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search results for “groove”
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List songs by Song title | Performer | Year

You searched for ‘groove’, which matched 88 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
Botho Zigarillo  performed by Botho Lucas Singers und die Sound Masters  1972
Recommended by uporo [profile]


available on CD - Pop Shopping 2 (Crippled Dick Hot Wax!)


"a carol for lorelei"  performed by the cryan’ shames  1967
Recommended by association [profile]

scratch in the sky is the name of the cryan' shames
album that came out in 1967 from these chicago soft/sunshine pop masters whom also added an amazing dash of psyche to all there recordings...
"a carol for lorelei" starts the album off with bells and association(ish) harmonies!! brilliant
ignore what allmusic.com said about this album they are fools the song writing is up to par with the beach boys and others.
if you dig the Association and The Millennium and other fine sunshine pop groups with that mellow groove get it now. the japanese import is worth the extra for the original back cover art work that the sundazed version didn't recreate faithfully. i love 'em

from scratch in the sky (columbia 2786)
available on CD - yes (sundazed or even better the japanese import)


A Cat In The Night  performed by Jacques Perrey  197?
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Meeeeoooow!! Geez... This song is mad-mad-mad! Everone makes a big deal about E.V.A., but for my money, this is the track on the album that makes the most of the MOOG. It's just soo wild! It's like somebody gave The Shadows a couple of Mini Moogs and they just jacked-in with this crazy spy-blues groove! People like Perrey & Gershon Kingsley did more with those instruments in the first few years of their existence than anyone else did in the 30 years following.... Barbaric!!

from Moog Indigo (Vangaurd VD6549), available on CD


A Festa  performed by Silvio Cesar  1977
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

A smooth jazz-funk groove with Rhodes and synths playing melodically against each other. It sounds like Azymuth. In fact, it is Azymuth. Conversation, glasses clinking, a girl laughs in the distance. And Silvio's voice comes in, nice and mellow, describing what it's like to have a bunch of friends over for a get-together. Although he's one of Brazil's hippest crooners, a man who specializes in somewhat cliched yet mysteriously cool and affecting love songs, he lays back here and lets the country's greatest jazz-fusion outfit do its thing. How many romantic crooners ever do that?

from Som e Palavras (RCA)


A Picture Of Love  performed by Nico Fidenco  1977
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Nico Fidenco scored all of the infamous "Emanuelle Nera" movies and these are a demonstration of pure, unadulterated sleaze, but very solidly arranged and composed with wordless female vocals, rich strings, flutes, horns, trumpets, percussion etc. All scores were released seperately in Japan, but for a very nice introduction the Dagored compilation "Black Emanuelle's Groove" is sufficient.

from Emanuelle - Perche violenza alle donne? (Wave WWCP 7225)
available on CD - Black Emanuelle's Groove (Dagored)



Baoba  performed by Claudia  1971
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

Great track. Entirely scat-sung, steady midtempo funky groove, with that distinctive Odeon Studios sound, and the bridge breaks into a waltz-time section, with Claudia's high-pitched vocal effects strongly reminiscent of something off the Vampyros Lesbos soundtrack album. Claudia's a big collector's favorite among Brazilian femme singers, since her stuff's consistently strong, she's got this great strong expressive voice, cool material choices including a number of exclusive Marcos Valle songs, and NONE of her early 70s Odeon sides have been issued on CD.

from Jesus Cristo (Odeon MOFB 3668)




  delicado: Yes! I picked up a Claudia compilation LP recently in Brazil. It was all great stuff, but this was really the standout track.
Beauty and the Beast  performed by David Bowie  1977
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

A nasty/under appreciated gem from David Bowie's Berlin period, "Beauty and The Beast" is sheer perfection/pure malice in musical form. Ominous squibs of sound coalesce around an almost crocodilian groove and Robert Fripp's hissing, poisonous guitar line. Then Bowie makes one his most memorable vocal entrances with a sound somewhere between a croon and a scream. Things just get nastier from there - David playing the hipster, killer android on the lead vocal, while the backgrounds get all down and dirty on chorus. Then, as if he's suddenly come his senses after committing some atrocious act, Bowie howls over the break: "I want you to believe me!/I wanted to be good!/I wanted no distractions!/Like every good boy should!" - before sliding back into the sociopathic sleekness of the last verse. The genius of the tune is that it suggests all manner of violence/bad shit without actually describing any act of mayhem. Therefore the imagination runs riot. A brilliant/evil track.

from "Heroes", available on CD (Virgin)


Big Time  performed by Peter Gabriel  1986
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

An even funkier hit single than "Sledgehammer" ? which had an epic groove but was too slow to actually dance to ? "Big Time" is a sardonic response to yuppie materialism with the funniest lyrics of Peter Gabriel's entire career. (The ending of the song, stopping just before the obvious punch line to all this discussion of how preternaturally huge everything in Gabriel's charmed life is, is a small moment of brilliance.) But the brilliance of the song is in the way it ties all that Gabriel had been learning about African percussion and Middle Eastern melodies ever since the days of his third solo album and ties them all into the service of a walloping great groove, making plain the connections between North Africa and Stax-Volt once and for all. The combination of talking drum and wah-wah guitar owes as much to Booker T and the MGs as it does to King Sunny Ade, which is both the key to "Big Time" and a clue as to why Gabriel's later, more explicitly world music focused albums just aren't as much fun.
(AMG)

from So, available on CD (Geffen)


birds do it (german’ sex education movies’ songs of  performed by compilation
Recommended by modette [profile]

maravillosa recopilación alemana que con frase irónica por título nos presenta una veintena de canciones de diversa musicalidad.
en él encontramos desde el funky mas setenta a cargo de Heinz Kiessling (petra), el sonido hammond y groove del siempre increible Jack Arel (following you), la diversión erótica más lounge de Uschi Moser (love, jet t'aime, l'amour y sunny honey) o el beat ritmico de Gerhard Heinz (look at me), junto con otros temas que recuerdan al pop, la psicodelia, etc...
en conjunto, un disco para pedir ya, con el fantastico libreto repleto de fotos de las peliculas mencionandas que tampoco tiene desperdicio.

from birds do it, available on CD


Bittersweet  performed by Lewis Taylor  1996
Recommended by Latimer [profile]

Lewis Taylor is a major musical talent, and his first album stands as a landmark among modern soul / R&B productions. Imagine Prince on a roll, with the Beach Boys on backing vocals and Jeff Beck adding psychedelic guitar. He does it all. Sweet falsetto vocals, funny lyrics and a worldwide groove. You'll want more.

from Lewis Taylor, available on CD


Blame It On A Monday  performed by Anita Kerr Singers  1972
Recommended by konsu [profile]

This is my favorite these days. Totally cuts into my dull recession-based lifestyle and peppers it with some yellow Nashville sunshine....

The song bounces through a hum-drum monday with the bouyant post-it note poetics of a 9 to 5 cutie... Nothing is going right today, and the song sounds like the antedote :

" ...Gotta' go to work, really gotta per-cu-late... Try to catch the fish that's jumping off your
dish-or-plate...." To "Don't ask for help... from anybody... cause they'll only turn you down-ooo...
na-na-na-na-na, ooooooooooh na-na-na-na-na, Blame it on a mondaaaaayy..... YEAH! ....

The session smokes and the players are astounding! Huge southern brass-blasts counterpoint the bouncing hoe-down groove... It must have been a hoot to play because the track clocks in at over four minutes, but you hardly notice for all the fun....Funky in a very music-city way. Almost Nancy & Lee like, with a little Free Design-like harmonic optimisim in the vocal arrangements, which Anita's well known for.

I recommend the whole record though.It plays straight through, and you play it again & again. A lost gem.

from Grow To Know Me (AMPEX A-10136)



Blowin' Bubbles  performed by Call and Response  2001
Recommended by ronaldo [profile]

Just a perfect, perfect pop song. Makes you wanna dance and groove along, but at the same time it's soo unbelievably sweet and a just a liitle melancholy. It starts with a drum beat, and then there's this bass-and-drums groove for a few seconds. Then a little sweet electric piano line enters, just before the voice begins singing the melody: "I'm drinking stars up in the sky, you know where you are / I'm driving cars around your house, it seems so fun". When it's time for the chorus ("So listen to my bubble go pop / I'm coming in, I'm coming over the top"), the main voice sings over a backing vocal doing an "ooh" harmony, and then there's absolute genius backing vocal, where the word "pop" becomes "papapapa". After that, a little guitar riff/solo, along with a very cool electric piano line. Then it just repeats everything all over again one more time, for infinite happiness. The time for a middle break has arrived. A new funky bass groove with lots of different "papapa"s harmonizing together. Now, go back to the first bass-and-drums groove, with a jazzy, relaxed guitar solo, and then it's just grooves and grooves and heavenly harmonies, "Blowin' bubbles".




Blowin’ Gold  performed by John Klemmer  1969
Recommended by mr_klenster [profile]

This is on my playlist for summer barbeque season. It's an unrelenting saxophone hurricane, with a beautiful warm sound, and great melodic soloing the whole way through. I love the tense break in the beginning that evolves into a total explosion, later punctuated with ecstatic moaning. A great groove.




Blues Party  performed by Gert Wilden
Recommended by GeorgyGirl [profile]

From a career supplying funky/hunky, cheezy/sleazy grooves to a series of late Sixties/early Seventies German soft-core flicks, Gert recently apeared on "Eurotrash"...perfect music for when you're feeling a little "saucy", in the European parlance.

from Schulmaedchen Report, available on CD



Boogaloo Baby  performed by Johnny Zamot and his Latinos  1965
Recommended by delicado [profile]

My experience of Boogaloo, a style to which I'm quite new, has been varied. In short, I love some of it and don't quite get the rest. The key to me seems to be the right instrumental and percussive blend, and vocals that don't dominate too much.

Although it sounds quite generic, this track manages to satisfy me on the criteria above. From a very lucky thrift store find (this album is up there with James Brown's 'Black Caesar' among my top bargains ever), this opens with a nice solid groove, featuring saxophone, brass and layered, relentless percussion. The vocals seem pretty much off-the-cuff - the main 'Boogaloo baby - baby baby do the boogaloo' is joined by a mixture of muttered Spanish and screaming. The attraction of this song is really the texture - it can't really claim any musical or lyrical sophistication. But the instrumentation and groove are really first rate.

from The Latin Soul of... (Decca DL-74838)



Boogie Oogie Oogie  performed by A Taste of Honey  1978
Recommended by ambassador [profile]

One of the most nonsensical song title ever, yes, I know and much derided for that reason, but to quote Otis Redding when told his lyrics didn't make any sense, "I'm gonna worry about settin' the groove. I get that groove going, they don't care what I say." Boogie Oogie2 has got groove to spare, with a jazzy intro (similar to Boogie Nights by Heatwave) before that bass line drops in shakes the floorboards. Just like all the dance craze songs of the 60s, the disco era about vocals were mostly used as a counterpoint to the rhythm section. The Mizell brothers add a touch of sophistication to this female-led band (Hazel Payne and Janice Marie Johnson on bass and guitar - they're the ones on the awesome album cover) which is a step further in the commercial direction after their work with Jazz Funk kings like Donald Byrd, Gary Bartz and Johnny Hammond. This song is up there with G.Q.'s "Disco Nights (Rock Freak)" and anything by Chic in the sophisticated disco category.

from A Taste of Honey (Capitol)


Bossa Rock Blues #1  performed by Manfredo Fest  1972
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Really suprised to see this one in a thrift store recently. I was taken back by the bad cover photo of some blue cheese in tin foil with saltines and a bottle of wine.(?) Anyway, the music is fantastic, much in the vein of Jobim's CTI work from the same period. This piece grooves almost more in a Deodato way, with a nice funky nocturnal jazz bite. Nice to see the gap close on the years between his Bossa Rio stint and the records he did for Discovery.

Strangely enough it was recorded in Minneapolis MN while he was living there. On the RCA subsidary Daybreak.

from After Hours (Daybreak DR 2012)


Bouncing Babies  performed by The Teardrop Explodes  1980
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Teardrop Explodes’ second single, "Bouncing Babies", was released in July 1979, following the departure of organist Paul Simpson and the arrival of his replacement Gerald Quinn. With those changes, the group's sound, too, would alter dramatically, as Quinn took the band into the crypt-like depths of proto-Goth; in true Phantom of the Opera style, his organ haunts the grooves, while Gary Dwyer pounds his drums like a man who’s just discovered he's been buried alive, and Michael Finkler reenacts the Texas Chainsaw Massacre with his buzzsaw guitar.

Ecstatic reviews greeted the single, but its lifespan was short – before long, ”Bouncing Babies” was so hard to find that the Freshies came close to scoring a hit simply by bemoaning that difficulty – their &"I Can't Get (Bouncing Babies by the Teardrop xplodes)" itself ranks alongside its namesake among the most memorable of the age.
(AMG)

from Kilimanjaro, available on CD


Butterflies  performed by Secrecy  2007
Recommended by Roro [profile]

My best friend recommended these guys to me recently. She knows how I love the old Curtis Mayfield and Earth Wind and Fire stuff. These guys have that type of favor.

You can hear them on their myspace page: http://www.myspace.com/secrecyone

from Love Seasons, available on CD


C'est Pas De Ma Faute  performed by Brigitte Fontaine
Recommended by djfreshmoney [profile]

Great loungey beat that's dying to be sampled. This is early Brigitte Fontaine and it reminds the folks at Dusty Groove of early Serge Gainsbourg. I agree. Cool upbeat jazzy beat with emotive singing. Wish I spoke French. The only problem with this song is that it's too short.

from 17 Chansons Décadentes




  jeanette: Ha! If you think this song is too short, you wanna catch the Vous Et Nous album with Areski: millions of songs, most clocking in under 3 mins, many under 1. And they look like primary school teachers on the cover. Good call; brilliant tune.
Cash Box  performed by Byron Lee & the Dragonaires  1970
Recommended by tinks [profile]

I spun this once on a friend's college radio show, and he said he had never heard a song with the bass mixed so heavily...honestly, the needle was so deep in the red we thought the Eisenhower-era console was going to explode. Once you get past that, you find yourself listening to an absolutely storming early reggae instrumental, with a beautiful slow, loping groove and a horn chart very reminiscent of a Stax session from around the same time. I met Lester Sterling in 1995 and talked to him about this song, he told me that he'd been trying to remember how it went for twenty years! Making me even prouder, the next time that the Skatalites came through town, they played it. The original Byron Lee LP that it appeared on has terrific naked lady cover art, to boot!

from Tighten Up! (Dynamic)
available on CD - Reggae Hot Shots, Volume 1 (Jamaica Gold)


Cavaleiro Andante  performed by Abilio Manoel  1970
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

This song is simply unreal. It starts out in a kind of 4/4 samba groove with a highly prominent cuica and a funky strummed acoustic guitar chord progression before the super-catchy pizzicato-violins riff comes in, and Abilio's mellow voice singing the melody. It's sunshiney and catchy, with a bit of a haunting aftertaste, very Brazilian. I can never hear this song enough times!! Abilio Manoel is a Sao Paulo-based singer-songwriter from the late-60s-70s (still active) who wrote a few moderate hits without attaining even a Marcos Valle level of popularity. Good for Marcos, since Abilio's work would have caused me a few sleepless nights if I were him. And both on the same label, too! Abilio's stuff is hard to find, but very worth the effort.....I've already given Dusty Groove the heads-up about the CD....

from Pena Verde (Odeon)
available on CD - 20 Sucessos (EMI Brazil)




  delicado: sounds great; I look forward to checking it out!
Children (Dream Version)  performed by Robert Miles  1996
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

A great thumping house-groove! Robert Miles flawlessly blends amazing piano work with great techno and produced a great album of very danceable tracks, especially this one. This is perfect for listening to while driving!

from Dreamland, available on CD



clair  performed by Singers Unlimited  1975
Recommended by klatu [profile]

A nice a capella version of my favorite Gilbert O'Sullivan song, in a very full arrangement reminiscent of the Swingle Singers, with whom they share a member. Lyrically, the song is an antidote to the sleazy feeling I get from Rod Stewart's "tonight's the night". I used to think they shared a theme of pedophilia until I listened closer. I got this on a Japanese collection put together by Toru Hashimoto, probably the greatest compiler ever. He puts together all the Cafe Apres Midi (perfect!) and Free Soul (quite nice) collections. They can be had for $25 a pop from the Dusty Groove site, which seems high for a single disc, but they are all close to eighty minutes and packed with great songs which have lead me to several thousands of dollars worth of related purchases in the last few years. Gilbert O'Sullivan's stuff is worth looking into if you have an ear for it, and there is a nice cheap two disc collection on JVC Japan.

from A Capella II (MPS)
available on CD - MPS for Apres-midi Grand Cru (MPS/Jasrac (Japan))


Clouds  performed by The Go-Betweens  1988
Recommended by john_l [profile]

The song with the heavenly lilt! It gets into a groove and chugs along merrily, with those lilting guitars in the background and some lovely light fretwork in the bridges and at the end. Excellent!

from 16 Lovers Lane, available on CD


Corazon  performed by Titan  1999
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

Its a delightful track, modern big beat sensibility with a great tune, a groover of the highest quality, sounds great in a car, in a club or at home. Full of hooks, vocal, guitar and rhythmic. One of the things I love about the band as well are the crappy pictures of themselves they use on their covers. Theres a promo 12 with a remix on it that is all Bongo's and Organ that didn't make it to release thats pretty good too.

from Elevator, available on CD



Coyote  performed by Joni Mitchell  1976
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

The first track from the first of Joni’s “jazz” LPs of the late 1970’s is all about opposition and equilibrium, (as are all her songs from this period). It is both richly melodic and dense/chant-like in structure, empty and lush in arrangement, its propulsive/hypnotic groove studded with Jaco Pastorius’ weird, atonal bass speed bumps. Joni’s words/voice/performance is likewise wildly romantic and knowingly jaded simultaneously. The song is the sound of best singer/songwriter ever elegantly/effortlessly pushing the envelope.

from Hejira, available on CD


Desire As  performed by Prefab Sprout  1985
Recommended by Genza [profile]

Steve McQueen is an almost faultless pop album. The first five or so tracks are quite awesome. Desire As comes in later down the album play list and it's got a lovely laid back groove. It builds slowly and Paddy McAloon's vocals are sweet. It's a nice track, make no mistake.

from Steve McQueen (Kitchenware Records)



  Mike: I love Prefab Sprout and Paddy is a great songwriter. Having said this, I do think I would love the band and their output even more were Paddy's vocals LESS SWEET! I mean, just about everything in their entire output seems to be bathed in honey, syrup, or treacle from his sugar-lined voicebox.
  kkkerplunkkk: Yes but isn't that the point of Prefab Sprout? That it was the sweetest pop you could taste. The best love song writer I've ever heard.
Devils Haircut  performed by Beck  1996
Recommended by geezer [profile]

A musical excursion through psychedelia,hip hop,country and jazz,in a compact slice of sample rich mayhem,uses Them "I Can Only Give You Everything" as its pivotal riff along side typically obscure Beck lyrics and Stooges drumming,these shambolic ingredients cook a juicy mean groove.

from Odelay, available on CD


Dodo  performed by David Bowie  1974
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

A fascinating out-take from the "Diamond Dogs" sessions, “Dodo” can be seen as the starting point of Lady Stardust’s shift from glitter space-boy to paranoid, plastic soul stylist. Like almost everything on D. Dogs, the lyrics are inspired by Orwell’s “1984”, but the music seems to be profoundly damaged by sleek, eerie production style of Willie Mitchell.
Thus the song plays like Al Green in Hell, w/a great groove and deeply creepy feel. The Thin White Duke starts here.

from Diamond Dogs (out-take) (RCA)
available on CD - Diamond Dogs (30th Anniversary edition) (EMI)


Eat Yourself  performed by Goldfrapp  2008
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

My favorite track from the latest Goldfrapp LP.
The song takes AM-Radio sunshine pop and exposes the concept to English psychedelic folk at its most radioactive.
The resulting mutation is both sexy and ominous.
The groove is languid, but insistent.
The samples and the synths sound dusty/dirty.
The strings/guitars/harps brood luxuriously.
And then there is Allison's lovely/creepy voice/melody: all woozy sex appeal and little girl menace.
It sounds like that image from the film "Blue Velvet" - lovely summer lawn under which throbs thousands of huge bugs.
Wonderfully slurred....

from Seventh Tree


Elevate My Mind  performed by Stereo MC’S  1991
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Knowledge is power and Stereo MC'S know how to preach it! Rob B turns out a great groove and a positive message reminding you to take the high road or get burned by your bad choices. I find it easy to get the memorable refrain "I wanna go higher" stuck in my head...

from Supernatural, available on CD


Europe Endless  performed by Kraftwerk  1977
Recommended by phil [profile]

This song is absolutely full of class and confidence - over 8 minutes long, and over a minute at the start is without drums or bass, just to get you into the groove. Then, they don't pull out the best tunes straight away - instead, they build up to them gradually with variations on the theme before building into a bigger and bigger climax. The tunes are as simple as you expect from Kraftwerk - the confidence to just hold a single note for 8 beats without changing is just fantastic - but the cumulative effect is brilliant.

The song is both hypnotic and euphoric and I can't recommend it too highly. When I looked at the iTunes stats as to what songs I had listened to the most, it turned out I had listened to this a heroic four times as much as any other song.

This song has clearly been hugely influential on groups like depeche mode and new order, and yet it somehow sounds quite separate from the things it has influenced. For example, just can't get enough by Depeche Mode is clearly influenced by this, but Europe Endless is much less poppy and commercial.

This whole album is fantastic - there is a kind of sister song to this one later on the album called Franz Schubert.

from Trans-Europe Express, available on CD


Everything You Wanted  performed by My Rich Friends  2007
Recommended by moonlabmusic [profile]

I wrote it and sang it. It is a statement about technology and asks the question whether or not we actually need what we say we want.

from Dane Cook's Tourgasm soundtrack (Rhino Records 74858)


Flowers And Beads  performed by Iron Butterfly  1968
Recommended by john_l [profile]

Not everybody remembers this, but the "other" side of the famous "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida" album featured five rather terrific songs. And this one has "cool passion" written all over it, because the lyrics are straight-ahead I'm-in-love-and-I'm-almost-tongue-tied-about-it but within a medium-paced 6/8 framework rather than a frantic groove. Meanwhile the organ and the choir-like backing vocals give it a lot of warmth. So it sounds like what I'm saying is that it manages to be both cool and warm at the same time. That may not make sense, but it's a great song off a classic LP.

Incidentally, rock writer Dave Marsh in one of his reviews said "It's now garbage" about this LP. Bullfeathers! It's still a classic. It makes me wonder what Marsh thinks is not garbage these days -- misogynous rubbish about ho's and bitches perhaps?

from In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida, available on CD


Fried Neck Bones and Home Fries  performed by Willie Bobo  1966
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Latin soul at it's finest!! Willie and his boys lock themselves into a serious groove on this cut. Also available on the highly-recommended Rhino compilation "Sabroso! The Afro-Latin Groove".

from Uno, Dos, Tres (Verve)
available on CD - Uno, Dos, Tres/Spanish Grease (Verve)



Go For Yourself  performed by Lennie Hibbert  1971
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

WOW! Reggae-funk doesn't get any bouncier, funkier or more life-affirming than this scorcher. From the late JA vibes player's long-deleted second Studio One LP, "Go For Yourself" is among the hottest examples ever heard of a particular rare species of James Brown-inflected Studio One tracks (Alton Ellis' "Alton's Groove" and the Brentford All-Stars' "Greedy G" are two other prime examples). Totally butter, with a WICKED open drum break that goes on and on, and then late in the track Lennie comes in on vibes sounding like Cal Tjamaican or something! I searched for this record for years, once finding the LP jacket at Coxsone's Musik City in Brooklyn and having the late great Mr. Dodd himself tell me he had no record to go with it!! This repress is among the last things he did, and Jah bless this great man for bringing us a lot of music the world would be unimaginable without....

from More Creation (Studio One SOL 1119)


Hands of time  performed by Groove Armada
Recommended by sireal [profile]

This song is softer than what I normally enjoy but I find it pretty addicting.




Hazel’s Groove  performed by Custom Blue
Recommended by aquila49 [profile]

Chill classic!

from Acoustic Chill


Honeytree  performed by The Wolfgang Press  1991
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

A great track from a truly great LP that I fear might have slipped through the cracks in the floorboards in the decade or so since it's release. TWP's "Queer" remains the band masterpiece, an ungodly amalgam of Can, Talking Heads, Roxy Music, King Tubby and De La Soul. This song perfectly highlights the record's/band's strengths - Mark Cox's cut and paste/dub programming, Andrew Gray's blistering guitar, Mick Allen's brilliant "Tom Waits sings the Mark E. Smith Songbook" voice/words, aided by then Throwing Muses Leslie Langston's sexy bass/backgrounds vocals. The song is both seductive and sinister - the spoonful of sugar being the its' "The Fall Plays The Burt Bacharach Songbook" shambling groove that helps down the medicine that is Mick Allen's venomous lyrics in re: America's inaction/indifference in the face of the AIDS crisis. Rarely has subject matter so heavy, been dealt with in such light/deft manner. I recommend the whole "Queer" LP - particularly the British edition , which differs in tracklisting and uses of samples. (It is likewise available on the band's fine - if somewhat short - best of "Everything is Beautiful 1983-1995"

from Queer &/or Everything is Beautiful 1983-1995, available on CD



  konsu: I always liked these guys too. Queer did miss the mark in america for sure, although I think "Going South" got some airplay... I'm a big fan of the Birdwood Cage LP. A very underrated group from a very popular label.
Hot Heels  performed by Vocal shades and tones  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This track opens with a twinkling sound, and a thick chord carried by harmonized vocals. It quickly builds into a ‘Mission Impossible’–like jazzy groover, with piano and bongos. Although this seems to owe a great debt to Lalo Schifrin, the overall sound is somehow very different and refreshing.


available on CD - Up! The Psycho Mellow (Schema)




  jezandliz1: Not sure why this has been listed in the French section as Barbara Moore is, I think, English. The whole album is fantastic though for fans of wordless female voices like Edda Dell'Orsa and a dreamy long-forgotten-summer vibe. Worth every penny of the steep import(Japanese_)cost.
  n-jeff: Barbara Moore was the go-to gal for wordless vocals on the UK session scene, she did soem great work on things like "Sort of Soul" by Birds and Brass etc.
I Love Every Little Thing About You  performed by Syreeta  1972
Recommended by ambassador [profile]

The day I bought this LP I got home late so I only had time to throw on the first track of the first side before my girlfriend asked me to turn it off. As soon as I heard it I knew immediately that I wanted to hear it again. I woke up with the song bouncing in my head. I was gonna be late to work, but I recorded the song so I could listen to it on the commute. I must have listened to it all the way to work and all the way home, so about 30 times before I tired of it. Why is it so great, you ask? I would say it was the Stevie factor as he wrote, produced and played nearly all of the instruments on this, his writing partner's debut album, but Syreeta really wails on her vocal parts infusing the song with an undeniable optimism. This was the year when Stevie really started to get adventerous with his music and you can tell that he took some additional liberties on this album then he did on his own from the same period, Music of My Mind. His version of this song from his album is great, but doesn't have the same synthesizer groove that bubbles along with the funky drums like syreeta's does. Marvelous song. I gave it to a friend and within days his friends' minds were all blown as well.

from Syreeta (MoWest 7001)
available on CD - Japanese Import?


I Won't Lie Down  performed by Face to Face  1996
Recommended by Vagina Man [profile]

I Won't Lie Down isn't just a punk song. It is more of a melodic punk song, then just punk. Face to Face originated in Southern Claifornia but has spread there wonder sound throughout the U.S. I Won't Lie Down isn't jus a song you can rock out to but a song you can groove to. I Won't Lie Down was also remixed (techno version) and put on the Mortal Combat souindtrack. Although the remix is good, it isn't as good as the original, but what is?




I’m 18  performed by Alice Cooper
Recommended by inbloom44 [profile]

Melancholy,nice smooth rocking groove.




I’m a Good Woman  performed by Barbara Lynn  1966
Recommended by human-cannonball [profile]

The 1966-original of this great raw soul tune from a much underrated blues/rnb singer, instrumentalist and songwriter. That's a smoking song, an underground rare-groove hit with many known djs in the scene; also covered in a great psyche-funk way by an unknown Silky Spearman (appearing in a Counterpoint compilation).




Ice Cold Lemonade  performed by Death By Chocolate  2000
Recommended by djfreshmoney [profile]

There must be tons of songs that follow this format. I'll call it the 'Tequila' form. Cool instrumental punctuated by someone speaking the name of the song. There are so many songs like this I'd guess that no one could pull off this kind of tune nowadays- without it sounding hopelessly retro. But this tune does it for me. Perfect summer groover. Sound like a bedroom recording, kinda lo-fi.


available on CD - Death By Chocolate




  ronaldo: really great song. perfect for a 60s-themed party. bet everyone will dance just like the people in the background of pulp's video for 'common people'. it also sounds a lot like the archies' 'sugar sugar'.
Iron City  performed by Grant Green  1967
Recommended by tinks [profile]

There is a significant amount of groove present in this, Green's paean to his adopted hometown of Pittsburgh. Green's guitar playing is absolutely sublime in this trio arrangement featuring the incredible Big John Patton on Hammond and Ben Dixon on drums. Green takes the lead throughout the song, and Patton provides some inspired, laid-back organ playing with a few terrific vamps thrown in and Dixon lays down a perfect rhythmic counterpoint to it all. One of those tracks that you just can't help but to bop your head to.

from Iron City, available on CD



Keep On Running  performed by Tom Jones  1971
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

The Spencer Davis Group Version is good. But this is even better, it kicks in with great brass stabs and then this fantastic Bass Line kicks in, similar to the original but with a deeper, funkier feel. Nice drums and Toms great voice. For once it keeps the groove going all the way through, one of my friends used to close a disco night with this, and it rocked every time.

from Tom Jones Great Hits (Decca)



Kojak Theme  performed by "The Pop Singers & Orchestra"  197?
Recommended by konsu [profile]

One of the better records of this ilk, surely for this one, which is hard to find and is such a typically great theme. Kojak, of course, was the blowpop sucking detective played by Telly Savalas. And like the "Rockford Files", "Baretta", and "S.W.A.T.", deserves it's place in the not-so-rare groove DJ file. With the obligatory Moog sound leading the melody, it becomes instantly recognizable (and dateable). Whoever the cats are on this session are cutting some decent shit for sure. They also turn out a surprisingly funky version of the M.A.S.H. theme, as well as the three aforementioned. The crazy Peter Pan cover art is there, with cute stuff like poorly drawn representations of Alan Alda looking at a martini glass, and Gabe Kaplan's finger being bit by Baretta's Cockatoo!!

Does anyone know the composer?

from Themes From Hit TV Shows (Peter Pan 8185)



L.O.V.E (Websters definition)  performed by Bob Dorough  1970
Recommended by mattias [profile]

A great, very represantive Easy Listening/Bossa Nova song. The lyrics is acctually Websters dictionary's description of love. I know this song has been recorded on some other Dorough album but this is the definitive version. It has a great female choire and a nice bossa groove. Really a must! The record containes a bunch of other grat songs like I'm hip, The stranger and oblai de oblai da.

from To communicate, available on CD


Lay It On Me  performed by Heatwave  1976
Recommended by ambassador [profile]

Heatwave's first two albums can almost be seen as prototypes for Michael Jackson's breakthrough album "Off the Wall." With Rod Temperton, future Quincy Jones and MJ collaborator, driving this album the sound is both funky and catchy, sophisticated and accessible. "Lay It On Me" is an overlooked album track that bubbles and gurgles under the surface of the groove until the chorus arrives with strings soaring for the ectasy of Johnnie Wilder's sweet vocals, "lay it on me, lay your sweet love on me!" Beautifully arranged and excellently executed and just one of many classics of their debut album.

from Too Hot to Handle, available on CD


Macumba  performed by Nicos Jaritz Sextet  1978
Recommended by human-cannonball [profile]

The famous Austrian percussionist Nicos Jaritz recorded a local best-seller LP in 1978 called 'Macumba', full of percussion-heavy jazzy pieces with a latin feel. This is the title track, a haunting flamengo-flavoured mid-tempo jazzy groove with a flawless interplay between a heart-breaking Spanish guitar and a tenorsax solo. I haven't been exposed to many tunes like this, it's really most entertaining, and very, very fresh-sounding!

from Macumba LP (Amadeo Osterreichische)


Mandato  performed by Osmar Milito e Quarteto Forma  1972
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A very cool sunshine pop style number from the soundtrack to the Brazilian soap opera 'selva de pedra'. This two-minute track has an irresistable groove and some nice harmonized group vocals. The vocals are mostly gentle and smooth, like strings, but there are also some jazzier scat phrases thrown in. The entire soundtrack is highly recommended.

from Selva de Pedra, available on CD



Mary-Ann  performed by Holly Golightly  1995
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Holly's always been prolific, but never more so than in the mid nineties when this fantastic tune was released. There were usually a couple of her own albums out every year, plus releases with her girl group Thee Headcoatees, and the quality never dropped.

This is a typically brilliant slice of Holly's sound - pop blues riffing with her who-cares vocals. It fixes me within such a groove whenever I hear it.

Random reminicense: One of the best live performances I have seen was Thee Headcoats and Thee Headcoatees on stage in North London at Hallowe'en, treating the crowd to the BEST EVER version of Monster Mash. At that gig I saw Holly milling around the crowd before Thee Headcoatees took to the stage and was struck by her luminescent beauty and remarkable poise. Truly she has everything. She's worthy of heroine status.

After her brief burst of mainstream recognition guesting with the White Stripes, Holly's back in the comfortable indie heartland these days. I really can't think of enough nice things to say about her.

from the single Mary-Ann (Vinyl Japan PAD=26)


Mechanical Emotion (Featuring Morris Day)  performed by Vanity  1984
Recommended by Nickfresh [profile]

If you are looking for Classic but Overlooked 80's Electro Soul, look to one of Prince's girls to fill your need. Vanity, who at this time was a 'vamp' going it alone after Prince, got together with Bill Wolfer and Morris Day with a serious sound of synthesizers, clean electric guitar, and risque lyrics, making it one of the two releases from her first solo album, "Wild Animal." The grooves in the song and the french breakdown has me going wild everytime. I have loved the song since I was a little boy (when I was told that I couldn't listen to songs like that), and I don't think I will tire from it anytime soon.

from Wild Animal (Motown)



My Baby Likes to Boogaloo  performed by Don Gardner  1967
Recommended by realpill [profile]

It's an absolutely over-the-top hard soul dance tune. I first heard it on a soul compilation and recently, against all odds, I found the 45! Really cool mid paced groove with amazing guitar sound.





My Friend  performed by Groove Armada  2001
Recommended by acidburn [profile]

from Goodbye Country (Hello Nightclub)


Natural To Be Gone  performed by Anita Kerr Singers  1970
Recommended by konsu [profile]

A real up-beat number for a very cerebral tune! All AK's records are full of wierd moments and odd delights, this is the one from the set that aim's to please! It starts out with the groups signature harmonies in a acapella almost swingle-like mode, and then kicks in to a hybrid pop groove from heaven, with castanets clacking away ... And the lyrics are wild ! :..." What's the difference being different when it's difference now that looks alike, you say i'm changing and i'm not so sure it's wrong..." " It's just that centerline on this highway runs up my banjo neck, and I feel somehow that it's natural to be gone..."

Written by John Hartford. A name i've seen before, but i'm not familiar with his work. I'd like to know more if anyone knows his definitive recordings!

from It's Anita Kerr Country (Dot DLP 25976)




  rio: John Hartford was a regular on The Glen Campbell television showof the late 60s, he wrote "Gentle on my mind" among other pop hits done by other artists.. talented writer and musician..
  artlongjr: Hartford was a favorite of mine as a kid, I used to see him on the Smothers Brothers and Glen Campbell shows, where he was somewhat of a regular. He was a celebrity back then for writing "Gentle on My Mind" which became a 60s standard. I do recall that he was a riverboat captain as well as a musician. He died a few years ago, which I was sorry to hear, but I've seen a number of his CDs that were on the market. I love his 60's stuff, he had a great laconic style.
Nem Vem Que Não Tem  performed by Wilson Simonal  1967
Recommended by Auriane [profile]

Wilson Simonal's mix of Brazilian soft pop and soul cause him to be a pivotal figure in the growth of the "Black Rio" funk scene. This track, classed as one of Brazil's "soul standards" bounces along with a laid back groove, brass and cheekiness.

from Alegria, Alegria!! (Odeon)
available on CD - Espresso (Deram)



  delicado: Brilliant track! Funnily enough, I just put this on a compilation last weekend. While I like this version best, there are also interesting versions in French (Brigette Bardot) and Italian (Mina).
  clmarcel: um grande cantor! infelizmente foi injustiçado e morreu sem ter o reconhecimento merecido! uma pena!
Ophis le Serpentaire  performed by Vincent Geminiani  197?
Recommended by human-cannonball [profile]

Slow beaty groove, deep, dramatic, emotive. This obscure French library tune was recorded in early 70s for an avant-guard French version of Shakespeare's 'Macbeth', and originally released on a very limited "Musique pour l'Image" 7-inch.


available on CD - Le Jazzbeat Vol 1 (Jazzman (UK))


Picturama / The Middle Bit / Soul Surrender  performed by The Motors  1978
Recommended by john_l [profile]

The B-side of the 12" single "Airport", this seems to be the Motors' forgotten song, although Virgin is about the most clueless of record companies when it comes to re-releases and best-ofs. This 8:15 track is a rollicking piano-driven stomper which gets into the groove right away and holds it throughout. The three parts do have the same tempo but it works a treat.




Pula Yetla  performed by Letta Mbulu  196?
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Great stuff from a young Letta Mbulu. Her first recording, and with the good company of H.B. Barnum & David Axelrod, is a stunner. This is my favorite track from the LP. It's almost in a Mystic Moods kind of mode, with a thunderstorm recording used for effect, it may have something to do with the lyrics, but since she sings in Xhosa, I have no idea. Her voice is strong and smooth, at times she sounds influenced by Nina Simone, but on this one she is more in a traditional mode. The backing is great Axlerod, with his strong soul-jazz-rock crossover, much like he did for Lou Rawls during this period. Highly recommended for fans of heavier african grooves.

from Letta Mbulu Sings (Capitol ST 2874)


Put Your Hands On The Screen  performed by Martin Briley  1985
Recommended by gypsy36 [profile]

Martin Briley is the same guy who did that catchy 80's song "The Salt in My Tears," which is the only one of his songs that got much airplay. It's a shame because Briley is such a talented artist.

"Put Your Hands On The Screen" begins with a solo bass drum beat that immediately gets your attention, followed by Briley's moody guitar riffs (the style reminds me of The Eagles "Those Shoes"). As a whole, the song is melodic with a slow, strong beat. It's also timeless. You can't tell whether it was a song from the 80's or a song from 2004.

It's all about TV evangelists and I love the lyrics:

...The choir is singing
And everybody's feeling good
The phones are ringing
From Bethlehem to Hollywood
So move in closer
Let your faces feel the glow
There's a holy presence
Right here in the studio...

The album is now considered rare, but you can google and find a copy.

from Dangerous Moments


rational culture  performed by tim maia  1975
Recommended by clmarcel [profile]

this is a soul/funk style music, performed by the father of brasilian groove, whem he converted to a Rational Sect. Two discs were released: Rational Vol1 and Rational Vol2. They were recently recently released in cd.

from racional 1 (trama)


Requiem pour un con  performed by serge gainsbourg
Recommended by olli [profile]

unbelievably cool track, one of my top ten gainsbourg compositions. great jazzy sex beat, smooth vocals.
it's one of his more agressive songs, similar to the also recommended "un poison violent c'est l'amour".
there seems to be a bit of a bit of a prog vibe going on (in lack of better words, i'm not exactly an expert in the technicalities of music).
nice guitar hook. though the track is pretty repetitive, it's by no means boring. the repetition only helps to make it more intense and interesting.
taken from the film le pacha. i think a lot of gainsbourg's soundtrack work is pretty interesting stuff, though some of it often seems a bit rushed or too similar to other cool compositions from the same era (hey, i'm a sucker for plagiarism...)
the soundtrack to cannabis comes especially recommended.


available on CD - le ciinéma de serge gainsbourg, initials b.b and a bunch of othe



  n-jeff: There is an instrumental version on a twelve inch I have that sounds remarkably prescient of Metal Box era PiL: heavy repetetive bass, odd guitar noises and something about the drums, too. Great track, vocal or no.
  olli: oh, that´s awesome, n-jeff! i always wondered if there was an instrumental version...one of the funkiest white tracks ever
Romance  performed by Beth Gibbons and Rustin Man  2002
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

A great track from the excellent "solo" LP by the Portishead vocalist (actually it’s a collaboration with Paul Webb - one time member of sublime 1980's pop group Talk Talk - calling himself Rustin Man for some reason.) The arrangement suggests a low-key take on one of Bacharach/David's statelier ballads, (like say "Aprils Fools" or "Trains and Boats and Planes"), which develops a wonderfully sad groove on the chorus. There are lovely strings, a great, woozy horn solo, and some inspired use of subtle, dissonant electronic textures and spooky female background vocals (both very Ennio Morricone.) Meanwhile, Gibbons does her most stylized take on Billie Holiday at her most stylized - which really shouldn't work, but somehow ends up being just right. Strong song from a very strong album.

from Out of Season, available on CD



  bobbyspacetroup: Agreed. This track and "Drake" are my favorites from the album -- especially "Drake." Good recommendation.
Samba Blim  performed by Tamba 4  1968
Recommended by sambablim [profile]

This 1968 LP out on CTI/A&M records was a big leap fpr the group formerly known as Tamba Trio. It spawned big bossa hits like the title track Samba Blim, my absolute favorite for hip acid jazz(nu-jazz/ Rare Groove)dancefloors from London to Tokyo to even Phoenix,AZ. It's fusion of traditional Bossa Nova, Samba, and 60's Jazz melodies are delectibale to the ears. Nice songs that will get you groovin' are "Samba Blim", Reza", "Tristeza de no dois", and "Baiano". A big LP in my DJ box. A pretty heavy cost for a mint copy, but mine is only VG condition full of pops and crackles. I STILL LOVE IT!!!

from Samba Blim


Sequoia  performed by Fay Lovsky  1997
Recommended by mojoto [profile]

The consistent high quality of the ever expanding oeuvre of Fay Lovsky doesn't make it easy to pick one song to examplify her work, so I'll just go by the moment and will choose my present favorite Sequoia, a humorous ode to a wooden californian characterised by a laid back bluesy pizzicato groove and tremelo glissandi especially towards the end, where they tickle the tree to a dramatic finale. All instruments on this track are acoustic (drums, bass, guitar, violins) and the sound is warm and direct as usual.

from Numbers (Basta 30-9069-2)



shortboard city  performed by The T yde  2003
Recommended by norfy [profile]

i love this band-sure they have ripped of the almighty 'felt' but what the hell-this track chugs and grooves along like loaded era-'velvets',the aforementioned 'felt', 'television' and a thousand perfect pop songs-the rest of the album is a killer and i urge you to purchase this immediately-features the godlike ric menck on drums and i beleive thay share members with'beechwood sparks'-a reason for being-a reason to keep believing.

from Twice, available on CD


Skin Trade  performed by Duran Duran  1986
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Beneath the avant-garde lyrics and futuristic synth textures, there was always a pulsing dance music quality that drove the classic Duran Duran sound. As they progressed into the late '80s, they allowed that dance element to move up front and dominate their style. A good example of this tactic is "Skin Trade," a hit whose silky and funky style led to it being mistaken for a Prince song. The lyrics have a surprisingly direct, soul-searching feel to them as they lay out scenarios of people shortchanging their dreams to make money. These moments are followed with the dramatic proclamation that makes up the chorus: "Will someone please explain/The reasons for this strange behavior?/In exploitation's name/We must be working for the skin trade." The music lends contrast to the angry tone of the lyrics by creating a sultry, mellow melody that juxtaposes verses with a soft, hypnotic ebb and flow with an ever-ascending chorus that revs up the song's inherent drama. Duran Duran's recording is fuelled by funky but gently layered guitar textures and subtle drum work that push its groove along, plus some atmospheric synth textures on the chorus. Interestingly, Simon LeBon uses his normal tenor voice for the choruses but sings much of the verses in a lush, soulful falsetto that led many pop fans to initially mistake "Skin Trade" for a Prince ballad. The result was a perfect blend of slow-dance textures and adult social critique. It didn't do as well as "Notorious," just barely making the Top 40 in the U.S., but it got plenty of radio airplay and is fondly remembered by the group's fans as one of Duran Duran's most mature achievements of the late '80s.
(AMG)

from Notorious, available on CD


Stone Slipper Cindy  performed by The Gimmicks  1972
Recommended by Pal [profile]

Swedish groove, a bit like Doris.


available on CD - The Best Of... (Sonet Grammofon)


Stop (in the name of love)  performed by Margie Joseph  1971
Recommended by sammykipper [profile]

Margie Joseph's 1971 cover of the Supremes "Stop in the name of love" starts off just as you would imagine it, and the first four or five minutes hold no surprises. It is a little funkier and a teensy bit sleazier and languid than the famous Supremes version, but there is no great departure until the middle of the song, when it changes into a grinding psychedelic humpathon. Margie squeals "stop it! stop it! stop it! STOP IT!" as an Isaac Hayes sound-alike slurps behind her ears and grooves sweet nothings for a full five minutes until she pops one off. Brilliant.

from Margie Joseph Makes A New Impression (Volt)


Stop Playing Ping Pong With My Heart  performed by The Six Teens  1957
Recommended by TippyCanoe [profile]

bouncy.

from The Six Teens Featuring Trudy Williams (Flip FL263)
available on CD - A Casual Look (Famous Grooves Records)


Stumblin’ In  performed by Suzi Quatro  1979
Recommended by TippyCanoe [profile]

it grooves...soft rock style

from If You Knew Suzi (RSO RS-1 3044)



  Mike: 1979 seems very late for a Suzie Quatro record but I remember enjoying "Devil's Gate Drive" at some point during the early 70's. When I grew up slightly, I seem to remember being offended by her political views, if I remember correctly.
Take 8  performed by Pete Moore  1970
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A simple blues/funk instrumental with a fuzzy bassline and an incredibly infectuous groove. It's short and sweet, and the drum sound super fresh and funky. This is typical of Pete Moore, who made some incredibly cool records in the easy-funk vein, which are rarely seen outside his native UK.

from The Exciting Sounds of Tomorrow (Fontana)


Take Me With You  performed by Lyn Christopher  1973
Recommended by mr_klenster [profile]

Sinister and spacy, slightly discordant, gospel-inflected soul groove, with a murderous, high-powered bassline. Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley of Kiss apparently sing background vocals on this artist self-titled album, and strangely enough it's their backing that makes this sound sort of reminiscent of a gospel session, but in space maybe. Begging lyrics and tripped out reverb enhance the strange, infectious hold of this song. This is a very heavy, mournful, and unique sound experience. Recommended.





teakwood betz  performed by perpetual groove
Recommended by bpdevs23 [profile]




The Cutter  performed by Echo & The Bunnymen  1983
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

On ”The Cutter” fellow Liverpool natives, Echo and The Bunnymen successfully wed the Eastern influenced psychedelic sounds made famous by hometown heroes, The Beatles. Crafting Eastern influences into a new post-punk hybrid that was sweeping England in the Early 80’s. It was songs like ”The Cutter” that would help define the newly coined Neo-psychedelic sub-genre, practiced by such group’s of the period as The Chameleons U.K., Psychedelic Furs and Simple Minds amongst others. The track opens with a keyboard approximation of Indian strings, whirring briefly before the band kicks into a percolating groove of popping bass, driving straight drums and chinking guitar accents. Ian McCulloch adds another layer of ’60 nostalgia, employing his expressive, slack-jawed vocal delivery that conjures aural images of the late Jim Morrison as he unfurls lines that drip with apprehension “Who’s on the seventh floor? / Brewing alternatives / What’s in the bottom drawer? / Waiting for things to give”. The Eastern strings re-enter at strategic points, filling in space between verses and McCulloch’s esoteric pleas to “spare us the cutter!”, which sounds like a good idea in any case. The arrangement also veers into epic territory quite unexpectedly in the second half, signaled by a sweeping wave of keyboard and McCulloch’s more subdued delivery as poses a string of rhetorically poignant questions, “Am I the happy loss? / Will I still recoil? / When the skin is lost / Am I the worthy cross? / Will I still be soiled? / When the dirt is off” -as the music swell behind him. Like any good single, the track never looses steam, cruising through each section with power and grace. A nod is in order for Ian Broudie, who’s smooth production helped The Cutter become Echo and The Bunnymen’s first top ten single in Britain and a linchpin track for the Neo-psychedelic movement.
(AMG)

from Porcupine, available on CD


The Flower Shop  performed by Our Front Porch  1971
Recommended by konsu [profile]

I happened across this LP in a friends shop. I went to listen to it and this song blew me away. It's almost like a tune from a lost Jimmy Webb opus, or a Galt McDermott musical.... Like "HAIR".

The group sings in a loose ensemble with a very gospel-like arrangement that jumps from a driving, fuzzy, Motown like groove to waltz-y 3/4 skip. It represents the two impressionistic counterpoints in the songs drama :

" We see the phonies, you and I.... Their faded posies make us cry...." to " I smell the flowers... I smell the roses, and buttercups...."

It also reminds me of the Rotary Connection stuff that was around the same time.

The arranger is what turned me on to it, Ralph Carmichael. His label, Light, released stuff by the Oral Roberts kids, which is worth checking out for novelty's sake.

50% of this record is preach-y, but the rest of the songs, like this one, are well done with a lot of personality.RC is well known in sample circles for his famous cut "Addict's Psalm",from the Xian film soundtrack "The Cross & The Switchblade".

Use caution!

from Our Front Porch (Light LS-5560-LP)



Theme From "Blow Up"  performed by Bobby Hutcherson  1967
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

This whole album is a masterpiece, but "Blow Up" is a track that should definitely be better known. It's a vibes-piano-bass-drums quartet session with Herbie on piano that inexplicably was never released at the time, only in Japan over a decade later. It was available on CD for a while in the early 90s, but has since been deleted. The track builds on a steady, understated 4/4 groove anchored heavy bass and creative drumming courtesy of Joe Chambers. Eight minutes of relaxed heaven, with messrs. Hutcherson and Hancock engaging in sublime vibes/piano dialogue over a very catchy theme. Seek out this album any way you can!

from Oblique (Blue Note)



tiger  performed by brian auger & the trinity with julie driscoll  1967
Recommended by shaka_klaus [profile]

hammond groover number one, brian auger, teams up with julie driscoll for a song that doesn't sound like anything else. the choir by driscoll is quite strange and repititous (straight from the bengal???), vocals by auger just blows me away.

from the single tiger (columbia db 8163)
available on CD - the mod years 1965-1969 (disconforme)



Under Pressure  performed by David Bowie
Recommended by alanajo [profile]

One third for the memories, one third for a song that relaxes and grooves out my soul, and the rest for a legend you should know.




waiting for a train  performed by Flash in the Pan  1982
Recommended by commonsense [profile]

Flash and the Pan was an Australian New Wave group (essentially an ongoing studio project) formed in the late 1970s by Harry Vanda and George Young, both formerly members of the Easybeats. George Young is also an older brother to Angus Young and Malcolm Young of AC/DC.
The song has an infectious lead that pulls you along to the very end a one off attempt that worked..

from Headlines
available on CD - Best of Flash in the Pan


Walk  performed by Pantera  1992
Recommended by MoeShinola [profile]

This song is on Vulgar Display Of Power, one of the best hard-rock records ever made. The sound is very...empty. Empty of any accessories, stripped-down, primal. Anselmo is reproaching somebody, and is almost annoyed enough to kick their ass. Dimebag Darrell(R.I.P.) does his usual excellent-but-not-showy guitar solo. All the guitar mags were calling this style "Power Groove" when it came out.

from Vulgar Display Of Power (Atco)


Walkabout  performed by Noah Lennox feat. Atlas Sound
Recommended by ianmalcolm2 [profile]



Doesn't everybody love a good collaboration? It turns out Noah Lennox's beachboy-inspired vocals fit in nicely with the sound-collage electronica of Bradford Cox's offbeat side-project, Atlas Sound. The tight vocal harmonies, and childlike sampled groove compliment each other perfectly.

Nothing too deep in terms of vocal content. It's one of those songs where the chorus is repeated about 800 times, but you can never remember the words.

Instead, this song is all about atmosphere. I'm a sucker for that bleached-out, 70's technicolor vibe lately, and this song captures it more effectively than most. The lo-fi skuzziness, however, only enhances its pop-perfection.

Enjoy before summer ends! This is the perfect doobed-up jam for driving to the beach on a day where you can see the heat. Happy listening.




What'd You Come Here For?  performed by Trina & Tamara  1999
Recommended by MMMp [profile]

This is an R&B song that I first heard on BET. It begins with the hand claps from the song "Car Wash" and then goes into a typically groovy R&B dance song. I like it so much because it is very easy to dance to and the lyrics are about a girl going to a club and wanting to get her groove on while the guy she came with just stands there "like he's much too cool." This is typically how I feel when I go out. Hand claps continue throughout the song.


available on CD - Trina & Tamara (Columbia)




  MMMp: Just thought I'd add; the comment, "this is how I typically feel when I go out," is a borrowed line. I've read the same comment about the Pizzicato Five song "Love Love Song" (A Television's Workshop e.p., TRIAD 1994, Japan) and I think I wanted to put it to use for myself, but it seems an awkard fit now. I don't typically question why anyone came out if they're not dancing, I'm just eager to dance, and that is the same feeling behind the song, a nice conflict of expectations that maybe we've all felt before. It's nice!
You Can Tell Me  performed by Tomi  2007
Recommended by chipster [profile]

R&B/Pop with a good groove. Reminds me of music from Justin Timberlake's first solo CD. Smmmmoooothhh!
Listen at www.myspace.com/tomi

Full CD comes out October 2- you heard it here first!

from Tomi (Rosehip)
available on CD - yes (tes)


You Go To My Head  performed by Bryan Ferry  1975
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

Lounge lizards rarely get more reptilian than this. Another brilliant example of Ferry’s cover mad, song-stylist solo work outside of Roxy Music in the early to mid 1970’s – totally rethinking some well-known standard, yet grasping something intrinsic about the song’s core. Here he gives the tune just the hint of a Philly-soul groove, and keeps the production/arrangement as open/eerie as an empty parking garage. Very sexy, and more a little creepy – its like being hit on by the ghost of Bela Lugosi in the toilet of a disco in 1975.

from Let's Stick Together, available on CD


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