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You searched for ‘raw’, which matched 86 songs.
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37 Hours (In The U.S.A.)  performed by Raw Stylus  1995
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Raw Stylus effortlessly combined british acid jazz elements with sophisticated, elegant Steely Dan-esque american jazz/soul/funk. In fact, like on this track, the music sounds very much like a Steely Dan backing track with warm Fender Rhodes keyboards, precise horn section, funky rhythm section and jazzy guitars. Which really isn't much of a wonder when looking at the credits of the album. Let's see: The album is impeccably produced by the Dan's producer Gary Katz, features an incredible amount of fine session musicians including Steely Dan regulars (like Bernard Purdie, Randy Brecker or Hugh McCracken), has even Donald Fagen providing synths on "37 Hours (In The U.S.A.) and they even embedded some chords of "Josie" in the song. Unfortunately, despite the talent, Raw Stylus remained a one album band to this very day, kinda sad actually...

from Pushing Against The Flow (Geffen 24822), available on CD



6060-842  performed by The B-52s  1979
Recommended by rum [profile]

The lyrical theme of ‘6060-842’ seems pretty mundane for the B-52s. Tina goes to the ladies room, sees a phone number scrawled on the wall, and so decides to ring it. Hmm… doesn’t sound like it’s gonna be a tale the measure of “the time our car was hijacked by the devil” and the like. Still this IS the B-52s, and recognisably so, “if you’d like a very nice time, just give this number a call” reads the unlikely graffiti. So something must happen. The band are optimistic too, bouncing along excitedly on a jumpy new wave rhythm. Tina, we reckon, is much like the band. She lives for wild parties and crazy adventures. This 6060-842 could be just the ticket. “Oh my gawd! I’m gonna give that there number a ring. You see if I don’t!” So she drops a dime in the phone slot and, “prays she gets the line.” She’s biting her lip, stabbing her nails into her finger tips, “come on… come ON!!!”

But pause a moment. Is she really so naïve? Does she really think a “really nice time” awaits her? In the gnarled and weather beaten hands of a social realist singer-songwriter, the number 6060-842 would lead to abuse, to prostitution, and ultimately, to death. In the hands of the B-52s? I don’t know, you tell me. A debauched toga party in a 1950s vision of the future…? Well, it’s neither. It’s just a brilliant anti-climax. You see Tina and the B-52a might be deranged, but the world they live in is not. It’s bloody typical. She dials 6060-842, and can’t get through! “The number’s been disconnected…” monotones the operator. But Tina won’t accept this, no, and neither will the band. They can’t end the track with Tina accepting the disappointment with a sigh of weary resignation, “ah well, nevermind… maybe next time.” No, no, this anti-climax has worked them up into an angry frenzy. Ricky Wilson vents his frustration with viscious slashes of electric guitar whilst Tina just keeps dialing and dialing, and getting rebuffed and rebuffed, “HELLO!!!” “sorry…” The track probably ends with them all smashing up the phone box. A superb, and much over-looked track.

from The B-52s, available on CD


90 Miles An Hour  performed by Ricky Fitzpatrick  2002
Recommended by gse [profile]

Remarkable cover of a classically great song. Ricky has an amazing voice and his solo guitar work is clean and just raw enough to engage you. Found him on hte web at www.soundclick.com/rickyfitzpatrick.

I can't think of another current unknown performer who deserves to be propelled into the realm of stardom more than Ricky.

In a word...spercalifragilisticexpialidocious!

from Ricky Fitzpatrick, available on CD


A HUGE EVER GROWING PULSATING BRAIN...  performed by The Orb  1990
Recommended by Synthetrix [profile]

Full Title is
A HUGE EVER GROWING PULSATING BRAIN THAT RULES FROM THE CENTRE OF THE ULTRAWORLD
What can I say. This record changed my life.

from THE ORB'S ADVENTURES BEYOND THE ULTRAWORLD (BIG LIFE)



  FlyingDutchman1971: This track is amazing! I really enjoy the whole CD! My favorite track is 'Earth'... think I'll have to submit it
Addiction  performed by Arthurkill
Recommended by spaceboy585 [profile]

Spawned from the depths of Staten Island, Arthurkill has risen to become one of NYC's best kept little secrets. Personifying modern rock by drawing on influences from U2 and Bruce Springsteen to Rage Against the Machine and Metallica, Arthurkill delivers market-friendly guitar driven songs that carry the torch of rock 'n' roll into the post-alternative era. Arthurkill's latest album "Addiction" is available either online or through Tower records. Arthurkill is currently in the studio recording "Frozen in Time" the eagerly anticipated follow up to 2003's "Addiction".




All For You Sophia  performed by Franz Ferdinand
Recommended by autopilot [profile]

Before the (deserved) hype and the sell out concerts, this tune- a B Side on one of their earlier EPs- was the first Franz tune I'd ever heard.

The raw, slightly out of tune vocals, the wonky synth/organ riffs, the lyrics about Archduke Ferdinand's assassination by Gavrillo Princip, as sung to his wife Sophia? How can anyone resist?

It's a shame they don't play this live at their shows!




Always Late (With Your Kisses)  performed by Lefty Frizzell  1951
Recommended by tapler [profile]

Opens with a gratuitously twangy pedal steel guitar and Frizzell's creamy melimsa vocals. A really lovely example of early 50s honky tonk music.


available on CD - Look What Thoughts Will Do (Columbia)



Ball and Biscuit  performed by The White Stripes  2003
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

The White Stripes' longest song at seven minutes, this song is amazing.
Jack White tells you how it is, and his voice takes on a sexy, drawn-out drawl. "I may not be your third man, girl/But it's a fact that I'm your seventh son". Genius.

from Elephant



Blitzkrieg Bop  performed by The Ramones
Recommended by inbloom44 [profile]

Pure,raw and freight train-like energy.




Boys of Summer  performed by Don Henley  1982
Recommended by StAgGeR [profile]

OK, OK, OK........I know that many of you hipster types out there are probably wincing at this recommendation, but...deal with it. I'm sure that most people are all too aware of this track, and probably avoid it at all cost, but in my humble opinion, this is one of the best pop radio songs ever recorded. I think I heard it first when I was about 12 or 13 while on summer break from school. I was immediately drawn to the eerie, repetitious, heavy delayed intro guitar line. Granted, it has some cheezy lyrics, and a fairly melodramatic tone overall, but this song will forever hold a special place in my heart....awe.


available on CD - yes




  callgirlscene: Yeah, this is an absolutely great song, a classic to my mind, yearning for that perfect love, that perfect moment, and the chance to prove ones self. And this comes from an Eagle, who weren't bad but have been way overplayed these last years on radio.
  konsu: I agree, Don nailed it with this one.It's eerie simplicity is what was great about the Eagles better tunes. It is too bad about overplay, at least in the USA. FM radio is like a Coke machine in a vegatable garden...
  Archipelago71: This is one of those few 80's songs that is still valid today. Instead of being about the excesses of the period, it's a very haunting song about missing something. Or is it about not looking back and having no regrets? You could probably argue for both sides of it. It's a true classic.
California Waiting  performed by Kings of Leon  2003
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

This song grabs you and doesn't let go. Catchy, melodic and flowing... It's very hard not to listen to this song without bobbing your head along with it. The slurred southern drawl of the lead singer, and the sparkly melody really put you in a specific place and time. A very cool track, and one that's perfect for drinking to.

from Youth and Young Manhood (RCA)


cemetery shuffle  performed by Stretcher Case  2001
Recommended by Earl Grey [profile]

The recording may be raw, but this song reeks of pure insane genius. 60's-inspired organ-fueled sleaze. The band boasts the former organist of "The Voluptuous Horror of Karen Black". This is one of many instrumental numbers consisting of guitar, organ, shakers and what sounds like an old drum machine. Shamelessly derivitive, lo-fi and spooky. It's one part surf and equal parts garage and swing. Henry Mancini-meets-The Mummies-meets-The Stray Cats.


available on CD - cassette (no label)



  jwmoz: Dude, everyone knows "Cemetery Shuffle" is by The Isolators. Get your facts straight man. I mean really, people read these things you know.
  Kriswell: Actually, The Isolators used to go by the name Stretcher Case, before they broke. So, both of you are actually right. Good call though "Moz".
  jwmoz: Listen man, we can't "both be right". You seem to think we live in a magical happy-world with gum drop streets and candy cane lamposts. Last time I checked outside, I saw a bum peeing on the street, and it wasn't into a champagne river, if you know what I mean (and I think you do). So although we can't both be right, you and Earl can both be wrong, and I would venture to say that you are. Wrong. Utterly wrong.
  Kriswell: Listen here, Pal. I use to be friends with those guys. So, I think I know what I'm talking about. Granted they stopped talking to me after I began dressing like the old bass player and started walking around town in a grey wig, claiming to be him. The shit really hit the fan when I locked him in a bathroom and tried to get on stage with the band. He got a restraining order against me. Rumor has it that's why he left the band. I think he was flattered though. But I hear they have a new bass player and have actually changed their name back to Stretcher Case, so look out, I'm getting my wig out of the closet.
  jwmoz: I don't blame you dude... that guy had an ass like butter.
Chain Reaction  performed by Don Ellis  1972
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Don Ellis is a often overlooked trumpeter/bandleader. His style of jazz was most well recieved in CA, and he's most famous for his Fillmore appearances opening for people like Janis Joplin and Frank Zappa. This is a demonstration of his prowess and his ability to construct an amazing band, and take them to new heights. Recorded hot on the heels of his French Connection score, and more than a decade into his career.

The piece is a sprawling morphilogical journey, full of orchestral passages and time/tempo changes, and blissful rests. He utilizes an "Electric String Quartet", which, through the magic of studio production, sounds like a full string ensemble! Making the wole track just bristle with dark energy.

Produced by the great Teo Macero, who had been doing great work at Columbia for a long time. He did some stuff with Ramsey Lewis around the same time, as well as Miles Davis. This record also has a great version of his "French ConnectionTheme" and really entertaining versions of "Alone Again (Naturally)" & Yes's "Roundabout"!

from Connection (Columbia KC 31766)


Chariot  performed by Gavin de graw
Recommended by allyokay [profile]




Chocolate And Strawberries  performed by The Januaries  2000
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

This song really sounds pretty much like the title would suggest : Warm, lush, sweet and sensual due to the 60s retro-ish, Bacharach-esque style of the tune combined with warm, warbling electronic sounds and with a delicately sounding trumpet solo. Very nice seductive vocal delivery by singer Debbie Diamond on top of that. Yummy !

from The Januaries (Foodchain Records)



Come Closer  performed by Miles Kane   2010
Recommended by geezer [profile]

Something new from pops new boy wonder ,former Rascal and Last Shadow Puppeteer Kane trawls through pops back pages to define the sound of NOW!.
Brit pop arrogance with Bolan esque flirtations and a smattering of David Essex combine to forge a great fresh poppy sound that will undoubtedly have a limited shelf life but for the rest of the summer this will be the album to have

from Colour of the Trap, available on CD


David  performed by Creation of Sunlight  1968
Recommended by andyjl [profile]

From a legendary pop-psyche LP in the Strawberry Alarm Clock vein ("the Sound of Young Ambition" according to the sleevenotes) about a small boy’s world of make believe, propelled by swirling keyboards. Sunny without being drippy.


available on CD - Creation of Sunlight


David Makalaster  performed by Les Claypool’s Frog Brigade
Recommended by kylemangan [profile]

Bass Masta' Les Claypool is at it again with with bizzare arangment about our favorite news anchor. Very Frank Zappa

from Purple Onion (Prawn Song)


Devil, Devil, Go Away  performed by Little Marcy  1973
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Ever felt there was a hole in your life that only a religious ventriloquist's dummy could fill? Then look no further. One of pop's bona-fide eccentrics, Marcy Tigner, voices Little Marcy in a thoroughly winsome way. The song, nay the whole album, encourages all young children to renounce the devil. However, if the devil were to see the scarily-bad drawing of Little Marcy on the cover, he would correctly deduce that no child is likely to listen to the ravings of a freaky end-of-the-pier doll voiced by an even stranger adult woman.

"Marcy wants you all to know how happy she is singing songs about Jesus" relate the sleevenotes. And, gee Marcy, we sure are glad to hear them!

Please don't think I recommended this song simply to mock it. I genuinely think it's a priceless piece of recorded gold and am more than pleased this site, and the world, is big enough to accommodate special talents like that of Marcy Tigner.

Out of Waco, Texas.

from Happy Am I (Word K-721)




  olli: aah, little marcy. i find her oddly touching. i adore the effect where the guitar seems to be meowing on "i love little pussy", it makes the song even more appealing than the questionable lyrics. "guitar festival of gospel songs" by little marcy's guitarist, bob summers is the current downloadable album over at basichip.com right now, by the way. snatch it while you can!
Diabolic Scheme  performed by The Hives  2004
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

The Hives best song of their career thus far. A brilliant ballad in the middle of their most hard rocking album yet. Howlin' Pele Almqvists voice drawls menacingly over guitar and strings that play as though the earth is collapsing. An incredible and beautiful song from an otherwise hard rocking band.

from Tyrranosaurus Hives (Interscope)


Die, All Right!  performed by The Hives  1999
Recommended by tempted [profile]

This song makes me wanna EXPLODE whenever I put it on. Think The Sonics' version of "Have Love Will Travel" with the punky rawness of The Stooges. Except that this song is even more brutally groovy! And the group dress real nicely.

from Veni, Vidi, Vicious (Burning Heart)
available on CD - See above!



Dinnertime  performed by Spiderbait  1999
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

Its 4 tracks into the CD, and after one of the fluffy pop numbers, so it quite takes you by surprise when a guitar kicks in of such rawness that it feels like small blisters are erupting over your eardrums.
In come the bass and drums, and the girly vocals (Janet presumably) with a nice sarcastic tone. The sarcasm seems to be a feature of the band.
Threres also a triffic 1980 style disco remix on the extra CD, for extra amusement. To be honest I love the whole LP, it has nice fat drums, lovely rolling bass, and they aren't afraid to use the technology, it was hard to pick one song out, but this one had the edge for Janets voice and that ruff guitar. God I love Fuzz.

Oddly the person who played the CD to me first dismissed them as just another Oz-Rock band. Nah, way off the mark.

from Grand Slam, available on CD




  n-jeff: My 4 year old daughter worked out enough of the CD player controls to play the disco remix back to back about twenty times over this weekend. Still sounds great.
dry drunk emperor  performed by TV on the Radio  2005
Recommended by stoneworks [profile]

This song makes me want to be a proud american. It's definitely the finest antiwar song I've ever heard. It perfectly sums up my feelings about the bush administration and it conjures up the revolutionary spirit that must have been swirling around before the birth of our country.
That being said, I'm not usually that drawn towards protest songs per se. But this one grabs my attention with its drumcorps-like rhythm and its chanted vocal delivery with many layered voices. The guitar work is incredibly moving dynamic and textural. The meandering flute soloing echoes the lyrical call to "grab your fife and drum!" and then carries the song off into the sunset.
Of course, the lyrics are the most mind-blowing element when you pick them apart. After two poetically scathing verses describing the idiocy of empire, the third verse imagines the unapologetic uprising of the people. I highly recommend downloading the lyrics and getting familiar on that level. Powerful song!!!!

from released as single (Interscope)


Dum Maro Dum  performed by Asha Bhosle  1971
Recommended by mr_klenster [profile]

Okay, here's an obvious Bollywood recommendation, a genre I don't know a lot about, but nevertheless, it's really a great track. It's from the movie Hare Rama Hare Krishna. The way Bollywood movies were able to draw elements of psychedelic, funk, and dance music, then fuse it with Hindi music is incredible to me. This song has a addictive, hard, danceable, and completely credible sound, not to be confused with some lighter, cheesier, or more kitsch Bollywood fare. Great stuff.





  olli: great choice! I´m no expert either, but the most appealing hindi tracks to me are the ones that feature a style of singing wich diverges from what you hear in most bollywood recordings, there seems way to many songs out there with cool instrumental parts that have bland and unoriginal vocals running over them. The doob doob o'rama series are just about the only compilations i've found so far that feature really great tracks (in my ears, anyway). too bad no one seems to be interested in releasing separate soundtracks to spesific films, there´s a lot of films out there that seem to have mindblowing soundtracks.. believe this was written by rd burman by the way, i find it generally easier to locate cool bolllywood music by paying attention to the composers rather than the singers, too bad most compilations don't bother to list more than the main vocalist.
Easter Parade  performed by The Faith Brothers
Recommended by tonyharte [profile]

During the early days of 1982, I was as a 'wet behind the ears' 19 year old suddenly sent to a faraway war in the (previously unheard of) Falkland Islands. This deeply haunting, passionate and heart-rendering track by the much missed Faith Brothers, encapsulates much of the mood, confusion, passion, patriotic pride and dark bitter reality of that horrific time. Now no longer naive at 42, my mind still screams and my heart still aches ... as I listen .. and remember.

Along with 'And The Band Played Waltzing Matilda' (Eric Bogle, The Pogues et al), I believe 'Easter Parade' to be the finest song ever written about the utter desperation of war ... and life after the tea and medals have been dished out.

Would love to know if any Faith Brothers music is available on CD. (Tapes worn out and faded in the sun - a bit like me!). Can anyone help?

from Eventide



  Mr Greedy: I have some Faith Brothers tracks on MP3 format (Easter Parade, Fulham Court, A Stranger On Homeground, Eventide). How can I get them to you? Mr G.
  tonyharte: Many thanks - your not so Greedy at all! However, since my original post, the very kind Faith Bros frontman Billy Franks has sorted me out with a CD. He's a top lad - check out his solo stuff too. Regards and keep on keeping on! TonyH
  watford7: How can I get my hands on a DVD copy of Eventide? Does anyone have In The Country of the Blind on CD? Recommendation: Welcome To Comboland (collection of great songs from Raleigh/Greensboro/Athens area of US, some genius songs. Watford7
  TDQ: LOVED the Faith Brothers, saw them in Dublin many years ago with the Alarm and was bowled over. AM DESPERATE to get MP3s or CD`s of any of their work, happy to pay too. So if anyone can help, please please mail me on [email protected] Oh and Fulham Court was wasted as a Bside, my fave FB track, would love to hear it again... sniff sniff... Have vinyls but no way of playing them! Glenn
  tonyharte: TDQ - I went to billyfranks.com and then emailed him directly. He was happy to send CDs. I responded with a donation, but really, he does it out of kindness. Dead right about Fulham Court!
  eddie: I am dying to get hold of the album, eventide I think its called, the one with the burning broken statue on the front. My dad used to play this album all the time when I was his little tom boy! Wanted to get it for Fathers Day. Know he would be really surprised!! Does anyone have it on CD/MP3? Have checked out ebay and amazon to no avail :(
  eddie: Hoorah!!!! I went to billyfranks.com and downloaded it!! Brilliant!!!! :)
  tonyharte: Well done young Eddie! Your dad is clearly a man of good taste. You've make me feel mighty old now though. T'Internet is a wonderful thing ... sometimes.
  eddie: Indeed! We danced to it for hours when i was a little girl back in the 80's, and the look on his face was priceless when i started playing it! Brilliant again!!!! :)
Even If You Dont  performed by Ween  2000
Recommended by Gwendolyn [profile]

This is such a fun song.. the lyrics outline this crazy relationship "I was happy this mornin/ you finally got yourself dressed/ eating raw bacon/ it's okay I was still impressed" It's got a happy beat w/ piano in the background. Love it.

from White Pepper


Everybody’s stalking  performed by Badly Drawn boy
Recommended by .holly. [profile]

from The Hour of Bewilderbeast


follow through  performed by Gavin Degraw
Recommended by .holly. [profile]




Forgetting You  performed by James Carr  1966
Recommended by tinks [profile]

The epitome of deep Memphis soul. The hurt evident in Carr's voice is absolutely unimaginable. Carr's story is a strange one. He is best known for recording the original version of the Penn-Moman composition "At the Dark End of the Street", a song which comes as close as possible to being considered a soul "standard", and of course, his version is the one by which all others are measured. His vocal range and intensity is comparable only to Otis Redding and Percy Sledge, and in my opinion, completely surpasses both of them. He suffered from a mental illness that on one hand allowed him to channel pain like few others have ever been able to. On the other, it led to serious instability and crippling stage fright which buried his career before it ever really started. He was also functionally illiterate, but you'd never know it based on the raw emotion he put forth in his recordings. On this song, he pleads with a lover to stay with him so that he won't have to try and forget her. Absolutely heartwrenching stuff. "I've done you wrong/now you are gone/but what can I do?/Don't make me live/the rest of my life/forgetting you."

from You Got My Mind Messed Up (Vivid Sound)
available on CD - The Essential James Carr (Razor & Tie)



Fulham Court  performed by The Faith Brothers  198?
Recommended by TDQ [profile]

Uplifting yet raw, and very passionate, like evrything they ever did. It amazed me they never broke through, they were a cut above the rest of that genre. Would love any MP3s or if someone could point me to where I`d find a CD would be very grateful. Ah go on! Thanks! [email protected]

from Bside


Good Dancer  performed by The Sleepy Jackson  2003
Recommended by geezer [profile]

Fantastic Austrlian pop drawing on the post Beatleseque for references ,perhaps an imaginary collaboration between John Lennon and George Harrison,the Dark Horse meets No9 Dream .Bright and energetic from start to finish with a sun bleached aura to make your day shine .incidentally this group split and re emerged as Empire of the Sun well worthy of perusal .

from Lover, available on CD


Hold Me in Your Arms  performed by The Black Keys  2003
Recommended by bluemas [profile]

Dan Auerbach plays slide guitar in this raw and emotional song. Simple yet moving. The Blues comes out in all of us in one point in time.

from Thickfreakness (Fat Possum)


I Don’t Know  performed by Ruth Brown  1959
Recommended by meganann [profile]

Her voice is so raw and real. You feel every note and lyric. Her and her voice are just so penetrating. She's not afraid to display her sexuality. She's barely displaying it in her lyrics, but it's the fullness and depth of her voice.

from Miss Rythm


I Stand Accused  performed by Isaac Hayes  1970
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A breathtaking cover of the Jerry Butler classic, drawn out to 11 1/2 minutes of heartwrenching glory. A true masterpiece from Hayes' most brilliant period. Beautiful string arrangements by Dale Warren, and ghostly backing vocals make this something that you won't soon forget.

from The Isaac Hayes Movement, available on CD



I’m a Good Woman  performed by Barbara Lynn  1966
Recommended by human-cannonball [profile]

The 1966-original of this great raw soul tune from a much underrated blues/rnb singer, instrumentalist and songwriter. That's a smoking song, an underground rare-groove hit with many known djs in the scene; also covered in a great psyche-funk way by an unknown Silky Spearman (appearing in a Counterpoint compilation).




I'm Your Man  performed by Leonard Cohen
Recommended by Reina [profile]

Leonarn Cohen has the deepest, darkest, creepiest voice ever. It's perfect for this song--a song about complete devotion. It sounds almost stalker-like. But awesome.

"I would crawl to you baby, and I'd fall at your feet, and I'd howl at your beauty like a dog in heat..."




In my dreams  performed by The Earls of Suave  1994
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An indescribably brilliant 50s-style rock'n'roll ballad, with vocals by the inimitable Marquis de suave. The musical setting is breathtakingly authentic, and the emotions are raw and powerful, as the vocals screech 'in my dreams...../I dreamed you didn't want me...' It's extremely hammed up and over the top, but quite wonderful all the same. Most of this band went on to form the excellent Flaming Stars.

from the single In my dreams (Vinyl Japan)




  phil: I was just searching for the earls of suave on the internet, and google returned this entry - and I just had to agree with mr Delicado here. A truly stupendous piece of work that everyone involved should be very proud of - sounds like it was recorded on 10 pints and is all the better for it. I've done a bit of research into this, and as far as I can tell, the Marquis de Suave now works in advertising.
  headcoat: this song appears in the punk film "Shooting at the Moon" watchable here: http://cuntyscoundrel.com/films.html
It’s A Desperate Situation  performed by Marvin Gaye  1969
Recommended by snafkin [profile]

A beautiful song. Marvin's voice is raw, pleeding emotion, the strings, the drums, the everything!
This song should be known to all. I challenge anyone who loves music not to feel moved listening to this!

from Motown Lost And Found(?)


Jazz Potatoes  performed by Jorge Ben  1973
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

This lost Jorge Ben stormer has a rawer sound and harder rock edge to it than usual during this, his greatest period. Relegated to an obscure soundtrack LP, it stomps all over the place at a slower, heavier and more menacing tempo than anything on "Ben" or "A Tabua De Esmeralda." The beat is anchored by that famous acoustic guitar sound, heavy bass and a loud cowbell, as Jorge yells out improvised nonsense in a hilarious mix of Spanish and English! "Rock Steady-O!!" Must be heard to be believed.

from A Volta De Beto Rockfeller (Soundtrack) (Polydor)


Just Friends  performed by Gavin DeGraw  2003
Recommended by Waterboy [profile]

Great songs are all you need to be good and add in a soaring vocal and you have Gavin DeGraw. A beatiful love song for the 21st century.

from Chariot, available on CD


Just Lust  performed by Buzzcocks  1978
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

"Just Lust" was the B-side to the Buzzcocks' highest-charting single, the Pete Shelley punk-pop classic "Ever Fallen in Love?," eventually reaching number 12 on the U.K. singles chart in September of 1978. The mysterious co-author " Dial" is, in fact, a pseudonym for the band's early manager, Richard Boon, who also shared songwriting credits on "What Ever Happened?," the B-side to the Buzzcocks' infamously banned first single "Orgasm Addict." However, the effect of his involvement in not apparent here, as the music is classic Buzzcocks — masters of the punk-fueled power pop nugget. The rhythm is springy, the track's nervous tension as wired as the melody is infectious. Punchy verses with quick-hit vocals are alternated with short dreamy sections of woozy flanged guitar and chopped up-tempo shifts, the band expertly maneuvering in tight spaces. Shelley follows the twists and turns with clipped phrases followed by drawn-out melodies in sync with the compact arrangement: "Your dream to possess/It hurts/It's so unjust/Just lust, just lust/If nothing mattered less/Then I wouldn't make a fuss/Just lust, just lust/I was slow to catch on and that just makes it worse/If passion is a fashion then emotion is just a curse." Though the track was also included on the Buzzcocks' second album, Love Bites, the group had yet to make an impact in the United States. Thankfully, this little gem was not left to languish in obscurity as it was included in the influential collected singles package Singles Going Steady, compiled as the band's introduction to American audiences and released in the states in 1979.
(AMG)

from Love Bites, available on CD


Kee-ka-roo  performed by Walter Wanderley and Luiz Henrique  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A very cool track, but not in the way I normally find Walter Wanderley's quick-draw hammond organ technique cool. This is a simple, bluesey number on which he is joined by the Brazilian singer Luiz Henrique. Luiz doesn't sing though, he just contributes some nice scat vocals, rather like the work Marcos Valle does on 'Garra'. In my experience, this is about as close as Walter gets to 'funky', and this version from the 'Popcorn' album is a great improvement from the 1967 'Kee-ka-roo' LP version.

from Popcorn (Verve)



Kojak Theme  performed by "The Pop Singers & Orchestra"  197?
Recommended by konsu [profile]

One of the better records of this ilk, surely for this one, which is hard to find and is such a typically great theme. Kojak, of course, was the blowpop sucking detective played by Telly Savalas. And like the "Rockford Files", "Baretta", and "S.W.A.T.", deserves it's place in the not-so-rare groove DJ file. With the obligatory Moog sound leading the melody, it becomes instantly recognizable (and dateable). Whoever the cats are on this session are cutting some decent shit for sure. They also turn out a surprisingly funky version of the M.A.S.H. theme, as well as the three aforementioned. The crazy Peter Pan cover art is there, with cute stuff like poorly drawn representations of Alan Alda looking at a martini glass, and Gabe Kaplan's finger being bit by Baretta's Cockatoo!!

Does anyone know the composer?

from Themes From Hit TV Shows (Peter Pan 8185)



land of a 1000 dances  performed by namelosers  1965
Recommended by shaka_klaus [profile]

biff! bang! pow! from the toughest band in sweden in the 60s. a really raw and fuzzy version of this song. a must have for all you who're interested in obscure 60s music a la nuggets etc.





Landslide  performed by The Smashing Pumpkins  1994
Recommended by Archipelago [profile]

Okay so it's a cover song. Fleetwood Mac re-released it a few years ago when the original members get back together. Then there was the recent popularity of the Dixie Chicks version. Now, I will admit that it is tough to beat the original version.

But this one's *real* close.

This song came out of left field. From a group whose first work was primarily long, drawn-out, sometimes cacophonous chords, this song was like a splash of cold water in the face. The CD itself is a B-sides compilation that fits like a "lost chapter" to the Pumpkins early work.

Keep in mind; this is not a happy song. It was not supposed to be. That's why Billy Corgan's version stands well above the Dixie Chicks’ version, His voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar is able is capture the abject heartache of the song’s words and rhythm.

Which makes it a great cover song.


available on CD - Pisces Iscariot (Virgin Records)


Let’s Get Married  performed by Mariya Takeuchi  1984
Recommended by drchilledair [profile]

I am a connoisseur (er, fan) of Japanese pop music, not just young further-out acts/groups like Cornelius (lost w/o his tape loops) and Love Psychedelico (think Beatles Meets Velvet Underground). But also that strain of Japanese pop which draws heavily on the stylistic traditions of the usual Brill Building suspects. i.e. Solo Nihogo artists like Mariko Takeuchi, especially those tracks with arrangements by the great Tomaji Sogawa. Also Chage and Aska, Eichi Ohtaki, (sometimes called Japan's Phil Spector), Gospellers, Rag Fair and, of course, Pizzicato Five. I am especially drawn to the efforts of Tatsuro Yamashita as a solo artist, and of his tracks with his wife, Mariya Takeuchi, released under her name. On their own and as a team they have been recording since the 1980s and in (affectionately known by his fans as) Tats' case since the late seventies (his first album was co-produced and arranged in the U.S. by the 4 Seasons' Charles Callelo). There are a number of other artists like this in Japan with uncommonly lengthy---by U.S. standards---careers. And believe it or not, a hit record in Japan sells in numbers that are generally far larger than the U.S. despite a population that is roughly half as large.

One of my favorite Takeuchi - Yamashita collaborations (she writes and sings, he arranges) is "Let's Get Married," which would not be perceived as being retro or sixties or somesuch by (IMHO) the more flexible and openminded Japanese music audience. Even though, admittedly it does draw upon such musical conceits. Instead, Let's Get Married would merely be regarded as a great record, case closed.

This 1984 cut track is timelessly, and extra-territorily infectuous. But with the exception of Kyu Sakamoto in 1963 with his fluke number one single, Sukiyaki, to the best of my knowledge no Japanese artist of any musical inclination has been able to crack the U.S. charts in any significant way. General garden variety xenophobia coupled with a hard time wrapping the tongue around those hard-to-pronounce names with two many vowels and and syllables. It is doubtful that LGM, even though it is sung by Takeuchi in perfectly accented English, was ever released in the U.S.

Starting with a full blown fanfare of the Wedding March played on organ, after twenty seconds, Let's Get Married abruptly switches gears and mood and becomes an ever-ascending excercise in neo-Spectorian pop, replete with castinets, chimes, a swirling ooh-wah background chorale (courtesy of an overdubbed Yamashita), multiple drumkits, a full complement of string players and plenty of good old fashioned Gold Star Studio-style echo. A paen to the joys of marriage, my favorite moment happens at 1:42 way down in the mix right after Takeuchi sings the line "You and me with a small house and a dog," where, if you listen carefully you can hear the sound of a dog yapping for joy. Homage to the "Pet" at the end of Brian Wilson's "Caroline, No" perhaps?

Both Yamashita and Takeuchi had number one albums in Japan last year. Unlike most of their 70s and 80s U.S. rock/pop counterparts, they have not been cast aside by the bulk of Japanese record buyers, but continue to peak at the top of the charts with every new issue. A listen to this perfectly crafted, classic, three minute (well. . . 3;45 actually) track should help illustrate why this is so.

Bill Reed (new to this list)

from Impressions, available on CD


Much Too Much  performed by James Crawford  1965
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A James Brown-produced James Brown-soundalike with a deep bass undertow and a truly odd mariachi flavor.

from the single Much Too Much (Mercury)


On and Off  performed by Forks and Knives  2009
Recommended by enemykite [profile]

Raw, passionate and abrasive female vocals.
You may like this band if you like any of the following:
Sleater-Kinney
Helium
Blood Red Shoes
Blonde-Redhead
Le Tigre

from Forks and Knives, available on CD


once around the block  performed by badly drawn boy
Recommended by licoricewhipped [profile]




One More Time  performed by The Clash  198?
Recommended by mattypenny [profile]

I love the Clash. I love the way they were four disparate individuals each bringing their own stuff to the mix. Topper's excellent drumming, Simonon's cool, Mick Jones musicality and street smarts, and Joe Strummer's....umm...Strummer-ness.

I love the fact they didn't play Top of the Pops. I love the fact that Strummer admitted that this was mainly 'cos he was crap at miming rather than out of any significant political stance or anything.

I love how gooood they were live. And I love the fact that I was lucky enough to see them.

I love the fact that Strummer picked 'Crawfish' as his favourite Elvis song. I also love the fact that sometimes, to my mind, they got things badly wrong, sounded a bit gauche or wrongheaded or worse. I'm thinking of Red Brigade t-shirts, using Belfast as a photo opportunity, and maybe singing about ghettos and Brixton, for the 'romance' of it when they weren't necessarily the closest to either. I dunno. That side makes me feel uneasy at times, but that's fine - makes me think.

This song is great. Reggae influenced rock, Strummer belting out 'one more time in the ghetto...'.

Its been so sad losing Joe, Johnny (Cash) and John (Peel) over the last couple of years. Good men, you feel.

from Sandanista, available on CD


Presidential Suite  performed by Super Furry Animals  2001
Recommended by delicado [profile]

To be honest, I have little idea of what this song is about, but it certainly sets an intoxicating mood - rather intense and dramatic, but very cool. It's a sprawling, majestic pop song, opening gently with a faint trumpet solo and a picked guitar, and then building up nicely with strings soon after the vocals come in. The chorus is simple and catchy, and the orchestration is lush and beautiful, and the vocals are tender. There is a nice cinematic instrumental section in the middle, with some nods to Burt Bacharach. I don't get the impression this is the most coherent song ever, but there are poignant moments lyrically, such as 'You know that when we met, there were fireworks in the sky...sparkling like dragonflies', set against the moody chorus. It feels kind of nice to be really enjoying a new, 2001 song for once. The new album is really quite good. There are some duff songs, but overall I'd say it deserved better reviews than it received.

Update, ok, I've now figured out this is about the Clinton/Lewinsky furore. I guess I'm just not primarily a lyrics person...

from Rings around the World, available on CD



Pula Yetla  performed by Letta Mbulu  196?
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Great stuff from a young Letta Mbulu. Her first recording, and with the good company of H.B. Barnum & David Axelrod, is a stunner. This is my favorite track from the LP. It's almost in a Mystic Moods kind of mode, with a thunderstorm recording used for effect, it may have something to do with the lyrics, but since she sings in Xhosa, I have no idea. Her voice is strong and smooth, at times she sounds influenced by Nina Simone, but on this one she is more in a traditional mode. The backing is great Axlerod, with his strong soul-jazz-rock crossover, much like he did for Lou Rawls during this period. Highly recommended for fans of heavier african grooves.

from Letta Mbulu Sings (Capitol ST 2874)


righteous wrong  performed by jim jones revue  2010
Recommended by patlallyjack [profile]

raw primal rock n roll, the way it should be played. This is my current favourite track but you won't go far wrong with any jim jones revue track!

from burn your house down


Sad, Sad Sunshine  performed by Al Kooper  1970
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Al Cooper is a great overlooked songwriter.His album,Easy Does It,is a double length tour de force.He wrote more than half the tunes for this double LP,and played a myriad of instruments as well!This one is my favorite right now, mainly because it mixes well with my miserable winter. Instumentally, it has a sort of"Indo-blues"quality, with sitar(played by Mr. Cooper himself) and tablas against a lilting string ensemble.It's a song of lost love and it's dreaded illumination:"...As the sun it slowly rises, there is judgement in it's glare/And it seems too much to ask, to light a face that isn't there..." A real treat of a tune, and a must for any fans of american songwriter stuff with a touch of sad humor.Also check out his sprawling version of the Big Joe Williams tune "Baby Please Don't Go" and another original,"She Gets Me Where I Live".

from Easy Does It, available on CD


Season of the Witch  performed by Lou Rawls  1968
Recommended by tinks [profile]

David Axelrod leads ol' Lou through a pent-up take on the Donovan classic. Starts out slow, building momentum as it draws to a fantastic close.

from the single Season of the Witch (Capitol)
available on CD - Classic Soul (Magnum Midprice)




  Goes Up To 11: And definitely don't miss the 1968 cover of "Season of the Witch" by Vanilla Fudge -- an absolute triumph of excessive bombast! The phrase "over the top" barely begins to capture that performance. It will leave you shaking your head in amazement at the sheer audacity and monumental bad taste, but it is so much fun!
  Swinging London: Lou Rawls never really cut it for me. Sounds like '60's soul for housewives. His voice sounds strained a lot of the time.
Serenade For Missy  performed by The Residents  1982
Recommended by Tangento [profile]

This is my first recommendation, so I will go easy on all of you. The following description is from my website. (it is the only way to do the song justice):

This can only be compared to something like "Retro-60's Upside-down Elevator Muzak".
(although it certainly draws from 20's/ 30's Big Band escapism)
The thing is, if this actually were playing in an elevator, the people there would certainly perform an odd ritual of alternately:
a. Merrily tapping their foot, and then
b. Looking up at the speaker, frowning and befuddled.
This is a song, which back in my partying days, we would use as a soundtrack for the following activity:
We would put our tiny baby Alligator Lizard, Festus
(who was an inch long, head to tail, and smaller around than a pencil)
...we would put him on this cheap little multi-colored fiber-optic "fountain" and put the clear cube back over it.
We would then watch as this "fountain" would very slowly spin around, Festus aboard, with this completely absurd (but oddly beautiful) music playing.
This produced near-catastrophic laughter because he would be looking up at you with this little tiny frown, as if to say;
"what the hell is wrong with you people?"
To this day, I cannot properly answer that question.
R.I.P., Festus.

Additional info:
The sax is not my favorite instrument, but it is perfectly utilized here. It wavers between slightly obnoxious and smooth as silk.
What really make the track sweet, however are the unique guitar stylings of Snakefinger.

from The Tunes of Two Cities, available on CD


Sexual Healing  performed by Hot-8 Brass Band  2005
Recommended by Festy [profile]

I think Marvin would be proud of this version, though quite unlike the original. A typical brass band sound introduces the song for a couple of verses which then drop out as drums and hand-claps accompany a group singing vocals over the top. Raw yet fun. I've edited this audio clip to try get as much as possible a feel of the song into it.

from Rock With The Hot 8 (Tru Thoughts)
available on CD - Unfold Presents Tru Thoughts Covers (Tru Thoughts)



Shake And Crawl  performed by House Of Love  1990
Recommended by john_l [profile]

My favourite House Of Love song, it's a mid-paced typically guitar-drenched track with an insistent percussive backing and that low ostinato guitar riff with the little flourish in it. It has lots of minor chords which give it a rather gloomy feel (like many of my favourite songs). Actually their later song "Feel", which was one of the '90s best, could be "Shake And Crawl" slowed almost to a literal crawl ...

from The House Of Love (2), available on CD



  Genza: I liked the House of Love - and 'Christine' is a genre-defining classic. But like many of the other sub-Valentines clones (Chapterhouse, Boo Radleys, etc.), I thought some of their tunes suffered from being slow and uneventful. Like you, I love minor chords - but I think other bands did that multi-layered guitar sound better. But hey, it's just my opinion and all that.
  lobo: The House of Love were brilliant and way ahead of their time, not to mention sadly overlooked in the pages of pop music history. They were hardly "Sub-Valentine Clones" - the band's sound dates back to their origins in 1986. The members of My Bloody Valentine were struggling to define their sound at that point (they were still working through their goth phase!). Guy Chadwick was a masterful songwriter and Terry Bickers was the preeminent guitarist of his time. Nobody knew their way around a stack of effects pedals better than him. Best songs: Safe, Christine, Destroy the Heart, Loneliness Is A Gun... This band's music is nothing short of superb.
Ship Rolls In  performed by Faster Pussycat  1987
Recommended by understudy constantine [profile]

What a great band they were! Surely one of the very best of the late 80's glam resurgence, and putting on a great live show reprising the Beasty Boys with a song called Babylon! This song brings to mind a pub crawl in Soho... raucous, tuneful, swaggering and knowingly gorgeous... a kind of smash-and-grab version of Don't Rain On My Parade!

from Faster Pussycat (Elektra)


Somebody To Love  performed by Jefferson Airplane  196?
Recommended by mattypenny [profile]

The 2nd in a series of 3 linked postings, the others being White Rabbit, and
the Boogie Pimps version of this song.

Many of the comments on 'White Rabbit' apply to this song, except the words are not quite as 'out there'. The voice is just as extreme though. Very much like Siouxsie Sioux, but with a rocking 60s backing. Really raw, basic drumming.




Sore  performed by Buck 65  2003
Recommended by trivia [profile]

Although Buck's "ragged old man" routine can be charming, it usually comes off feeling more like a Tom Waits rip-off than a Tom Waits homage. "Sore" is my favorite track on "Talkin' Honky Blues" because it does away with the overly-cute oddball beat poetry that Buck often indugles in and offers a more sincere and unaffected portrayal of the wayfaring nomad / poor white trucker.

Buck's in a one horse town with a broken down pick-up, left to set up shop in a shoddy motel and reflect on his life. The lyrics are country gold all rapped up pretty: "I'm drawn to familiar environments and dangers / I look in my photo albums and all I see is strangers / What is my problem?"

I'm a sucker for good desolation-hop (unfortunately for me, there isn't much out there), and "Sore" fits the bill perfectly.

from Talkin' Honky Blues, available on CD



Space Lord  performed by Monster Magnet  1998
Recommended by King Charles [profile]

After nearly three and a half years of speculation, I finally bought this album in the fall of 2003. Wow. As soon as I popped it in, I knew that it was Monster Magnet, but I knew I had a new band to add to my favorite list. These guys rock, period, they're in the lower upper class of hard rock (with upper upper being reserved for such acts as Metallica, Iron Maiden, and Dream Theater), hell I don't even want to categorize them, as this would place a restriction on their potential (in much the same way the Jewish cannot write the word "God," and Muslims cannot draw Him, according to friends I have of those faiths). The song starts off like a fireside story, we've got a low bass beat, a great little intro compliments of Ed Mundell. Wyndorf's space, money, power, sex and religion influenced lyrics become prevalent as soon as the song begins, and we are launched into a maracca, tambourine, and 70's/80's hard line influenced metal trip. Ned Raggett's characterization of an 'acid folk' edge to the beginning of the song gives it good justice, and Space Lord slowly cranks up the volume, settling down once, and then cranking it up again, ready to conquer worlds with the hard rock edge that has kept Monster Magnet in the limelight, but away from the new age/pathetic sounds. Upon listening to this song, we think "classic rock," not because of it's refusal to metamorphose (or rather, transmogrify) into today's rock, but because of it's influence from the aforementioned 60's - 80's hard core, unfiltered, instrumentally diverse sound (including alternate percussive effects from tambourines and maraccas, as well as keyboard infiltration that would make The Doors jealous), which is uniquely self-complimenting, orchestrated, and coherent. Space Lord deals with becoming (unconsciously) corrupt with power, wealth, and ultimately desire (Now give me the strenth to split the world into, yeah/I've ate all the rest, and now I've gotta eat you), which may delineate the stereotypical American 'powertrip,' hence the album's appropriate name. If you are looking for unrelenting excellent rock, which isn't too harsh to listen to, but most certainly isn't along the lines of Phish or Weezer (in any respect at all), I recommend this song, album and any others one could get one's hands on. 5 out of 5 stars for its genre.

from Power Trip


Straw Dog  performed by Something Corporate
Recommended by alanajo [profile]

a beginning to call batman.

"Heaven and Earth are impartial;
They see the ten thousand things as straw dogs.
The wise are impartial;
They see the people as straw dogs."

Tao Te Ching, Verse V




Strawberryletter 23  performed by Shuggie Otis  1974
Recommended by Pal [profile]

Absolutely stunning track. If you like music at all you must have this.

from Inspiration Information, available on CD



  tinks: it is a great song, even if it was in a cereal commercial. and i think i like the brothers johnson's hit cover of it just as much as the original.
  olli: hey, don't forget aht uh mi hed. it's one of the two absolutely fantastic songs on the album. too bad his comeback flopped, i think the reissue of inpiration information was too hyped, those who were expecting "THE LOST GENIUS OF SOUL" were disappointed... still, i think his work is pretty interesting. it´s worth checking out some of the recordings made by his father johnny otis, too. pretty good stuff.
Superlungs My Supergirl  performed by Donovan  1968
Recommended by tinks [profile]

"She's only 14 but she knows how to draw!" I can't help but think this song isn't about what it sounds like. A great psychy dancer from Donovan's 'rockier' period.

from Barabajagal, available on CD


Tell Me When  performed by The Human League  1995
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Although a thick line has long been drawn connecting disco to the '90s techno scene, few have bothered to connect the dots between the more modern genre and synth pop. The Human League didn't need to fret about such things, though; they intuitively understood those relationships, having explored virtually all the influences over their career — industrial, funk, R&B, synth pop, new wave, and disco itself. And when the wheel turned again, the band was back on top with a sound that hadn't really changed, but just refined. With a few minor alterations, 1995's "Tell Me When" could have come from 1983, slotting nicely between "Fascination" and "Mirror Man." Of course, the drum programming would need to be changed (there were no jungle rhythms back then!), but the funky bassline can stay, along with the bubbly synths. In fact, the real difference is found in the vignette-esque lyrics and the more complex vocals. And these slight changes make all the difference, turning synth dreams into techno club success. A taster for the group's forthcoming Octopus album, "Tell Me When" hit on both sides of the Atlantic, landing just outside the Top 6 and Top 30 in the U.K. and U.S., respectively.
(AMG)

from Octopus, available on CD


Temptation  performed by New Order  1982
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Although far less well known than the 12" version and the 1987 'substance' rerecording, I'm utterly in love with this 7" version. I think perhaps the band hate it, since it doesn't seem ever to have appeared on CD, and was not even on the recent 'Retro' box set. At a little over 5 minutes long, it just seems much more focused and affecting to me than the overlong 12" version and the scrappy 1987 version.

It opens with that hypnotic beat/synth sound that has become famous since the song was used in various film soundtracks (most famously, Trainspotting, and most recently, 24 hour party people. Both used the later, rubbish version though). On this version, there's a twangy guitar sound added over the top of the introduction. The other main difference from other versions is vastly improved vocals (particularly over the 1987 version), and that wonderful early New Order guitar sound, as witnessed on other classic tracks like 'Ceremony' and 'Procession'. Like a handful of other tracks I've recommended, it's hard for me to be completely objective about this one, because I've adored it since my mid-teens. But having just bought an extra copy of the single, I'm happy to report that it sounds as brilliant as ever.

This recording showcases a raw and under-appreciated New Order/Joy Division sound that mixes early synth sounds and beats with punky guitars in a really beautiful and affecting way. I still enjoy their later stuff, but it's tracks like this that really attract me to the band.

from the single Temptation (Factory fac63)




  n-jeff: I've not heard the 7 since I was at college in 82, but there is also a version about 15-20 minutes long on one of the first "Touch" cassettes, where they have cut it with an interview. The whole thing seems to have been a lengthy Jam, edited differently for different releases. So the 7 would give you the most focused version. Compare the 7 and 12 edits of the KLF's "3am Eternal" for the enhancing effect of a great edit.
  Genza: I totally agree with everything delicado says. Early New Order rocks. Everything after and including Blue Monday is more poppy - and I can live with that. But most of their albums are very patchy - with half the tracks good and the other half almost unlistenable. But Temptation is an utter, utter classic. And I just love Dreams Never End, Cries and Whispers and In a Lonely Place. Well, any early New Order - it all that has tinny dance-music quality but still holds that desolate Joy Division sound.
Thalassocracy  performed by Frank Black  1994
Recommended by esti [profile]

Pixies gone raw.

from teenager of the year, available on CD


The Cutter  performed by Echo & The Bunnymen  1983
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

On ”The Cutter” fellow Liverpool natives, Echo and The Bunnymen successfully wed the Eastern influenced psychedelic sounds made famous by hometown heroes, The Beatles. Crafting Eastern influences into a new post-punk hybrid that was sweeping England in the Early 80’s. It was songs like ”The Cutter” that would help define the newly coined Neo-psychedelic sub-genre, practiced by such group’s of the period as The Chameleons U.K., Psychedelic Furs and Simple Minds amongst others. The track opens with a keyboard approximation of Indian strings, whirring briefly before the band kicks into a percolating groove of popping bass, driving straight drums and chinking guitar accents. Ian McCulloch adds another layer of ’60 nostalgia, employing his expressive, slack-jawed vocal delivery that conjures aural images of the late Jim Morrison as he unfurls lines that drip with apprehension “Who’s on the seventh floor? / Brewing alternatives / What’s in the bottom drawer? / Waiting for things to give”. The Eastern strings re-enter at strategic points, filling in space between verses and McCulloch’s esoteric pleas to “spare us the cutter!”, which sounds like a good idea in any case. The arrangement also veers into epic territory quite unexpectedly in the second half, signaled by a sweeping wave of keyboard and McCulloch’s more subdued delivery as poses a string of rhetorically poignant questions, “Am I the happy loss? / Will I still recoil? / When the skin is lost / Am I the worthy cross? / Will I still be soiled? / When the dirt is off” -as the music swell behind him. Like any good single, the track never looses steam, cruising through each section with power and grace. A nod is in order for Ian Broudie, who’s smooth production helped The Cutter become Echo and The Bunnymen’s first top ten single in Britain and a linchpin track for the Neo-psychedelic movement.
(AMG)

from Porcupine, available on CD


The Damned Don't Cry  performed by Visage  1982
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

First of all I had to ask myself whether the real reason I really like this song is because the title is cribbed from a movie I love. (An ace bit of film noir from 1950, starring Joan Crawford, that I can't recommend strongly enough.) And yeah, it is rather "Fade to Grey"- Part II, (though I think the melody/mood/dynamics are stronger here.) And yeah, lyrically it’s all a bit John Foxx-light - images of European ennui and dissipation minus the inspiration. And yeah, I'm the first to admit Visage is to great post-punk-electro what Baccara is to prime 1970's disco, but I love "Yes Sir, I Can Boogie" and I love "The Damned Don't Cry" - damn it!

from The Anvil
available on CD - The Damned Don't Cry


The Ghosts You Draw On My Back  performed by Múm  2004
Recommended by FCS [profile]

This song is an IDM - slash - trip-hop, ethereal vocals, nice melody, but very melancholic.

from Summer Make Good, available on CD


The Holy Filament  performed by Mr. Bungle  1999
Recommended by Tangento [profile]

This is a truly unique song, from a beyond unique band. Mr. Bungle has a rabid, almost cult-like following, and songs like this are the reason why.
This band has always drawn on many different, widely varying influences, including ska, grindcore, jazz, and funky beats, to name just a few.
This track displays a whole new direction for the band, with dreamy, ethereal bass and piano interplay, retro-vocal harmonies, and an almost rapturous climactic sequence, followed by a melancholy fade-out.
This is a work composed by Bassist Trevor Dunn, (a true talent) and I feel it is more than worthy of a place on this list.
The album is a classic, I highly recommend it for people with just about any kind of musical taste.
I am providing a review/ option to purchase:
HERE

from California, available on CD


the sprawl  performed by sonic youth
Recommended by licoricewhipped [profile]

one of my favorite sonic youth songs. it slow and beautiful and reminds me of rainy days.




The year of the rat  performed by Badly Drawn Boy
Recommended by inbloom44 [profile]

This song makes my soul happy.




There She Goes  performed by The La's  1988
Recommended by LawrenceM [profile]

2:42 of pop perfection ... the chiming guitar sounds like something Roger McGuinn could have come up with. However, the skiffle beat and Liverpool drawl make this sound like a song from the docks, not the sunshine state.

from The La's, available on CD


Threshold Of Transformation  performed by Isis  2009
Recommended by SamHall [profile]

The 9:52 long track immediately blasts you off your feet with a ethereally heavy series of riffs and Aaron Turner's rough vocals. Keeping it interesting, the structure continues to evolve, and drifts downward into a more dreamy movement which stays dense and builds the tension for the following verses. About halfway in, the song reaches the first climax that (I think) embodies the "Threshold" in the song title. After which, it moves into a more contemplative section, smoothing out the turmoil and tension brought on by the first half, while building its own. Beautifully, it succeeds in building yet another crescendo, only to end in free fall, with guitar and bass fantastically accenting the mood. The bass in this song is truly something to behold, wavering and powerful in its tone.

What I like about this song reflects on why I like Isis' music in general: it's complex, atmospheric, emotional, intricate, and smart. It truly is "thinking man's metal." Isis is all about themes and atmospheres, emotions and vibes, rather than clear ideas and lyrics. It's visceral, raw, and transcendent. And in some ways, I think this song embodies everything that makes them great.

from Wavering Radiant, available on CD


Tim McGraw  performed by Taylor Swift
Recommended by mklinsao [profile]

A song that Taylor Swift wrote as a freshman in high school about her senior boyfriend. She knew that when he left for college, they would have to break up, so the song talks about all the memories she wants him to keep.

from Taylor Swift


Truck Yeah  performed by Tim McGraw
Recommended by lsingleton36 [profile]




Try To Understand  performed by Lulu  1965
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Lulu has inflicted on the world many crimes against music, politics and fashion but gets into the pearly gates of musical heaven on the basis of this track. One of her early Decca sides, it's raw and heartfelt, and (despite her tender age at the time) a mature, original view of love.

from the single Try To Understand (Decca F.12214)
available on CD - The Girls' Scene (Deram)



Understanding in a Car Crash  performed by Thursday  2001
Recommended by cryofthecelt [profile]

"Understanding in a Car Crash" is the song that brought me to love Thursday, a hardcore emo rock band from the New Jersey area. Emo (for "emo"-tional) is a genre that encompasses deep and tenderly obscure lyrics with raw, impassioned screams and hard rock riffs. Thursday is probably the best emo band out there. This is a great song about wasted time and wanted love, so listen to it! You might discover an emo-punker inside of you that you never knew existed!

from Full Collapse, available on CD


Walk  performed by Pantera  1992
Recommended by MoeShinola [profile]

This song is on Vulgar Display Of Power, one of the best hard-rock records ever made. The sound is very...empty. Empty of any accessories, stripped-down, primal. Anselmo is reproaching somebody, and is almost annoyed enough to kick their ass. Dimebag Darrell(R.I.P.) does his usual excellent-but-not-showy guitar solo. All the guitar mags were calling this style "Power Groove" when it came out.

from Vulgar Display Of Power (Atco)


Wanderlove  performed by Claudine Longet  1967
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

I always like Claudine Longet's whispery, French accented voice, singing cutesy little love songs with all the dreamy passion of a girl decorating her school notebook with detailed drawings of unicorns and flowers. But she sounds even better when performing a darker, vaguely forboding song like "Wanderlove". The gentle string arrangement and subtle sitar flourishes are the icing on the cake. Wherever you're going, Claudine, take me with you.

from Claudine, available on CD


Whirl  performed by High Rise
Recommended by Damian Vegas [profile]

Totally overdriven, psych-noise power trio rawk. (There, that should satisfy your need for critical cliche.) Seriously, though, this is one of my favorite tracks by High Rise. The band just seems totally in sync here while still going nuts. Especially potent (as always) is Munehiro Narita's guitar soloing. The band puts so much in the song that it really feels longer than it is, and it's still not nearly long enough. Recommended for people who love great guitar solos and just plain fierce rock and roll.


available on CD - Disallow (Squealer Music)


whitchi tai to  performed by Harper’s Bizare  1968
Recommended by gaymod [profile]

since this tune entered my life, about a year ago,it has been my obssession, i've collected together about 10 other versions, including the original by Jim Pepper & a live bootleg recording from 3 years ago by Plush. Based around a red indian chant, it's trance like beauty propels the listener to the nearest faraway place, the white vocal harmony performance has never been beaten by anyone, beach boys included. Check out the Brewer and Shipley version too.

from harper's bizare 4 (warners)
available on CD - harpers bizare 4


Winkin, Blinkin and Nod  performed by The Big Three  1963
Recommended by rum [profile]

If you ask any industry bigwig right now what’s gonna be the next big thing, they’ll all say the same, “Sea Shanties”. Every one of them. You think I’m joking? Well listen up ignorami because I’m not.

You might have noticed ripples rolling in from the Indie scene on both shores of the Atlantic, as The Coral, The Decemberists, and others, have romanticised the plight of the seafarer, but now Shanties are due to hit the mainstream, and hard. As I write this Richard X is in his London studio working on the final mix of ‘Salty Seadog’, an explosive slab of “neo-shant’ purred over seductively by Rachel Stevens. Cathy Dennis, my old pal from our days changing skates at Norwich Rollerama, told me yesterday that she’s just sold three ‘Shanties’ to some “top name artists”. For legal reasons I’m not allowed to say who, but let me assure you these are white hot names. The kind of names that kids get on their knees and pray to. So, you see, Shanties are big business. I’ve also heard that Jennifer Lopez, J-Lo, ‘Loopy’ Lopez, Jell-O, whatever, never one to miss a passing fad, is rumoured to be changing her name to One-Eyed-Jenny. Make of that what you will, might just be street talk. Now what concerns me is the forthcoming release from Britney Spears. This you may have heard about. It’s called, ‘Wingin’, Blingin’ and Not!’, and it’s a ‘fresh’ adaptation of the 19th century poem/song, ‘Winkin’, Blinkin’ and Nod’ by Eugene Field. I know this song from the glorious version by Cass Elliot’s pre-fame folk trio, The Big Three. It’s less a shanty than a bewitching lullaby, intended to lull a child into restful slumber, as Winkin’ and gang sailed not in rusting trawler through the bleak North Sea, but, “in a wooden shoe/off on a river of crystal light/into a sea of dew.” And it contains some of the most hauntingly beautiful oooh ooohs and aahh ahhs ever waxed, as Tim Rose and Mama Cass harmonise the rolling waves of slumber. Nevertheless because of it’s sea-faring theme (“we’re going fishing for the herring fish/that live in the beautiful sea”), it’ll probably get caught up in the nets of the inevitable ‘Sea Shanty Fever’ cash-in compilations that will soon litter our shores like syringes and floor tiling. I wanted to draw your attention to it now before it gets beaten blue and bloody by the Spears, and rattles out over supermarket tannoys the world over.

from The Big Three



  n-jeff: Obviously Mr Scruff is well ahead of the field then, with three songs about Fish (ing) on his first LP...
  tonyharte: Yo ho ho, me hearties. Well I never. Thanks for the tip/warning Rum (where's the bum and baccy?) I predict that this year (in the UK) will belong to The Coral.
  konsu: Um... what about Weens album "The Mollusk"? That was shit was shanty-city! So, whats next? Weavers laments??
You Get What you Give  performed by New Radicals  1998
Recommended by Mike [profile]

Probably the only anthemic pop song I will ever choose to listen to. Was drawn to it the first time I heard it, as a piece of chart music at the end of the 1990s.

The first two chords of the verse are audacious, most unusual in pop music, and are what makes the song for me. Without them, or with conventional choices, the song would lose its tension and power. The lyric can be considered cheesy, but it kind of aims high in searching out some kind of universal truth, and it works. When in the right mood, it is even elevating. The last part is lyrically very pathetic, a lame series of insulting name drops. But it probably got the record heard - this was their first single.

I recently read that this song was much admired by U2, and I'm not surprised as I can hear them striving for something like this. But they never get anywhere even slightly close.





  Mike: An opera singer included this in her \"Desert Island Discs\" selection last week.

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