for writing "Gentle on My Mind" which became a 60s standard. I do recall that he was a riverboat captain as well as a musician. He died a few years ago, which I was sorry to hear, but I've seen a number of his CDs that were on the market. I love his 60's stuff, he had a great laconic style.
Niki  performed by The Third Wave  1970
Recommended by Festy [profile]

It took me a while to get a copy of this album as even the out-of-print re-issue on Crippled Dick Hot Wax (that's the name of the label, folks. Promise!) sells for a bit these days. I'm glad I got it as it's a fantastic album - the only LP released by the 5 Filipino/American sister vocal group, although I think they released at least one 45". Discovered by George Duke, he wrote the arrangements and his trio of the time provides backing. The album was recorded in Germany (released by MPS) and is a little bit poppy, a little bit jazzy, a little bit funky. There are a number of songs which could be recommended (a number of them jazz standards, such as 'Maiden Voyage' and 'Cantaloupe Island'), but the one I've chosen is 'Niki'. I hadn't come across this track before getting the album, unlike a few of the other tracks which have turned up on compilations over the years.

'Niki' is a song that builds. It starts off fairly casually and builds up to a swinging chorus, accented by some very hip playing by George Duke, still on an acoustic piano during this stage of his career.

Another commendable and notable track on the album, and which I discovered through a compilation created by 'mine host' of Musical Taste, Senhor Delicado, is "Waves Lament". Absolutely fantastic.

from Here & Now, available on CD



Oh, Calcutta!  performed by Dave Pell Singers  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This short track opens the classic 1995 easy listening compilation The Sound Gallery. I'm sure it's well known to anyone with a remote interest in the whole revival scene. It's a really beautiful track, with funky drums, organ, a gentle, whispery vocal chorus, and some great jazz piano. Evocative and glamorous, this evokes a swinging party attended by people wearing sparkly dresses. For me, this is perhaps the ultimate stylish/glamorous 60s recording.

from Mah-Na-Mah-Na (Liberty)
available on CD - Sound Gallery (EMI)




  n-jeff: Its funny that it should make you think of people wearing sparkly dresses, when of course the show itself was primarily famous for having large numbers of hairy hippies naked onstage.
One,Two,Three  performed by Tony Scotti  1968
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Ah yes.... You know him alright, the tragic lounge singer from "The Valley Of The Dolls"! And the schmaltz is transmitted directly into this version of the top 10 smash with deft precision! This track absolutely kicks ass, and is worth the 25 cents you'll probably have to pay for this work of art! The rest of the record is pretty hum-drum,nothing to sniff at though,especially for fans of swingin' supper-club jazz. Fans of the movie will dig it as well,if not just for the cover,which looks like a still from the film with him in a tuxedo,gripping the microphone with a devilish sneer!

from Starring Tony Scotti (Liberty LST-7544)



Penny Lane  performed by Stephen McCarthy  2006
Recommended by edhurst [profile]

This is a track from Stephen McCarthy's debut album. Originally recorded by The Beatles as a traditional pop song, Stephen's version is a jazz swing with Piano, Bass and Drums.

from Call Me Irresponsible, available on CD


Rhode Island Is Famous For You  performed by Blossom Dearie  1960
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

A cute and amusing song from the 1948 musical, 'Inside USA', this song is perfect for Ms. Dearie's adorable voice. She swings thru a state-by-state list, hilighting what each state is famous for, at first on a factual basis, then going off in a whimsical frenzy with such phrases as, "Pencils, come from Pencil-vania, vests from Vest Virginia, and tents from Tent-essee, they know mink where they grow mink, in Wyomink, a camp chair in New Hampchair, that's for me!" I'm amazed that the Farelly Brothers haven't gotten this one to use in one of their films yet!

from Blossom Dearie, Soubrette, Sings Hit Broadway Songs (Verve MGV 2133)
available on CD - Blossom Dearie - Verve Jazz Masters 51 (Verve/Polygram 529906)


Rhode Island Is Famous For You  performed by Nancy LaMott
Recommended by California [profile]

This swings along and it's witty and it's romantic too. A wonderful match for Nancy LaMott's wonderful voice.

from My Foolish Heart, available on CD


Rhode Island Is Famous for You  performed by Lascivious Biddies
Recommended by JMartz [profile]

Performed under its alternate title, "Coney Island", t;he Biddies' version, from their debut CD, Biddi-luxe!, swings and bops with the jazzy exuberance. If you don't know the Biddies, this is a great introduction. These girls have the chops!!





  FlyingDutchman1971: I will have to seek this one out. My favorite artist Blossom Dearie recorded a great version of it back in the 1950's. I have it listed as a recommendation on this site.
Richmond Bridge  performed by I Cantori Moderni di Alessandroni  1966
Recommended by andyjl [profile]

Soaring choral evocation of a cold bright day on a busy river. From Piero Piccioni’s soundtrack to a Swinging London exploitation film in which an Italian eccentric encounters bikers, fox hunters and a haunted castle.


available on CD - Fuma Di Londra


Route 66  performed by Just Jazz  2002
Recommended by jazzgoa [profile]

Just Jazz is Goa's premier jazz band featuring jazz diva Belinda Oliveira. Hear sample sounds at http://www.justjazz.8m.com

from Live in concert (www.angelav.com 001)


Sixteen Tons  performed by Bobby Laurel  1968
Recommended by konsu [profile]

I saw this record at a local shop and based upon the up-scale credits (Don Sebesky, Joe Cain, etc.), I picked it up. And Boom! I instantly had the swinginest version of sixteen tons ever recorded! As you can imagine, Don S. puts his magical twist on things, hot on the heels of his A&M/CTI work (The intro for this track sounds just like "Going to Detroit", from the Wes Montgomery album "Down Here on the Ground"), and full of swanky harpsichords and snappy drum beats. Bobby has a very Jack Jones-y sound, super pop, but with that saccharine smarm of an uptown lounge pianist... Great stuff!

from The Beautiful Days Of My Youth (MGM SE-4618)


Sugartown  performed by Les Miladys  196?
Recommended by konsu [profile]

While miss boot's version isn't as sugary as I want it to be, this one succeeds. It starts off with the three singers giggling like the Powerpuff Girls tickling each other, and leads into the verses cooed in french, only to swing into harmonies on the chorus. The backing is like a tinkling country stroll in candy land... Very Charming.

The trio is Canadian, I believe. I tried to get the original for ages on ebay before I found this tasteful reissue from Gear Fab. I picked it up for the great scat number "Jazz A Go-Go", but this track is great for fans of Lee & Nancy and french pop.

from Les Miladys (Gear Fab (Reissue) RGF003A)



Sultans Of Swing  performed by Dire Straits  1978
Recommended by acidburn [profile]

from Dire Straits


Suzy  performed by Caravan Palace
Recommended by Gimpsters [profile]

I just found Caravan Palace a while ago. They're amazing! They play a mix of gypsy swing and dance techno with some jazz thrown in there and a little bit of hip hop sprinkled over top.
This track is great because it showcases all their influences. Also the guy scatting over the song is awesome!

from Caravan Palace, available on CD


Swing Like Thunder  performed by Boy from Arkansas  198?
Recommended by mattypenny [profile]

This is partly a recommendation, partly a request for information if anybody has it. (hope thats not an abuse of the website)

I recorded this by accident off of a John Peel show in the late 70s/early 80s. Its a dance-y dub-by version of a old American square dance song I believe. Its not unlike Malcolm Maclarens stuff of the same time in concept, but its al lot more taste.

So does anybody else know it?





  n-jeff: Hmmm, Sounds like the sort of thing the Suns of Arqa were up to at that time, the early stuff tended to mix uptempo dubby backings with guitar and or fiddle, and then do something daft like phase the hell out of it. I should say it would be worth eliminating, I'll try and find te hname of the LP I have thats like that.
Suns of Arqa - Sounds like thunder ? could be...

  mattypenny: Jeff - judging by the website, that's a really good call. I shall investigate...Thanks, Matt
  n-jeff: Glad to be of assistance. Suns of Arqa are well worth checking out anyway, I saw them live a couple of times in their Indian phase, Tabla's, Sitar, drums and Wadada on deep bass. At the time there was no-one like it. Nice.
Swing, Swing  performed by The All-American Rejects  2003
Recommended by izumi [profile]

I love the organ used in this song's intro, and Tyson Ritter has really yummy vocals. :D Okay, well, besides that, it's a soppy, lovey-dovey song about loneliness and heartbreak and losing your girlfriend (I guess). The lyrics may seem a bit tacky but it's still a cool melodic song with lots of catchy hooks and a great sing-along!

from The All-American Rejects (Polydor 4504606)


swingset chain  performed by loquat
Recommended by zenstar [profile]




The Chelsea Memorandum  performed by Lalo Schifrin  1967
Recommended by tinks [profile]

I'm a sucker for Hammond organs. And no place is that more true than in spy tv & film scores. Here is a cut which really swings from one of the genre's masters, Lalo Schifrin.

from More Mission: Impossible (Paramount)
available on CD - Mission: Anthology (One Way)




  Swinging London: Groovy! Groovy! Groovy! What else can I say...what else could anyone say?
The Girl from Ipanema  performed by Antonio CArlos Jobim  1999
Recommended by aea.lima [profile]

The girl from Ipanema is the greatest song in this planet. I got (belive!) 320 versions of it. And wht I guess so cool is that it has been recorded in all styles of music: Jazz, blues, Reggae, Techno, Rock, Salsa... Its very nice. My favouritte version is played by the brazilian singer "GAl Costa" in album "Gal Canta Tom Jobim". Its a swinger jazz. Very nice!!!

Please... is anyone got unknow versions of this song or enjoy it as me, send me a e-mail, ok?:
[email protected]




The House Song  performed by Scott Walker  1974
Recommended by callgirlscene [profile]

This has a country-western kind of swing to it - the type of song Waylon Jennings might do. It seems to be about selling a house full of precious memories. Scott manages to sound like a really cool Elvis Presley, that is, with a swagger Elvis had but without Elvis's annoying mannerisms. For me, Scott's forte has been moody ballads, but he shows here that he can pull off country western too.

from WE HAD IT ALL (Philips)
available on CD - stretch/we had it all (BGO)


the lady is a tramp  performed by della reese
Recommended by king8egg [profile]

before della reese was touched by an angel she was a singer. it seems that some songs own their singers and other songs the vocalist owns the song. in della's case she definately owns the song. this song rocks and swings with blaring horns and percussion that makes it hard to sit still. and then della's voice comes in with all its unique style letting you know exactly who is boss. after della's version any other version just pales in comparison.

from della, available on CD




  tinks: I've always really loved Buddy Greco's version of this song. Late 50s Vegas mob-pop at it's finest.
Through The Sky  performed by Swing Out Sister  2001
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

When mentioning Swing Out Sister casual listeners often dismiss them as forgettable, mere 80s martini pop kitsch. Or worse, one hit wonders due to the fact that their 1987 offering Breakout is still, by far, their biggest single hit. But this is completely wrong. In fact, they're enjoying an ongoing career for almost 20 years, recording 8 studio albums. Nowadays they’re fitting a niche no other group fits in so comfortably: escapist, late 60s oriented sophisticated glamorous easy listening pop music with all the right influences that spring to mind of that era: Burt Bacharach, Jimmy Webb, John Barry, late 60s european soundtracks in general, Ennio Morricone specifically and sunshine pop. Since these guys aren't necessarily household names in mainstream pop culture today, Swing Out Sister were practically invisible from the mid 90s on in Europe and the USA, releasing their records primarily in Japan, where easy listening music still gets the biggest exposure. The Sisters’ 2001 album “Somewhere deep in the night” is their most cinematic, most elegant and visually evocative album to date, where the Bacharach/Barry/Morricone spirit is prevailing the most: 60s arrangements with Bacharach-oriented songwriting, Barry-esque lush strings, Morricone-style harpsicord, saxophone, harps, jazzy guitars, muted trumpets, fluegelhorn, wordless vocals, blending vocal songs with atmospheric instrumentals, creating an imaginary soundtrack. The whole album is a truly underrated gem.

from Somewhere Deep In The Night, available on CD




  jeanette: I have to say I am thoroughly delighted at learning of the continued career of SOS. I always had time for them, and thought Breakout was actually the weakest of the singles I heard. I particularly remember liking 'Fooled By A Smile' and 'You On My Mind'. Hearing the snippets of these songs here, I can say I'm intrigued enough to try and seek out some of this later work. It reminds me of the more produced end of Siesta records' (Spanish easy-pop label) output.
  eftimihn: You probably should try "Shapes and Patterns" from 1997 first, it's pretty much in the vein of 1989's "Kaleidoscope World" and thus a good starting point to rediscover SOS. This and the aforementioned "Somewhere Deep In The Night" (2001) as well.
Tonight  performed by The Raspberries  1973
Recommended by Bebecca [profile]

Fuzzy sound, guitar bass drums
Swingy lead voice
Triumphant harmonies
Sweet moments

from Side 3 (Capitol)


Twisted  performed by Lambert Hendricks & Ross  195?
Recommended by konsu [profile]

One of my favorite vocal jazz sides. Annie Ross tears through this swingin' tune about adolescent madness : " My analyst told me, that I was right out of my head/The way he described it, I would be better dead, than live/ I didn't listen to his jive!..." Really just a corker of a tune! Makes you do the soft-shoe across the room... Their debut LP is full of great stuff, and is available on CD for super cheap!

from "The Hottest New Group In Jazz!", available on CD


Underwater Chase  performed by Al Caiola  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I had forgotten quite how brilliant this track is until it strangely popped into my head yesterday. It was originally available on Al's superb 'Sounds for Spies and Private Eyes' album, as well as volume 2 of the 'Music to Read James Bond By' series on United Artists records. It's very obviously James Bond rip-off music, but it's so perfectly executed, with cool percussive brass and Al's reverb-laden guitar nicely complemented by a swinging organ, that you can't help but love it.

from Sounds for Spies and Private Eyes (United Artists UAS 6435)
available on CD - Ultra Lounge - Cocktail Capers (Capitol)



Waters Of March  performed by Akiko  2002
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

An outstanding version of this much covered Jobim tune by japanese singer Akiko with Corinne Drewery of Swing Out Sister providing guest vocals. Starts out light and fluffy it later gets into full gear with electric harpsicord, orchestra, percussion, saxophone and a massive background chorus all blended together wonderfully by Paul Staveley O'Duffy (who also produced all but one Swing Out Sister records).

from Hip Pop Bop, available on CD



When The Laughter Is Over  performed by Swing Out Sister  2004
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Their latest offering "Where Our Love Grows" seems like a brighter, lighter twin of the beautiful 2001 release "Somewhere Deep In The Night", trading in sparkling stars with sunny seashores. "When The Laughter Is Over" conjures up a late 60s melancholic "lost summer" kind of mood. That's obvious since they delicately build the song around a sample taken from Roger Nichols & The Small Circle of Friends' marvelous "I Can See Only You" from 1968.

from Where Our Love Grows, available on CD



you were the last high  performed by the dandy warhols  2003
Recommended by angelica [profile]

the dandy warhols are particularly skilled at making songs that are simultaneously moody and dance-y, so you can listen to most of their output no matter what direction your mood is swinging in. this song is a perfect example of just this skill, being both tinged with melancholy and yet resolutely upbeat. in my mind, this is the best song off their last album (which was produced by nick rhodes of duran duran). like the other tracks, it has more of a synth-y electro feel than much of their previous output, but unlike the rest of the album, this is a strong song very much in character.

from Welcome to the Monkey House, available on CD




  olli: i really like the dandy warhols. too bad only about 1/3 of the songs on each of their albums are worth paying attention to. An eventual "best of" album released in about ten years time is going to be absolutely essential.
You’re No Good  performed by Dee Dee Warwick  1963
Recommended by OneCharmingBastard [profile]

Having grown up treasuring the memory of Linda Ronstadt's "Heart Like A Wheel" era version (ah, those AM radio school bus days of childhood), I was nothing short of amazed to find out that not only was it a cover, but a shockingly inferior one at that (picture that - a shoddy Linda Ronstadt cover!). This original from 1963 finds Dionne's little sister (she of the more soulful chops in the family) strutting her stuff in a Lieber/Stoller production that apparently sank without a trace, but my oh my, what a revelation.




You'll Never Get to Heaven (If You Break My Heart)  performed by Cal Tjader  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This was actually never one of my favorite Bacharach songs, but I find this version delightful. It opens with a simple bassline and a groovy breakbeat, which are soon joined by delicate strings and woodwinds, and finally Cal's cool vibes. There are a lot of cool sounds in the mix; I think I can hear both a 12 string guitar and a hammond organ. Anyway, the track swings very nicely, and the groovy beat carries on relentlessly in the background. The all-Bacharach album this comes from is apparently disliked by purists, but I think it's really rather wonderful.

from Sounds Out Burt Bacharach, available on CD



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