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List songs by Song title | Performer | Year

You searched for ‘groovy’, which matched 89 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
Afro - Harping  performed by Dorothy Ashby  196?
Recommended by Arthur [profile]

Cool in the Xxtreme !
Sixties dance jazz funk instumental from harpist Dorothy. Complete with organs, flutes and bongos it is driving classy joyful music .

The album also contains the awesome "Action Line " which is weirdly atmospheric and deeply strange

from Afro - Harping ( CADET LPS809)


Berimbau  performed by Golden Boys  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An addictive and perfect track, which fuses several of my obsessions (vocal groups, Ennio Morricone-style chord sequences, Brazilian pop) with incredible power. The song is a Brazilian standard, written by Baden Powell, but this version is very different to any other I've heard. This recording opens feverishly with brass and strings, maintaining a doomy and very serious mood throughout. All the same, it manages to be extremely groovy, with rock drums and a twangy guitar accompanying the strings and harmonizing vocals. The arrangement is quite brilliant and never sounds crowded, with a stark feel produced by the different parts dropping in and out. The part of the track which to me is pure genius is the instrumental break in the middle, which sounds like it's excerpted from one of the coolest of Morricone's late 60s B-movie soundtracks - honey smooth strings, blended with some excellent drums and a cool trumpet part. The vocals are also rather gripping - always very serious sounding, and often wordlessly chanting the melody.

from Golden Boys (Odeon MOFB 3590)
available on CD - Blue Brazil Vol 3 (EMI)




  Galt: You should check out the 1971 Odeon album 'So Vou Criar Galinha': 'Chuva de verao' starts with the sound of rainfall (always a winner) and 'Com a lembrança apenas' has one of those amazing Brazilian melodies you just can't get out of your head.
Billy Liar  performed by Acker Bilk  1965
Recommended by standish [profile]

Acker's trad-jazz stuff leaves me cold, but this groovy instrumental picks up a musical theme (from the 1963 movie version of the Keith Waterhouse classic) and runs with it.

from Great Themes From Great European Movies (Columbia S(C)X 3576)


Birds And Bees  performed by Warm Sounds  1967
Recommended by BlueEyedYe-Ye [profile]

A brilliant psychedelic dance record mixing over-the-top orchestration and brilliant harmonized vocals. Plus the kind of innocent-meets-intense vocal that I find immensely attractive in pop. Pity it's not officially available on CD, but that could change...





  artlongjr: Never heard "Birds and Bees", it sounds interesting. I have a 45 by Warm Sounds that I may do a write-up on, it's called "Night Is A-Comin'/Smeta Murgaty", from 1968 on Deram Records. The reason I mention it is because it is one of the most totally "out-there" psychedelic numbers I've ever come across. Features the wonderful lyric "In my head the Grateful Dead are peering through the bars!" Unfortunately I don't think it's on CD either.
  Sadman: it's amazing! heard it from "A Walk in Alice's Garden" compilation.
Black Coffee  performed by Petula Clark  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Regular visitors to this site will know I'm partial to this song and to the era of this recording. But nothing could have prepared me for the mind-blowing grooviness this Petula Clark version from 1968. It has a 'slightly too slow to dance to' funkiness, kind of like the tastiest version of 'Watermelon man' you ever heard. The arrangement has piano, bouncy drums, peppy brass, flutes, and to top it all, some beautiful strings adding some complexity to what is basically a simple bluesy composition.

Isn't it great when you come across a track and just think 'this is the best thing ever'?

The entire CD is great - 28 of Petula's grooviest tracks. I recommend it!

from The Other Man's Grass (Is Always Greener) (Pye NSPL 18211)
available on CD - Feelin' Groovy (Sanctuary)




  FlyingDutchman1971: Ah, Ms. Pet! She is one of my favorites too. I've managed to get my hands on most of her 60's catalog, including the original album this song comes from. Thanks for mentioning her! k.d. Lang also does a beautiful rendition of this great torch song on her album "Shadowland".
Blues for Hari  performed by Dave Mackay & Vicky Hamilton  1969
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Groovy! groovy! This is one of the better versions of Tom Scott's indo-jazz swinger, and has been compiled a lot over the years. It has this great buzzy sitar played by Bill Plummer, and some sweet flute by Ira Schulman, who's presence on the album just sets the whole thing off! Dave Mackay's the blind pianist behind a lot of great west coast jazz like Don Ellis & Emil Richards, and his touch is just effortless. The two harmonize on the best tracks, like this one, sounding an awful lot like Jackie & Roy at times! Also, Vicky does a great Gismonti-inspired piece called "Moon Rider" and there's a version of Mackay's moody "Here" that's just sublime. A winner all the way, and must for J&R fans for sure.

from Dave Mackay & Vicky Hamilton (Impulse! AS 9184)


Breathalyser  performed by Cocktail Cabinet  1967
Recommended by Lonely Lottie [profile]

Super groovy percussive Hammond work-out on the mod-pop Page One label. (The B-side to Puppet On A String.) I got pretty tired of listening to wimp-out Hammond slop, but this is a dancefloor-filling boomer. Costs an arm and a leg on a 7" - anyone know if it's on a compilation?




Breve Amore  performed by Mina  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Another great dramatic pop number by Mina, this song is from the comic Alberto Sordi film, 'Fumo di Londra'. The backing track is identical to that used in the film, although Mina's version was released separately as a single. What can I say? This is an other deeply affecting dramatic pop number in which Mina belts out the words in a heartfelt manner. If these are the same words I used to describe her track 'se telefonando', then that's because this song is pretty much in the same vein, with a heavy, brass-laden pop arrangement.
ps. a version of this song exists with none other than ME singing in Italian - reverb-laden vocals belted out karaoke style over the same background track.

from the single Breve Amore
available on CD - Studio Uno 66 (BMG Italy)




  tinks: the 'fumo di londra' soundtrack was recently reissued as a 2lp set, with tons of outtakes. i really, really love it. i'd make a recommendation from it right now, but i can't remember the song title, and the record isn't with me. argh!
  delicado: The one which really bowled me over was 'Mr Dante Fontana'! Like 3 brilliant songs rolled into one!
  tinks: wouldn't you know it? that was the one i was trying to remember! i couldn't recall if that was the title or if they just said "hey, mr. dante fontana" a lot.
  jeanette: Also from that Fumo Di Londra album: that fabulous 'You Never Told Me'. A Brit-girl-sound lost classic!
  delicado: Yes; that's actually an English-language version of this same song
California Soul  performed by Marlena Shaw  1969
Recommended by maumaugroove [profile]

A very good song. Deep soul with very beautiful string arrengments

from Spice of Life (Cadet)
available on CD - Anthology (Import)


Captain of Your Ship  performed by Reparata & the Delrons  1968
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Mind-blowing late-60s girl-group sound with very odd lyrics...words really can't describe it. Suffice to say, it's a strange song. This group started out as a very typical girl group of the early 60s mold, but kept plugging away long after those groups had gone out of style. This cut from '68 is very psych-y and "groovy", as was the fashion at the time. They eventually transformed into Barry Manilow's backup singers, but please don't hold that against them.

from Best From Bell (Bell UK BLLP-111)
available on CD - Magical Musical History Tour (Mo-Banana)




  jeanette: I agree - absolutely fantastic. Even its use in the Muller yoghurt commercial couldn't harm its basic genius. The fact that it's sampled by Betty Boo in Doin' The Do is another plus point!
  shakeahand: I first heard this song on the Muller ad! - which led me to hunt out the original. Great pop!
Caravan  performed by Husky Rescue
Recommended by urbangee [profile]

Groovy, sexy, catchy--give it try.


available on CD - Ghost is not Real (Catskills UK)


Casino Royale  performed by 18th Century Corporation  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This is a rather ridiculous but super–catchy take on this theme to the 1967 spoof Bond movie. Performed by German session musicians, it ends up being a rather groovy mix, with viola d’amore, flute, female wordless vocals, harpsichord, and that other staple of the Baroque era, funky drums. It’s short and sweet and really very cool. The late sixties were cool for many reasons, but one of them is that they could accomodate TWO albums called 'Bacharach Baroque' - this one, and the other great Snuff Garrett-produced one by 'The Renaissance'. Both are superb.

from Bacharach Baroque (United Artists)




  leonthedog: I found the entire "Bacharach Baroque" album superb! The "baroque" is not overdone. The arrangements are very pleasing - better than most of the hundreds of instrumental takes on Bacharach that surfaced in the 60's and early 70's. So where can I find more by the ephemeral "18th Century Corporation"?
Chocolate  performed by Fantastic Explosion  2003
Recommended by chipple [profile]

An old Lotte chocolate commercial song turned into an infectious disco-ish club track.
The song starts with a loop of the famous "we like music, we like the disco sound" sample and with social dance instructions in Japanese, and then turns into disco with a groovy bass line and wah-wah guitar, to then apply the commercial song's vocals perfectly.

from Return of Fantastic Explosion (Transonic TRS-22001)



Chorou, Chorou  performed by João Donato  1973
Recommended by Festy [profile]

It has been argued that Joéo Donato was the first to play a bossa nova rhythm on a recording (playing the accordian on "Eu Quero Um Samba" with Os Namorados), but whilst his contemporaries from the early years of bossa, such as Gilberto and Jobim, were happy to expand on the traditional bossa sound in later years, Donato went a number of steps further. The first track "Chorou, Chorou", from a fabulous album titled "Quem é Quem" is not even the best track off the album, but the opening bars give an idea of what the whole album is about. It's playful in melody, often subtly funky in rhythm and over all, a great album. This particular album also contains my favourite interpretation of "A Rã" by Donato. I'll have to recommend more songs from this album at a later time, because it really is great.

from Quem é Quem (Odeon)
available on CD - Quem é Quem (Odeon/EMI)




  konsu: He was always revisiting his compositions. He did this one in the mid sixties as well. Also check out the mad versions on his "Bad Donato" LP he did for Blue Thumb in 70', his take on The Frog is amazing.
  Festy: I recall reading somewhere that "A Rã" was his most favourite track that he had written. I haven't heard a bad version of it by him or anyone else. The "Bad Donato" album never grabbed me either, for some reason. Lots of people love it. I think I need to have another listen to it. ;)
  ambassador: i had the pleasure of interviewing maestro donato a couple summers ago as he was celebrating his 70th birthday. I recently went through the interview again for a forthcoming article about the man and he admitted that "A Bad Donato" was his "noisiest" album. hard to disagree with that and I think that's why some people love it and others are turned off. Sometimes there is just too much going on with it and his later versions of some of these songs are much more refined and better in my opinion. regarding his regularly recording previous songs, he is a HUGE Stan Kenton fan and kenton also recorded his songs dozens of times. my two pennies.
C’mon And Join Us  performed by Alzo & Udine  1969
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

Folk? Soul? Pop? Rock? I don't know, I just know I REALLY like it. The sole album by this mysterious duo (Alzo's got a solo album too) is the very definition of groovy. This song, like the rest of the record, is hard to describe, but let's just imagine a funkier version of the 60s Bee Gees crossed with, I don't know, Donovan? No, maybe the Rascals crossed with Jose Feliciano and Joe Bataan is closer to it. It totally works, especially when they get to the falsetto chorus of "Everybody feel iiiiit......come on and clap your hands!" People, find this record: it will improve your life!

from C'mon And Join Us! (Mercury), available on CD (Mercury)



  delicado: It totally works; thanks for bringing it to my attention!
Die, All Right!  performed by The Hives  1999
Recommended by tempted [profile]

This song makes me wanna EXPLODE whenever I put it on. Think The Sonics' version of "Have Love Will Travel" with the punky rawness of The Stooges. Except that this song is even more brutally groovy! And the group dress real nicely.

from Veni, Vidi, Vicious (Burning Heart)
available on CD - See above!



diggin deeper  performed by asha puthli  197?
Recommended by hewtwit [profile]

This is a great funky version of the jj cale classic. Groovy and sexy as can be.





  tulipthe: hi, thats a great track. Its from the first LP "Asha Puthli". Have u heard the song "Space Talk" from her album ' The Devil is Loose' also a fantastic track. btw, the year for 'Right down here " is 1974 way ahead of its time,like most of her music.
Do What you Wanna  performed by Ramsey Lewis  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A nice funky instrumental with simple blues chords. Ramsey plays electric piano, and the beat is sweet, like a lot of Cadet label stuff from the late 60s. Groovy stuff, and quite easy to come by on the reissue 2 LP - 'Inside Ramsey Lewis'.

from Another Voyage (Cadet LPS-827)




  tinks: excellent track! definitely one of my favorites from ramsey's late 60s work.
Don’t Make Waves  performed by Vic Mizzy & Orchestra  1967
Recommended by singjohn [profile]

A swingin' 60's soundtrack gem for the 1967 movie of the same name. Mizzy is probably most famous for his theme for the Addam's Family (snap, snap). "Waves" just cooks from start to finish! A freakbeat bass and blaring horn section do a wild frug while swirling strings hover above. I can't sit still when I hear this song!

from Don't Make Waves (MGM MGM E-4483 )
available on CD - Vic Mizzy Suites and Themes (Percepto Records)


Easy Money  performed by King Crimson  1973
Recommended by mardikas [profile]

Has a heavy sound, ethereal and complex rhythm. Guitar, bass guitar, violin, 2 drummers. I like it because it is insanely groovy.

from Larks' Tongues in Aspic


Edge of Reality  performed by Elvis Presley  1968
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

A quasi-psychedelic throwaway from one of Elvis' later, cheesier movies. This song in particular gets a bad rap because it's presented in an ultra-campy dream sequence with groovy go-go dancers writhing and a man pouncing about in a dog costume. But I'm addicted to the song itself, which has a gorgeous arrangement with harpsichords, punchy trumpets and pillow-soft backup vocals by The Love Generation (who also sang on The Partridge Family's hits). And Elvis' vocal performance is more gutsy than you would imagine at this stage in his career. Worth seeking out!

from Live A Little, Love A Little (RCA)
available on CD - Command Performances - The Essential 60's Masters 2 (RCA)



  n-jeff: Funnily enough for a long time this was the only song I could remember from the film, which we have on vid. It was only after we got the "Oceans 11" OST that I realised "A little less conversation" was from a later party scene. So at this stage of his career, Elvis was actually making some pretty groovy music. And I love the cheesy dream sequence, too.
Eque  performed by Duke Ellington  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Taken from his exquisite Latin American Suite, this is an unusual sounding track to me. Mid-tempo, with an unrelenting bossa nova style beat, the action is shared between the piano and various horns and saxophones. I guess it's the strange discordant tones that take this track higher for me. They remind me of some chords I've heard in the more adventurous Brazilian pop music of the late 1960s - basically taking what is fundamentally a sweet sounding, warm chord, and overlaying notes that provide a darker, more forboding feel.

Adding to this, the punctuating horns and reeds give the whole thing a gently groovy feel that's reminiscent of quirky 60s soundtrack music. Really cool stuff, and I recommend the whole album.

from Latin American Suite, available on CD


Falling Free  performed by Bert Kaempfert  1971
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This is one of those odd discoveries: a track on a CD I've owned for about 8 years, but which I had somehow overlooked. I buy a lot of CDs, and I guess is one of the later tracks on a long compilation cd. Still, that's not much of an excuse, is it!

This is a slow, groovy instrumental (well, with wordless vocals) with funky drums, some fine fuzz guitar work, nice spiky brass and some very pleasing chord changes. It is strongly reminiscent of similar work of the time by people like Johnny Harris. I have a few tracks by completely different artists with a very similar feel/orchestration and closely related chord sequences. It's simultaneously very hip sounding yet quite square with the choir and strings. I love it, obviously.

from Now! (Polydor)
available on CD - Easy Loungin' (Polydor Germany)



Fine Art Of Friendship  performed by King’s X  1990
Recommended by MoeShinola [profile]

King's X is my favorite hard rock band by far. This song is on Faith Hope & Love, a very psychedelic record with a sound different from their others. They must have had the fairy dust going on at the recording sessions for this album because the sound is just beyond bluesy and groovy. The guitar just sounds...slinky! that's the word. Slink and snaky and dark. Their harmonies are a wonder to behold as usual, and the lyrics are mystical and weird.

from Faith Hope & Love (Megaforce UPC)


Fire and Rain  performed by John Gregory  1972
Recommended by delicado [profile]

In my experience John Gregory is one of the most consistently superb British arrangers of the 60s and 70s. I've never really heard anything I didn't like by him, although I understand that he was very prolific and that I've barely scratched the surface so far.

His arrangements have simultaneously a bite and a beauty that few others were able to match. Although not much of his work is available on CD, there's one excellent disc, 'Mission Impossible and other themes', that compiles most of his 'big band crime jazz' work, dating from the early 1960s to the mid 1970s. The disc isn't very excitingly packaged and can be had very cheaply, but it's full of outstanding tracks.

'Fire and Rain' is from a 70s album (I have it on a Philips sampler from the early 70s), and is a sumptuously arranged instrumental in the vein of some of the work of other British arrangers of the era, such as Johnny Harris and John Schroeder.

Of course, the song was written and originally recorded by James Taylor. His track is quite nice, but maybe it helped that I came to this version 'fresh', without having heard the original. This happens to me a lot, and Gregory's full arrangement and jazzy touches definitely elevate the track for me.

The melody is carried by a beautifully played trumpet, and later by the strings. There's a strong beat throughout, and a particularly groovy break towards the end with some great brass.

from Gregory Conducts... (Philips)



Follow me  performed by Gert Wilden & Orchestra
Recommended by pulsa [profile]

Nice groovy dancetrack with electric sounding guitars, trumpets and a rockbeat....

from The Schulmadchen Report


Foolin' Around  performed by Chris Montez  1967
Recommended by Swinging London [profile]

'We won't do anything that shouldn't be done, only the groovy things like having fun'...& there's absolutely nothing wrong with that, in my book.

This is the title track to Chris Montez's third album with A&M, produced by Herb Alpert & it's very, very sweet, but, for some reason not sickly so. That's the magic of mid-'sixties Chris Montez.

This song was almost a hit in Britain. It was released just as the pirate radio stations were about to be banned. It was 'Record Of The Week' on Radio London the week it was shut down and sadly never grabbed it's deserved foothold after that.

A lot of people are taken aback by how high Chris's voice was when he sang, but once you get over that, his music from the A&M era (1966-8) is strangely addictive. Very warm and melodic.

He did mostly cover songs, mostly 'hits of the day', but also generous helpings of classics from the 1940's & '50's. Always giving them a brand new very mid-'sixties treatment.

from Foolin' Around (A & M)



Footprints on the Moon  performed by Francis Lai  1973
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An incredibly perfect easy listening piece, this opens with an other-worldly, John-Barry-ish synth sound, and then leads into a groovy, lightly funky piano riff, with shimmering strings. Francis Lai's signature organ sound carries the tune as the song builds into a dramatic orchestral pop masterpiece. A standout track, with superb wistful, lazy, summer day feel, rather like some of the best tracks on the 'Sound Gallery' compilation of a few years ago.

from Plays the compositions of... (UA UA-LA095-F)




  scrubbles: Yow! That sound snippet alone is so cool.
  AndreasNystrom: I finally got the version by Francis Lai, and i think its better then Johnny Harris one. Splendid song!. I love the ending part of it.. cant get that part out of my head :)
  standish: I'd have to go for the Johnny Harris original over the Francis Lai version. It's colder and spookier with less obtrusive strings. "Movements" is available on CD (great sleeve - his expression suggests a combined photo shoot/visit to his proctologist) - but the mono single version (w/"Lulu's Theme") is all you need.
  leonthedog: Well, thanks to all of you I had to track down BOTH versions! Amazing what a difference an arrangement makes. I agree with scrubbles: the clip of Lai's version is the most infectious thing around!
Function at the Junction  performed by Ramsey Lewis  1966
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A very swinging, groovy Latin jazz take on Shorty Long's Motown classic finds Lewis at the height of his form. As expected, Richard Evans turns in an astounding arrangement, utilizing handclaps, studio chatter and a magnificent horn chart.

from Goin' Latin (Cadet)



funnel of love  performed by wanda jackson  1962
Recommended by olli [profile]

essential listening. psychedelic rockabilly doesn't get much better than this. check out the chanting in the background! the bells! the sitar-guitar sound! the drum pattern! wanda jackson's vocals! love it to death. can't believe i hadn't recommended it yet...


available on CD - rockin' with wanda




  jeanette: Woooh. I love Wanda and this is fairly atypical of her, but even better for it. It's in the film "But I'm A Cheerleader" too, one of the finest movies I've seen in the last few years. RuPaul is the greatest. After Wanda Jackson.
Get Up and Use Me  performed by Franz Ferdinand
Recommended by avalyn [profile]

a cover of The Fire Engines's song (the Engines then reciprocated with a cover of "Jacqueline"). knocks the socks off the original version, but i'm biased after all -- it's just incredibly sexy and groovy, and there's Alex K and Nick McC -- can't go wrong there.




Groovin With Mr. Bloe  performed by Mr. Bloe  1970
Recommended by tempted [profile]

With the likes of Buzzsaw by The Turtles and Dance With The Devil by Cozy Powell, Groovin' With Mr. Bloe is one of my favourite late 60's-early 70's groovy "novelty" pop instrumentals.
Beginning with a tight drum beat that carries on throughout the song and followed by one of the fattest basslines ever, this is a real dancefloor gem for hip crowds. Best of all is the harmonica lead by Mr. Bloe himself, a session musician by the name of Harry Pitch. Groovin'...became a surprise top ten hit but the best credit to the song is that it allegedly still enjoys club play by Richard Searling, the legendary northern soul deejay.

from Groovin' With Mr. Bloe (DJM)



  n-jeff: I take the opportunity to play it out whenever I can, it's a belter of a record, and still relatively easy to find in UK charity shops. Good choice!
Heaven Up Here  performed by Echo & the Bunnymen  1981
Recommended by Fig Alert [profile]

I'm glad that I get the opportunity to be the first to recommend a Bunnymen track, especially since their early work, which I feel is far stronger than anything after "Porcupine," is unknown, primarily Stateside, to many.

"Heaven Up Here" is a car losing it's wheels at full speed while cornering on a high mountain pass. Will Sargeant's opening chick-chick-chicking on guitar gives way to a straight bassdrop, headlong into Pete DeFreitas' insistent pounding on drums, while Ian McColluch's yelps sound utterly desperate, claustrophobic, pleading and angry simultaneously. There's a pause in the careening during the bridge, just long enough for Ian to remind us that "We're all groovy, groovy people...we're okay, we're okay," before it all plunges straight down the cliffside, banging, exploding, scraping and finally, ending succinctly.

I don't ever recall hearing back then, and rarely today, such a beautifully cacophonic melding of swirling psychedelia and assaultive punk/pop. The guitars are cascades of shimmering shards of sound. Les Pattinson's coy, but effective bassline floats beneath the furious energy DeFreitas unleashes on his drumkit. "Mac the Mouth" may be the frontman, but I think this gem is DeFreitas' piece all the way.

After 20+ years of living with this album, and this song in particular, the pump, pump, pump of the bass drum still sends shivers up my spine. Don't overlook this album as a whole either!

from Heaven Up Here (Sire/Warner 3569-2)



Hell Yes  performed by Beck  2005
Recommended by Sulku [profile]

from Guero


Home  performed by Lene Lovich  1978
Recommended by mattias [profile]

This is the first song I heard by Lene Lovich and I imidietly fell in love. Probably one of the coolest new wave-tracks from that time. Very fast and groovy beat. Lene's voice is icy and deep and really on top. A great song from a great album

from Stateless (Stiff)
available on CD - The Stiff years vol. 1


It takes a thief  performed by John Schroeder  1971
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An unusual-sounding instrumental that mixes a 3/4 time signature with a light breakbeat. The song (incorrectly cited as 'the name of the game' on the record I have) is a spooky and groovy instrumental, with a continuous organ riff, great strings, and a big beat. A different interpretation of this song by another British arranger, John Gregory, appears on the excellent German compilation 'the mad mad world of soundtracks'.

from TV Vibrations (Polydor)



I’ve Novacane Been In Love  performed by Beck vs. Doris Day  2004
Recommended by tapler [profile]

One of the more unusual mashups you'll hear. Combines the music of "Novacane" by Beck with Doris Day's vocals from the song "I've Never Been In Love Before," which is from Guys and Dolls. Pretty groovy. It works!





Jaane Jaa Dhundtah Phirrahan  performed by Kishore Kumar & Asha Bhons
Recommended by trebole [profile]

How can a Bollywood song from the sixties be soooooo groovy?





  olli: heh..thanks. iv'e had this song in my collection for a long time, and only listened to it just now because of your recommendation. love the swirly flute-like thing at 1:32 and the crazy shit going on around 2:58. (what is that, anyway? sounds they've spilled water into their organ or something) i think the details in this song makes it cooler than it ought to be. too bad most bollywood songs seem to go on for far too long.
  trebole: Hey olli, thanks for your your comment. When I read it, I remembered I had a song somewhere with that same swirly flute you liked so much used massively...And I found it! It's in a compilation called Bollywood Breaks with funky, instrumental versions from Bollywood films remastered with a modern twist. The song is called "cosmic flute" and you can download it for free here: http://stage.vitaminic.com/main/bollywood_breaks Thanks again
  olli: exellent! thanks a bunch! love the disco vibes on cosmic flute.
Julia  performed by Ramsey Lewis  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This one really has everything, to me. I'm not a connoisseur of the Beatles's 'White album', but I'm completely crazy about Ramsey Lewis's superb LP in tribute to it. The entire album has a delicious balance of crisp beats, electric piano, strings, and subtle touches of moog, played by the album's producer, Charles Stepney. I've chosen 'Julia' to recommend because I enjoy the way it changes mood - opening mournful and slow, and then getting very funky. But the entire album is really packed with winners; other highlights are a wacky and extremely funky 'back in the USSR', a superb 'Dear Prudence', and a great 'cry baby cry'.

from Mother Nature's Son (Cadet)




  vince: Is there any way to get the whole album Mother Nature's Son on CD?
  delicado: yes, there's a Japanese CD, which you could probably get via www.dustygroove.com. It really is a wonderful album (for those that like this kind of thing!)
Jungle Montuno  performed by Les Baxter  1970
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A really nice gently tropical instrumental with strings and a rock (drums/guitars) backing. I seem to be in a minority in adoring Les's 'Que Mango' album (which apparently was originally sold only in supermarkets at $1.99). I actually listen to this album as much as I listen to his classic exotic jazz LPs from the late 50s. It contains lots of great, shimmering, groovy tracks, such as 'boca chica', and the superb 'tropicando', which you can now hear almost everywhere (via a TV ad, and the aptly named 'Thievery Corporation'). Record geek part: on the vinyl version of this I have, the track 'Jungle Montuno' is shorter and sweeter - it begins one minute into the CD version of the track. I'm just mentioning this because the first minute seems to me to be inferior, and from a different song.

from Que Mango!, available on CD



Keep a Friend  performed by Dr. Dog  2006
Recommended by phil-e-most_1 [profile]

Great Baseline, Harmonies that make you smile, All around great "throwback" sound.

from We All Belong, available on CD


Kelly's Heroes  performed by Lalo Schifrin & the MGM Orchestra  1970
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Superb Mike Curb production of a Schifrin theme to an absolutely terrible WW2 action-comedy. Militaristic drumming and a very cool whistling chorus (reminiscent of Quincy Jones' theme to "The Italian Job", which came out the previous year) make this a piece of extremely groovy soundtrack work. The same album also yields a horribly sappy Hank Williams, Jr. song and the much-sampled "Burning Bridges" by the Mike Curb Congregation.

from Kelly's Heroes (MGM)
available on CD - Kelly's Heroes/The Cincinnatti Kid (Chapter III)



La Discotheque  performed by Mike Rozakis  1973
Recommended by human-cannonball [profile]

This is an absolutely impossible rarity, as it has never been released out of the original master-tape (until 1 year ago)! Part of the soundtrack of a 1973 Greek psychedelic underground film with the international title 'She Knew No Other Way' (local title: Children of the Flowers). However, this is not a mad freak-beat groovy tune (which is the case for most of the rest of the tunes in the soundtrack score); instead, it's a warm, classy, mid-tempo, funky jam with wah-wah guitar & sax solos and a very discreet piano backing. As a Greek, I was astounded by the discovery of this 70s funky gem from a totally unknown composer (Mike Rozakis). A true obscurity masterpiece, seek the proper vinyl release from Greek label 'Potfleur'.

from She Knew No Other Way OST (Potfleur)



  n-jeff: Thanks for the heads up on this LP! Its a great one, I love the way its at once stumbling and psychedlic, but at the same time maintains the great groove. Good fuzz guitar and great strings, plus that lovely wayward organ. Is there any more Mike Rozakis music lurking around?
Lluvia de Primavera/Spring Rain  performed by Bebu Silvetti  1975
Recommended by tempted [profile]

The definition of a groovy, instrumental easy listening disco tune. Makes me wanna jump on the first plane to somewhere warm and swinging. Great piano and acoustic guitar accompaniment from this Spanish lizard with a hairy face. And that girl backing choir.. there are two single versions of this that are slightly different and a full length version which is the best.






  tempted: To correct: the "full-length version" is in fact a disco mix by Salsoul stalwart Tom Moulton. So good, man... Crazy percussive middle part galore! Available as a Salsoul 12". Tell me if you bump into one!
Lolita Go Home  performed by Jane Birkin  1975
Recommended by tempted [profile]

A simple and groovy, mid-tempo easy pop tune with a nice wah-wah guitar riff and Jane B.'s trademark teen fox vocal. Everything apart from the words "Lolita go home" is sung in French. Jane B. didn't really know French and it sounds quite funny. Gainsbourg and Birkin must've had a hell of a relationship! Another classic in my dj set which again shows Gainsbourg's tremendous ability to write sunny bubblegum pop as well as arrange it deliciously.




Lookin’ At A Baby  performed by The Collage  196?
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Another awsome but forgotten vocal group from 60's California that deserves a proper re-issue!The Collage were a vocal quartet(2 boys & 2 girls)with a very cool sound.Not enough to set them apart from the pack,but very groovy out of their context.The sound is as good as re-discovered groups like Free Design, or Millenium.In fact,Curt Boettcher wrote one of the songs on the LP,as well as Roger Nichols!
This song has a kind of"love awareness" message that seems just as relevant in today's troubled world: "...Look at a baby,what do you see?What do you see,lookin' at a baby?/I can see the world the way that I would like the world to be!..."This song,as the opener on the LP,has a lot of power, with that great 8th note stomp and a big,boomy,bass line with harpsichord.The arrangements are by the great Perry Botkin Jr.,and he gives the whole record a nice swirling,magical quality.And the rest of the album is just as impressive, and should be worth the high price for any lover of the genre.

from The Collage (Smash SRS 7101/MGS 27101)



  kwan_dk: Great song! I was lucky enough to find their album for 1 (!) dollar at a garage sale and loved that great opening track...
  rum: I heard a version of this track on that excellent rhino handmade 'Hallucinations' compilation. It was by the Collectors. I'm not sure whether it was the original or not, but it's really good. I remember looking at a picture of the band and thinking that if these 'collectors' started peering over into my baby's pram, I'd be wheeling him away to the nearest bobby. Ah such was the carefree innocence of the 60s that shabby young men could spend balmy afternoons in the park staring at young children.
  maya: I love this album! I may post some recs once I've listened to it a few times more...and since the year has a question mark, it's from 1967! they've got such a soft, sweet sound, that it's hard to resist.
  artlongjr: This song and band are great, no doubt. They were Canadian and later evolved into Chilliwack (who I haven't heard). I have their first LP which contains this song, and is excellent, it's a classic of West Coast psychedelia. I had a chance to hear their second album from a friend of mine who works in a record store, it's terrific! I think I heard that the name "Collectors" was given to them by a manager or record executive...but please, overlook the dorkiness of the name! This song is getting around, I now have it on two comps.
Love, love, love  performed by Gerhard Heinz  196?
Recommended by delicado [profile]

What a winning track! Opening with Morricone-style 'boing' sounds, this is a sexy, funky pop song with interchanging female/male vocals and pounding drums.

The sub-genre of pop songs in this style, featuring flirting and laughing alongside groovy 60s backings, is under-appreciated. I can think of a few more examples: Piero Umiliani's 'Flirt a Rio', Marcos Valle's 'Ele e ela', and my previous recommendation, Ed Lincoln's 'Bon-jour'. Mina's 'Parole Parole' almost fits as well, although the interplay there is a bit more dramataic than flirtatious.

Confusingly, there's another track called "Love, L'Amour, Amore" by Gerhard Heinz, which appears on the "Melodies in Love" compilation of his work. But I gather from hearing a clip that this is a different track altogether.

from Birds Do It: Music From German Sex Education Movies of the 60's, available on CD



Maggy Mistake  performed by Cinque Ipotesi per Irma  2000
Recommended by maggy mistake [profile]

This is a typical exemple of Noir-Music. Italian Noir Music. Very groovy and jazzy.

from maggy mistake



Mahahbalipuram  performed by Stu Phillips  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An exotic, atmospheric and unique masterpiece, this is taken from the portion of surfer flick 'Follow Me' in which the surfers visit India. The tune drifts along with some sitar and spooky vocals before exploding into life with a furiously catchy and groovy segment with piano and plucked strings.

from Follow Me (soundtrack) (Universal City 73056)




  chukelley: Great taste!
  bsgkr: Thank you "delicado" for your wonderful review of "Mahabalipuram." I'm only three years late in thanking you, so please forgive me. Stu Phillips
Mecca  performed by Gene Pitney  1963
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

Middle-Eastern '60s teenpop! Wild backup singers and a groovy guitar/flute solo add a distinctive, exotic touch to this lovers-from-different-cultures song. Still, it's Gene Pitney's incredible, dramatic singing that pushes this over into the "so weird it's wonderful" arena.


available on CD - 25 All-Time Greatest Hits (Varese Vintage)



Mississippi Delta  performed by Zack Laurence Orchestra  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Another recent rediscovery from a record I bought long ago, and another song I'm not normally crazy about. But the arrangements are too outrageously groovy for me to ignore here. I'm a sucker for beaty late 60s instrumentals, and I can forgive the lack of musical variation when the production is as cool as this.

from A taste of Zack Laurence (Silverline DJSL007)



mo funky  performed by zoobombs  1999
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

I think Zoobombs are a Japanese Heavy Metal band, but this is not metal, sort of groovy rock, maybe derived from the Stone Roses. Most of the words are in (presumably) Japanese but the chorus is English, and you can just imagine the meeting with an A&R man that gave rise to it. "You're a good band, y'know, you just need to get more funky". And he may have been right, this is mo funky, percussion, driving bass, great chorus, It gradually builds up and speeds up all the way through. Until it falls apart then the dub starts with guitars all over it. Classic.

from let it Bomb, available on CD




  penelope_66: I haven't heard anything from this album, but I love the song "Flat-Top" off their 'Welcome Back, Zoobombs!' album. I'd have to say there are some catchy tunes that pop up throughout the record, but overall it's rather mediocre and strikes a bit of ambivolence within my taste. One of those things you buy for a song or two.
  n-jeff: Let it bomb is a bit of a mixed bag, too. I love mo funky and mo dub, but don't play much of the rest of it.
Mowgli  performed by Nino Nardini & Roger Roger  1971
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An unusual sounding piece from a recently reissued Library LP, the overall sound here reminds me of the lush tropical easy listening/rock hybrid which Les Baxter achieves on his superb 'Que Mango' LP from 1970. However, on this track the strings and guitar sound very slightly out of tune in a way which our man Les would never have tolerated. Still, it’s a very pleasant sound, which takes some unexpected turns (e.g. the wild guitar solo in the middle).

from Jungle Obsession, available on CD



Mr Peacock  performed by Orange Colored Sky  1969
Recommended by Ron1967-1970 [profile]

A non-lp track... I went nuts where I first played this. If you want a song that will stuck in your mind for the rest of the week, then play this one :) Very very catchy and lyrics that will put a smile on your face "Mr Peacock, Mr Peacock, no one else can be so groovy". A song full of surprising hooks, building to a harmony climax. Man oh man ... this IS music ... makes you wonder how it all turned sour in the mid 70s... when orchestras and catchy melodies were replaced by synthesizers and drum-pads ...





  moe: Based on your enthusiastic description, I tracked this song down (it wasn't an easy task!), and I can't say I was disappointed. Very groovy indeed! The best song ever written about peacocks.
  deathshadow: For those who don't know - the song is from the movie "The Love God" starring Don Knotts.
Musica del Alma  performed by TNT Boys
Recommended by Festen [profile]

Cool and groovy latin soul

from Playtime (superclasse adi 0002 cd)
available on CD - yes


Nao Tem Nada Nao  performed by Marcos Valle  1973
Recommended by pleasepleaseme [profile]

WOW! 3 fat composers ( Marcos Valle, Joao Donato & Deodato) join forces for one groovy track. Awesome keyboard work from Bertrami of Azymuth. Mesmerizing,sexy and funky.

from Previsao Do Tempo, available on CD



  n-jeff: Very pleased to say I saw Marcos Valle perform this last night. Thats a great set of names to drop "Heres a song I wrote with Eumir Deodato and Jao Donato". Very cool. And a very good song, he handled the keys himself live.
And thanks to everyone whos namedropped Valle on musical taste, as I otherwise would have missed out on a great gig!

  ambassador: this track was a reworking of Donato's tune "Batuque" from his album with Deodato, called "Joao Donato" or Donato/Deodato on the original LP. Basically, Marcos Valle liked the song and decided to add lyrics. Funnily, the way that Donato/Deodato was recorded each of these famous composers added their parts seperately starting with Donato's keyboards, then Deodato's arrangement and then marcos took that and reworked it with lyrics and azimuth as his backup band. one of my all-time favorite tracks.
Naturally Stoned  performed by Helmut Zacharias  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A nicely groovy easy listening instrumental from an album which is a very common item in British charity shops. It's nicely percussive from the start, with some nicely strummed guitar and Helmut's bizarre sounding low solo violin. It builds up to a full and funky orchestral sound - a real stomper...

from Light My Fire (Philips)



Née dans un ice-cream  performed by Michel Polnareff  1971
Recommended by tempted [profile]

A key song from the French folk rock bohemian's ambitious concept album, Polnareff's. This could have been produced by David Axelrod but wasn't. Beautiful, aching pop song with grandeur and despair. And a rhythm section that's so groovy. Another example of how great the studio orchestras sounded in France back then. What an arrangement. As hip as it gets.

from Polnareff's, available on CD




  Sem Sinatra: Totally agree ... all Polnaref's early 70s albums have killer tunes backed up by orchestrations to die for
  jezandliz1: The orchestra backing on Polnareff's is excellent and was recorded in the UK using UK session musicians who also played on some of the best groovy uk library and soundtrack music of the late 60s. Try the three instrumentals on Polnareff's - so funky they're ridiculous!
O Ganso  performed by Ed Lincoln  1968
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

Ed Lincoln is a Samba Organist and this was probably his best known song at the time, its on all his greatest hits LP's. Its a pretty wild number, with lots of silly organ tricks, a kazoo (!), some Mexican style trumpets and lah, lah vocals. It stops and starts, is groovy, is damn catchy and makes every day a sunny day. (very useful if you live in the UK).

from Ed Lincoln, available on CD



  sodapop650: Pick up the LP its on Cochise. Get the mono copy not the stereo copy. Its always on ebay.
Ode to Billy Joe  performed by Ronnie Aldrich  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A near-perfect take on this classic song. Ronnie dispenses with vocals, instead building a beautiful mood with some great strings, a relentless beat and percussive guitar. The bluesey melody is carried delicately by the piano. I'm not really getting it across here, but the track is astounding - astonishingly addictive and well recorded, building wonderfully to a warm and incredibly groovy climax.

from For Lovers Only (London/Phase 4)



Oh Happy Day  performed by Quincy Jones  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A great soul jazz track with one of the most beautifully spare and groovy introductions I've ever heard. Featuring Bernard 'pretty' Purdie on drums, Ray Brown on bass, and Quincy Jones on Fender Rhodes, it really is irresistible. The track explodes with a huge vocal choir about half way through; it ends up sounding almost like a gospel song, before slipping back into the cool funky instrumental sound from the introduction

from Walking in Space, available on CD



Pense à moi  performed by France Gall  1964
Recommended by delicado [profile]

One of a few especially jazzy and hip tracks by France Gall, I enjoy this one even more than I enjoy her more sugary pop tracks like 'Christansen'. The arrangement is quite spare - basically just France singing with a groovy small jazz combo. She also gets into some very cool scat vocals. Very, very cool.

from Ne sois pas si bête (EP) (Philips)
available on CD - Poupée de Son




  modadelic: most of france gall's 60's output from her yeh yeh bubble pop to the NOW sounds is excellent and highly recommended by moi. her compilation poupee de son is a great place to start for anyone new to the charms of france and her lovely songs. her later 70's records are not so wonderfull but then thats only my opinion, some of us may feel different. happy listening everyone.
  G400 Custom: Great song, this. I find much of her mid-60s output highly enjoyable, however throwaway they were supposed to be. 'Laisse tomber les filles' from around the same time is great too.
Pinball Number Count  performed by The Pointer Sisters  1975
Recommended by Festy [profile]

There seems to be a cut off age where people either recognise this tune immediately, or have never heard it. I'm not sure what year Sesame Street stopped using this cartoon, but my guess is somewhere between 1980 and 1985. Having said that, for those of you who do recognise the track, it may bring back images of a cartoon pinball racing around a pinball machine with you following closely behind. I never realised that this track was by The Pointer Sisters (no surprise there), nor appreciated how funky it was as a toddler (no surprise there either). This track was never released on any Sesame Street records, but a label called "Legacy" has recently released a 3CD box set of tracks from Sesame Street, mostly including the celebrities that have visited over the years (check Stevie Wonder's funky toon), but with this track on it also. This re-edited track was also released as a 12" (with two versions of "C is for Cookie" on the flip) at the same time that the box set was released.

Sesame Street expanded into many countries, some of which created their own versions ("Vila Sesamo" in Brazil, "Sesamstraat" in the Netherlands, "Iftah Ya Simsim" in Kuwait and "Rechov Sumsum" in Israel to name a few), and I'd be interested to hear comments as to whether or not Pinball Number Count was shown in these countries also.


available on CD - Songs From The Street: 35 Years of Music (Legacy)




  snafkin: Wow! What a great track! This song has always been lurking around the darkest depths of my mind, every now and again inexplicably popping out into the sunshine. Now I know what it's called and who did it. Thanx Festy!
  Katya: It's so true that this is either embedded in you as a kid, or you missed it altogether. There is a letter kicking around on the web from Walt Kramer to Matthew Jones of the Helium site in which he discusses this tune and the recording session. Fun stuff. [Walt's letter] This is from the NinjaTune.net SolidSteel subsite: "It all started a couple of years ago when Strictly Kev, part of DJ Food, desperately wanted to include the infamous 'Pinball Number Count' on the first 'Solid Steel Presents' mix CD. You know the track, it was super funky and was accompanied by the cool animation of a pinball rolling around strange landscapes. Now this track is the stuff of legends within beat digging circles, DJs have scoured record bins for decades in the hope of finding it included on old Sesame compilations but alas, it was never on any of them. "Fortunately Kev knew this and rang Sesame Workshop in New York asking for a copy of the tape. It never actually made it onto the mix CD but that's another story. What you have here is a composite of numbers 2-12 of the 'Pinball Number Count' animations (number 1 was never created). Kev has re-edited all the key elements and cleaned up the sound while he's at it. And cooing those syncopated numbers and do-dos in the background is only the Pointer Sisters on a session singing assignment." You can also SEE the old cartoon segments that the song accompanied. The entire series seems to have been included with several other number classics on the DVD "Sesame Street - The Great Numbers Game."
  Festy: My pleasure, Snafkin! Thanks Katya for the extra info and links. It was great to read up on the history of the track and also see the lengths some people were going to when trying to find the track before it became readily available. I noted DJ Food refer to another release on Ninja Tunes featuring Sesame Street toons in the near future. Yay! Also, there were quite a few references to an earlier, jazzier track titled "Jazz Numbers". I hope this pops up somewhere too.
  Eclipse80: The pinball skits are one of my fondest classic Sesame Street memories. I was born in 1980 and remember seeing this skit from about 1983 to 1986. So sad they don't use it anymore. The song brought back great memories! Thanks!
Road ode  performed by The Carpenters  1972
Recommended by delicado [profile]

The Carpenters have become like Abba were for me about 15 years ago - I can lose hours at a time just listening to their best songs with the volume up high. I actually never really dared to venture beyond my favorites from Abba's hits, but with the Carpenters I have a few LPs and recently picked up a 5-CD reader's digest set, allowing me to hear some less famous tracks by them.

This track is a bit of a revelation for me. Highly produced, early 70s. Piano-led, with strings, guitar, bass etc, and Richard providing some backing vocals. Karen's singing is beautiful as ever, although her voice sounds a bit funny - she over-pronounces words like 'goes'. The verse is plaintive and moody, while the brief chorus is funky in that glorious way tracks from the early 70s can be funky. This section is reprised with pretty sick flute playing!

In all, a really beautiful track that for me showcases all the best things the Carpenters have to offer. The band are still stigmatized by many, for reasons I'm not exactly clear on. I understand that this kind of highly produced, clean sounding music might not be for everyone, but if you've just been put off listening to them because they're not very cool, maybe give this track a try!

from A song for you (A song for you)
available on CD - Magical Memories of the Carpenters (Reader's Digest)



  FlyingDutchman1971: You are not alone in you love of the Carpenters! I am proud to say that I have every studio album produced by Richard and Karen and still play them all the time. I need to pull them off the shelves and post a few songs on here... thanks for bringing it to my attention!
  callgirlscene: I like the Carpenters too. They have a pristine flawless and happy quality that is slightly unreal. It's fascinating and yet there's a kind of tragic undercurrent in some of their music too.
Rose Rouge  performed by St. Germain  2000
Recommended by secularus [profile]

An obvious selection for a favorite track but nonetheless truly deserved. I nearly wet my pants when I heard this track and immediately went up to the dj to ask what it was. I ran out to the record shops in town looking for it and finally found a copy a week later. That was exactly one year ago, this month, March 2001. Its repetitive cymbal/drum shimmy, combined with the samples of "I want you to get together" and "put your hands together one time" begins this journey of jazzy dancefloor heaven. Then the real electricity of the tune begins and yes its otherworldly. Slowly, the house beat teases its way into the song, until it can't take it anymore and the shit hits the fan!! If you don't know it, listen to it and see if you agree.


available on CD - Tourist (Blue Note France)



Runaround Sue  performed by Dion & the Belmonts  1962
Recommended by fantasticsupremedeluxe [profile]

"I should have known it from the very start
This girl would leave me with a broken heart
Now listen people, what I'm telling you
keep away from Runaround Sue


I miss her lips and the smile on her face
touch of her hands and this girls warm embrace
so if you don't wanna cry like I do
keep away from Runaround Sue"


Half sad, half funky. A very groovy Doo Wop - track with a funny melody that makes it hard to believe that the guy is really blue...


available on CD - Dion Hits (1958-1963) (Ace)


Rye Bread  performed by Edd Kalehoff  197?
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

The name and artist may not be familiar, but I defy anyone not to smile in recognition at "Rye Bread". It was a composition that Edd Kalehoff conceived in the '70s as background music for the game show classic "The Price Is Right". It's not surprising why some of Kalehoff's cues are still in use today - they're much more imaginative and groovy than mere background music needs to be. "Rye Bread"'s peppy arrangement is fantastic (dig those drum fills!), and it never fails to put me in a goofy, "avocado pant suit" kinda mood.





samba primitivo  performed by nouvelle
Recommended by leontjr [profile]

from free bossa, available on CD


Seance on a Wet Afternoon  performed by John Barry  1964
Recommended by nighteye [profile]

I love John Barry's work, he always seam to be able to score anything with excellent results. This song is no exception, taken from the movie 'Seance on a Wet Afternoon' from 1964. Haven't seen the movie my self so I can't really say what the premise of it is, but IMDB says it's a crime-drama about a self-styled psychic in London. Groovy eh?

This song is however great, Barry relies heavily on haunting flutes and trombones to create a some what eeire feeling, and it really works. Just listening to this song makes me think of a rainy gloomy dark afternoon in London. Now if I only could get a hold of a copy of the movie...


available on CD - Ultra Lounge: Vol 16 - Mondo Hollywood



Slowly Surely (Theo Parrish Remix)  performed by Jill Scott + Theo Parrish  2001
Recommended by lil_ze [profile]

Unreal.
First of all, there's Jill Scott. With as much respect I have for her songwriting and singing abilities, I've never thought of her as a musical genius. Her music was, and stays, consistently the best soul music being released. And I'm sure that in twenty years I'll still have great fondness listening to her tunes. Yet, I don't hesitate to state that she is not a genius.

"Slowly Surely" is a great track off Jill Scott's "Who is Jill Scott: Words and Sounds, Vol. 1" album. The track, itself, is a departure from the rest of the album in composition. It is lyrically and melodically experimental, and deosn't perform as a very commercially radio friendly tune. Having said that, this is probably my favorite track on this sublime album.

Theo Parrish is a genius, however. There are no two ways about it. His music is difficult to understand. His path to fame and stardom seems as intentional as Donald Trump's efforts at staying unnoticed. He has a tendency to compose electronic dance music with beats so slow, they'd make Big Daddy Kane half step. This isn't a salmon swimming upstream. This fish is out of the water wondering why he can't fly.

The remix, in the commercial music industry, has been tainted ever since the digital age. Starting off as a tool for DJs in night clubs, a track would have been remixed to have extended beats in the beginning and the end of the track. Thus, early remixes were plainly titled, "Extended Version". However, remixes on commercial radio are merely an effort to milk the popularity of whatever is popular at the moment. These remixes usually include a guest vocalist singing, or rapping, along the original track. Another version of the remix is the time filler. When albums were made with consideration to program times for opposing sides (as well as cassette tapes), remixes were often added when material was scarce. This practice would eventually wipe out the addition of the "Reprise" track. These remix tracks were usually the chosen radio friendly track with extra production on top of the original track.

The remix for "Slowly Surely" is none of the above. It is very unique as it's own being. It pulsates to it's own heartbeat. It moves on it's own, in no predictable direction, as if Theo Parrish had little control over his artistic output. That's his genius. That's his art.

from not available, available on CD


Speak Low  performed by Harpers Bizarre  1976
Recommended by konsu [profile]

When I first came to this site I was suprised to not see any Harper's Bizarre tunes! They were a pretty fab vocal group who seem to be getting their due.

This song is from an almost unknown "lost" album from 76'. (Their heyday was the mid to late 60's, and had great success with their hit "Feelin' Groovy" in 67') And is a suprisingly jammin' version of a song from 1943 called "Speak Low" (From the film "One Touch of Venus"). I've heard other versions of this song, but nothing like this!

It starts off sounding like an O'donell Levy track, with a slinky/breezy latin step, and smooth, jazzy, compressed chords gliding across the top..... And then the vocal kicks-in, with this apropos low vocal harmony, instantly recognizable as HB, but more subdued.... They take the song and totally make it their own! Really just a superb track! Very A&M like, but with a bit more whimsy.... This record is hard to come by and needs a re-issue..... HELLO?!

HB is a must for fans of later B-boy's stuff or other Sunny pop from LA in the 60's and 70's!!!

from As Time Goes By (Forest Bay Company DS-7545-LP)



Sunshine Among Us  performed by Eternity’s Children  1968
Recommended by masayo [profile]

Ahh, how much I love Eternity's Children's sounds...
A week ago, I bought their CD where 25 songs in, as my bootleg's mix was terrible and no main vocal on Lifetime Day! Anyway, now I enjoy its perfect tracks, especially Lifetime Day, Your World and this song Sunshine Among Us. I do love Sunshine..'s catchy melody, beautifully thick effected harmonies and groovy backing rythm section including keyboards.
By the way, the liner notes says " However, each year, on the day before Thanksgiving, Bruce Blackman leads members of various Eternity's Children lineups at a benefit in Greenville, Mississippi featuring reunions of the area's best-loved acts" wow...this year also?!?!...I really wanna join the event!!

from Eternity's Children (Tower)



  luna: Bruce Blackman comes to The Krakerjacks Annual re-union. He is an invited guest, it is an event every nite-b4-thanksgiving that we;The Krackerjacks, have a big throw down in own,and Bruce's hometown. Charlie Ross is our Bassist; nothing what-so-ever to do with the children or Starbuck.We're all seasoned musicians, and have been together since 1981.
  luna: PS Now that I'm fully awake,let me state that Bruce is a very good friend of ours,as we've all been around him, or played in groups with him since the 60's. He is a musical genius. He is also a very talented writer. The best keyboard player I've ever known. The Biloxi days seem like a dream now, man, we had some fun! Just wanted to clear that up! We all love ya, Bruce.
  493440: Bruce: I don't know who you are Luna but I appreciate the nice comments. By the way, that crap in the Eternity's Children liner notes about me leading you guys in G'ville is totally bogus. I have no idea where that came from at all, certainly not from me. The whole Biloxi/Children thing is a vague memory to me as well. And by the way, the Krackerjacks kick ass!
  luna: You know me, Bruce; I'll tell you when I see you again. You've always amzed me, and I admired you from a distance. I was the one yall left behind when The Omen started at the Fiesta. See ya soon!
  cks6: Does anyone know where I can buy a copy of the Krackerjack's CD entitled "Rockin in the Delta"? Please email me at [email protected]e.edu if you have any information. Thanks!
  Andelyn: Hi everyone. Had to jump in here. I spent many of my 'growing up' years in Greenville, MS. My brother, Allen Graves, was a member of the Lancers mentioned here. I recognize a lot of the names surfacing in the posts here.
  eyazoo: Looking for a Krackerjack CD...any one would do. I love them and would especially like to get one with that "green grass" song. I grew up in Yazoo county and my step-dad actually played with them for a while....so I had a CD, but it has disappeared (I think someone took it). Anyway, It would be great if the Krackerjacks could post something on their myspace page about purchasing CDs.
Take it easy my brother Charlie  performed by Astrud Gilberto  1972
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This entertaining track opens with Astrud talking over a groovy guitar and piano background. As she starts to sing the words, the percussion becomes more pronounced, producing a nice bossa/funk hybrid. The production is very different to a lot Astrud’s work, probably because this album was from an obscure label (Perception) with contributions from different personnel than on many of her Verve recordings (e.g. Airto Moreira, Maria Toledo and Eumir Deodato).

from Astrud Gilberto Now (Perception)



Tartiflette  performed by Loungerie  2002
Recommended by loungerie [profile]

ascoltate bene il testo...very italian style!!

from Live at Blu Cammello, available on CD


Tattoo  performed by Siouxsie and the Banshees
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

The b-side of The Banshees' great/very successful cover of "Dear Prudence", and a great example of the band's perverse ability to generate b-sides on the odd afternoon off that where not only better than most bands' A-sides, but often better than most of the proper tracks from the Banshees' albums. (Thus, I can't recommend the "Downside Up" box set of the group's non-LP tracks highly enough.) This song is sleek, groovy, evil, paranoid funk, with Siouxsie at her most alluring/menacing. Tricky covered the song, thus acknowledging the impact of The Banshees on the Bristol trip-hop crew.

from Downside Up


The 59th Street Bridge Song (Feelin’ Groovy)  performed by Bobby Byrne  1970
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I recently found this LP in a stack that I had bought years ago and stored somewhere without having listened to them. It's on Evolution, which is the Command/Project 3-inspired label that was set up by former Command arranger Bobby Byrne. Many of the standard Command session players are featured, including Dick Hyman. Indeed, it's Hyman's moog playing that is the highlight of the album for me.

This song has never been a particular favorite of mine, but there's something in the mix of brassy, beaty late 60s pop and Hyman's delightful moog sounds that is very catchy in this version. The album also features a cover of 'Barbarella', along with a great 'Respect' and the best version of 'Delilah' that I've ever heard.

from Shades of Brass (Evolution 3003)



The Beat  performed by ESG  1978
Recommended by tempted [profile]

Avant-garde punk funk played by pre-teens from The Bronx. Rarely has anything this groovy been made with such few elements. A main point must be that these kids from the same family could barely play.

ESG played the closing night of Paradise Garage, NY and the opening night of Hacienda, Manchester.

from Get Away With ESG (99)
available on CD - A South Bronx Story (Mo' Wax)



The End of Life  performed by Gabor Szabo  1967
Recommended by konsu [profile]

I have to write about this song just to defend it. Because,among Szabo fans, this is considered crap...

But for a guy not known for his pop,this is a slammer! Most of this can be attributed to the singers on the session, who incidentally, are from The Love Generation. The Bahler brothers wrote this under the guise of "The California Dreamers", who also did a record the same year for Impulse with Tom Scott... And, whereas the Scott record has become a plunderphonic classic, Szabo's record goes unnoticed for it's lack of "breaks".....

This song is a great groovy stomper much in the tradition of all sunshine pop from the time period. Only with the added bonus of being performed by some of the best west coast session players of the time including Tom Scott himself, alongside Jimmy Gordon, Mike Melvoin, and Carol Kaye. And as with all Szabo's stuff,dark and sexy,with that eastern twist that he added to everything he did.... Bill Plummer added some buzzy sitar to this track too, which makes it a must for indo-pop fans!!

Did I mention the cover art?

from Wind Sky & Diamonds (Impulse! A-9151)



The Life of the Party  performed by April March  2003
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Shock modern recommendation. The entire 'Triggers' album sounds great to me, with Bertrand Burgalat's production very prominent alongside April's vocals.

'The Life of the Party' has lots of interesting electronic and vocal sounds, including some excellent synths, and a cool and rather spooky chord sequence.

Big thanks to robert[o] for turning me on to the album.

from Triggers, available on CD




  olli: i really dig bertrand burgalat. 'specially sssound of music.
The Proper Ornaments  performed by The Free Design  1967
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

So groovy. Outstanding popcraft from an outstanding group. Love the contrasts between such pretty music and Chris Dedrick's trenchant lyrics. The arrangement - heavy on the trumpets and harpsichords - is exquisite. Fetch me my paisley nehru jacket, Gweniviere.

from Kites Are Fun (Project 3)
available on CD - Raindrops (Siesta)




  tempted: Kites really are fun!
  charlesives: Blow your mind (but not completely)!
  konsu: See!!
  Delimit: defintely one of their better songs. it's one of those weird songs that every once and a while i need to listen to about 50 times in a row. great lyrics, Free Designs usual amazing vocals and some slick arrangement.
The Teeny Bopper Song  performed by Keith  1966
Recommended by Swinging London [profile]

This is the 'B' side to Keith's 1967 hit '98.6'.

It also has a groovy thing going.

Apart from these two songs I've never found anything worthwhile by Keith.

from 98.6




  konsu: There are some really great cuts by that guy! If you like 98.6 he did a sort of reprise tune called "I Ain't Gonna Lie" that ends up on his first LP. Another song I just love from that record is "Sweet Dreams (do come true)" which I highly recommend. There is a great retrospective of his stuff on CD on the UK label RPM that has both his LP's plus extras... but it can be too much sugar to swallow at once I must say.
  Swinging London: I always thought 'Aint Gonna Lie' was a real dud, personally. But I'm interested to hear about the compilation CD.
Theme From "Blow Up"  performed by Bobby Hutcherson  1967
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

This whole album is a masterpiece, but "Blow Up" is a track that should definitely be better known. It's a vibes-piano-bass-drums quartet session with Herbie on piano that inexplicably was never released at the time, only in Japan over a decade later. It was available on CD for a while in the early 90s, but has since been deleted. The track builds on a steady, understated 4/4 groove anchored heavy bass and creative drumming courtesy of Joe Chambers. Eight minutes of relaxed heaven, with messrs. Hutcherson and Hancock engaging in sublime vibes/piano dialogue over a very catchy theme. Seek out this album any way you can!

from Oblique (Blue Note)



Trip 60  performed by Montefiori Cocktail
Recommended by followyourbliss [profile]

Easy-listening Italian style with sax, synths, percussion, and a kinda groovy beat. Quirky mid-tempo from the twins.

from Raccolta No.1, available on CD



Tuareg  performed by Gal Costa  1969
Recommended by DJ Markinho [profile]

Singer Gal Costa was born in Salvador (Bahia state). Together with other musicians from Bahia: Caetano Veloso, his sister Maria Bethânia, Gilberto Gil and Tom Zé, she moved to São Paulo in 1964. There she bacame one of the most important members of de Tropicalia movement. I consider “Tuareg” as her best song.


Pois ele é sentimental
Humano, é nobre é mouro
È muçulmano
Pois ele é guerreiro
Ele é bandoleiro
Ele é justiceiro
Ele é mandingueiro
Ele é um tuareg

“Tuareg” is from an era in which the attitude towards Muslims was a lot more positive then these days. The song is written by Jorge Ben and a fruitful mixture between Brazilian and Arabic music. I love the sound of the ud (the classical Arabic lute) and ghaita (or oboe: a double reed instrument) which Ben put together with an organ, a bass and a groovy rhythm. The song reminds me of Yusef Lateefs version of “Brazil”, Ary Barbosa’s hit. This jazz musician was also exploring and fusing musical cultures, and often used instruments of the Eastern world.




Wantin’ Ain’t Gettin’  performed by The Association  1967
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

In putting together a mix CD tentatively called "Far Out Sixties", this song immediately came to mind. Anybody who knows the Association from "Windy" or "Along Comes Mary" is in for a rude awakening when hearing this tune. It's quite a funky little jam with laid back, almost scatting vocals and droning sitars. So groovy you could picture the guys wearing love beads and nehru jackets while performing it!

from Insight Out (Warner Bros.)



  konsu: Alright! I've compiled this one before too. I think the sitar/drum break at the top has been sampled more than a few times. The tune almost sounds like a tribute to Ravi Shankar & The Lovin' Spoonful simultaneously...Right On!
  deaser26: This was a song written by my father, Michael Deasy Sr - who played guitar on most of the Association's stuff. He did a couple of psychedelic albums, Friar Tuck and his Psychedelic Guitar and Tanyet - both cutting edge classics. This song was an interesting exploration for the Association guys.
What'd You Come Here For?  performed by Trina & Tamara  1999
Recommended by MMMp [profile]

This is an R&B song that I first heard on BET. It begins with the hand claps from the song "Car Wash" and then goes into a typically groovy R&B dance song. I like it so much because it is very easy to dance to and the lyrics are about a girl going to a club and wanting to get her groove on while the guy she came with just stands there "like he's much too cool." This is typically how I feel when I go out. Hand claps continue throughout the song.


available on CD - Trina & Tamara (Columbia)




  MMMp: Just thought I'd add; the comment, "this is how I typically feel when I go out," is a borrowed line. I've read the same comment about the Pizzicato Five song "Love Love Song" (A Television's Workshop e.p., TRIAD 1994, Japan) and I think I wanted to put it to use for myself, but it seems an awkard fit now. I don't typically question why anyone came out if they're not dancing, I'm just eager to dance, and that is the same feeling behind the song, a nice conflict of expectations that maybe we've all felt before. It's nice!
Wunder Gibt Es Immer Wieder  performed by Katja Ebstein  1970
Recommended by BlueEyedYe-Ye [profile]

Who would have thought something with a groovy, funky loungey feeling like this could come straight out of the Eurovision Song Contest? Not only that but the girl is cute as a button, has a fantastic blue eyed soul voice and was a bit of a cunning linguist too, this song exists in the original German, French, Italian, Spanish, English and even Japanese! This really is killer lounge funk and ought to be comped, but i'm pretty sure it isn't... Worth checking out though.


available on CD - Wunder Gibt Es Immer Wieder (Ariola Extra)


You'll Never Get to Heaven (If You Break My Heart)  performed by Cal Tjader  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This was actually never one of my favorite Bacharach songs, but I find this version delightful. It opens with a simple bassline and a groovy breakbeat, which are soon joined by delicate strings and woodwinds, and finally Cal's cool vibes. There are a lot of cool sounds in the mix; I think I can hear both a 12 string guitar and a hammond organ. Anyway, the track swings very nicely, and the groovy beat carries on relentlessly in the background. The all-Bacharach album this comes from is apparently disliked by purists, but I think it's really rather wonderful.

from Sounds Out Burt Bacharach, available on CD



Zigarillo  performed by Botho Lucas Singers und die Sound Masters  1972
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This one of the most insanely catchy and infectious tracks I've heard in a long time. Opens with a sparse bongo beat, accompanied by 'mouth percussion'. A German voice sounding slightly like aging British radio DJ Tommy Vance starts talking ('Der man, das Zigarillo'), before a catchy piano riff and jaunty easy listening chorus come in. A fun track - nice that compilations like 'pop shopping 2' come out and save things like this from total obscurity.


available on CD - Pop Shopping 2 (Crippled Dick Hot Wax!)



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