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search results for “lush”
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List songs by Song title | Performer | Year

You searched for ‘lush’, which matched 98 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
1000 Times  performed by Tahiti 80  2002
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

A perfect piece of contemporary pop music: uplifting and sunshiny, yet with the right dose of melancholia. The production is excellent, as well as the instrumentation with a very driving rhythm section, warm electric piano, guitars and horns. What makes this really stand out is the terrific string arrangement by Richard Hewson (A protegee of George Martin and quite busy arranging during the 70s) which is very floating, sweeping and lush.

from Wallpaper For The Soul, available on CD (Minty Fresh)




  texjernigan: Ooh yeah
Always You (Single Version)  performed by The Sundowners  1968
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

To me this is certainly a pinnacle of pure late 60s sunshine pop. Composed by pop genius Roger Nichols the timeless, idealistic lyrics were written by Tony Asher (who wrote most of the lyrics with Brian Wilson on Pet Sounds) not by his regular partner Paul Williams. Sunshine pop hardly gets any sunnier than on this track: great production, strings galore, Beach Boys-esque vocal harmonies, great bassline & trumpet and catchy as hell with it's uplifting chord progressions throughout. While the album version (recently included on the highly recommended "The Get Easy! Sunshine Pop Collection") is good already, the single version is just crisper, lusher, just perfect.

from Captain Nemo (Decca)
available on CD - The Get Easy! Sunshine Pop Collection (Universal)




  delicado: I have to agree. What a beautiful track! Very similar to the Small Circle of Friends record, but perhaps even better! I just have the version from the compilation; I'll try and track down the single.
  eftimihn: Delicado, you have the single version already, it's the one on my Roger Nichols compilation, i just somehow forgot to mark it as the single version. The single is clocking in at 2:18, the album version runs 3 minutes.
  delicado: Cool; I'll listen again. This track is sure to make it onto one of my comps; surely it could make a soft pop fan out of anyone!
  tinks: great album, and a horrendously overlooked group..."dear undecided" is the best beatles song that the beatles never recorded.
  Major Minor: I agree this is the best version... I think it's the same one that's on the "Sunshine days" compilation.... The one on Captain Nemo isn't awful or anything, but the orchestral intro does go on a bit...
Amoureuse  performed by Kiki Dee  1973
Recommended by john_l [profile]

This is a fabulous, lush, orchestrated ballad sung from the point of view of a woman who is totally in love ... the only unusual thing is that it is very serious and sombre, rather in opposition to the lyrical intent. Vastly superior to her forgettable mid-'70s pop hits like "I've Got The Music In Me". Oh, and a different set of lyrics by somebody named Dahlstrom enabled the wretched Helen Reddy to have another hit named "Emotion" -- same melody, but an absolute piece of rubbish. This just proves that a song's worth comes from the arrangement more than anything else ...

There are a number of CDs available which contain this song.


available on CD - Greatest Hits


Angelica  performed by Scott Walker  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A quintessential Scott track, recorded when he was at peak of his abilities. There doesn't seem to be much middle ground over Scott Walker - people seem to either love him or hate him. I don't really understand how anyone could not be charmed by Scott - sure, he's a crooner and the music backing him is often lush and is rarely 'hip'. But the voice! The words! I've never been really big on either vocalists or lyrics, but these really, really get to me. Angelica's verse is dark and melancholic, and the words speak of regret over a neglected lover. The chorus explodes with emotion, and at this point you should be able to figure out one way or the other whether you love Scott or not. n.b. I always thought this song was composed by Scott, but I was mistaken. As well as being a great songwriter, he had superb taste in other material.

from Scott, available on CD ()



At Last  performed by Etta James  1960
Recommended by Mike [profile]

Wonderful arrangement with lush string backing, great tune and sentiment, beautifully delivered, even a beautiful recording...just the blues exactly the way I like to hear it.

from At Last, available on CD (Chess)


At Once You Fall In Love  performed by Birgit Lystager  1970
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

Birgit Lystager is incredible, a Danish cross between Astrud Gilberto and Karen Carpenter with really artily written and composed pop songs. It's hard to choose just one tune from this magnificent and scarce album, but I'm often unable to get that "Eyes and hair and legs, oh what a sight/She's a flash of light in darkest night...." chorus out of my head for days at a time. To the above two chanteuses I might also add a dash of Joni Mitchell because of the conversational lyrics and melodic savoir-faire (maybe I should also mention Francoise Hardy right about here as well!). The arrangement is lush and expansive with more than a hint of Bacharach (whose "Another Night" is covered spectacularly on the same album). All this is already more than enough, but lovely Birgit also opted to go the extra mile and pose stark naked on the gatefold LP cover, tastefully exhibiting her considerable assets. (Heh heh, he said "assets.") In any event, this song, and the album it comes from, would be completely brilliant no matter what she looked like. Extremely hard to find, but WELL worth the search. I recommend Soulseek.....

from Ready To Meet You (Artist)



  criz: Yes, we are talking about a real rare album, worth searching for. Filled with unexpected chords and abosutely anti-typical for that era of Danish popular-music, or should I state it: Compromise-lessness. Compared to Bacharach's music, I myself find the pieces on this album more sophisticated - not saying that Bacharach finds the "easy way out!" "I'm Waiting For A Bus", the opening tune of the album is truly my favourite. May I also recommand the Birgit-album "Love's Labyrinth", also worth a search. Here you will find Elton John's break-through "Your Song" in a version of international class, among other fine pieces. Arrangements made in the same style as Ready To Meet You. And yes, also with a nice-looking picture on the cover. Go look for it - but not in my house!
  tempted: You guys share my thoughts on this 100%. A friend of mine from Stockholm made me a copy of Ready To Meet You just at the doorstep of summer '01. That summer I barely spent a day without enjoying that record. I'd been a passionate fan of 60's soft pop and psych (and Bacharach) but had never heard anything like Birgit Lystager. The adventurousness of the compositions and the colour of Birgit's voice are what sets this record totally apart from other stuff from that era. It's great that you guys have found this, too!
  tempted: ...but please guys, if you have until know somehow managed not to get a glimpse of the cover of Ready To Meet You then don't. It will shatter every pretty thought that you may have about the chanteuse. It's totally rude. But this is just my opinion...!
  criz: Latest news...In Denmark a 7-CD-set has just arrived, with 76 Birgit Lystager-tunes, including the two English albums - and very fair priced. Have a look at www.lystamusic.com - and be guided to the places to buy it on the internet (link-page). Just a recommendation from one who knows!
Big White Cloud  performed by John Cale  1970
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A superb song from Cale's first solo LP after leaving the Velvet Underground. Very melodic, lushly orchestrated and sophisticated, an absolutely impeccably-crafted pop song. I really love the echo effect on the whole thing, coupled with Cale's ultra-fluid viola playing. A great album from start to finish, actually.

from Vintage Violence, available on CD (Columbia)



  G400 Custom: Also check out 'Gideon's Bible' from this album. Soothingly poppy, but with a fantastic, soaring chorus - not usually one of Cale's strengths.
Black Cherry  performed by Goldfrapp  2003
Recommended by Mike [profile]

Wonderfully lush, yet dark electronica. Alison Goldfrapp's excellent voice shines on a landscape dominated by synthesizers of various vintages. When she stops singing, the synths fizz even more.

from Black Cherry, available on CD


Broken Heart  performed by Spiritualized  1998
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A different version than the one that appears on "Ladies and Gentlemen We are Floating in Space", this one features a slightly slower tempo, a full gospel choir and some lushly arranged strings and horns. Absolutely beautiful...a longer instrumental version also appears on the EP.

from Abbey Road (EP), available on CD (Arista)



  delicado: this was on my list to recommend too...but I've only heard the album version...what an astounding track! Will have to check out the EP...
Camille 2000  performed by Piero Piccioni  1970
Recommended by texjernigan [profile]

This is one of the rare italian soundtracks from the era in which I would recommend you see the movie. Camille 2000 is a stylish gem of aristocratic sex and fantasy in the late sixties. The score is has a sweeping beauty, lush sounds which match the eroticism of the film.





ces petite riens  performed by jane birkin
Recommended by daidai [profile]

lush cover of the gainsbourg standard. jane's voice fits the tone of the song, not overpowering and never really bursting out into 'song'. brilliant in it's own way.





  pleasepleaseme: Hi Daidai, Which album is the Jane Birkin Track From?
Champagne And Caviar  performed by Elegant Taste  1975
Recommended by DJJimmyBee [profile]

Lush, with strings, mid 70's sweet soul group ballad...Lyrically about the proverbial lunch box/hard hat guy on the job singin' 'bout the love he's gonna bring home to his gyrrrrl

from only on 45



Chinon / Eleanor’s Arrival  performed by John Barry  1968
Recommended by nighteye [profile]

I didn't know anything about 'The Lion In Winter' from 1968 until a few days ago. I had the TV on in the background when my attention was grabbed by one particular song in the movie. "That must be John Barry's work", I thought to my self. His use of strings and trumpets are unmisstakable -- and surely I was correct!

'Chinon / Eleanor's Arrival' has the same type of sound as Barry's later soundtracks such as 'Moonraker', 'High Road to China' and 'Out of Africa'. In fact, I first thought I was listening to a passage from 'Moonraker' when I heard this song the first time. The arrangement is brilliant, the lush rich strings, trumpet and female- male choir really makes this song stand out. It has a very majestic, grand feeling to it and it really fits the scene it is used for in the movie.

from The Lion In Winter
available on CD - The Lion In Winter OST (Silva)



Chocolate And Strawberries  performed by The Januaries  2000
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

This song really sounds pretty much like the title would suggest : Warm, lush, sweet and sensual due to the 60s retro-ish, Bacharach-esque style of the tune combined with warm, warbling electronic sounds and with a delicately sounding trumpet solo. Very nice seductive vocal delivery by singer Debbie Diamond on top of that. Yummy !

from The Januaries (Foodchain Records)



Claudie's Stockings  performed by Jerry Goldsmith  1971
Recommended by bobbyspacetroup [profile]

Goldsmith's score to this (supposedly forgettable) action film is mainly in a Lalo Schifrin/John Barry bag. This track even recalls Les Baxter's best work of the era. It begins with the main theme reminiscent of Barry's "Ipcress File." I think they even use the same instrument, the cymbalum. The main them then breaks out into this beautiful, lush orchestration topped with electric organ, a funky electric bass, and a very nice backbeat. It totally sounds like "Que Mango"-era Baxter. Anyway, this track and really the entire score are very cool in their own right.

from The Last Run
available on CD - The Last Run/The Wild Rover (Chapter III)



Cologne Cerrone Houdini  performed by Goldfrapp  2008
Recommended by komodo [profile]

Gorgeous track off Goldfrapp's latest - a lush slice of 60's tinged sexiness, all breathy vocals, soaring pop strings and hints of Serge Gainsbourgh.

A mere pastiche? More than that I think. The track certainly has strong echoes of times past, but there is also something distinctly modern in the mix too.

There is other good stuff on this album, but it took me a few listens to absorb and appreciate it - which is no bad thing.


available on CD - Seventh Tree (EMI)


Coyote  performed by Joni Mitchell  1976
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

The first track from the first of Joni’s “jazz” LPs of the late 1970’s is all about opposition and equilibrium, (as are all her songs from this period). It is both richly melodic and dense/chant-like in structure, empty and lush in arrangement, its propulsive/hypnotic groove studded with Jaco Pastorius’ weird, atonal bass speed bumps. Joni’s words/voice/performance is likewise wildly romantic and knowingly jaded simultaneously. The song is the sound of best singer/songwriter ever elegantly/effortlessly pushing the envelope.

from Hejira, available on CD (Asylum)


Death Valley  performed by The Bellyachers  2002
Recommended by TippyCanoe [profile]

an atmospheric l-o-v-e waltz.

from Heavy In My Hands (Gut GUT0002)


Desire Lines  performed by Lush  1994
Recommended by parlop [profile]

So beautiful and quietly emotional as a lot of shoegazing is. One of their longest songs... it starts out with the wailing guitar melody that's repeated throughout and accented by Miki Berenyi's calm and melancholy vocals, but the instrumental parts are really the most prominent parts of the song. The best part is at around 3:53 when the guitars go crazy. the whole thing seems very representative of sadness and getting to that point where you just can't hold it in anymore and you start weeping hardcore. it's a good song... the only one that can make me cry over and over again.

from Split (4AD)


Don’t Talk to Me About Love  performed by Altered Images  1983
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

By late 1983, when Altered Images' third and final album, Bite, was released, Altered Images were already dead in the water. The group had never made any particular headway in the US, where their blend of Siouxsie and the Banshees and the Monkees (not to mention Claire Grogan's bizarre, baby-talk hiccup of a singing voice) was just a little too weird for mainstream tastes, and in their native UK, their colorful look and bubblegummy 1982 singles "I Could Be Happy" and "See Those Eyes" had forever typecast them as a kiddie-pop band. Grogan was already branching off in her second career as an actress (she played the title role in Bill Forsyth's 1982 cult classic Gregory's Girl), and Bite seemed like a mere contractual obligation. For the most part, it sounds like it, too, but the brilliant single "Don't Talk To Me About Love," which led off side two, was a welcome surprise, and possibly the best song they ever did. Mike Chapman's production recalls his work with Blondie, while the disco-tinged electronic beat, chicken-scratch electric guitar part and rubbery, melodic bass part all sound closer to New Order's "Blue Monday" than Bananarama's "Cruel Summer." Grogan herself is in an entirely different mood than usual, with her newly-lowered singing voice (and slightly improved enunciation) displaying a rueful, almost petulant edge that suits the cranky lyrics. Only at the very end does she shoot into her usual helium-pitched unintelligibility, with an air of "See, I can still do this, I just choose not to anymore." Coupled with the most indelible chorus of the band's entire career, it all adds up to a minor masterpiece. Sadly, however, nobody wanted to know.
(AMG)

from Bite (Portrait 25413)
available on CD - Bite...Plus (Edsel)


donne-moi ton amour  performed by sylvie vartan  196?
Recommended by daidai [profile]

a french reworking of 'gimmie some loving' by the spencer davis group. lush strings and pounding horns make this song a stormer. i personally like this version better than the original. highly recommended.





Dream On Dreamer  performed by Brand New Heavies  1994
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

The Brand New Heavies were one of the significant groups of the then popular "Acid Jazz" sound in the early 90s. "Dream On Dreamer" still strikes me with it's precisely executed funk rhythm and lush production: Tight rhythm section with funky drums, guitar and bass combined with jazzy piano chords, swirling strings and a crisp brass section. On top of that some flutes, fluegelhorn, percussion and organ with a very pleasant vocal performance by N'Dea Davenport.

from Brother Sister, available on CD (FFRR)



Ears  performed by Cinerama  1998
Recommended by tinks [profile]

The first line says it all: "I've gone as far/as I can go with this crap". A classically lush pop tale of infidelity. This bitter duet featuring Emma Pollock of the Delgados has a brooding feel reminiscent of great orchestral pop of the past, especially that of Barry and Bacharach.

from Va Va Voom, available on CD (SpinART)




  delicado: I was a huge 'Wedding Present' fan, so I really should check this out, thanks.
  tinks: absolutely, cinerama's first album is excellent. quite a bit different from the wedding present, but very good in it's own way.
Elephant Woman  performed by Blonde Redhead  2004
Recommended by executiveslacks [profile]

A stunning piece of music. It's a lush swirl of clavinet, strings, and slightly distorted vocals -- easily the best song on what was my favorite album from last year.

from Misery Is A Butterfly, available on CD (4AD)


Eternal Journey  performed by Ramsey Lewis  1968
Recommended by konsu [profile]

The prolific and always entertaining Ramsey Lewis.This track is one of my favorite from his collaborations with the legendary fusionist,Charles Stepney.It has all the best elements from their work,lush orchestral textures,rock steady soul jazz,and the siren calls of Miss Minnie Riperton.It sounds like this recording was done during the same sessions as Minnie's incredible solo album,Come To My Garden.In fact,the record contains a version of "Les Fluer" that has the same istrumentation, except Ramsey plays the lead vocal melody in his typical style.

This piece is almost like some kind of lost soundtrack work,impressionistic in a spiritual way,like a cosmic gospel.Travelling the silver thread of consciousness back to the source...An Eternal Journey indeed,and a must for fans of spooky jazz and 60's soundtracks.

from Maiden Voyage (Cadet LPS 811)



  delicado: Nice track, and a great album, which is also available on a cheap CD, 'Maiden Voyage and more' (the 'more' consists of four tracks from his excellent 'Mother Nature's Son' LP, also produced by Stepney)
Fantasia tragica  performed by Stelvio Cipriani  1971
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

This is one of these sensationally sensual, wonderful instrumental tracks only the italians could pull off in late sixties/early seventies. This is the title theme to "La morte cammina con i tacchi alti/Death walks on High Heels", one of the numerous gialli (thriller movies with that special italian touch) to come out of italy in heavy doses from the late sixties up to the mid seventies. Wonderful scores have been one of the constitutive elements of these films and while the scores that Ennio Morricone did for these movies (e.g. "L'ucello dalle piume di cristallo/Bird with the crystal plumage, "Cosa avete fatto a Solange/What have they done to Solange", Una lucertola con la pelle di donna/Lizard on a womans skin" or "Le foto proibite di una signora per bene/ Forbidden fotos of a lady above suspicion") have been long released, a lot of excellent music is still locked up in the vaults of CAM, Cinevox and other italian soundtrack labels. Thanks to the hard work of the guys at DigitMovies a lot of these scores now successively get a proper, remastered release (often for the first time ever), music otherwise would have been lost in oblivion forever. Stelvio Cipriani may not be remotely as well known as Morricone (who, naturally, overshines just every other italian composer), but he was very prolific in the heyday of italian cinema, scoring an equally wide range of different genres from westerns to gialli and from romantic movies to italain police (so called "poliziotteschi") and crime movies. This title track of "La morte cammina con i tacchi alti" doesn't have to hide behind the best of themes Morricone did, in fact the orchestration does sound very Morricone itself with an uptempo-ish bossa nova beat, lush strings, wonderful harpsicord and a female voice carrying the main melody with a bitterweet tone. The voice is delivered by Nora Orlandi, one of the very few female soundtrack composers and she could easily be mixed up with Edda Dell'Orso here. Wonderful stuff, recommended for anyone who enjoys the "Mondo Morricone" comps.

from La morte cammina con i tacchi alti, available on CD



Fascination  performed by Saint Etienne  2004
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

With Saint Etienne being one of my favourite groups of the last decades (and possibly the best british pop group today) it's really hard to pick a track, it wouldn't be hard to recommend dozens of amazing tracks they did the last 15 years. That said, "Fascination" is the only new song they produced since Finisterre (2002) and it was included on their first compilation released in the US. It doesn't really matter if they embrace a more late 60s style a la Good Humor or a more electronic or dance approach to their music, due to Sarah Cracknells distinctive voice and Stanleys and Wiggs' ear for strong melodies it always sounds essentially Saint Etienne. This one is a heartfelt, bittersweet song, with an almost Hip Hop-ish basic beat, lush synths, floating harp-like electronica and a great piano melody.

from Travel Edition 1990-2005, available on CD



Fell in Love at 22  performed by Starflyer 59  1998
Recommended by avalyn [profile]

a wee lush love song that makes me turn into a puddle without fail. very dreamy and ethereal, and it has a gorgeous melody too... so if you're into that brand of guitar pop, you'll dig this.

from The Fashion Focus, available on CD



  konsu: Already recommended, only with olli's "mooncat style" lower case spelling... While you are there, observe if you will the ensuing religious commentary thread. One of the more entertaining on the site so far.
  avalyn: heh. merci for letting me know. i'll keep me nose to the ground then, and just watch from afar. (religious thread -- would it have to do with them being on Tooth on Nail or summat?)
Fire  performed by Etta James  1967
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

The unmistakeable Etta. My favourite of her 60's rock-soul belters (and one of the lesser-played ones; I was surprised when it didn't even make it onto the Etta Chess box set), recorded when she had a drug habit that would make Keith Moon blush. I ended a DJ set with this song and the reaction was phenomenal.

from the single Fire (Cadet 5620)
available on CD - Tell Mama: The Complete Muscle Shoals Sessions (Chess)



Flying Up Through The Sky  performed by The Oxfords  1969
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

An underrated, forgotten gem of perfect sunshine pop. Why this is rather little known is completely beyond me, since the song just has it all: breezy, swirling, lush strings, tight rhythm section, sweeping french horns and great male/female vocal harmonies. It's an uplifting uptempo song, pretty much in the vein of the 5th Dimensions' "Up, Up and Away".

from Flying Up Through The Sky, available on CD




  artlongjr: This is gorgeous! Great title, too. I've never heard of this band before.
  Major Minor: YES! The Oxfords have three of my favorite Sunshine Pop tracks: Flying Up through the sky, My world and Lighter than air... all great sunshine pop... however be warned much of the rest of the album seems to my ears to be fairly awkward Blues rock attempts that just don't work to my ears.... but those three tracks are Sunshine Pop perfection!
Follow Me  performed by John Barry Orchestra  1972
Recommended by MickeyPeas [profile]

This track also comes from "The Very Best Of John Barry" and is the main titles from the soundtrack of the film "Follow Me" starring Mia Farrow, Topol and Michael Jayston and directed by Carol Reed in 1971. The soundtrack has only been offically released in Japan for some reason but a version can be found on the Polydor CD "The Very Best of John Barry" which in itself is a compilation of two John Barry Polydor albums released in the 70s (one of which is the fantastic "The Concert John Barry"). The track is a lush string led theme in a minor key with the Polydor version including a mandolin leading the main melody along. The film I saw many years ago and my memory of it is very vague, but I do remember enjoying it and the music really stuck with me (being directed by Carol Reed who gave us "The Third Man" means it must have had something going for it!). The soundtrack is also available as a 500 limited edition bootleg (Dark Son Records DSRJB71-01A) and includes the vocal version heard at the end credits. Like a lot of Barry's 60s output the soundtrack consists of the main theme repeated in various different styles with the exception of one or two tracks (like "The Knack" and "The Ipcress File").

from The Very Best Of John Barry, available on CD


For Love  performed by Lush  1992
Recommended by parlop [profile]

"this is so real, it's what i feel. i look in your eyes and lose myself" this song is a great dream-poppy ditty about someone falling in love with falling in love... which is kind of cheesy in a sense... but Lush just does it so amazingly. I really like how this band really embraces their girly-ness and doesn't try to act like their trying to keep up with the boys as many female-led bands from their era were doing. the background vocals are amazingly beautiful as are the guitar solos. There's a nice, lush, romantic feeling received from listening to this song. the imagery from the aforementioned lyric is very nice as well.

from Spooky (4ad)


For Once In My Life  performed by Pia Zadora  1986
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Do not rub your eyes, you read that right, PIA ZADORA! Don't stop reading now, I promise you this is not a joke! Who knew that the squeaky little girl with the string of bad movies and the chubby cheeks had such a great voice. I didn't and was only buying the LP with the expectation of amusement at how hilariously bad this listening experience was going to be, but I am now a convert and you will be too if you ever chance to come across this rare out-of-print album. With the help of the London Philharmonic Orchestra and the lush arrangement by Robert Farnon, Ms. Zadora takes this classic Stevie Wonder track and transforms it into a beautiful torchy anthem that escalates to a triumphant finish!

from I Am What I Am (CBS/Columbia BFZ 40533)


Getting Away With It  performed by Electronic  1989
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

The amount of 80s talent was really incredible on Electronic's debut single: Bernard Sumner (New Order) doing vocals and synths, Johnny Marr (Ex-The Smiths) on guitar (pulling off a wonderful solo in the middle of the song), Neil Tennant (Pet Shop Boys) providing background vocals and Anne Dudley (Art Of Noise, arranger on ABC's legendary "Lexicon Of Love") orchestrated a wonderfully lush string arrangement. The outcome is a fluffy, elegant, slightly melancholic and almost timeless piece of british pop music (except for that dated, rather bland sounding electric piano).

from Getting Away With It (Single), available on CD




  delicado: odd - I was thinking about this song just yesterday. The B-side, 'lucky bag', was also quite good as I recall.
  Mike: Electronic could be very good indeed when they started out and I'm a big fan of a number of their songs from this period. Tennant and Marr went on to work together on the last PSB album, but I'd like to hear more collaborative work from Tennant and Sumner.
Girl In A Sportscar  performed by Alan Hawkshaw  1973
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

This track by british session musician and library composer Alan Hawkshaw is the just the perfect soundtrack to cruise along a coast highway and, as the title suggests, you might want to do this in a sportscar (if available) for maximum enjoyment. Featuring incredibly lush strings and an Alpert-esque trumpet playing the melody it's not unlike "Pacific Coast Highway" by Burt Bacharach in mood and feel.

from The Sound Gallery Vol. 1, available on CD



Groovin’ With You  performed by The Gentle People  1999
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

What a great blend of electronica and easy listening this track is. Think of it as a trippy, chillin' "A Summer Place" in outer space with gentle male/female vocals, some french whisperings and sparse, delicate electronica intertwined with the memorable, lush string melody sample of "A Summer Place".

from Simply Faboo, available on CD




  n-jeff: Great track, it made me buy the LP, which was a little disappointing, but the first four or five tracks are great, and for me this song is the opeak of them, and the whole LP.
Hein?  performed by Tom Ze
Recommended by PappaWheelie [profile]

Experimental Samba guru finds himself saturated in intricate rhythms & lush strings while bouncing his stacatto guitar plucks.

from Brazil Classics, Vol. 4: The Best of Tom Ze - Massive Hits, available on CD



Hobart Paving  performed by St Etienne  1993
Recommended by geezer [profile]

A lesson in how to make despair sound appealing and seductive. An under played female vocal relays the vision of an unhappy soul to surreal lyrics and lush orchestration and all distilled and inspired into the name of a building firm seen on the side of a van "Hobart Paving" ,a real building firm still in existence .
Reminiscent of Brian Wilson and The Zombies at their most reflective and a french horn solo that will give you a lump in the throat .

from the single Hobart Paving
available on CD - Smash The System



  delicado: Alright geezer? Yes - a really lovely track. It took me several years to be converted to the band but I'm hooked now.
  psansom: Hi - I have been seeking the Hobart Paving track, specifically as you mention, the one with the lovely french horn solo. I bought the St Etienne \"So Tough\" CD but the version of Hobart Paving on that has a different solo, a really wishy washy harmonica type event. Are you able to let me know please on what specific St Etienne CD is that best version of Hobart Paving with that french horn solo? Many thanks - Peter (email: [email protected])
How to open at will the most beautiful window  performed by Lalo Schifrin  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A beautiful, lush masterpiece with a bossa nova beat (hmm, is there a pattern to the songs I'm submitting?), 'how to open...' is one of my top tracks ever. It opens quietly with a slightly cheesy flute sound over a gentle guitar. A great wordless vocal then comes in coupled with strings. Superb. If you never listen to music like this, what I'm saying probably doesn't exactly make it sound cool. But it really is cool, very very cool indeed.

from There's a Whole Lalo Schifrin Goin' on (Dot)




  Sem Sinatra: A lot of Lalo Schifrin's music doesn't seem to adhere to a formula, and this is one of those ... I never get tired of hearing it
  Fox: This track is so quiet and peaceful. Lalo is a genious. We got in France, an electronic artist called Alex Gopher (I think he took his name from the soap opera "Love Boat", it's a sign!) that sampled the three first strings notes from that track. His album is called "You, my baby and I" but is more famous for the interpretation he made on "The child" based on a beautiful song from Billie Holliday "God bless the child". For those who want notice the fruits that have grown from the roots! Ennio Morricone made a concert recently in Paris, if Lalo could do the same soon...
Hurry to Me  performed by Roy Budd  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A superb recording of a really perfect song. Ennio Morricone's theme to the obscure movie 'metti, una cera a cena' (one night at dinner) is here performed in a classic crisp, clear version by Roy Budd. I'm not sure if I love this recording so much because it was the first version I heard, but I think it may even be better than the Morricone recording. Anyway, if you don't know this song, you will probably recognise it when you hear it. It features an infuriatingly catchy repetitive female wordless-vocal over a gentle bossa beat, with rich strings and piano. Every now and then everything goes quiet and all you hear are the vocals and a faint tremelo guitar. It is really amazingly beautiful. There is also a great italian version of this song by Milva, which sounds amazingly like the group Stereolab.

from Soldier Blue (Pye NSPL 18348)
available on CD - Sound Spectrum (Sequel)




  leonthedog: The Budd version is also available on "Rebirth of the Budd," for those (like myself) wanting an introduction to his work. The Sandpipers' version on "Canto Morricone Vol." is equally nice.
  DickieB: I just wanted to recommend ‘The Sound Spectrum’ which this is on. I’ve had a copy of years but have only just realised that it’s essential listening - if you like this sort of thing, probably drive you mad otherwise.
  delicado: Yes, it\'s a cracking compilation. It\'s so well done that if you listen to the tracks out of context (e.g. on the original LPs), they don\'t sound as thrilling as they do on this mix!
I Don’t Know How To Love Him  performed by Shirley Bassey  1971
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Thanks to robert[o] for bringing this song to my mind. This is my favorite of all of Shirley Bassey's recordings. Her powerful voice is perfectly suited for this deeply emotional track from the hit musical "Jesus Christ Superstar". Backed by lush orchestrations, Shirley hits the notes perfectly and her fabulous vibrato captures the feelings of the song.

from And I Love You So (United Artists UAS 5643)


I Never Dreamed  performed by The Cookies  1964
Recommended by john_l [profile]

A girl-group classic! It has a very interesting rhythm, which guitars, bass, piano, drum fills, and backing vocals all help to construct ... and then it changes completely within the bridge! The sound is lush, the lead vocal great and soulful. Even in its own genre this is a standout, so why it didn't become a hit is beyond me.


available on CD - The Complete Cookies (Sequel)


I Will Get On  performed by Annie  2002
Recommended by SleazyListening [profile]

You may remember Annie from her/their housey dancefloor number of a year or two back "The Greatest Hit".

Well, they've come back with this, a sublime downbeat track with a lush-yet-delicate female vocal. Instrumentally, it reminds me of a slower, swinging P-funk number, quite minimal beats but funky as all hell (in a chill kinda way).

Absolutely beautiful -hard to find but worth looking.

Originally a limited-release 7" on Norwegian label Telle, and quickly licensed by UK house label Loaded -it appears on a sampler they released late 2002.


available on CD - (vinyl) (Loaded)


If I Ever Feel Better  performed by Phoenix  2000
Recommended by geishalass [profile]

This is a gorgeous summer tune in a similar vein to "Heartbeat" by Tahiti 80. This song makes you want to dance, a bit disco, a bit easy listening and a smudge of retro. I can't recommend the entire album - it's all over the place but this single is stunning.

from United (Astralwerks)




  G400 Custom: Couldn't agree more. This is one of my favourite singles of the last five years. The album certainly is patchy, but there's a few things on there that reach similar heights, notably the other single, 'Too Young'.
It’s Impossible  performed by Aldemaro Romero And His Onda Nueva  1972
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

This is an uptempo, light bossa nova vocal interpretation of this song, very much in the vein of the classic Sergio Mendes & Brasil '66 sound. Very nicely arranged male/female vocal harmonies, superb electric harpsicord and swirling, lush strings really make this version quite outstanding and contrasting to the Perry Como version, who popularized this song a year earlier.

from Aldemaro Romero And His Onda Nueva (Columbia)
available on CD - Brisa Brasilera (CBS)



Jesusland  performed by Ben Folds  2005
Recommended by gopeeinafridge [profile]

This song starts with lush orchestration and a pretty melody, followed by Ben Folds' sweet and wonderful voice, and then the bouncy piano line kicks in and the whole effect is sublime. I really like this song, and I'm not usually much of a Ben Folds fan, even.

from Songs For Silverman (Epic 5170122)


Jos aiot niin sano  performed by Liekki  2000
Recommended by tempted [profile]

A beautiful, progressive pop song from the best album I've ever heard. This is something completely different. A lush arrangement with flutes and ravishing J. Marr -like guitars. The melody and chords in the chorus give me goosebumps. The talent and musicianship are simply stunning. This is almost as good a pick as any song from this, Liekki's first album. They come from Finland.

from Magio (Hawaii Sounds)
available on CD - See above!



Kim  performed by Bertrand Burgalat  2000
Recommended by dedismo [profile]

style: pop, downbeat. Smooth, easy, just the right amound of bossa, drums, synthesizers. Kim is just a great song all around and only 7 some minutes long. But you don't ever want it to end. Keeps your head nodding. Burgalat is the master of instrumentation as much as Sean O'Hagen is to the High Llamas. He can produce a mellow, warm, lush sound like no one else at the moment.

from The Genius of... (Bungalow bung 079)



  tempted: Ah, mon dieu! I hate comparisons in general but I must say to everyone who's just bought 10 000 Hz legend by Air: get rid of it and get hold of The Sssound of Mmmusic by Bertrand Burgalat instead. He's special.
  delicado: yeah, I must pick it up. I have 'the genius of' and I love most of it.
  autopilot: One of the best things that Burgalat has ever created, and considering his incredible body of work as producer/performer, is no mean feat! It's this tune that turned me on to the whole Tricatel sound that he singularly seems to be the master of.
Lavender Thursday  performed by Nanette Natal  196?
Recommended by konsu [profile]

A lost folk-jazz classic. I remember hearing this the first time and thinking that Portishead must have used this as a schematic for their live album.Spooky art-school-chick folkie lyrics with lush,velvety arrangements by an enigmatic Leon Salem. Jazzy and very passionate!



from Yesterday,Today,Tomorrow (Vangaurd VSD-6508 (OOP))



Liberation  performed by Pet Shop Boys  1993
Recommended by Mike [profile]

Lush electronica from the masters of the art. In the early 1990s, the Pet Shop Boys produced some of the finest electronic pop ever heard. This lyrical, optimistic song is a superb example. "Your love is liberation".

from Very, available on CD


Like Treasure  performed by Editors
Recommended by bobbykulprit [profile]

Lush




Moon Time  performed by Dudley Moore  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

The soundtrack to Bedazzled is remarkably good, one of a few much-hyped records floating around in my head that has actually lived up to my expectations. This instrumental is notable for its haunting mood and astonishingly beautiful chord sequence. The flute melody, lush strings and gentle latin percussion combine beautifully. Musically, it's one of those pieces that's so good you want to cry.

from Bedazzled OST, available on CD




  standish: Hats off to Dudley for the whole soundtrack. Sparkling, serious and intelligent music - I totally agree about the goosebump chord sequence that reappears throughout the album. Haven't found any other stuff by him that's as good - maybe "Genuine Dud" if you're into piano trio jazz.
  Mike: What a gem! Very arresting, and good enough to listen to several times in a row, each time finding things to marvel at in the harmony, texture, overall structure, melody...well, pretty much everything.
Moonchild  performed by Rick James  1985
Recommended by Nickfresh [profile]

Rick James rocks. but he also can croon. His 1985 LP, "Glow," was highly underrated, and because of this fact, many folks passed up this gem of an album. "Moonchild," with its lush bassline - dreamy keyboards - and somewhat inspired lyrics, is one of the many tracks should've made RJ a bigger star than he was. Motown really dropped the ball on not releasing this ballad as a single or promoting the album, PERIOD. Mary J. Blige brought this song back to life (without butchering it) with 1997's "Love is All We Need."

from Glow (Gordy (Motown) 6135 GL)



Mowgli  performed by Nino Nardini & Roger Roger  1971
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An unusual sounding piece from a recently reissued Library LP, the overall sound here reminds me of the lush tropical easy listening/rock hybrid which Les Baxter achieves on his superb 'Que Mango' LP from 1970. However, on this track the strings and guitar sound very slightly out of tune in a way which our man Les would never have tolerated. Still, it’s a very pleasant sound, which takes some unexpected turns (e.g. the wild guitar solo in the middle).

from Jungle Obsession, available on CD



My Life  performed by Nelson Riddle  1973
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

Ahhh. Short but sensational instrumental written and arranged by Claus Ogerman. It reminds me of a lusher, more dynamic version of the background music from The Price Is Right. Definitely a Now Sound of Today thing.

from Changing Colors
available on CD - Cafe Apres Midi: Rouge (Universal Japan)


Ninna nanna per adulti  performed by Ennio Morricone  1969
Recommended by m_thom [profile]

This track, heck, make that soundtrack, is fast becoming an all-time Morricone favourite for me (that's saying a lot-I would hate to have to count the # of soundtracks I have collected by him). It describes, quite evocatively and soulfully, exactly what it feels like to be in a dream. No synthesizers, either (well, obvious synthesizers), just celeste, strings and Edda doing this descending scale thing. And the drums and rhythm pick up and we are off to the races in some kind of cosmic heaven. It's a jangly melody that keeps spiralling higher and higher. I don't think Edda has ever hit any higher notes! The whole "Vergogna Schifosi" soundtrack is glorious, really. I know that sounds stupid, but it's so short and sweet and filled with beautiful, mysterious and lush instrumentation. Worth seeking out the CD. I found mine thru Lionel, the fello at Hillside in the UK. Thanks Lionel!

from Vergogna Schifosi



  eftimihn: Yes, wonderfully dream-like track indeed. It's also featured on the last entry in the excellent "Mondo Morricone" trilogy, "Molto Mondo Morricone". But i think Edda managed to sing even higher notes, just check out "Una spiaggia a mezzogiorno", also on the "Vergogna schifosi" soundtrack.
  m_thom: Yes, "Una spiaggia..." is indeed really good. I heard that one first on the "L'Orchestra La Voce" compilation (I found it in Paris years ago when the vinyl was quite rare). And let's not forget "Un Altro Mare", which ranks right up there (also on "L'Orchestra...", but in an edited version).
Non-Stop To Brazil  performed by Astrud Gilberto  1965
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

The wonderful arrangement never fails to impress me whenever i listen to this Gilberto song (I always thought this was an Ogermann arrangement just to find out recently it's by Don Sebesky). Anyway, the arrangement is excellent: with its incredibly lush, glissanding strings it feels like you're just about to leave a 60s jet set lounge to enter your private plane on a sunny summer day that takes off to Rio. Well, that's how it sounds to me anyway...

from The Shadow Of Your Smile, available on CD



On a clear day you can see forever  performed by The Peddlers  1968
Recommended by mojoto [profile]

I recently (March 2002) went through my Peddlers albums and made a selection of my faves, which was exactly enough to fill an 80 minute CD. I could probably recommend any song that's on it, so why "On a clear day?" Because it never failed to cheer me up, I guess, and after 30 years it still hasn't managed to induce the slightest sign of boredom in me, because I just love Roy Phillips's singing, his characteristic smokey, velvety voice, and his fabulously stuttering hammond solo, and because of the lush stringy orchestration and Trevor Morais's typical drumbreaks. The song itself is a blast in itself too, of course, I know of a version from the same period by Cleo Laine that I also really like.

from Three in a Cell (CBS S63411)



One Man in My Heart  performed by The Human League  1995
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Although far removed from the adventurous group that had long ago dabbled in minimilist, almost avant-garde electronics, all these years later the Human League continued to take its pop seriously. "One Man in My Heart" could have been a total throwaway, a gloopy little love song without a single redeeming quality, beloved by grannies and tweenies, gag-inducing for those outside those age parameters. But the band obviously gave the number time and attention, and thus ensured that it can't be so easily dismissed. Inserting a much sampled electro effect into the intro, creating an intriguingly intricate rhythm, counterpointing swelling, lush synths with a palpitating '70s-styled organ, layering on vocals and harmonies, and conjuring up a romantic milieu flushed with delicate atmospheres, the group produced a love song unlike virtually all typical pop fodder. The work, effortless as it sounds on disc, paid off, and this 1995 single swept into the U.K. Top 15.
(AMG)

from Octopus, available on CD


Papaya  performed by Stelvio Cipriani  1978
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Very well arranged, fully orchestrated bossa nova piece by the otherwise rather obscure Stelvio Cipriani. Very warm, breezy,summery feeling on this one with it's light beat, lush and silky strings, great melody played on trumpet and harpsicord. It's very resembling of the Morricone sound of the late 60s/ early 70s, in fact you could easily fit this one onto the first "Mondo Morricone" compilation it's so good.

from Bossa Galore - Lounge At Cinevox, available on CD



Pelas Sombras  performed by Arthur Verocai  1972
Recommended by mr_klenster [profile]

I'm really blown away by this song (and this entire album), it's simply a masterpiece to my ears. A possible comparison might be to Oba, La Vem Ela by Jorge Ben (who Verocai arranged for), as the guitar chords and lush, cool tones are quite similar. This song however moves with a much greater sense of urgency, and right from the start, it a spills out like a mournful plea. As a listener, the attention to detail in the arrangement and instrumentation is obvious. The song is packed densely with sound and great short soloing, all played skillfully by a large band of famous contemporaries, whom Verocai personally recruited. There's something very magical about how the vocals and instruments combine, and how the song plays out. It feels as though you are witness to a uniquely perfect and possessed performance that would be impossible to reproduce. A beautifully moving and perfect song that leaves you craving more.


available on CD - Arthur Verocai (Luv N' Haight)



Pilots  performed by Goldfrapp  2000
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

An otherworldly beautiful track. Will Gregory provides an excellent arrangement here: smooth, stylish, elegant, lush orchestration with Barry-esque cinematic soundsacapes, evoking images of a slow-motion nightflight. While there is a strong 60s influence, Gregory throws in some subtle, futuristic sounding digital artefacts giving it a slight neo-noir feel.

from Felt Mountain, available on CD



poinciana  performed by gary burton
Recommended by jazzfanwv [profile]

superb arrangement similar to the ahmed jamal version but more mellow . cue it up with your favorite glass of wine.

from departure


Presidential Suite  performed by Super Furry Animals  2001
Recommended by delicado [profile]

To be honest, I have little idea of what this song is about, but it certainly sets an intoxicating mood - rather intense and dramatic, but very cool. It's a sprawling, majestic pop song, opening gently with a faint trumpet solo and a picked guitar, and then building up nicely with strings soon after the vocals come in. The chorus is simple and catchy, and the orchestration is lush and beautiful, and the vocals are tender. There is a nice cinematic instrumental section in the middle, with some nods to Burt Bacharach. I don't get the impression this is the most coherent song ever, but there are poignant moments lyrically, such as 'You know that when we met, there were fireworks in the sky...sparkling like dragonflies', set against the moody chorus. It feels kind of nice to be really enjoying a new, 2001 song for once. The new album is really quite good. There are some duff songs, but overall I'd say it deserved better reviews than it received.

Update, ok, I've now figured out this is about the Clinton/Lewinsky furore. I guess I'm just not primarily a lyrics person...

from Rings around the World, available on CD



Punti di vista  performed by Alessandro Alessandroni  1974
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Alessandroni is probably best known for his characterstic whistling on Ennio Morricone's spaghetti soundtracks. Apart from that he was also one of the few sitar players at the time, guitar player, composer, arranger and the founder of the chorus group "I Cantori Moderni" that was featured on a lot of italian soundtracks of the 60s. In the early 70s he had the opportunity to record a "solo" album, not a score, with a big orchestra without any restrictions (which means it didn't had to fit the mood of a film). The result was "Prisma Sonoro" and it's very Morricone-esque stylewise and regarding the texture of the music with lush strings, horns, wordless vocals,harpsicords etc. Unfortunately it's scarcely available on vinyl, but the track "Punti di vista" was issued as "A spanish village" as a bonus track on the Hexacord release "Di Tresette Ce N'E' Uno Tutti Gli Altri Son Nessuno & Other Western Themes".

from Prisma Sonoro (Sermi)
available on CD - Di Tresette Ce N'E' Uno Tutti Gli Altri Son Nessuno & Other Western Themes (Hexacord)




  eftimihn: This track was also issued under yet another name, "Skyliner", on a Hexacord Alessandroni compilation called "Wizard Of Sound".
Restons Groupés  performed by Alexandre Desplat  1998
Recommended by nighteye [profile]

Does it get any more happier and sunnier than this? This is a true sunshine pop / jet-set lounge piece with a fast paced beat, lush strings, woodwinds and a catchy melody. The style reminds me of Bacherat's 'Pacific Coast Highway' and Alan Hawkshaw's 'Girl in a Sportscar'. Just imagine your self beeing on the French riviera, crusing around in your sportscar with a beautiful girl at your side and you are the king of the world as you drive into the sunset.

I can be very wrong here, but it seams that this is the title song for the movie with the same name, made in 1998. I could have sworn that this was a piece from the 1960s, the sound, the arrangement, the instruments, sound incredibly accurate and realistic. I found this song on the excellent 'Jet Set Society' compilation from our own eftimihn on this site, a brilliant pick.


available on CD - Mondo Lounge Vol.1 - Jet Set Society




  eftimihn: Excellent description, for me the track evokes similar scenes when listening to it. And you're not wrong, the track really is from 1998, but sounds absolutely late 60s/early 70s. Well, the whole compilation ain't that bad either i guess :-) If anyone is interested: http://www.artofthemix.org/FindAMix/getcontents.asp?strMixID=84985
  nighteye: This song alone almost makes me want to see the movie! I wonder if the whole soundtrack is like this? Btw. I almost got a eargasm at 2:15 minutes into the track. :)
Rock With You  performed by Michael Jackson  1979
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

While i can't say i'm an admirer of Jackson, his first two Epic records "Off The Wall" and "Thriller" are a reminder he wasn't always that pathetical popular figure he is today but a talented performer and songwriter with an array of gifted people to back him up as arrangers, songwriters and musicians. The most imported credit goes to the legendary Quincy Jones, who really gave these records an incredibly rich sounding, impeccable prduction. All instruments, funky guitars and bass, swirling disco-esque strings, horns and brass, vocal harmonies and syths, are in the right place here. The production is detailed, lush and transparent sounding, easily beating most of todays pop productions, even more so on the remastered versions of these records.

from Off The Wall, available on CD



Rose Kennedy  performed by Benjamin Biolay  2001
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

In his home country France Benjamin Biolay often is praised as the "nouveau Gainsbourg", he's a singer, songwriter, arranger, producer, orchestrator and plays various instruments. His debut album "Rose Kennedy" shows the impact "Histoire de Melody Nelson" had on him, as this is also conceived as a concept album. The track "Rose Kennedy" sounds very 60's in its instrumentation and feel, with lush, rich strings, warm Fender Rhodes keyboard, gentle and dreamlike vocals with a sparse dose of electronica and some samples thrown in.

from Rose Kennedy, available on CD




  nighteye: Can you call him the french version of Scott Walker? This song reminds me of some of Walkers songs from the '60s, and what a great song 'Rose Kennedy' is. I love the strings and Biolay's deep voice.
Rose Petals, Incense and a Kitten  performed by The Association  1968
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

This is a pretty much overlooked gem by The Association. Somewhere described as a "total pacific beach fantasy", that's exactly how the song sounds. With it's idealized lyrics, great vocal harmonies, lush strings and a very nice acoustic guitar solo you can almost feel a gentle pacific breeze, evoking a similar kind of "lost summer" mood Chad & Jeremy's "Distant Shores" provide (at least for me)...

from Birthday, available on CD




  tinks: yummy song! i love this whole lp.
Rose Petals, Incense, and a Kitten  performed by The Association  1968
Recommended by artlongjr [profile]

This song has been a favorite of mine ever since I first heard it on the album "Birthday" back in the 80's. It reminds me of walking along the beach with my girlfriend, looking at a gorgeous sunset. The song was written by Jim Yester, who also sings lead...the string arrangement, great vocal harmonies, lush melody and delicate guitar solo by Tommy Tedesco make this a sunshine pop classic. Jim Yester also contributed two other equally great tunes on this album, "Birthday Morning" and the stunning, majestic "Barefoot Gentleman". I recommend the entire album to fans of 1960s harmony pop-it is their most psychedelic record, hands down, and my favorite by them,although I still haven't heard their first LP yet, which others have recommended to me as their best.

from Birthday, available on CD



  delicado: This is a truly exquisite track. I've been listening to this album a lot recently actually.
  eftimihn: A track so great it abolutely deserves to be recommended twice, here is my entry: http://www.musicaltaste.com/filter.php?songtitle=Rose%20Petals%2C%20Incense%20and%20a%20Kitten
  artlongjr: I'm glad so many people like this song...you can't go wrong with this album, in addition to "Rose Petals", there is "Everything That Touches You", "Toymaker", "Hear in Here", and "The Time it is Today", all great tunes. I just wonder what the results would have been if the Association had recorded "MacArthur Park" like they were requested to at that time!
  Major Minor: Seconded! Birthday is my favorite Association album containing some of the finest Sunshine Pop tracks ever!
Silverbird  performed by Justin Hayward
Recommended by elfslut [profile]

Here is another lush ballad by the Moody Blues frontman. A fantastic single from the Moving Mountains cd.

from Moving Mountains


Skin Trade  performed by Duran Duran  1986
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Beneath the avant-garde lyrics and futuristic synth textures, there was always a pulsing dance music quality that drove the classic Duran Duran sound. As they progressed into the late '80s, they allowed that dance element to move up front and dominate their style. A good example of this tactic is "Skin Trade," a hit whose silky and funky style led to it being mistaken for a Prince song. The lyrics have a surprisingly direct, soul-searching feel to them as they lay out scenarios of people shortchanging their dreams to make money. These moments are followed with the dramatic proclamation that makes up the chorus: "Will someone please explain/The reasons for this strange behavior?/In exploitation's name/We must be working for the skin trade." The music lends contrast to the angry tone of the lyrics by creating a sultry, mellow melody that juxtaposes verses with a soft, hypnotic ebb and flow with an ever-ascending chorus that revs up the song's inherent drama. Duran Duran's recording is fuelled by funky but gently layered guitar textures and subtle drum work that push its groove along, plus some atmospheric synth textures on the chorus. Interestingly, Simon LeBon uses his normal tenor voice for the choruses but sings much of the verses in a lush, soulful falsetto that led many pop fans to initially mistake "Skin Trade" for a Prince ballad. The result was a perfect blend of slow-dance textures and adult social critique. It didn't do as well as "Notorious," just barely making the Top 40 in the U.S., but it got plenty of radio airplay and is fondly remembered by the group's fans as one of Duran Duran's most mature achievements of the late '80s.
(AMG)

from Notorious, available on CD


Sosta Vietata  performed by Ennio Morricone  1975
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Thanks are due to bobbyspacetroup for bringing my attention to this track. I foolishly thought I must have heard all the brilliant Morricone in existence. I was wrong. This is an incredibly perfect track, slightly reminiscent of the track 'Jet Society' by the Cordara Orchestra. It has lush strings, and a melody that is typical of Morricone - simple, obvious even, but very effective, with great instrumentation (in this case, harpsichord and later brass).

from Il Poliziotto Della Brigata Criminale
available on CD - Belmondo Morricone Verneuil (Playtime)




  eftimihn: After listening to a fairly large amount of Morricone music over the years this still stands out as one of his very best tracks for me. Oddly enough, this one never got compiled for one of the countless compilations that cover his "lounge" sound of the late 60s to the mid 70s. This should have been on "Molte Mondo Morricone", one of only a few essential tracks that were overlooked on this otherwise excellent trilogy.
  nighteye: I agree with you, this is a incredible track! The slow lush strings are perfect. I can't say I have heard much of Morricone's music, but if the rest is anything like this - he is going right in my list of favorite composers.
  eftimihn: Nighteye, you should definitely give the Mondo-Trilogy a spin. Can't really praise these comps enough, they actually got me into Morricone and are by far the best ones when it comes to sum up the maestros non-spaghetti late 60s to mid 70s work.
  nighteye: Yeah, thanks eftimihn I think I have to look at those compilations.
Sunny  performed by Oscar Peterson  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A great take on the pop classic “sunny” - taken at a fast tempo with a bouncy piano style and a hip beat. A really great track, produced by Claus Ogerman, who really was one of the coolest arrangers; perfect for me anyway - able to perfect both lush and beat oriented 'now sound' type stuff.

from Motions and Emotions (MPS 21207137)
available on CD - Snowflakes (Motor)




  konsu: A really cool record. Also with a nice version of "Ode To Billy Joe" and Jobim's "Wave".
Sweden  performed by Tito Fontana
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Don't know much about neither the artist nor the origin of this track, but it´s, despite being a bit repetitive, flawlessly arranged. Female la-la-la lyricless voice singing the melody, italian soundtrack kind of mood (misleading title that is) with lush strings and good overall arrangement.

from Easy Tempo Volume 6, available on CD



Tear It All Away  performed by The Church  1981
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Following shortly on the heels of Of Skins and Heart, "Tear It All Away" still was the picture of a developing band, but one already more comfortable with the studio, able to use subtlety and quiet drama to inform its cool, soothing yet tense take on post-punk filtered through psychedelic touches. The familiar Byrds-derived guitar and Bowie-tinged lyrical regret and sighing crop up as they so often would in the earliest days, but there's a clean, blue tinge to the whole performance, something that feels inexpressively like an eighties recording rather than a sixties throwback. Call it the space in the mix, the gentle keyboards here and there, or the substituting of folk and country roots for something more urban and faster-paced. The lovely mid-song solos show the Marty Willson-Piper/ Peter Koppes team still well within its element, and the whole composition has a rich, lush feeling to it that's most attractive.
(AMG)

from Of Skins and Heart, available on CD


The end of a love affair  performed by Julie London  1963
Recommended by delicado [profile]

'do they know, do they care, that it's only/that I'm lonely and low as can be.../And the smile on my face...isn't really a smile at all...'
This is a brilliant, devastating recording. Julie's gentle, heartfelt vocal, the lush background... I'm speechless!

from Love on the Rocks (Liberty)
available on CD - The Liberty Years (EMI)




  G400 Custom: Julie London's version of 'Fly Me To The Moon' is the best I've ever heard.
  followyourbliss: I love Julie London - I agree with G400. Her Fly Me To The Moon is on Ultralounge's Bossanovaville and it's even better than Sinatra's
  rio: great choice; the whole album is one of my favorites by julie.. how about "guess who i saw today"?
  masten: I am looking for a CD of Julie London titled "Love on the Rocks". Does anyone know if this exists?
  vanguard77: It will be released on Feb 6 by EMI-UK, coupled with "Julie." :) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B000DNVJSQ/qid%3D1134833868/202-9396444-0797459
The Last one to Know   performed by The Maisonettes  1982
Recommended by geezer [profile]

An obscure b-side of an obscure one hit wonder from 1983! but thats where you find the treasure ,by digging.A band from the tail end of the mod revival of 79 ,a sixties pastiche played on synthesisers but an overwhelming Motown influence played and written in good faith with a lush melody that would have suited the lonely spy from any movie from 1967 onwards .An eighties version of sixties soul heard 25 years later when pop almost lives on its reference points makes this sound like the first of its kind .The other side, Heartache Avenue ,is also a little nugget and worth a listen too.These boys were also City Boy of 5 7 0 5 fame from 1978.

from Heartache Avenue The best of (Readt Steady Go)
available on CD - Heartache Avenue The best of the Maisonettes



  delicado: i have this 7" but I don't remember this. I know the fleetwoods' version if it's the same track. I once played in a covers band with the drummer from the Maisonettes!
  geezer: dig it out and give it a spin its not the Fleetwoods versionbut it is good in a kind of nostalgic way from a time when i didnt have many records so the b side always got aplay by the way some brilliant recomendations Thanks
The Light of Day  performed by The Divine Comedy  2006
Recommended by Mike [profile]

In what is another of Neil Hannon's best songs, we hear his superb bittersweet lyrics emerging from an intricate and intermittently lush backing. As usual, the chords are not particularly complicated or unusual, but are extremely well-chosen.

Brilliant, in spite of the strange choice of sangria near the beginning, with its forced accent on the second syllable.

from Victory for the Comic Muse, available on CD


The Lily  performed by Shelby Flint  196?
Recommended by konsu [profile]

This song is really nice.... Shelby's voice floats pillowy-soft above a lush, paced,jazz ensemble with vibraharp chiming chords alongside a heartbeat-like rhythym section.Her voice dipping down to touch it like a feather only to be lifted by the wind again... and again... A nice "Ode to a flower" almost in a hobbit rock mode, only without the schtik........

This is one of two that she wrote herself for (as far as I know) her only LP. The rest of the record is good, mind you. But the two songs she wrote are worth the price of the record. The other one is "Moonlight", which is an almost Stu Phillips-like bossa-nova...... Very pretty.

The Adrissi brothers look like they did some arranging, alongside Perry Botkin Jr., who did the two she wrote for the record. He's well known as an arranger and had done work with Harpers Bizarre, among others.

Good if you like A&M pop with folksy touches...

Claudine maybe?

from Cast Your fate to the wind (Valiant VLM-2/5003)
available on CD - S/T (Collectors Choice CCM 273-2 USA)


This is Hardcore  performed by Pulp  1998
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I was never a Pulp fan, and I'm still not exactly a huge one. I never quite got why songs like 'Do you remember the first time' and 'Common People' were so great. I don't mind those songs now, but they never hit me in the way that 'This is Hardcore' did.

It's hard to explain why the dramatic, slightly ridiculous tone of the song appeals to me so much. The song is built around a sample from 'Bolero on the moon rocks' by Peter Thomas, the German film composer, and I think it's used very well - the sample adds texture and atmosphere, but doesn't dictate the song. I enjoy the way things develop at a slow pace, with new musical sections still being introduced late in the song. I'm very fond of all of these, but the slow, dreamy section that comes in at around 4:15 is particularly appealing, with its lush and strangely 80s sounding backgrounds.

Utter, utter genius!

from This is Hardcore, available on CD



  scrubbles: Totally agree ... I remember that the video for this song was equally fantastic - a tribute to '50s technicolor melodramas, but with an added dose of sleaze.
  olli: dammit. just rediscovered this myself and was about to rcommend it. didn't appeal to me the first time around, but then again i probably have a slightly better/ more diverse taste in music now. besides, the years have been kind to it. you're spot on about the use of the peter thomas sample, i have to agree that it's pretty tastefully done.
  olli: if you can use the word "tasteful" about this song, that is:)
Through The Sky  performed by Swing Out Sister  2001
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

When mentioning Swing Out Sister casual listeners often dismiss them as forgettable, mere 80s martini pop kitsch. Or worse, one hit wonders due to the fact that their 1987 offering Breakout is still, by far, their biggest single hit. But this is completely wrong. In fact, they're enjoying an ongoing career for almost 20 years, recording 8 studio albums. Nowadays they’re fitting a niche no other group fits in so comfortably: escapist, late 60s oriented sophisticated glamorous easy listening pop music with all the right influences that spring to mind of that era: Burt Bacharach, Jimmy Webb, John Barry, late 60s european soundtracks in general, Ennio Morricone specifically and sunshine pop. Since these guys aren't necessarily household names in mainstream pop culture today, Swing Out Sister were practically invisible from the mid 90s on in Europe and the USA, releasing their records primarily in Japan, where easy listening music still gets the biggest exposure. The Sisters’ 2001 album “Somewhere deep in the night” is their most cinematic, most elegant and visually evocative album to date, where the Bacharach/Barry/Morricone spirit is prevailing the most: 60s arrangements with Bacharach-oriented songwriting, Barry-esque lush strings, Morricone-style harpsicord, saxophone, harps, jazzy guitars, muted trumpets, fluegelhorn, wordless vocals, blending vocal songs with atmospheric instrumentals, creating an imaginary soundtrack. The whole album is a truly underrated gem.

from Somewhere Deep In The Night, available on CD




  jeanette: I have to say I am thoroughly delighted at learning of the continued career of SOS. I always had time for them, and thought Breakout was actually the weakest of the singles I heard. I particularly remember liking 'Fooled By A Smile' and 'You On My Mind'. Hearing the snippets of these songs here, I can say I'm intrigued enough to try and seek out some of this later work. It reminds me of the more produced end of Siesta records' (Spanish easy-pop label) output.
  eftimihn: You probably should try "Shapes and Patterns" from 1997 first, it's pretty much in the vein of 1989's "Kaleidoscope World" and thus a good starting point to rediscover SOS. This and the aforementioned "Somewhere Deep In The Night" (2001) as well.
Ticket to Ride  performed by Mystic Moods Orchestra  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This probably sounds like an odd thing to recommend, but the more I hear this track, the more I love it. It's as if the arranger didn't actually like the song that much - he has changed it a great deal, but for better. Mixed with the trademark Mystic Moods sound effects, it begins lush and gentle. However, after the sound effects fade away, the quality of the arrangement and recording come through, with crisp drums, a nice bass and some great piano. It has a very cool funk-orchestral feel, recalling some of Pete Moore's best work.

from English Muffins, available on CD




  delicado: Erm- when I wrote this I think I hadn\'t yet got into the Carpenters. this is basically the Carpenters\' version of ticket to ride but an orchestral version. Still very cool, but that was the origin of the arrangement!
Time Out From The World  performed by Goldfrapp  2005
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Am i the only one disappointed Goldfrapp by now almost completely abandoned their "Felt Mountain"-style and are now solely winding down on the glam-electro route? Anyway, "Time Out From The World" could easily have been on the first album, it sounds like a follow up to "Pilots": Gently flowing, nocturnal in texture, floating through a vast open space with delicate electronica and synths building up to a lush finale with an orchestral armada of strings. Despite the electronics it still has this late-60s-John-Barry feeling all over it.

from Supernature, available on CD




  robert[o]: I doubt you're "only one" who wishes Goldfrapp lingered a tad longer on the slopes of Felt Mountain, but I really feel they made the right choice. "Felt Mountain II - The Sequel" would have been really anticlimactic. The Thin White Duchess, @ his height in the 1970's, had the right impulse - once you've got a trope right; move onwards! A great song tip though, and I would give a shout towards "Let It Take You" likewise. It sounds like John Barry arranging a weird Prince song circa "Purple Rain".
  Mike: You're definitely not the only one, Efti ,and there is one more just here. To me, each successive album has contained fewer magically beautiful tracks than the last, the jump "onwards" into material I find uninteresting being accelerated hugely with the new disc. Robert, the evidence suggests that the choice appears to have been the right one when assessed on the basis of commercial success, but artistically I personally think it a shame they chose to concentrate so much on the "T-Rex with synths material". However I'll return to the new record again in a while and see if it grates less on me...
  eftimihn: Thanks for the song recommendation, Robert. Well, i wouldn't have asked for just another Felt Mountain, but maybe for a slower transition towards their new sound, for keeping that magical feel of such stellar song such as "Pilots" or "Utopia". And "Supernature" feels rather "Black Cherry II" to me, so to me they really haven't moved on from there now either. But i know it's always a topic of debate, the "sticking to their style" vs. "changing/progressing from album to album" thing basically. I mean, did anyone complain The Smiths didn't move on to, say, synth pop? Did anyone complain Kraftwerk using electronics for 30 years? I don't know, i like electronic music a lot, but with Goldfrapp i just feel it's a loss such a gifted arranger like Will Gregory with all the right influences, carrying a Morricone/Barry style into a new contemporary sound, is now so firmly into synths and electronics...
  robert[o]: You have some very valid points - I just don't agree that they apply here. A band/artist need not radically change styles release to release, but I stand by my previous statement when you get it right, move on. "Felt Mountain" got it really, really right. In retrospect, I see the shift for that group as correct move artistically. Likewise, I see "Supernature" not so much as "Black Cherry II", but as the logical fulfillment of the shift that that record, now clearly a transitional LP, suggested. I would also say that "Supernature" is a stronger record than "Black Cherry" on pretty much every front (save perhaps the lack of anything as utterly exquisite "Black Cherry's" title track - which I believe is the group's best song to date.) Now I happen to like the obvious points of reference for "Supernature" - glam rock and electro - as much as I do Italian soundtracks. (All three genres do much the same for me - create their own sonic environments, that play with the contents of my skull.) And if Goldfrapp's next LP is "Supernature II", I will complain loudly - (but I hope/suspect Allison and Will are smarter than that.) And @ the risk of fueling further controversy, many a great band/artist has run a great sound/trope/idea/etc. into the floorboards. (See: The Pixies, The Ramones, The Cocteau Twins, (my beloved) T. Rex and, sadly, The Smiths (post "The Queen is Dead") and Kraftwerk (post "Computer World").) Many of the artists I love best - Bowie, Gainsbourg, Joni Mitchell, Kate Bush, Siouxsie, Wire, The Fall, Broadcast - all remake/remodel themselves every so often. Sometimes said exercise fails - but seem, to me, to create a sense of artistic vitality within the work of said bands/artists. (And "Supernature" feels, to me, thick with that very vitality.) Also let's not fall prey to the reverse snobbery that the commercial success of this LP means it is therefore an inferior piece of work artistically. Remember so much of what this forum champions - Bacharach, Nancy and Lee, Serge, Dusty, etc. - was squarely middle of the road pop music. It makes me very, very happy that people are actually hearing/buying sexy, smart, pop music w/more that a little sense of darkness to it, rather than bland, processed, obvious crap that dominates the charts.
Tinseltown In The Rain  performed by The Blue Nile  1983
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

The Blue Nile must be one of the most enigmatic and fascinating bands of all time. Formed in Glasgow in 1981 they released just 4 albums in 23 years with 6 years between the debut "A Walk Across The Rooftops" (1983) and their sophomore effort "Hats" (1989), 7 years between this and their third album "Peace At Last" (1996) and an 8 year break until their latest record "High" was released in 2004. That sums up to a mere 33 album tracks in almost a quarter of a decade, but what they lack in quantity they make up in quality. While "Hats" is undoubtedly their masterpiece, "Tinseltown In The Rain" may be their strongest single track. Backed by a strong, funky bassline combined with jazz-like piano chords and incredibly lush strings the track shines with a wonderfully clear, sophisticated arrangement and production. Paul Buchanan delivers wonderfully emotional, heartfelt vocals to it that tinges the song in a melancholic and uplifting mood at the same time.

from A Walk Across The Rooftops, available on CD




  ronin: "Tinseltown in the Rain" brought BN to the DC airwaves, as also did "Stay." A band not based on 3 guitars, and I actually liked it! "Easter Parade," also on lp, is a very slow, detailed description of an event, loaded w/haunting atmospherics, coming to an understated climax. (To me "Hats" is their least exciting work.) "Peace at Last" and "A Walk Across.." are the most exhilarating... electronics/Linn drum machines aside, it's the magic of Paul Buchanan's incredibly moving voice. His heart's on his sleeve... a big sleeve. Emotion drips from every syllable. These get constant airplay at home.
Too Young  performed by Phoenix  2000
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

To me this is one of the best pop songs of the last 10 years or so where just everything falls perfectly into place and couldn't be bettered in any way. It's insanely catchy without ever getting annoying, it's immaculately produced with the whole instrumentation blending together perfectly (including extremely lush synths all over the place provided by Daft Punks Thomas Bangalter) and it doesn't wear off even after listening to it for ages. I was glad to see this track finally getting some exposure on the "Lost In Translation" soundtrack recently. If only they would write more songs of that caliber, but instead both albums they released to date are rather patchy.

from United, available on CD



Toxic Girl (Monte Carlo 1963 Version)  performed by Kings of Convenience  2001
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

The basic track, as heard on their album "Quiet Is The New Loud", is pretty minimal with just acoustic guitars, bass and drums. For the single release they added wonderfully lush strings arranged by David Whitaker, transforming the rather autumnal, Simon & Garfunkel-esque track into a lighter, brighter, well, more "Monte Carlo 1963" sounding song.

from Toxic Girl (CD Single)



Trippin A Hole In A Paper Heart  performed by Stone Temple Pilots  1996
Recommended by brooksyinc [profile]

It's very catchy. Along with the song Plush, if you want to get a STP song make it either one. Their both very good. I like the bass in this one as well.

from Thank You: The Best Of...


Trouble Every Day  performed by Tindersticks  2001
Recommended by bobbyspacetroup [profile]

From the film of the same name. This has to be one the darkest songs from the Tindersticks. It features the lush string arrangements that the band has been shying away from lately, and incorporates some soulful pizzicato effects. Guitarist Dickon Hinchcliff contributes vocals along with Stuart Staples. Haunting.


available on CD - Trouble Every Day (Beggar's Banquet)



Viola  performed by Sergio Mendes & Brasil ’66  1969
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

This is Mendes' take on Viola Enluarada, one of my favourite Marcos Valle tunes, and what a beautiful interpretation this one is: starting of with just electric piano it later comes into full gear with a wonderful Dave Grusin orchestral arrangement including lush strings, flutes, trumpets and some harp embellishments.

from Crystal Illusions, available on CD



Watching The World Go By  performed by Joanie Sommers & Laurindo Almeida  1965
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

The title of this Sommers/Almeida album is spot on: gentle, soft arrangements by Laurindo Almeida, simple yet effective with guitar and lush strings, embellished with flutes, harps and vibes and Joanie Sommers' vocals dominantly on top of it.

from Softly, The Brazilian Sound, available on CD



Way Form 3 (If You Ever)  performed by Elegia
Recommended by Mr Tom [profile]

A slice of unbelievably sweet, lush electronica from Elegia. An insistent, original, clattery percussive line and the most enormous heart-rattling sub underlie a sparingly used, sweeping string riff and a vocal which you can't quite make out--I think that's to the good in this song, since Elegia are no Paul Simon--except in fragments. It's sung with strength and melancholy, perfectly structured and as moving as any six minutes I know.


available on CD - Megasoft Office 98 (F Com)



We Could Be Flying  performed by The Singers Unlimited w/ Art Van Damme  1974
Recommended by Festy [profile]

This was the first version of this song that I'd heard, but have since discovered that it has been recorded many times. The song is written by Michel Colombier & Paul Williams and this version is somewhat haunting, whilst, at the same time, it's also spacey and heavenly. The lush vocals give the song its "other worldly" sound.


available on CD - Afternoon Tea Music - Clear Herb Tea (Universal Music)




  Mr Steal: I only ever heard this once - been looking for it ever since. It's truly lovely. I should say that Scott Walker does a really nice version of the song on his much-maligned (but actually pretty OK - albeit covers only) LP Any Day Now.
Whistle Down the Wind  performed by Nick Heyward  1983
Recommended by geezer [profile]

A lush orchestrated pop song that carries the sadness of autumn and the hope of spring in its stunning almost visual arrangement ,piano ,acoustic guitar and strings weave in and around a deceptively simple song whose chorus will stay with you long after music ends.Very close to perfect pop ,if such a thing exists,thoughtful ,intelligent ,sensitive and humourous .

from North of a Miracle
available on CD - North of a Miracle (Bonus)


whitchi tai to  performed by Harper’s Bizare  1968
Recommended by gaymod [profile]

since this tune entered my life, about a year ago,it has been my obssession, i've collected together about 10 other versions, including the original by Jim Pepper & a live bootleg recording from 3 years ago by Plush. Based around a red indian chant, it's trance like beauty propels the listener to the nearest faraway place, the white vocal harmony performance has never been beaten by anyone, beach boys included. Check out the Brewer and Shipley version too.

from harper's bizare 4 (warners)
available on CD - harpers bizare 4


White Car in Germany  performed by The Associates  1981
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

Post-punk "pop" at its most gorgeous/baroque/bewilderingly extreme - and the perfect introduction to the God-like genius of Alan Rankine and the late/great singer Billy Mackenzie. A four car-pile-up between Roxy Music (circa "For Your Pleasure"), Bowie (circa "Heroes"), Scott Walker's "Scott 3" and Kraftwerk's "The Man Machine", (with King Tubby and Shirley Bassey acting as ambulance attendants), this song is both empty and lush, creepy and hilarious, ice-cold and almost embarrassingly emotional. I have loved/lived/died by this song for almost two decades, and I still can't begin to tell you what its about. It's like something from outer space - like so many of the greatest pop songs are.

from The Fourth Drawer Down (Situation Two)
available on CD - From The Fourth Drawer Down (V2)


Worlds Away  performed by Strange Advance  1982
Recommended by john_l [profile]

Lush, languid progressive new wave with synthesizers, from Vancouver, that seemed to arrive out of the blue in '82. They have a number of other good songs, my personal favourites are "Just Like You" and "Alien Time".

from Worlds Away
available on CD - Worlds Away & Back (EMI)



  Colinator: You like 'Just Like You', and so do I, so here are the lyrics: Just Like You She closed her eyes and spoke to me Said 'If you could have seen the things that I have seen' I've walked the desert of lost souls Well the moon was late for me last night But the dawn and I are still alive She said 'Tell me things I want to hear Now you're safe and sound and the coast is clear' I saw her body move with her blue dress on While the sun cut through venetian blinds I was her last frontier when she said 'You're mine' Chorus We'll love until tomarrow Chained to your heart I'll follow And what you ask I'll do Today I'm just like you On razor edge you're falling You're new ice age is calling I know just what this means Today you're just like me I think I've gone too far this time And I feel that I should change my point of view Time fades like shadows in the sun While I stand outside in the pouring rain If I had the chance I'd do it all again PS-There are some beggining lyrics not shown that appear only in the remix version, available on the compilation 'Worlds Away and Back'.
you, you, you  performed by second story man  2002
Recommended by complacentbasement [profile]

gorgeous four part harmonies, slow tempo, fantastic guitar sounds and solo, the lyrics are simple, and easy to hear, listen to, learn, sing along with at shows, and relate to. kelly scullin (formerly of second story man) had a knack for writing songs in a "simple" fashion, lending themselves to further embellishment and tasteful flourish as a sort of "icing on the cake" ideal. she is one of my favorite songwriters out right now. as stated before, the songs are simple, yet their textures were always thick and lush- just imagine a big, cushy purple velvet victorian-style couch.

from pins and needles (landmark records lmr10)


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