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List songs by Song title | Performer | Year

You searched for ‘funky’, which matched 156 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
"The Price Of Oil"  performed by (funkypoormusician)  2008
Recommended by funkypoormusician [profile]




(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction  performed by Otis Redding  1965
Recommended by antarctica [profile]

Much like Aretha Franklin did with his 'Respect', Otis Redding took this song and made it his own. The Stones' driving guitar becomes funky, pulsating horns. When Redding breaks it down at the end with his signature improvisational style there's no turning back. This track'll leave you going, "Mick who? The Rolling whats?"





11 Uhr 20 (Main Theme)  performed by Peter Thomas  1970
Recommended by tinks [profile]

The Teutonic funky drummer? Herr Thomas and his inimitable Sound Orchester turn in this terrific theme song to some long-lost detective show from German television. Shows that Thomas was as great a tv/film composer as Schifrin, Mancini, Barry, Budd or Jones.


available on CD - Moonflowers & Mini-Skirts (Marina)




  Swinging London: That's another WILD track recommended by 'tinks'. I'm SPINNING!
37 Hours (In The U.S.A.)  performed by Raw Stylus  1995
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Raw Stylus effortlessly combined british acid jazz elements with sophisticated, elegant Steely Dan-esque american jazz/soul/funk. In fact, like on this track, the music sounds very much like a Steely Dan backing track with warm Fender Rhodes keyboards, precise horn section, funky rhythm section and jazzy guitars. Which really isn't much of a wonder when looking at the credits of the album. Let's see: The album is impeccably produced by the Dan's producer Gary Katz, features an incredible amount of fine session musicians including Steely Dan regulars (like Bernard Purdie, Randy Brecker or Hugh McCracken), has even Donald Fagen providing synths on "37 Hours (In The U.S.A.) and they even embedded some chords of "Josie" in the song. Unfortunately, despite the talent, Raw Stylus remained a one album band to this very day, kinda sad actually...

from Pushing Against The Flow, available on CD



818 323 01  performed by Rainbow Brothers  2007
Recommended by fourthirtythree [profile]

An obscure(ish) cover of a Daft Punk song done in 1980 when Daft Punk's babysitter entered a timewarp, grew a moustache, played a guitar synth, and rapped self consciously badly. Either that or it's Air's funky alter ego with a touch of that Phoenix FM sound.




A Festa  performed by Silvio Cesar  1977
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

A smooth jazz-funk groove with Rhodes and synths playing melodically against each other. It sounds like Azymuth. In fact, it is Azymuth. Conversation, glasses clinking, a girl laughs in the distance. And Silvio's voice comes in, nice and mellow, describing what it's like to have a bunch of friends over for a get-together. Although he's one of Brazil's hippest crooners, a man who specializes in somewhat cliched yet mysteriously cool and affecting love songs, he lays back here and lets the country's greatest jazz-fusion outfit do its thing. How many romantic crooners ever do that?

from Som e Palavras (RCA)


Ah melody  performed by Serge Gainsbourg  1970
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A slow number from Gainsbourg’s classic concept album, ‘Ah melody’ opens with that picked acoustic guitar sound which the group Air have now imitated and made one of their trademark sounds. The arrangement is very bare, with the guitar accompanied by just a vocal, bass, and a spikey, funky drum beat. Later in this short track, strings and Bacharach-style horns slip in and out of the mix, before everything stops abruptly. It’s a great track from what I find otherwise to be a slightly disappointing album.

from Histoire de Melody Nelson, available on CD




  e: ah delicado....
  Mike: Wonderful track; absolutely magic, and second only to "Manon" in Gainsbourg's output for me. In the context of the album, it's a kind of foil to the more vigourous remainder, an all-too-short lyrical interlude.
  Liv: Stellar. "Histoire de Melody Nelson" is one of THE best concept records of all time..period.(But you don't have to understand French to appreciate this wicked album..) The lush string arrangements, interweaving deep&funky bass, Gainsborough's sleazily "seductive" voice:sometimes whispering,sometimes "singing"..all adds to the perfection. I will always treasure this album.. ("Ah!Melody" is one of the "lighter" songs from the album as the overall atmosphere of the album is darker,creepier:a feeling of perversion, death & doomed love..) One of his best. Pure magic.
  olli: got to love that. one of the definite highlights in his amazingly diverse output for me.
Ai Ai Ai  performed by Emma Sugimoto  1970
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

The "Softrock Drivin'" series is a terrifically compiled collection of japanese soft rock and bossa nova gems from the late 60s/early 70s. And it clearly shows that the japanese interest in all kinds of easy listening music wasn't solely influenced by contemporaries like Burt Bacharach but by native artists as well. This track by Emma Sugimoto is a delightfully light and fluffy piece of japanese pop and sounds like a blueprint for some kind of "Shibuya-Kei" track artists like Pizzicato Five could have produced. With shimmering strings, harpiscord embellishments, slightly funky electric guitar and a wonderful trumpet on top. With the clear, transparent production and fine arrangement it's a true standout track of the series.

from Softrock Drivin': Between Waves, available on CD



Ain’t Too Proud To Beg  performed by Ben Harper; The Funk Brothers  1975
Recommended by ajhorse21 [profile]

Very motown- lots of instrumentation. Simplistic but upbeat.


available on CD - Standing in the Shadows of Motown


Allora Il Treno  performed by Bruno Nicolai  1975
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

This track is simply outstanding, a showcase for Nicolai as well as for Edda Dell'Orso. It's insane how this is put together: funky rhythm section with drums, bass and acoustic guitar, loads of brass throughout, reverb-laden plucked strings interchange with sweeping, floating strings and an incredible vocal performance by Edda Dell'Orso. Hard to describe how magically this is woven together...

from Allora Il Treno
available on CD - Esay Tempo Vol.10 (Easy Tempo)



Anonymus  performed by Focus
Recommended by voshege [profile]

Today on my way out from my favourite store I saw a bargain bin that had the lp 'In and out of Focus' (by Dutch band Focus). Anonymus is the B-side opener with magic interplay between flute and guitar (Jan Akkerman vs Thijs van Leer). Dutch progjazzfunkystuff all the way. For 50cents it's a perfect buy; I never bothered to pick it up along the way during many visiys. Essential listening!




Anyway that you want me  performed by Spiritualized  1990
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A great version of this Troggs song, which formed one side of Spiritualized's first single. It's a pretty straight cover version, but with a richer production and that probably soon to become hip again early 90s dance/indie crossover sound (wah wah guitars, funky drums). Actually, it has aged pretty well, and I still can't listen to it without singing out loud when I hear it 'I've been watchin' you; and a lovin' you in vain...'

from the single Anyway that you want me (Dedicated)




  tinks: does that mean that it's almost time for a soup dragons revival?? hahahaha...
  shaka_klaus: i heard another version of this one recently in a commercial on tv. don't remember which at the moment. spiritualized gives me goosespots. i saw them in 98 at a festival and they opened up with 'cop shoot cop', what can i say? amazing. this version is also a fav of mine.
  delicado: I've been listening to the original Troggs version a lot recently. The Spiritualized version is a great cover - the same in many ways but also very different and intense. I think they're a good band; not everything they do is spot-on, but when a song by them is good, it's normally pretty mind-blowing.
  shaka_klaus: i forgot to write that the version of the song in the commercial is sung by a female singer.
  artlongjr: The female singer may have been Evie Sands, she sang the original, which was written by Chip Taylor. Chip is famous actor John Voight's brother. My favorite version of this tune is by the band American Breed from about 1967. Haven't heard the Troggs version yet.
Baila Chibiquiban  performed by Nico Gomez and His Afro Percussion Inc.  197?
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A very catchy and percussive hard funk track by Nico Gomez. Electric guitars, a chanting vocal chorus, and an enormous beat. It's wild and relentless and utterly seductive.

from Nico Gomez and His Afro Percussion Inc (Omega)



Baoba  performed by Claudia  1971
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

Great track. Entirely scat-sung, steady midtempo funky groove, with that distinctive Odeon Studios sound, and the bridge breaks into a waltz-time section, with Claudia's high-pitched vocal effects strongly reminiscent of something off the Vampyros Lesbos soundtrack album. Claudia's a big collector's favorite among Brazilian femme singers, since her stuff's consistently strong, she's got this great strong expressive voice, cool material choices including a number of exclusive Marcos Valle songs, and NONE of her early 70s Odeon sides have been issued on CD.

from Jesus Cristo (Odeon MOFB 3668)




  delicado: Yes! I picked up a Claudia compilation LP recently in Brazil. It was all great stuff, but this was really the standout track.
Beginnings  performed by Astrud Gilberto  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An amazingly warm and funky cover of the Chicago song 'feelings'. I know that doesn't sound like a recipe for success, but it really is very cool. The song degenerates into a huge jamming session at the end and carries on for 9 minutes. But it's storming stuff!

from September 17, 1969, available on CD



birds do it (german’ sex education movies’ songs of  performed by compilation
Recommended by modette [profile]

maravillosa recopilación alemana que con frase irónica por título nos presenta una veintena de canciones de diversa musicalidad.
en él encontramos desde el funky mas setenta a cargo de Heinz Kiessling (petra), el sonido hammond y groove del siempre increible Jack Arel (following you), la diversión erótica más lounge de Uschi Moser (love, jet t'aime, l'amour y sunny honey) o el beat ritmico de Gerhard Heinz (look at me), junto con otros temas que recuerdan al pop, la psicodelia, etc...
en conjunto, un disco para pedir ya, con el fantastico libreto repleto de fotos de las peliculas mencionandas que tampoco tiene desperdicio.

from birds do it, available on CD


Blame It On A Monday  performed by Anita Kerr Singers  1972
Recommended by konsu [profile]

This is my favorite these days. Totally cuts into my dull recession-based lifestyle and peppers it with some yellow Nashville sunshine....

The song bounces through a hum-drum monday with the bouyant post-it note poetics of a 9 to 5 cutie... Nothing is going right today, and the song sounds like the antedote :

" ...Gotta' go to work, really gotta per-cu-late... Try to catch the fish that's jumping off your
dish-or-plate...." To "Don't ask for help... from anybody... cause they'll only turn you down-ooo...
na-na-na-na-na, ooooooooooh na-na-na-na-na, Blame it on a mondaaaaayy..... YEAH! ....

The session smokes and the players are astounding! Huge southern brass-blasts counterpoint the bouncing hoe-down groove... It must have been a hoot to play because the track clocks in at over four minutes, but you hardly notice for all the fun....Funky in a very music-city way. Almost Nancy & Lee like, with a little Free Design-like harmonic optimisim in the vocal arrangements, which Anita's well known for.

I recommend the whole record though.It plays straight through, and you play it again & again. A lost gem.

from Grow To Know Me (AMPEX A-10136)



Blowfly’s Rap  performed by Blowfly  1980
Recommended by JoNZ [profile]

From the godfather of filthfy rap comes this FUNKY,slamming tune. It tells the story of trucker with a CB radio(timewarp) who is, in his mind anyway, the baddest bastard around. On his journey he picks up a transvestite hooker, masterbates, has a fight with the Grand Dragon of the klu klux klan, claims to be related to Mohammed Ali, and drinks a bottle of wine. The killer rhyme is "We got to the room, pulled off her clothes, and the funk from her p***y started f**king with my nose." If you don't mind that sort of talk, you'll love this cut.

from X-Rated Blofly's Party (Weird World lp-2034)



  delicado: I don't have this record, but must confess that I find Blowfly strangely compelling. The mix of toilet humour, offensiveness, and authentic funk sounds is very potent indeed.
Blowin' Bubbles  performed by Call and Response  2001
Recommended by ronaldo [profile]

Just a perfect, perfect pop song. Makes you wanna dance and groove along, but at the same time it's soo unbelievably sweet and a just a liitle melancholy. It starts with a drum beat, and then there's this bass-and-drums groove for a few seconds. Then a little sweet electric piano line enters, just before the voice begins singing the melody: "I'm drinking stars up in the sky, you know where you are / I'm driving cars around your house, it seems so fun". When it's time for the chorus ("So listen to my bubble go pop / I'm coming in, I'm coming over the top"), the main voice sings over a backing vocal doing an "ooh" harmony, and then there's absolute genius backing vocal, where the word "pop" becomes "papapapa". After that, a little guitar riff/solo, along with a very cool electric piano line. Then it just repeats everything all over again one more time, for infinite happiness. The time for a middle break has arrived. A new funky bass groove with lots of different "papapa"s harmonizing together. Now, go back to the first bass-and-drums groove, with a jazzy, relaxed guitar solo, and then it's just grooves and grooves and heavenly harmonies, "Blowin' bubbles".




Blues Party  performed by Gert Wilden
Recommended by GeorgyGirl [profile]

From a career supplying funky/hunky, cheezy/sleazy grooves to a series of late Sixties/early Seventies German soft-core flicks, Gert recently apeared on "Eurotrash"...perfect music for when you're feeling a little "saucy", in the European parlance.

from Schulmaedchen Report, available on CD



Born Under a Bad Sign  performed by Booker T. & the MG's  1969
Recommended by tinks [profile]

An amazing, slow, funky cover of William Bell's classic electric blues. The whole thing serves as a great reminder of how instrumental the rhythm section of Al Jackson, Jr. & Duck Dunn was to "the Memphis Sound".

from Soul Limbo, available on CD



Bossa Rock Blues #1  performed by Manfredo Fest  1972
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Really suprised to see this one in a thrift store recently. I was taken back by the bad cover photo of some blue cheese in tin foil with saltines and a bottle of wine.(?) Anyway, the music is fantastic, much in the vein of Jobim's CTI work from the same period. This piece grooves almost more in a Deodato way, with a nice funky nocturnal jazz bite. Nice to see the gap close on the years between his Bossa Rio stint and the records he did for Discovery.

Strangely enough it was recorded in Minneapolis MN while he was living there. On the RCA subsidary Daybreak.

from After Hours (Daybreak DR 2012)


breakdown suite  performed by serge gainsbourg
Recommended by olli [profile]

a couple of great spy jazz tracks from the movie "si j'etais un espion" by my favourite old pervert..funky guitar/strings combination followed by a morricone-like piano part. (this entire soundtrack seems to be quite inspired by some of morricone´s work...) there's a really nice repetetive bass line that pops up a couple of times during the track.


available on CD - le cinéma de serge gainsbourg, vol 1



Breakfast  performed by Mary Prankster
Recommended by Reina [profile]

Funny, fast, w/ weird stream of conciousness lyrics. Mary Prankster (a funky mix of punk, rock, and rockabilly) is in-your-face, vulgar, clever, and original. Also great live--check out MaryPrankster.com for tour dates.

"I'm really stoned, and I think mom put acid in my orange juice again"




Bring the Boys Home  performed by Freda Payne  1971
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

An antiwar anthem that has even more relevance today than back then. Payne often sounded too girlish to pull off the sophisticated soul Invictus produced for her, but here she's fully in command. Maybe it's the gospel-esque fervor of the arrangement and the backing singers, but this is an awfully passionate song - to a heart-breaking degree. The highlight of Freda's funky, underrated album Contact.

from Contact (Invictus)
available on CD - Unhooked Generation: The Complete Invictus Sessions (Castle Music)


By the time I get to Phoenix  performed by Dorothy Ashby  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

The idea of a funky jazz harp rendition of this classic Jim Webb song is probably cheesy to some people, but trust me, this one works brilliantly. The opening shimmers delightfully with fender rhodes piano, strings, and a huge breakbeat. Dorothy's harp then takes over, and we move into a nice pop/funk/jazz take on the song. The relentless beat is pretty funny when you compare this version to others (e.g. the Glen Campbell hit version, also Nick Cave's classic stripped down version from 'Kicking against the pricks'), but it is really very charming, happy stuff. A similar funk/pop hybrid occurs on her version of 'Windmills of your mind' - highly recommended.

from Dorothy's Harp (Cadet)



Can U Feel It?  performed by Original Concept  1986
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

DJ tomfoolery, a funky, formless response to "Close (To the Edit)" by Art of Noice. If anything, a nifty excuse to play Spot the Sample. Lots of scratching and drum machine beats complete the sweaty, mid-80s NYC feel.


available on CD - Def Jam Classics Vol. 1 (Def Jam/Columbia)




  trivia: Fun fact: Original Concept featured Yo! MTV Raps personalities Doctor Dre (not Dr. Dre) and T-Money.
Casino Royale  performed by 18th Century Corporation  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This is a rather ridiculous but super–catchy take on this theme to the 1967 spoof Bond movie. Performed by German session musicians, it ends up being a rather groovy mix, with viola d’amore, flute, female wordless vocals, harpsichord, and that other staple of the Baroque era, funky drums. It’s short and sweet and really very cool. The late sixties were cool for many reasons, but one of them is that they could accomodate TWO albums called 'Bacharach Baroque' - this one, and the other great Snuff Garrett-produced one by 'The Renaissance'. Both are superb.

from Bacharach Baroque (United Artists)




  leonthedog: I found the entire "Bacharach Baroque" album superb! The "baroque" is not overdone. The arrangements are very pleasing - better than most of the hundreds of instrumental takes on Bacharach that surfaced in the 60's and early 70's. So where can I find more by the ephemeral "18th Century Corporation"?
Cavaleiro Andante  performed by Abilio Manoel  1970
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

This song is simply unreal. It starts out in a kind of 4/4 samba groove with a highly prominent cuica and a funky strummed acoustic guitar chord progression before the super-catchy pizzicato-violins riff comes in, and Abilio's mellow voice singing the melody. It's sunshiney and catchy, with a bit of a haunting aftertaste, very Brazilian. I can never hear this song enough times!! Abilio Manoel is a Sao Paulo-based singer-songwriter from the late-60s-70s (still active) who wrote a few moderate hits without attaining even a Marcos Valle level of popularity. Good for Marcos, since Abilio's work would have caused me a few sleepless nights if I were him. And both on the same label, too! Abilio's stuff is hard to find, but very worth the effort.....I've already given Dusty Groove the heads-up about the CD....

from Pena Verde (Odeon)
available on CD - 20 Sucessos (EMI Brazil)




  delicado: sounds great; I look forward to checking it out!
Chorou, Chorou  performed by João Donato  1973
Recommended by Festy [profile]

It has been argued that Joéo Donato was the first to play a bossa nova rhythm on a recording (playing the accordian on "Eu Quero Um Samba" with Os Namorados), but whilst his contemporaries from the early years of bossa, such as Gilberto and Jobim, were happy to expand on the traditional bossa sound in later years, Donato went a number of steps further. The first track "Chorou, Chorou", from a fabulous album titled "Quem é Quem" is not even the best track off the album, but the opening bars give an idea of what the whole album is about. It's playful in melody, often subtly funky in rhythm and over all, a great album. This particular album also contains my favourite interpretation of "A Rã" by Donato. I'll have to recommend more songs from this album at a later time, because it really is great.

from Quem é Quem (Odeon)
available on CD - Quem é Quem (Odeon/EMI)




  konsu: He was always revisiting his compositions. He did this one in the mid sixties as well. Also check out the mad versions on his "Bad Donato" LP he did for Blue Thumb in 70', his take on The Frog is amazing.
  Festy: I recall reading somewhere that "A Rã" was his most favourite track that he had written. I haven't heard a bad version of it by him or anyone else. The "Bad Donato" album never grabbed me either, for some reason. Lots of people love it. I think I need to have another listen to it. ;)
  ambassador: i had the pleasure of interviewing maestro donato a couple summers ago as he was celebrating his 70th birthday. I recently went through the interview again for a forthcoming article about the man and he admitted that "A Bad Donato" was his "noisiest" album. hard to disagree with that and I think that's why some people love it and others are turned off. Sometimes there is just too much going on with it and his later versions of some of these songs are much more refined and better in my opinion. regarding his regularly recording previous songs, he is a HUGE Stan Kenton fan and kenton also recorded his songs dozens of times. my two pennies.
Claudie's Stockings  performed by Jerry Goldsmith  1971
Recommended by bobbyspacetroup [profile]

Goldsmith's score to this (supposedly forgettable) action film is mainly in a Lalo Schifrin/John Barry bag. This track even recalls Les Baxter's best work of the era. It begins with the main theme reminiscent of Barry's "Ipcress File." I think they even use the same instrument, the cymbalum. The main them then breaks out into this beautiful, lush orchestration topped with electric organ, a funky electric bass, and a very nice backbeat. It totally sounds like "Que Mango"-era Baxter. Anyway, this track and really the entire score are very cool in their own right.

from The Last Run
available on CD - The Last Run/The Wild Rover (Chapter III)



Come and Get This Stuff  performed by Syreeta  1974
Recommended by Nickfresh [profile]

Very nice, laid back summer song. Stevie Wonder struck Gold when he worked with Syreeta.

from Stevie Wonder Presents Syreeta (Motown 11268)




  Swinging London: I'd forgotten about this album. Thank you for reminding me. Absolutely wonderful. I especially loved the bits when Stevie's voice suddenly appears out of nowhere. I rank this album with all the great acclaimed Stevie Wonder albums of this (1971-76) era. I can't say that the song you've chosen is one of the high points, though.
Come Live with Me  performed by Dorothy Ashby  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An exquisite and much-sampled version of this nice tune from the Valley of the Dolls soundtrack. The slow, funky beat is simply one of the sweetest you will ever hear, and the harp melody is ethereal and beautiful.

from Afro-Harping, available on CD



Cucumbe  performed by Edda Dell’Orso  1975
Recommended by human-cannonball [profile]

Italian singer Edda dell'Orso is the voice backing many soundtrack scores and lounge-beat tracks by Ennio Morricone, Alessandro Alessandroni, Armando Trovajoli (and his 'Mark 4'). This is a Cinecitta-composer Romolo Grano composition for the cult fantasy-drama TV-series 'La Montagna della Luce'. A very deeply and sensually voiced Edda accompanies the slightly latin-flavoured, percussive funky-jazz piece; the haunting funky bassline and a very gentle tenor present throughout the track complete this exotic, obscure jazzy soundtrack.


available on CD - Up!!! The Second (Schema (Italy))


Dance and Shake Your Tambourine  performed by Universal Robot Band
Recommended by mr_klenster [profile]

Find this song! It is by far one of the funkiest things I've ever heard, it absolutely screams party. The lyrics repeat "dance and shake your tambourine, your funky tambourine, tambourine, tambourine". The instrumentation may get a bit repetitive for some, but the sheer funkiness and humor of this song will put a smile on your face while you're dancing the night away, without a care in the world. I especially get a kick out of the background voices, that seem to approve the shake that this song has. It sounds like it was recorded at a party and a time that you could only dream about experiencing. I like to play this song with the pitch up to about +4, which makes the experience all the more intense.





delicious lady  performed by The Peddlers  1967
Recommended by djfreshmoney [profile]

I got turned onto the Peddlers from Mojoto on this site. Now I've been grabbing all I can get. Sometimes funky, often smarmy. Reminds me of a mix between Scott Walker and Tom Jones.

from The Fantastic Peddlers (Fontana)



Die herren dieser welt  performed by Hildegard Knef  1970
Recommended by delicado [profile]

From the same album which spawned the mindblowing 'Im 80 Stockwerk' comes this superb track. It opens slowly, with a moody guitar/vocal introduction. Soon the heavy Burt Bacharach influence of 'Stockwerk' returns, as the strings come in and the song develops. The beat is funky in a gentle late-sixties pop kind of way. I have no idea what Hildegard is singing, but it sounds rather positive and uplifting, and I’m a big fan of her smoky voice.

from Knef (Decca)
available on CD - Fur Mich... (box set) (BMG Germany)




  AndreasNystrom: Really great song!, nice rhythm and harmonys.
  bellboy: this song is about "masters of this world" - the text would stir you up rather than just lift you up. It breathes the same air as a song by Alexandra "Mein Freund der Baum". Heavy bittersweet german Weltschmerz. One of the Knef's best songs is "Von nun an ging's bergab" which means "From now it went downhill". She tells us her story: Her birth in cold winter, her film career in the USA, her return to Germany, starting a second career as a singer - and everytime she comments ironically: "From now it went downhill" which is VERY funny! The last words of this song comment herself as a singer: "Es war nicht meine Schuld - ich bitte um Geduld" - "It wasnn't my idea to start singing, please be patient with me"
  heimwehblues: To "bellboy": "Von nun an ging's bergab" is performed by Hildegard Knef as "From Here On It Got Rough" (LP "The World of Hildegard Knef"), last lines: "A change was overdue, from here it's rough on you.".
  eftimihn: Warner Music Germany finally released "Knef" on CD ahead of the celebration of Hildegard Knef's 80th birthday. While it's completely beyond me why people had to wait until 2005 to get this masterpiece in it's entirety, i'm thrilled that it's finally arrived. Also, Hildegard Knef repeatedly expressed "Knef" was her best album.
  n-jeff: "From Here On It Got Rough" is the opening track on teh recent (2005) compilation "the in-kraut". And very witty it is too. But also a very groovy song.
diggin deeper  performed by asha puthli  197?
Recommended by hewtwit [profile]

This is a great funky version of the jj cale classic. Groovy and sexy as can be.





  tulipthe: hi, thats a great track. Its from the first LP "Asha Puthli". Have u heard the song "Space Talk" from her album ' The Devil is Loose' also a fantastic track. btw, the year for 'Right down here " is 1974 way ahead of its time,like most of her music.
Do What you Wanna  performed by Ramsey Lewis  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A nice funky instrumental with simple blues chords. Ramsey plays electric piano, and the beat is sweet, like a lot of Cadet label stuff from the late 60s. Groovy stuff, and quite easy to come by on the reissue 2 LP - 'Inside Ramsey Lewis'.

from Another Voyage (Cadet LPS-827)




  tinks: excellent track! definitely one of my favorites from ramsey's late 60s work.
Do you know the way to San Jose  performed by Pete Moore  1970
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A great instrumental by Pete Moore, which is laid back yet gently funky at the same time with nice brass and a cool wah-wah guitar sound. The production and arrangement is typical of his other work - clean sounding with a slow introduction and a superb rhythm section. Check out what is probably his best known track - Catwalk, which was featured on the Inflight Entertainment CD.

from Pete Moore plays the best of Burt Bacharach (Rediffusion ZS61)




  umbrellasfollowrain: I must have this song. Where could I find the record?
Dream On Dreamer  performed by Brand New Heavies  1994
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

The Brand New Heavies were one of the significant groups of the then popular "Acid Jazz" sound in the early 90s. "Dream On Dreamer" still strikes me with it's precisely executed funk rhythm and lush production: Tight rhythm section with funky drums, guitar and bass combined with jazzy piano chords, swirling strings and a crisp brass section. On top of that some flutes, fluegelhorn, percussion and organ with a very pleasant vocal performance by N'Dea Davenport.

from Brother Sister, available on CD



Drugs  performed by This Mortal Coil  1986
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

Perhaps the least typical track from the 4AD house band – and, ironically, one of the project’s great triumphs. Abandoning for a moment their gorgeous’ prototype - beautifully dreamy soundscapes and/or readings of songs by Tim Buckley, Alex Chilton, etc. – this Talking Heads cover is little more that a series of grinding, funky sample loops w/Alison Limerick’s soulful vocals drifting in and out. A brilliant rethink of the song, that anticipates (perhaps influenced?) the Bristol/trip-hop mob - Portishead, Tricky, Massive Attack, et al. (Can still be found as a vinyl 10” single, if you look hard.)

from Filigree & Shadow (4AD)
available on CD - Filigree and Shadow (4AD)



  kohl: great band.
  konsu: Sort of ironic too, considering an interview with Ivo I once read with a short list of groups he wished he'd signed to 4AD, which included Portishead. TMC was such an ifluential project that completely escaped the 80's indie mainstream indeed.
Drugs (Electricity)  performed by Talking Heads  1980
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

An outstanding live reading of this song recorded by Talking Heads’ “big band” on the tour to support “Remain in Light” in 1980. Augmenting their original quartet with six extra players, the sound of the group is huge and funky, but appropriately paranoid. Check out the use the of Adrian Belew’s freaky guitar textures – here between stints w/Bowie and Robert Fripp’s soon to be reformed King Crimson, and Dolette McDonald’s cinematic background vocals on the song’s break. (It’s all very Morricone-damaged, I think). And David Bryne is @ the absolute height of his powers, here.

from The Name of the Band is Talking Heads, available on CD


East Breeze  performed by Okay Temiz  1975
Recommended by djfreshmoney [profile]

I got into Turkish pop/rock music after picking up a Mogollar CD in Istambul a year or two ago. Like Mogollar, Okay Temiz combines eastern rhythms and instrumentation with rock sounds. You can forget most of this because all you need to know is "East Breeze" is Super FUNKY. Great driving rhythms mesh with flute and synths and the whole thing rocks.

from Drummer of Two Worlds (Finnadar Records)


Ego Tripping At The Gates Of Hell  performed by The Flaming Lips  2002
Recommended by pleasepleaseme [profile]

Funky Rock. Nice Title! Sweet Lyrics. And i love the Beach Boys break. Move over George Martin!
Is this the best concept album since "Dark Side Of The Moon / Wish You Were Here". Or Maybe even " Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band/ Magical Mystery Tour"? Very Trippy Rock! Nice electronics. How do you sound like Neal Young, Bread, America, Pink Floyd, Moody Blues, David Bowie, Beach Boys and the Beatles all at once? You can hear the full album through the thier site: www.flaminglips.com
Super Generous & Super Talented. One of the most beautifully produced albums ever!
POP HEAVEN! "Light Side of the Moon" for the new millennia.

from Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots, available on CD



Empty Pages  performed by Traffic  1970
Recommended by geezer [profile]

Classic period Traffic ,soulful vocals ,jazzy electric piano and funky flute .Never soaring but gently uplifting on a sunny morning.

from John Barleycorn Must Die, available on CD


Etude in the form of Rhythm & Blues  performed by Paul Mauriat  197?
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Usually I'm bored to tears with Mr. Muriat's over the top orchestral take on stuff... but this track is a total exception. Starts out with this reeling Beethovenesque orchestral intro, and then lays flat into this funky latin workout, almost in a Deodato meets Zarathustra way. Really nuts. Just a great dancefloor track for loungecore types.

from El Condor Pasa (Philips PHS 600-352)


Falling Free  performed by Bert Kaempfert  1971
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This is one of those odd discoveries: a track on a CD I've owned for about 8 years, but which I had somehow overlooked. I buy a lot of CDs, and I guess is one of the later tracks on a long compilation cd. Still, that's not much of an excuse, is it!

This is a slow, groovy instrumental (well, with wordless vocals) with funky drums, some fine fuzz guitar work, nice spiky brass and some very pleasing chord changes. It is strongly reminiscent of similar work of the time by people like Johnny Harris. I have a few tracks by completely different artists with a very similar feel/orchestration and closely related chord sequences. It's simultaneously very hip sounding yet quite square with the choir and strings. I love it, obviously.

from Now! (Polydor)
available on CD - Easy Loungin' (Polydor Germany)



Footprints on the Moon  performed by Francis Lai  1973
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An incredibly perfect easy listening piece, this opens with an other-worldly, John-Barry-ish synth sound, and then leads into a groovy, lightly funky piano riff, with shimmering strings. Francis Lai's signature organ sound carries the tune as the song builds into a dramatic orchestral pop masterpiece. A standout track, with superb wistful, lazy, summer day feel, rather like some of the best tracks on the 'Sound Gallery' compilation of a few years ago.

from Plays the compositions of... (UA UA-LA095-F)




  scrubbles: Yow! That sound snippet alone is so cool.
  AndreasNystrom: I finally got the version by Francis Lai, and i think its better then Johnny Harris one. Splendid song!. I love the ending part of it.. cant get that part out of my head :)
  standish: I'd have to go for the Johnny Harris original over the Francis Lai version. It's colder and spookier with less obtrusive strings. "Movements" is available on CD (great sleeve - his expression suggests a combined photo shoot/visit to his proctologist) - but the mono single version (w/"Lulu's Theme") is all you need.
  leonthedog: Well, thanks to all of you I had to track down BOTH versions! Amazing what a difference an arrangement makes. I agree with scrubbles: the clip of Lai's version is the most infectious thing around!
For a Few Dollars More  performed by Al Caiola  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A wickedly funky and twangy take on this classic Morricone theme. The beat is very cool - funky and surprisingly insistent, reminiscent of some of the best tracks on Howard Roberts's albums of the time on capitol. This track is from the interesting LP 'King Guitar', which also yields a Vinnie Bell-esque 'watery guitar' take on 'Sleepwalk' and a version of 'Tiny Bubbles' done in Latin boogaloo style.

from King Guitar (United Artists UAS 6586)



Ford Capri II  performed by Christian Bruhn  1973
Recommended by heinmukk [profile]

actually, this is a german advertising-song from 1973. i wonder how advertising was in those days, since this track lasts 2:56min.
found on popshopping, a compilation with old funky german advertising-songs issued by the lable crippled hot dick wax, where you can find many of those obscure old recordings. for example shake sauvage. a compilation with old french film soundtracks. great catchy tunes in there, too!
anyway, christian bruhn is rather known here in germany. he wrote a lot of hits and a great soundtrack for the 70s/80s cartoon/anime series captain future.
this one is funky and catchy, with female "aaaaah" singings and great brass hits (which i like more and more....)

from Pop Shopping (Crippled Hot Dick Wax)



  n-jeff: Yeah man! Brash horns on the intro, a nice mellow bit in the middle and out with a bang. Remixed by Ursula1000 on a 12, which although it seems redundant, isn't bad at all. Sounds nice when driving around my own Ford Capri MkII. Lovely!
Freio Aerodinamico  performed by Os 3 Morais  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A truly incredible vocal/jazz pop track which really has everything. Os Tres Morais were (are?) a mysterious Brazilian vocal trio. Here they tackle a great Marcos Valle song, and do such a storming job of it that this may be one my very favorite tracks EVER in the whole world ever! Honestly. Until I put a sound sample up, please accept these measly words of explanation:
1. It's bouncy and smooth and has warm strings
2. It's actually quite funky as well
3. The vocal harmonies are fantastic. I don't think there are any actual words - it's all just beautiful interwoven sound
4. Someone starts playing a scratchy electric guitar rebelliously at end of the song, completely out of context with the rest of it. It sounds cool.

from Os Tres Morais
available on CD - Blue Brazil volume 2 (EMI UK)




  tinks: i have a sneaking suspicion that os tres morais and os tres brasilieros were in fact the same group...the reason that i say this is because os tres brasilieros were a family group comprised of two brothers and a sister, whose last name just happened to be "morais". if so, have a look for the album that i've made a recommendation from. it'd seem to jive, since this comp is on emi, and the lp i have is on capitol.
  delicado: hmm, interesting. Shame there is a dearth of info available for either group... are os tres brasilieros consistently good, out of interest?
  tinks: well, the album i have is pretty standard vocal bossa & samba-type stuff, but it's not bad. very easy to listen to, and there are a few inspired moments. i'll check the liner notes to see if i can garner any more info on them.
  clmarcel: i think the correct name this band is "os tres moraes". here in Brazil, moraes is frequently a last name, while "morais" can be traduzed by "ethics", "moral".
  clmarcel: sorry, i made a mistake. The real name is MORAIS. The link to this band is http://acesso-raro.blogspot.com/ . There can be downloaded the mp3 e see the album cover.
  Luroberto: This ensemble was the best one in the end of the 60s in Brazil. The accurate voise of Jane Moraes was simply marvelous. They have been influenced by Les Swingle Singers. They began their career singing music erudite and in a second moment they joined Bossa Nova hits of Chico Buarque and Tom Jobim. They have enregistered three LPs. When Jane married Herondy and make the kitsch couple Jane & Herondy her brothers relpaced her by Ana Lucia and after one last LP they splited the ensemble for separate careers. One of them is now new as "Santo Morales", a bolero singer. One of their best hits was O Sonho (The Dream), 1968, of Egberto Gismonti.
Garcon Glacon  performed by April March  2004
Recommended by leonthedog [profile]

I just found out about this chick (self-proclaimed, okay?!). I feel like Superman having been kissed by Kryptonite . . . "In-tri-guing . . .(gasp) . . .
Must ... find ... out ... MORE ..!" Why am I so
far behind? Sorry, can't really describe it. Funky, sultry, French, (France) Gallic & Gainsbourdian as noted by one reviewer of another April March song ... Derivative is one thing, but this is inspired.


available on CD - Chrominance Decoder (Tricatel)



Garra  performed by Marcos Valle  1971
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Another wonderful, genre-defying track by Marcos Valle, Garra is a bouncy mix of scat vocals and funky, soulful pop. The arrangement somehow manages to remain very tasteful and tight. The entire album is highly recommended.

from Garra (Odeon)



Gods Cop  performed by The happy Mondays   1990
Recommended by geezer [profile]

This one track alone contains all the swagger and danger that made The Mondays musics public enemy number one ,a bunch of bad boy Mancs led by two brothers years before that other bunch of bad boy Mancs led by two brothers ,rockin and funky and joyous .

from Thrill Pills and bellyaches
available on CD - Thrills PIlls and Bellyaches


Hair  performed by Zen  1969
Recommended by Ashley [profile]

Yes it is the title tune from the hit musical, but this Dutch band played it fast and funky. Kind of like Speed Lounge. The single comes from a five CD set which has plenty of other wonderful garage/pop tunes from the 60s.

from Neder Best (Hunter Music HM 1351 - 2)
available on CD - Neder Beat (Hunter Music)



Happy Together  performed by Hugo Montenegro  1969
Recommended by konsu [profile]

I can't believe how great this is! Really part of Hugo's best period, when he was using some of his best players, and best ideas! The track starts out with this plunky Carol Kaye like bass line, alongside funky harpsichord, and the vocal begins in his typical "choral" style. Really faithful to the turtles original, with all the twists and turns of his crazy arrangements. Check out the vocal effect on the chorus, where he runs the tracks through a Leslie speaker! Crazy stuff.

from Good Vibrations, available on CD


Holy Thursday  performed by David Axelrod  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An instrumental of monumental brilliance. Mixing religious moods with tight beats and strings really seems to work for me. The track opens quietly with piano chords and a bass guitar. A slow, funky drum beat comes in, and after this the track goes on all kinds of journeys, building up and down with doomy strings and psychedelic guitars. A really incredible way to set a mood...

from Song of Innocence
available on CD - 1968 to 1970 (Stateside)




  tinks: and if you like this, you'll probably dig the work axelrod did on the electric prunes' "mass in f minor" lp, too.
  tempted: Endtroducing... by DJ Shadow would've never happened without David Axelrod. Not the way it did.
horns  performed by atila zoller  1970
Recommended by voshege [profile]

this is a great mellow funky jazz Hungarian styled piece in the vain of Gabor Szabo...has a great drum beat with superb jazz guitar interplay by Atilla...well worth tracking down


available on CD - gypsy cry (embryo)



  konsu: Oh yeah, this guy appears on some of Tony Scott's Verve LP's. A great session guitarist. Need to get this one!
Hot Percussion Licks Part 2  performed by Raymond Simmons  1989
Recommended by simmons [profile]

Raymond Simmons performs a funky bongo percussion solo.

from Hot Percussion Licks (SELECT)


i believe in miracles  performed by jackson sisters  1973
Recommended by whatever [profile]

this is a funky song. it makes you wanna dance and have fun. great great great song





  Issie: Quite a good song i agree
I Love Every Little Thing About You  performed by Syreeta  1972
Recommended by ambassador [profile]

The day I bought this LP I got home late so I only had time to throw on the first track of the first side before my girlfriend asked me to turn it off. As soon as I heard it I knew immediately that I wanted to hear it again. I woke up with the song bouncing in my head. I was gonna be late to work, but I recorded the song so I could listen to it on the commute. I must have listened to it all the way to work and all the way home, so about 30 times before I tired of it. Why is it so great, you ask? I would say it was the Stevie factor as he wrote, produced and played nearly all of the instruments on this, his writing partner's debut album, but Syreeta really wails on her vocal parts infusing the song with an undeniable optimism. This was the year when Stevie really started to get adventerous with his music and you can tell that he took some additional liberties on this album then he did on his own from the same period, Music of My Mind. His version of this song from his album is great, but doesn't have the same synthesizer groove that bubbles along with the funky drums like syreeta's does. Marvelous song. I gave it to a friend and within days his friends' minds were all blown as well.

from Syreeta (MoWest 7001)
available on CD - Japanese Import?


I Will Get On  performed by Annie  2002
Recommended by SleazyListening [profile]

You may remember Annie from her/their housey dancefloor number of a year or two back "The Greatest Hit".

Well, they've come back with this, a sublime downbeat track with a lush-yet-delicate female vocal. Instrumentally, it reminds me of a slower, swinging P-funk number, quite minimal beats but funky as all hell (in a chill kinda way).

Absolutely beautiful -hard to find but worth looking.

Originally a limited-release 7" on Norwegian label Telle, and quickly licensed by UK house label Loaded -it appears on a sampler they released late 2002.


available on CD - (vinyl) (Loaded)


James Brown  performed by Nancy Dupree  1970
Recommended by Festy [profile]

So, the song is called 'James Brown' and is written by a teacher, Nancy Dupree, with her students who are heard singing. It was recorded in 1970. By all reports a strong-headed and hearted woman, Nancy Dupree had much motivation for social causes and artistic output which didn't reach far beyond her home town of Rochester, NY, until the last decade or so. It was during this last decade that I first came across this track on a German compilation focussing on 'black movement' songs.

The track itself is interesting, but obviously very serious for the students as they sing about their hero. It's innocence, yet clear ability to capture a moment in time, is probably more real than many blaxploitation or struggle albums that were recorded around the same time. Ultimately though, it's one of those tracks that is unusual and makes me think "how did this come to be?". I think we should all sing:

Ugh... With your bad self
Ugh... It's funky
Ugh... I can�t stand it
Ugh... Good God

from Ghetto Reality (Folkways Records FC 7520)
available on CD - Black & Proud Vol. 1 - The Soul Of The Black Panther Era (Trikont)



Julia  performed by Ramsey Lewis  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This one really has everything, to me. I'm not a connoisseur of the Beatles's 'White album', but I'm completely crazy about Ramsey Lewis's superb LP in tribute to it. The entire album has a delicious balance of crisp beats, electric piano, strings, and subtle touches of moog, played by the album's producer, Charles Stepney. I've chosen 'Julia' to recommend because I enjoy the way it changes mood - opening mournful and slow, and then getting very funky. But the entire album is really packed with winners; other highlights are a wacky and extremely funky 'back in the USSR', a superb 'Dear Prudence', and a great 'cry baby cry'.

from Mother Nature's Son (Cadet)




  vince: Is there any way to get the whole album Mother Nature's Son on CD?
  delicado: yes, there's a Japanese CD, which you could probably get via www.dustygroove.com. It really is a wonderful album (for those that like this kind of thing!)
jumpin’ jack flash  performed by ananda shankar  1970
Recommended by shaka_klaus [profile]

one of my fave songs at the moment. what's better than a funky sitar mover? a funky sitar/moog mover! i think you can find it on ebay or on some indian comps.

from ananda shankar (reprise)



  n-jeff: A true go-go swinger! It works in ways that it quite clearly shouldn't. The LP should be quite available, it was re-issued cheaply fairly recently.
  tinks: oh hell yes. i love me some ananda...but i also have a special affinity for such lesser more exploitative sitarists such as big jim sullivan or lord sitar. i recently dug a sweet thelma houston version of the song at the swap meet, for what it's worth.
Just Dropped In (To See What Condition My Condition Was In)  performed by Kenny Rodgers & The First Edition  1969
Recommended by pleasepleaseme [profile]

Great early psychedelic rock track by Kenny Rodgers.





  olli: hell yeah. it was the first sign that the big lebowski was going to be a great film.
Kee-ka-roo  performed by Walter Wanderley and Luiz Henrique  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A very cool track, but not in the way I normally find Walter Wanderley's quick-draw hammond organ technique cool. This is a simple, bluesey number on which he is joined by the Brazilian singer Luiz Henrique. Luiz doesn't sing though, he just contributes some nice scat vocals, rather like the work Marcos Valle does on 'Garra'. In my experience, this is about as close as Walter gets to 'funky', and this version from the 'Popcorn' album is a great improvement from the 1967 'Kee-ka-roo' LP version.

from Popcorn (Verve)



King of the Rodeo  performed by The Bamboos feat. Megan Washington  2008
Recommended by Festy [profile]

This is a cover of the Kings of Leon song done by a band from my hometown (Melbourne, Aus) who are riding the funk, soul revival (a la Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings). I knew this version before hearing the Kings of Leon version and much prefer it. When I've played it to those who know the Kings of Leon version, a few of them haven't liked this version. It's uplifting, funky, and a 'feel good' version. I don't think the lyrics are great, but vocals are handled well by Megan Washington. Let the good times roll!

from Side-Stepper, available on CD



Kojak Theme  performed by "The Pop Singers & Orchestra"  197?
Recommended by konsu [profile]

One of the better records of this ilk, surely for this one, which is hard to find and is such a typically great theme. Kojak, of course, was the blowpop sucking detective played by Telly Savalas. And like the "Rockford Files", "Baretta", and "S.W.A.T.", deserves it's place in the not-so-rare groove DJ file. With the obligatory Moog sound leading the melody, it becomes instantly recognizable (and dateable). Whoever the cats are on this session are cutting some decent shit for sure. They also turn out a surprisingly funky version of the M.A.S.H. theme, as well as the three aforementioned. The crazy Peter Pan cover art is there, with cute stuff like poorly drawn representations of Alan Alda looking at a martini glass, and Gabe Kaplan's finger being bit by Baretta's Cockatoo!!

Does anyone know the composer?

from Themes From Hit TV Shows (Peter Pan 8185)



La Discotheque  performed by Mike Rozakis  1973
Recommended by human-cannonball [profile]

This is an absolutely impossible rarity, as it has never been released out of the original master-tape (until 1 year ago)! Part of the soundtrack of a 1973 Greek psychedelic underground film with the international title 'She Knew No Other Way' (local title: Children of the Flowers). However, this is not a mad freak-beat groovy tune (which is the case for most of the rest of the tunes in the soundtrack score); instead, it's a warm, classy, mid-tempo, funky jam with wah-wah guitar & sax solos and a very discreet piano backing. As a Greek, I was astounded by the discovery of this 70s funky gem from a totally unknown composer (Mike Rozakis). A true obscurity masterpiece, seek the proper vinyl release from Greek label 'Potfleur'.

from She Knew No Other Way OST (Potfleur)



  n-jeff: Thanks for the heads up on this LP! Its a great one, I love the way its at once stumbling and psychedlic, but at the same time maintains the great groove. Good fuzz guitar and great strings, plus that lovely wayward organ. Is there any more Mike Rozakis music lurking around?
la planete sauvage  performed by alain goraguer  1973
Recommended by olli [profile]

this entire soundtrack to the film la planete sauvage comes highly recommended. never seen the film, but it can´t possibly be as good as the soundtrack suggests.
chilly, funky instrumental orchestral music. there´s a really haunting recurring theme through the album, nice use of choirs and twangy guitar too.


available on CD - la planete sauvage (soundtrack)



  HoboTech: Actually, the film La Planete Sauvage is quite good. There are lots of really great visuals that go perfectly with the music. It can be a bit slow at times, and the music is fantastic on its own, but I urge anyone towards viewing of this masterpiece of French cinema.
Lay It On Me  performed by Heatwave  1976
Recommended by ambassador [profile]

Heatwave's first two albums can almost be seen as prototypes for Michael Jackson's breakthrough album "Off the Wall." With Rod Temperton, future Quincy Jones and MJ collaborator, driving this album the sound is both funky and catchy, sophisticated and accessible. "Lay It On Me" is an overlooked album track that bubbles and gurgles under the surface of the groove until the chorus arrives with strings soaring for the ectasy of Johnnie Wilder's sweet vocals, "lay it on me, lay your sweet love on me!" Beautifully arranged and excellently executed and just one of many classics of their debut album.

from Too Hot to Handle, available on CD


Less is More  performed by Mauri Sanchis  2003
Recommended by bomboncito [profile]

It's a great funky, melodic tune with great Spanish hammond organist, Mauri Sanchis.
It is his first cd and his web is great also, www.maurisanchis.com

from Less is More (Maos Records SA00886)


Let the Sunshine In (The Flesh Failures)  performed by The Don Kirshner Concept  1969
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A surprisingly hip easy-listening orchestral version from the decidedly unhip Kirshner. Very funky drumming and a cool girl chorus make this my favorite version of this song.

from Don Kirshner Cuts Hair (RCA Victor)


Let’s Go to the Dark Side of the Moon  performed by Original Love
Recommended by johannp [profile]

One of the best songs from the cd 'Sunny Side of Original Love' and one of my favorite songs by Original Love. The instrumentation is typical of this cd: Organ, a driving bass line, drums, a funky guitar riff, brass and a very interesting flute. (Why don't western bands use flutes more? Japanese bands surely seem to realize how they can enhance the mood of a song.)

I love the chords and harmonies in this song. Together with the instrumentation and the suggestive title they make this song very strongly emotional. I can almost feel myself leaving the dull everyday life, escaping to the dark side of the moon as I listen to this song. Oh, and Takao Tajima's vocals are as good as ever.

If you like this song, you may also like 'Sunshine Romance' from the same CD, although this one is the better of the two in my opinion.


available on CD - Sunnny Side of Original Love


Light My Fire  performed by Shirley Bassey  1970
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

Prior to hearing her "Something" LP, I always referred to Dame Shirley as "The Godzilla of Song". By this I meant I always felt she treated a tune the way Rodan treated Tokyo, like something to be smashed underfoot. While I lived/died by her Bond themes, and such like, I never thought she was capable of nuance, restraint, and/or sexiness. Then I heard this god-like album, brilliantly produced and arranged by Johnny Harris. This cover of The Doors' song perfectly sums up the record's strengths. It's jazzy, sexy, incredibly funky, yet still totally Dame Shirley in all her over-the-top-glory. Probably the best Doors cover ever (though Nico's toxic reading of "The End", and Siouxsie and The Banshees' strangely Motown-esque version of "You're Lost Little Girl" come awfully close.)

from Something, available on CD


Lolly Lolly  performed by Wendy & Lisa  1989
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Minimalist pop, and hurrah for that. The ex-Revolution musicians show Prince that they have learned their lessons well and throw in their own funky twirls, too. They eschew the back-up lipstick lesbian persona that characterised their time with Mr Rogers Nelson and dig out a sound that nicely epitomises the late 80's, a great and much-ignored time in funky dance-pop.

from Fruit At The Bottom (Virgin VWL2580)



Love Song  performed by Lani Hall  1974
Recommended by ambassador [profile]

This is one of those songs that really sounds nothing like any of the artists' other songs. This is off Lani's first solo album "Sundown Lady" and was produced by her husband and label executive Herb Alpert. The song is the first song on the album and sets the tone with a nice easy bass line accented by the tinkling of an electric piano. The real money is the combination of Lani's impassioned vocals with whoever (maybe Herb?) singing a simple male vocal complement during the chorus. The song is effortlessly funky, understated and oh-so-deep. I haven't played this song for someone who hasn't loved it.

from Sundown Lady (A&M 4359)



  delicado: By coincidence I picked up a compilation CD of Lani's work (a 25 year A and M anniversary disc that came out in 1987!) just yesterday, and this track and 'we could be flying' were the ones that really stood out. I'm a big Brasil 66 fan but had never picked up her albums. Strange that you happened to recommend this track today!
  scrubbles: You're right -- this is a lovely, understated yet passionate song. That male singer might possibly be Burt Bacharach, since the tune was included on a Bacharach collection.
Love, love, love  performed by Gerhard Heinz  196?
Recommended by delicado [profile]

What a winning track! Opening with Morricone-style 'boing' sounds, this is a sexy, funky pop song with interchanging female/male vocals and pounding drums.

The sub-genre of pop songs in this style, featuring flirting and laughing alongside groovy 60s backings, is under-appreciated. I can think of a few more examples: Piero Umiliani's 'Flirt a Rio', Marcos Valle's 'Ele e ela', and my previous recommendation, Ed Lincoln's 'Bon-jour'. Mina's 'Parole Parole' almost fits as well, although the interplay there is a bit more dramataic than flirtatious.

Confusingly, there's another track called "Love, L'Amour, Amore" by Gerhard Heinz, which appears on the "Melodies in Love" compilation of his work. But I gather from hearing a clip that this is a different track altogether.

from Birds Do It: Music From German Sex Education Movies of the 60's, available on CD



Maggie May  performed by Simtec & Wylie  1972
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Okay, I know what you're thinking. Rod Stewart?? But hold your horses, buckeroos! This is one incredible funky take on Rod's old show-stopper. Simtec & Wylie were a duo from Chicago who were modeled after such testifyin' '60s soul acts as Sam & Dave, Williams & Watson, Bob & Earl, Mel & Tim and the like. In the early 70s, they signed up with Gene Chandler's (of "Duke of Earl" fame) vanity label, Mister Chand. There, somebody convinced them that recording a cover of "Maggie May" would be a great idea. It was. First of all, they got rid of that exasperatingly unfunky mandolin intro from the original and replaced it with an electric guitar with heavy feedback. They also sped the tempo up considerably, transforming the whole thing from something rather cloying into a defiant statement...these boys aren't content to remember their time with Maggie, they're back to show her what they've learned in the meantime.

from the single Maggie May (Mister Chand)


Mandom Mod Och Morske Män  performed by Merit Hemmingson  1972
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An instrumental with a fascinating fusion of styles, this track starts out quietly and then explodes delightfully. Hemmingson plays what sounds like a church organ (alongside various other keyboard instruments), but mixes it in with wah-wah guitar, funky beats and percussion, strings, and a dirty, blaxploitation soundtrack-style flute, to produce a compelling sound. Sabu Martinez plays the congas.

I can't offer a great deal of background information here, since I picked this up on a third-hand recommendation, but there are a few great tracks on the album

from Trollskog, available on CD




  delicado: Just to note that this still rocks it for me 12 years on!
Mark Rae’s Medicine (Kraak & Smaak Remix)  performed by Kraak & Smaak  2007
Recommended by iPodChick [profile]

The multi-talented Dutch artists Kraak & Smaak shine in their unprecedented, soul-shaking compilation, “The Remix Sessions” due out May 29th. Named by IDJ as "one of the most incendiary live outfits," Kraak & Smaak take that crackling energy and infuse classic jams with their signature style. Music lovers everywhere will rejoice as hard-to-find tracks, many of which were only released on vinyl, join each other in this boogie-licious showcase.

From banging dance floor "Mimezine – Can't get Enough (Kraak & Smaak Remix)," to funky, midtempo "Jamiroquai – Electric Mistress (Kraak & Smaak Remix)" to eerie, internationally-infused "Skeewiff – Man of Constant Sorrow (Kraak & Smaak Remix)," Kraak & Smaak reveals their astounding vision for the possibilities of electronica. This beat-driven assembly is an invaluable resource for re-tracing the various pathways of this modern musical expression.

from The Remix Sessions (Quango Records)



  aquila49: Recommendation is by a recording industry shill. You can find the exact some wording at ubl.com and Indie911.com—straight from a press release. Ugghh.
Mi Querido Amor (My Cherie Amour)  performed by Cristian Castro  1994
Recommended by RCA76 [profile]

I love this Spanish version of the Stevie Wonder classic because it the new instrumentation. It is still very Stevie Wonder with a new, latin flair. The vocals are absolutely amazing, this guy can really sing.

from El Camino Del Alma, available on CD


mo funky  performed by zoobombs  1999
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

I think Zoobombs are a Japanese Heavy Metal band, but this is not metal, sort of groovy rock, maybe derived from the Stone Roses. Most of the words are in (presumably) Japanese but the chorus is English, and you can just imagine the meeting with an A&R man that gave rise to it. "You're a good band, y'know, you just need to get more funky". And he may have been right, this is mo funky, percussion, driving bass, great chorus, It gradually builds up and speeds up all the way through. Until it falls apart then the dub starts with guitars all over it. Classic.

from let it Bomb, available on CD




  penelope_66: I haven't heard anything from this album, but I love the song "Flat-Top" off their 'Welcome Back, Zoobombs!' album. I'd have to say there are some catchy tunes that pop up throughout the record, but overall it's rather mediocre and strikes a bit of ambivolence within my taste. One of those things you buy for a song or two.
  n-jeff: Let it bomb is a bit of a mixed bag, too. I love mo funky and mo dub, but don't play much of the rest of it.
Moonchild  performed by Rick James  1985
Recommended by Nickfresh [profile]

Rick James rocks. but he also can croon. His 1985 LP, "Glow," was highly underrated, and because of this fact, many folks passed up this gem of an album. "Moonchild," with its lush bassline - dreamy keyboards - and somewhat inspired lyrics, is one of the many tracks should've made RJ a bigger star than he was. Motown really dropped the ball on not releasing this ballad as a single or promoting the album, PERIOD. Mary J. Blige brought this song back to life (without butchering it) with 1997's "Love is All We Need."

from Glow (Gordy (Motown) 6135 GL)



Morning  performed by Cal Tjader  1971
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

Clare Fischer's oft-covered Latin jazz classic was first recorded by the man himself on a 1966 album whose title escapes me right now. Cal Tjader first cut it on "Soul Burst" the same year, but the truly classic rendition for me is the 1971 Tjader re-recording on "Agua Dulce." With a smooth, flowing Rhodes-based sound, some synth effects floating around and none other than Wendy & Bonnie on backing vocals, this version is the one to beat.

from Agua Dulce (Fantasy)
available on CD - Descarga (Fantasy)


Mr. Bob Dobalina  performed by Del the Funky Homosapien
Recommended by cleanfun [profile]




Mumbai Jumbo  performed by The Brown Indian Band  2002
Recommended by jazzgoa [profile]

Mumbai Jumbo is an exciting and funky sound of indo-jazz fusion. Hear mp3 track at http://www.hullocheck.com/brownindian

from East BEATS West (Raga to Rock records)


My Way  performed by Brook Benton  196?
Recommended by oldmangeorge [profile]

The best version of My Way I ever heard. Unfortunately I haven't heard it for thirty years or more. Never been able to find it since I had it as a single when I was a teenager.




Não Adianta  performed by Leny Andrade  1975
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An absolutely storming upbeat funky Brazilan pop/bossa track. I've never found anything else in the same vein by Leny Andrade, but this one is truly incredible. From the very beginning, this song is quite relentlessly uplifting. It manages to be very hip and funky, yet emotional and warm at the same time. Far more percussive than most Brazilian stuff I've recommended, this is nevertheless one of my absolute favorites.


available on CD - Blue Brazil Vol 3 (EMI UK)



Nao Tem Nada Nao  performed by Marcos Valle  1973
Recommended by pleasepleaseme [profile]

WOW! 3 fat composers ( Marcos Valle, Joao Donato & Deodato) join forces for one groovy track. Awesome keyboard work from Bertrami of Azymuth. Mesmerizing,sexy and funky.

from Previsao Do Tempo, available on CD



  n-jeff: Very pleased to say I saw Marcos Valle perform this last night. Thats a great set of names to drop "Heres a song I wrote with Eumir Deodato and Jao Donato". Very cool. And a very good song, he handled the keys himself live.
And thanks to everyone whos namedropped Valle on musical taste, as I otherwise would have missed out on a great gig!

  ambassador: this track was a reworking of Donato's tune "Batuque" from his album with Deodato, called "Joao Donato" or Donato/Deodato on the original LP. Basically, Marcos Valle liked the song and decided to add lyrics. Funnily, the way that Donato/Deodato was recorded each of these famous composers added their parts seperately starting with Donato's keyboards, then Deodato's arrangement and then marcos took that and reworked it with lyrics and azimuth as his backup band. one of my all-time favorite tracks.
Naturally Stoned  performed by Helmut Zacharias  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A nicely groovy easy listening instrumental from an album which is a very common item in British charity shops. It's nicely percussive from the start, with some nicely strummed guitar and Helmut's bizarre sounding low solo violin. It builds up to a full and funky orchestral sound - a real stomper...

from Light My Fire (Philips)



Niki  performed by The Third Wave  1970
Recommended by Festy [profile]

It took me a while to get a copy of this album as even the out-of-print re-issue on Crippled Dick Hot Wax (that's the name of the label, folks. Promise!) sells for a bit these days. I'm glad I got it as it's a fantastic album - the only LP released by the 5 Filipino/American sister vocal group, although I think they released at least one 45". Discovered by George Duke, he wrote the arrangements and his trio of the time provides backing. The album was recorded in Germany (released by MPS) and is a little bit poppy, a little bit jazzy, a little bit funky. There are a number of songs which could be recommended (a number of them jazz standards, such as 'Maiden Voyage' and 'Cantaloupe Island'), but the one I've chosen is 'Niki'. I hadn't come across this track before getting the album, unlike a few of the other tracks which have turned up on compilations over the years.

'Niki' is a song that builds. It starts off fairly casually and builds up to a swinging chorus, accented by some very hip playing by George Duke, still on an acoustic piano during this stage of his career.

Another commendable and notable track on the album, and which I discovered through a compilation created by 'mine host' of Musical Taste, Senhor Delicado, is "Waves Lament". Absolutely fantastic.

from Here & Now, available on CD



No,No,No  performed by Dieter Reith  197?
Recommended by K Pucino [profile]

"Hammond Explosion"-Dieter Reith
German Hammond Organist
There are brilliant funky breaks and Hammond sounds on this awesome record!
Record Cover is visible on my website: www.easylounge.org

from Hammond Explosion (Bellaphon)



Oba, la vem ela  performed by Jorge Ben  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An incredible, hard-to-describe classic from Jorge Ben. It opens with a funky, feverishly strummed chord sequence, and builds up beautifully. Warm strings come in, while the vocals become more and more manic (in a good way). I really can't do this song justice in words, but I urge you to check it out. Jorge Ben really is a genius songwriter, and his backing group, 'trio mocoto' really rock.

from Forca Bruta
available on CD - mojo club volume 4 (Polygram Germany)




  sodapop650: My favorite Jorge Ben is his work on the LP "Tudo Azul" by Ze Maria. If you are not familiar with Ze Maria he is a very hip brazilian organist. The easy comparison whould be with Walter Wanderley, but he is way way cooler with a chimelike reverbed style and a lot darker sound, almost creepy voodoo northern Brazil Bahia sound like the way "Os Afrosambas" by Baden Powell Vinicius de Moraes and Quarteto Em Cy is. A guy I work with is from Brazil and says that although just about everyone is Catholic in Brazil many practice voodoo too and that Vinicius made a pact with the Devil in return for his career - There is something distant and weird about that LP - and the Ze Maria LP as well. Anyway, I think "Tudo Azul" which is available on CD is the first versions of Ben classics Mas Que Nada and Por Causa de Voce Menina. If you go on to ebay look for a guy named Alan Bastos, he sells tons of cool Brazilian CDs cheap.
  tinks: was this recorded in '69? it's the first track on his '76 "samba nova" lp...is that a re-recording, or what? can somebody shed some light for me? at any rate, it's a great album for, uh, "lovin'". my favorite track would have to be "vendedor de bananas cosa nostra--bicho do mato", if not for its unwieldly title alone.
  sodapop651: No this LP is on Continental Label and recorded in 1963. It is available on CD. Tudo Azul, I think it means "everything Blue"
  tinks: the version i have is definitely not from 63, it's waaay too funky.
  delicado: I'm confused about the whole thing. I have no idea where I originally got 1969 from (other than that the arrangement suggested it); the song is on 'Forca Bruta', which I thought was from 1975, but I think in retrospect that's just the date of the copy my (appalling quality) LP was bootlegged from.
  delicado: Ok. It turns out there's a pretty good Jorge Ben discography at http://www.uol.com.br/benjor/disco.htm, which confirms the date of Forca Bruta as 1970. I think sodapop was talking about the (completely separate) Ze Maria album. I heard 'mas que nada' from this album, and it was indeed excellent.
  Marco-Visitante: Official and completes discography of Jorge Ben Jor is here: http://www.jorgebenjor.com.br/sec_discogra_discos.php?language=en
  sodapop650: But I've changed my mind. My new favorite Ben classic is "Carnaval Triste" of the Sacundin LP. There is also a great Ze Maria cover of it off an even earlier LP I'm not sure who penned it or recorded it first. But its meditative and chantlike and very voodoo.
Ode to Billy Joe  performed by Buddy Merrill  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Another amazing version of this fantastic tune. This features several very different-sounding multitracked guitars, and really is quite astounding. It feels very short at a little under 2 and a half minutes. The opening features an acoustic guitar playing a wonderfully delicate and precise rhythm, accompanied by a nice wall of strings and electric guitar hits. A twangy picked guitar plays the melody, building gradually for about a minute.

The track then explodes into a quite amazing sequence, in which a dirty-sounding fuzz guitar picks out a bassline while a manic and jazzy improvised guitar solo moves around over the top and the strings maintain some solid bluesey chords. The sound is extremely funky, and vaguely reminiscent of some tracks from the late 60s 101 strings album 'Astro Sounds from beyond the year 2000', but ends up being more tasteful. Pure genius!

from Land of a Thousand Guitars (Accent ACS 5026)
available on CD - 25 All time hits (Accent)



Oh Happy Day  performed by Quincy Jones  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A great soul jazz track with one of the most beautifully spare and groovy introductions I've ever heard. Featuring Bernard 'pretty' Purdie on drums, Ray Brown on bass, and Quincy Jones on Fender Rhodes, it really is irresistible. The track explodes with a huge vocal choir about half way through; it ends up sounding almost like a gospel song, before slipping back into the cool funky instrumental sound from the introduction

from Walking in Space, available on CD



Oh, Calcutta!  performed by Dave Pell Singers  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This short track opens the classic 1995 easy listening compilation The Sound Gallery. I'm sure it's well known to anyone with a remote interest in the whole revival scene. It's a really beautiful track, with funky drums, organ, a gentle, whispery vocal chorus, and some great jazz piano. Evocative and glamorous, this evokes a swinging party attended by people wearing sparkly dresses. For me, this is perhaps the ultimate stylish/glamorous 60s recording.

from Mah-Na-Mah-Na (Liberty)
available on CD - Sound Gallery (EMI)




  n-jeff: Its funny that it should make you think of people wearing sparkly dresses, when of course the show itself was primarily famous for having large numbers of hairy hippies naked onstage.
Once in Lifetime  performed by Talking Heads  1980
Recommended by geezer [profile]

A bubbling almost loop like backing track punctuated by David Byrnes deranged t.v evangelist style exclamations "My god this is not my beautiful house ,this is not my beautiful wife,what have i done"? .Then a stroke of genius to pull the song back from the edge of avant garde ,a joyous funky ,gospel inspired chorus .A band at their most inspired and confident with the wizardry of Eno pressing all the right buttons.Hard to believe no one has recomended this before.

from Remain in Light
available on CD - Remain In Light


Out of this World  performed by Buddy Merrill  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Ok, I feel kind of lame for recommending two tracks called 'out of this world' in one sitting, but as soon as I remembered this one, I felt compelled to recommend it. Before I became completely obsessed with the kind of smooth bossa-influenced stuff I've been recommending, my big thing in music was that it had to be twangy. This is quite twangy, but in a very tasteful way. An incredibly haunting song whoever it is performed by, 'out of this world' here gets its other-worldliness from Buddy's incredible multitracked guitars - the main tune is played on the slide guitar, while several other parts relentlessly pick out accompaniments. It's hard to categorize this track really - it's not remotely funky or particularly rocking, yet it's very catchy and undeniably compelling.

from Latin Festival (Accent)


Pata Pata  performed by Augusto Alguerro  1968
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

This is the sound of summer in the sixties as I remember it from my childhood. Sunny, light, breezy. Its from one of Augusto Alguerro's 2 Polydor releases, and while not as funky or bizarre as some of the other tracks, in terms of shear fun pop its a total star. Starting with a nice little trombone riff, its quite fast with wordless vocals, flute and light brass. It has the very good production that you always seem to get with 60's polydor LP's. I wonder if the Ragovoy that wrote it is Jerry Ragovoy who I know better as a soul writer, penning Lorraine Ellisons mighty 'Stay with me baby' amongst others.

from Sounds Spectacular (Polydor)




  delicado: Horst Jankowski's version of this is excellent also! I would love to check out the Alguero, but it seems to be very hard to find his LPs. I have 'Laugh Laugh'; that's it...
  RCA76: This artist is totally worth looking for. He's arranged, composed and played pretty much Spain's most important music of the 50's and 60's. Spanish (and now international) vocalists like Rocio Durcal, Sara Montiel, Karina and Marisol recorded countless impressive hits of Algueró and Antonio Guijarro (his long-time writing partner). They are the Rodgers and Hammerstein of Spanish cinema.
  mike33436: If anyone is interested, this CD set includes some nice tunes. Michele ps: Am looking for some Andre Brasseur,Ted Heath, Edmundo Ros and a few more.
Peace Frog  performed by The Doors
Recommended by Lubi [profile]

From the album Morrison Hotel, Peace Frog is a bouncy toe tapping tune encapsulating funky wah wah with jazzy tones and a hint of country.

What I love about this tune is it's ability to make me get up and dance, head bounce toes tap.

Facinating lyrics, quite contradictory in contrast with the merry, whimsicalness of the music.

"There’s blood in the streets’ it’s up to my ankles"

However when your dancing around It has little precedence, the organs and drums take you away and the lyrics are gone.....

from Morrison Hotel, available on CD


Pearlie’s swine  performed by Monica Zetterlund  1972
Recommended by mattias [profile]

A extreamly funky track that we're not use to hear from Monica. Everything she's recorded are great but this song (and the whole album) is unique. Quite simulair to the work of Blossom Dearie or Astrud Gilberto at the time.

from Chicken Feathers (Sveriges Radio)



  Issie:
  Issie:
Pinball Number Count  performed by The Pointer Sisters  1975
Recommended by Festy [profile]

There seems to be a cut off age where people either recognise this tune immediately, or have never heard it. I'm not sure what year Sesame Street stopped using this cartoon, but my guess is somewhere between 1980 and 1985. Having said that, for those of you who do recognise the track, it may bring back images of a cartoon pinball racing around a pinball machine with you following closely behind. I never realised that this track was by The Pointer Sisters (no surprise there), nor appreciated how funky it was as a toddler (no surprise there either). This track was never released on any Sesame Street records, but a label called "Legacy" has recently released a 3CD box set of tracks from Sesame Street, mostly including the celebrities that have visited over the years (check Stevie Wonder's funky toon), but with this track on it also. This re-edited track was also released as a 12" (with two versions of "C is for Cookie" on the flip) at the same time that the box set was released.

Sesame Street expanded into many countries, some of which created their own versions ("Vila Sesamo" in Brazil, "Sesamstraat" in the Netherlands, "Iftah Ya Simsim" in Kuwait and "Rechov Sumsum" in Israel to name a few), and I'd be interested to hear comments as to whether or not Pinball Number Count was shown in these countries also.


available on CD - Songs From The Street: 35 Years of Music (Legacy)




  snafkin: Wow! What a great track! This song has always been lurking around the darkest depths of my mind, every now and again inexplicably popping out into the sunshine. Now I know what it's called and who did it. Thanx Festy!
  Katya: It's so true that this is either embedded in you as a kid, or you missed it altogether. There is a letter kicking around on the web from Walt Kramer to Matthew Jones of the Helium site in which he discusses this tune and the recording session. Fun stuff. [Walt's letter] This is from the NinjaTune.net SolidSteel subsite: "It all started a couple of years ago when Strictly Kev, part of DJ Food, desperately wanted to include the infamous 'Pinball Number Count' on the first 'Solid Steel Presents' mix CD. You know the track, it was super funky and was accompanied by the cool animation of a pinball rolling around strange landscapes. Now this track is the stuff of legends within beat digging circles, DJs have scoured record bins for decades in the hope of finding it included on old Sesame compilations but alas, it was never on any of them. "Fortunately Kev knew this and rang Sesame Workshop in New York asking for a copy of the tape. It never actually made it onto the mix CD but that's another story. What you have here is a composite of numbers 2-12 of the 'Pinball Number Count' animations (number 1 was never created). Kev has re-edited all the key elements and cleaned up the sound while he's at it. And cooing those syncopated numbers and do-dos in the background is only the Pointer Sisters on a session singing assignment." You can also SEE the old cartoon segments that the song accompanied. The entire series seems to have been included with several other number classics on the DVD "Sesame Street - The Great Numbers Game."
  Festy: My pleasure, Snafkin! Thanks Katya for the extra info and links. It was great to read up on the history of the track and also see the lengths some people were going to when trying to find the track before it became readily available. I noted DJ Food refer to another release on Ninja Tunes featuring Sesame Street toons in the near future. Yay! Also, there were quite a few references to an earlier, jazzier track titled "Jazz Numbers". I hope this pops up somewhere too.
  Eclipse80: The pinball skits are one of my fondest classic Sesame Street memories. I was born in 1980 and remember seeing this skit from about 1983 to 1986. So sad they don't use it anymore. The song brought back great memories! Thanks!
Pinwheel Herman  performed by Mouse on Mars  2000
Recommended by HoboTech [profile]

The Kings of electro-funk strike again! This has got to be thier funkiest song. Weird synths battle against funky beats and moog style bass. Was there ever a better tasting jam? Pretty much undescribable, but fantastic. Simply fantastic.

from Niun Niggung, available on CD


Please, Please Me  performed by Bearcuts  196?
Recommended by K Pucino [profile]

Interesting Beatles related Exploitation Record with a nice Cover!
The Sound is much similar to the Original Beatles from Liverpool!

Go to http://www.easylounge.org to see the cover and look for other interesting Records! (Organ Sounds, Easy Listening, Funky Big Band Beats, Cheesy Listening.....a lot of them with sound samples!)

from The Bearcuts Swing in Beatlemania (Somerset)
available on CD - not available on CD !!



Poema Ritmico do Malandro  performed by Sonia Santos e Zito Righi  1969
Recommended by DJ Markinho [profile]

This is the first track from the album Aluciunolandia van Zito Righi e Seu Conjunto, a very rare record. Original copies are sold for $ 350,-. I am very happy with the reissue. This song is like a early Brazilian rap (1969). All in Portuguese of course. It starts with a funky piano and spoken words by singer Sonia Santos. When she has finished her introduction, there is some cheering by the musicians and after the whistle has blown a very rhythmical samba starts. Sonia Santos starts rapping and rhyming. The words from title poema ritmico are well chosen. It sure is a very rhythmic poem! I havent been able yet to understand what it is all about, but this rap is about um malandro, a rascal.




Prelude in Black  performed by Cy Coleman  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Both shocking and extremely cool, this has to be heard to be believed - a 'rock' adapation of Rachmanninov's Prelude in C# minor which really does rock. Cy Coleman lays a huge funky breakbeat and a heavy bassline on top of the beautifully dark, doomy theme. A jazzy guitar comes in and out as the track builds. I've never heard anything quite like it (I mean that in a good way). I am now unable to hear the original piece without Cy Coleman's breakbeat!

from The Ages of Rock (MGM)



Rainmaker  performed by Harry Nilsson  1969
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

A chunky, funky open drum breakbeat opens this supremely catchy song. It sticks in my head and at times I wake up simply having to hear it.

from Harry (RCA LSP-4197)
available on CD - Harry/Nilsson Sings Newman (Camden-RCA)




  n-jeff: Bobby Gentry does a top version on her LP Fancy. The whole LP is a funky Swamp Pop extravaganza, this is a wonderful tune by a writer that doesn't normally do much for me.
Real Pain  performed by Kraak & Smaak  2007
Recommended by iPodChick [profile]

The multi-talented Dutch artists Kraak & Smaak shine in their unprecedented, soul-shaking compilation, “The Remix Sessions” due out May 29th. Named by IDJ as "one of the most incendiary live outfits," Kraak & Smaak take that crackling energy and infuse classic jams with their signature style. Music lovers everywhere will rejoice as hard-to-find tracks, many of which were only released on vinyl, join each other in this boogie-licious showcase.

From banging dance floor "Mimezine – Can't get Enough (Kraak & Smaak Remix)," to funky, midtempo "Jamiroquai – Electric Mistress (Kraak & Smaak Remix)" to eerie, internationally-infused "Skeewiff – Man of Constant Sorrow (Kraak & Smaak Remix)," Kraak & Smaak reveals their astounding vision for the possibilities of electronica. This beat-driven assembly is an invaluable resource for re-tracing the various pathways of this modern musical expression.

from The Remix Sessions (Quango Records)



  aquila49: If this recommendation sounds like an ad, it's because it is one! I found the exact same wording on another site—indie911.com. iPodChick works for the recording industry. Is that acceptable to Musical Taste members? It isn't to me. By the way, I like Kraak and Smaak—but I am not coming here anymore if shills like "iPodChick" are going to be posting "recommendations."
  delicado: Hi aquila49 - thanks for your comment. yeah, I figured this was probably an 'inside' recommendation although I didn't do the follow-up googling! I don't mind say people recommending their own band so long as it's one song and they're pretty straight up about it, but obviously this isn't the same thing. I guess I should set out some guidelines somewhere. If anyone else has any feelings about this feel free to chime in!
  n-jeff: I agree with aquila49 - off with their heads! I hardly buy music papers because too much is regurgitated verbatim from press releases. I must admit when I read the initial recommendation my mind glazed over halfway through the first phrase, so I couldn't actually read it. Send them back to MYSPACE!
  aquila49: I guess "ipodchick" doesn't have anything to say about this—or anything else. Good riddance.
  liveinpeace: I think the music speaks for itself, however it may have come to our awareness. I do not criticize ipodchick or anyone else for not posting more here. You have made people feel so "welcomed" to join in the discussion. Just keep on living in peace, love, and music.
Road ode  performed by The Carpenters  1972
Recommended by delicado [profile]

The Carpenters have become like Abba were for me about 15 years ago - I can lose hours at a time just listening to their best songs with the volume up high. I actually never really dared to venture beyond my favorites from Abba's hits, but with the Carpenters I have a few LPs and recently picked up a 5-CD reader's digest set, allowing me to hear some less famous tracks by them.

This track is a bit of a revelation for me. Highly produced, early 70s. Piano-led, with strings, guitar, bass etc, and Richard providing some backing vocals. Karen's singing is beautiful as ever, although her voice sounds a bit funny - she over-pronounces words like 'goes'. The verse is plaintive and moody, while the brief chorus is funky in that glorious way tracks from the early 70s can be funky. This section is reprised with pretty sick flute playing!

In all, a really beautiful track that for me showcases all the best things the Carpenters have to offer. The band are still stigmatized by many, for reasons I'm not exactly clear on. I understand that this kind of highly produced, clean sounding music might not be for everyone, but if you've just been put off listening to them because they're not very cool, maybe give this track a try!

from A song for you (A song for you)
available on CD - Magical Memories of the Carpenters (Reader's Digest)



  FlyingDutchman1971: You are not alone in you love of the Carpenters! I am proud to say that I have every studio album produced by Richard and Karen and still play them all the time. I need to pull them off the shelves and post a few songs on here... thanks for bringing it to my attention!
  callgirlscene: I like the Carpenters too. They have a pristine flawless and happy quality that is slightly unreal. It's fascinating and yet there's a kind of tragic undercurrent in some of their music too.
Rock With You  performed by Michael Jackson  1979
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

While i can't say i'm an admirer of Jackson, his first two Epic records "Off The Wall" and "Thriller" are a reminder he wasn't always that pathetical popular figure he is today but a talented performer and songwriter with an array of gifted people to back him up as arrangers, songwriters and musicians. The most imported credit goes to the legendary Quincy Jones, who really gave these records an incredibly rich sounding, impeccable prduction. All instruments, funky guitars and bass, swirling disco-esque strings, horns and brass, vocal harmonies and syths, are in the right place here. The production is detailed, lush and transparent sounding, easily beating most of todays pop productions, even more so on the remastered versions of these records.

from Off The Wall, available on CD



Roses and Revolvers  performed by Janko Nilovic  1970
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Janko Nilovic deserves attention. He composed a huge volume of library music in the 1960s and 70s, and what I've heard of his work has all been excellent. Some of it has recently been made available on CD by the Cosmic Sounds label, who are also releasing new work by him. It's hard to sum up his work, because it was quite diverse. From what I've heard, Nilovic was like a jazzier, more wild version of other contemporary library composers like Roger Roger and Nino Nardini.

This is a wonderful instrumental that opens with a bare breakbeat. This is soon joined by bass and electric guitar, which then give way to a Morricone-style harpsichord, which riffs over a descending minor chord sequence. The whole thing remains funky and slightly menacing as different parts drop in and out. The whole piece is really just a simple jam, but the impeccable arrangement takes it to a higher level.

from Supra Pop Impressions (Montparnasse 2000 MP16)



Runaround Sue  performed by Dion & the Belmonts  1962
Recommended by fantasticsupremedeluxe [profile]

"I should have known it from the very start
This girl would leave me with a broken heart
Now listen people, what I'm telling you
keep away from Runaround Sue


I miss her lips and the smile on her face
touch of her hands and this girls warm embrace
so if you don't wanna cry like I do
keep away from Runaround Sue"


Half sad, half funky. A very groovy Doo Wop - track with a funny melody that makes it hard to believe that the guy is really blue...


available on CD - Dion Hits (1958-1963) (Ace)


Skin Trade  performed by Duran Duran  1986
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Beneath the avant-garde lyrics and futuristic synth textures, there was always a pulsing dance music quality that drove the classic Duran Duran sound. As they progressed into the late '80s, they allowed that dance element to move up front and dominate their style. A good example of this tactic is "Skin Trade," a hit whose silky and funky style led to it being mistaken for a Prince song. The lyrics have a surprisingly direct, soul-searching feel to them as they lay out scenarios of people shortchanging their dreams to make money. These moments are followed with the dramatic proclamation that makes up the chorus: "Will someone please explain/The reasons for this strange behavior?/In exploitation's name/We must be working for the skin trade." The music lends contrast to the angry tone of the lyrics by creating a sultry, mellow melody that juxtaposes verses with a soft, hypnotic ebb and flow with an ever-ascending chorus that revs up the song's inherent drama. Duran Duran's recording is fuelled by funky but gently layered guitar textures and subtle drum work that push its groove along, plus some atmospheric synth textures on the chorus. Interestingly, Simon LeBon uses his normal tenor voice for the choruses but sings much of the verses in a lush, soulful falsetto that led many pop fans to initially mistake "Skin Trade" for a Prince ballad. The result was a perfect blend of slow-dance textures and adult social critique. It didn't do as well as "Notorious," just barely making the Top 40 in the U.S., but it got plenty of radio airplay and is fondly remembered by the group's fans as one of Duran Duran's most mature achievements of the late '80s.
(AMG)

from Notorious, available on CD


Skippin’  performed by Ramsey Lewis  1977
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

On my weblog, I referred to this song as a "Funky Housewife Thang", since "Skippin'" was used as the theme song for a local homemakers' TV show in the late '70s and early '80s. It really is funky (several members of Earth Wind and Fire play on it) -- squishy synths bobbing along until Ramsey's piano enters and brings it down to earth. The kind of thing you could get down to safely while dusting around the house.

from Tequila Mockingbird, available on CD


smells like teen spirit  performed by pleasure beach  2001
Recommended by shaka_klaus [profile]

strange and kind of funky version of a song that was very popular when i was just a little boy. i don't know any other songs by the group. i heard it on a acid jazz label comp and i bought the single. i don't think i've ever listened to the a-side...


available on CD - hammond street (acid jazz)


So Nice (Summer Samba)  performed by Howard Roberts  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I just heard this for the first time and was completely bowled over. Summer Samba, which in its famous Walter Wanderley organ version sounds like a not-particularly-hip roller-rink tune, is here given a funky treatment with organ and guitar. The guitar gets a little noodley, but in a cool way. Most of Howard Roberts's capitol albums have just been re-released as 2-on-1 CDs; I hope they are all as good as this one.

from Jaunty-Jolly! (Capitol ST-2716)
available on CD - Jaunty-Jolly!/Guilty!! (Euphoria/Sundazed)



Something  performed by Chet Baker  1970
Recommended by konsu [profile]

One of the more overdone of the Harrison tunes, brought to life by one of most understated jazz singers ever. This one always gets me, and I often prefer it to the original for it's pure poignancy. By this time in Chet's career he's not batting a thousand, but this whole album is pretty entertaining. It has a funky version of "Vehicle" and a fantastic version of "Come Saturday Morning"!

from Blood,Chet And Tears (Verve V6-8798)


Sophisticated Side Ponytail  performed by Natalie Portman’s Shaved Head
Recommended by melpomenex [profile]

This is a really wacky song, but I love it. It's by a little-known band. Check out the music video (I found it on Vimeo). It's as crazy as the song!

from Glistening Pleasure


Sordid  performed by Amon Tobin  1998
Recommended by JerMan [profile]

funky, jazzy, hypnotic...

from Permutation (Ninja Tune)



Soulounge Jam  performed by Soulounge  2004
Recommended by lenny [profile]

Grooving. funky bassline, mute and open trumpets above black voices, thin rhythm guitar.
Beautiful stuff of the young, rather unkown band Soulounge from Hamburg. If anybody knows a more grooving tune, please tell me.

from Home



State of the Nation  performed by Fad Gadget  1980
Recommended by geezer [profile]

A funky bassline and psychedelic vocalising were not the norm for the normally synthy electronic Fad,a rumbling slightly intimidating track that pre dated The Stone Roses and Trip-Hop ,how this track can be nearly 30 years old is slightly unreal and the line "life begins when youre ready to face it" will resonate with anyone whos time has yet to come .

from Fireside Favourites, available on CD


Step Out  performed by The Mamsa and Papas   1971
Recommended by geezer [profile]

If you are familiar with the,by now,well played M and P sound this will surprise you ,a gentle ,light funky ballad with an entirely male led vocal .The measured ,considerate vocal by John Phillips takes the Mamas and Papas into a new mature almost sophisticated territory.Regretably short at 2.20,the previous sunshine pop makes way for new feeelings and concerns ,from a fantastic album callled "People Like us " which seemed to pave the way for what came to be known as AOR,the relentless sunshine of California discovers the humidity of 70,s L.A .This was their last record

from People like us
available on CD - People Like Us


Stormy  performed by Scott Walker  1970
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This is not a typical Scott track in any sense, but is still very enjoyable. Scott's take on the often-covered 'Stormy' is charming, breezy, and (unusually for Scott) funky. The arrangement is very full, but there is a strong rhythm section which prevent the prominent strings from becoming overbearing.

from 'til the band comes in, available on CD



sway of the verses  performed by Talvin Singh  2001
Recommended by Siobhan [profile]

Sound builds using funky indian beat into an amazing primal but mesmerising layers of rhythmn.
Resist if you can !

from Ha


Take 8  performed by Pete Moore  1970
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A simple blues/funk instrumental with a fuzzy bassline and an incredibly infectuous groove. It's short and sweet, and the drum sound super fresh and funky. This is typical of Pete Moore, who made some incredibly cool records in the easy-funk vein, which are rarely seen outside his native UK.

from The Exciting Sounds of Tomorrow (Fontana)


Te Ofrezco Mi Corazón (Make It With You)  performed by Roberto Jordan  1971
Recommended by RCA76 [profile]

This is a very cool, sultry and funky Spanish version of Bread's "Make It With You". Of course the vocals are definately not par to the original, but I like it. This guy has like a million other translated 60's and 70 rockabilly tunes; La Chica De Los Ojos Café (Brown Eyed Girl), Uno, Dos Y Tres ¡Detenté! (1, 2, 3, Red Light), Rosa Marchita (Cracklin' Rose), Juntos Felices (Happy Together), Ven A Darme Amor (Come And Get Your Love), Estos Ojos (These Eyes). Check 'em out!

from Rosa Marchita (RCA)
available on CD - Lo Mejor De Lo Mejor De RCA Victor (RCA Victor)


Tell Me When  performed by The Human League  1995
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Although a thick line has long been drawn connecting disco to the '90s techno scene, few have bothered to connect the dots between the more modern genre and synth pop. The Human League didn't need to fret about such things, though; they intuitively understood those relationships, having explored virtually all the influences over their career — industrial, funk, R&B, synth pop, new wave, and disco itself. And when the wheel turned again, the band was back on top with a sound that hadn't really changed, but just refined. With a few minor alterations, 1995's "Tell Me When" could have come from 1983, slotting nicely between "Fascination" and "Mirror Man." Of course, the drum programming would need to be changed (there were no jungle rhythms back then!), but the funky bassline can stay, along with the bubbly synths. In fact, the real difference is found in the vignette-esque lyrics and the more complex vocals. And these slight changes make all the difference, turning synth dreams into techno club success. A taster for the group's forthcoming Octopus album, "Tell Me When" hit on both sides of the Atlantic, landing just outside the Top 6 and Top 30 in the U.K. and U.S., respectively.
(AMG)

from Octopus, available on CD


The 8.17 Northbound Success Merry-go round  performed by Margo Guryan  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Margo Guryan wrote several quite famous songs in the 60s, the most famous of which are probably 'Sunday Morning' (made famous by Spanky and our Gang; also recorded by Julie London and others) and 'Think of Rain' (recorded by Claudine Longet, among others).

After the incredibly brilliant reissue of Margo's solo LP, 'Take a Picture', Franklin Castle released a compilation of Margo Guryan's demos. This is the standout track on that disc, a very spare and funky number with a cool organ sound, nice drums and catchy vocals. As would be expected from a recording intended only as a demo, this is a little rougher sounding than the studio LP, but it's a brilliant song. I wonder if anyone else ever recorded it...


available on CD - 25 Demos (Franklin Castle)



The Body Clap  performed by Sharron Lucky  1975
Recommended by mr_klenster [profile]

This is a children's song, giving instructions to a game, the catch is that the rhyme is spilled over a great drum backing. Yes, it's a bit corny and high on kitsch-value, but the pairing of such funky, stiff drumming with a children's rhyme makes it a real gem. The brevity of this track insures that it won't grate on anyone too heavily. It's a 7-inch Stones Throw release, with three other songs. Of other note is her husband's Pease Porridge Hot rhyme, sampled by De La Soul.




The Call  performed by Gene Page  1972
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An atmospheric soundtrack instrumental, with a superb blend of strings harpsichord, brass and woodwind. Everything is underpinned by a gently funky beat that delights me, and is typical of early 70s mood instrumentals.

from Blacula, available on CD




  Mike: Nice dense arrangement with the harpsichord penetrating attractively (try to remember that penetration can be unattractive at times). I enjoyed the excerpt very much.
  delicado: Yeah, the clarinet/sax you hear at the end of the sample nearly ruins it for me, but not quite. Those chords at the beginning recall that great song 'Life is Mono' by Mono, don't you think?
The Detectives  performed by Alan Tew  1974
Recommended by nighteye [profile]

Another "detective themed" song that sounds like the backside of the theme from 'The Streets of San Fransisco'. Heavy basses, powerful percussion, trumpets and a cool melody to top it off. Run before they catch you!


available on CD - The Sound Gallery (Scamp)




  n-jeff: This is a variation of one of the tracks off the "Hanged man" Soundtrack. There is also a third version I believe on a library record soemwhere. Anyway, its well worth tracking the Hanged Man down, its been re-issued by DC recordings and on bootleg (vinyl and cd). The original on contour can be expensive. I think moviegrooves have the re-issues.
  nighteye: You're right n-jeff there are a variation of it on the 'Hanged Man' soundtrack avaiable at Moviegroovies.co.uk. I also recognize the track 'Smokey Joe the Dreamer', not sure from where - but it might have been on one of the 'Dusty Fingers' compilations?
  n-jeff: Tew was one of many UK composers who also did shedloads of Library music, so it could have been anywhere, TV, Film, another LP.
For lots of information on the UK Lounge/ Library/ Collecting thing have a look around www.vinylvulture.co.uk.

  nighteye: There are a shitload of variations and other builds on the same theme on a De Wolfe compilation called "Alan Tew - Drama Suite Part 1". I think that's the library record you are thinking of n-jeff.
The Good, the Bad & the Ugly  performed by Luiz Bonfa  1968
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A rather warm and funky take on the Morricone classic, with harp, violins, trumpets and very cool percussive elements.

from Bonfa! (Dot)


The Holy Filament  performed by Mr. Bungle  1999
Recommended by Tangento [profile]

This is a truly unique song, from a beyond unique band. Mr. Bungle has a rabid, almost cult-like following, and songs like this are the reason why.
This band has always drawn on many different, widely varying influences, including ska, grindcore, jazz, and funky beats, to name just a few.
This track displays a whole new direction for the band, with dreamy, ethereal bass and piano interplay, retro-vocal harmonies, and an almost rapturous climactic sequence, followed by a melancholy fade-out.
This is a work composed by Bassist Trevor Dunn, (a true talent) and I feel it is more than worthy of a place on this list.
The album is a classic, I highly recommend it for people with just about any kind of musical taste.
I am providing a review/ option to purchase:
HERE

from California, available on CD


The Peterman  performed by Bullet  1975
Recommended by HoboTech [profile]

Beautiful slow jazz funk. Funky bass, floating flutes, trombone, rhodes piano. This entire album is a classic. You've probably heard some of it somewhere before, it's been sampled by lots of people from DJ Vadim to Buck 65. Originally recorded as library music and then used in the British TV series the Hanged Man, this record is one of my favorites.

from The Hanged Man, available on CD


The Real World  performed by The Ga Ga’s  2004
Recommended by izumi [profile]

This song was first released on their limited edition debut single "Breaking America" which is where I first heard it. Incidentally, I think it's the best song on this 3-track single as opposed to the title track. The lyrics and concept are uber-funky, and the guitar riffs are really really cool. This is a song that points to a band with lots of spunkiness and talent. ^_^

from Tonight the Midway Shines (Sanctuary SANCD319)
available on CD - Breaking America


The Seed (2.0)  performed by The Roots  2003
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

Funky, and soulful, and very smooth. I love the sound of acoustic guitar in a hip-hop song.

from Phrenology



The Thief Who Came To Dinner  performed by Henry Mancini  1974
Recommended by bobbyspacetroup [profile]

A great track hiding out on a later Mancini LP. Soulful brass, funky bass, and theremin-like sounds coming out of the Arp Sythesizer -- the Arp programmed here by Chris Mancini (Hank's son?).

from Hangin' Out With Mancini (RCA CLP1-0672)




  JoNZ: Yes, Chris Mancini is the son of (sw)Hank. I believe he has some lp's of his own out but they are weak in comparison to Poppa Mancini.
The Wiggely Cat Walk!  performed by Montparnasse  2000
Recommended by tinks [profile]

One of the coolest-sounding things from the past couple of years! A very funky breakbeat, odd sound effects, wordless vocals and an organ sample come together in this very chic (and very Japanese) melting pot. This comes to us from Masanori Ikeda, who was a longtime resident DJ at Blow-Up in London (DJ Nori) and also records under the guises of Mansfield and the High Yummies.

from Escalator Records, Tokyo, available on CD



Three Days Of The Condor  performed by Rythm Heritage  1976
Recommended by Pal [profile]

Great soundtrack to a great film and composed by Dave Gruisin that some of you might know from the excellent the get easy! sunshine pop compilation from last year (2003). I think this was the one record who got me into the soundtrack genre. It´s got that typical 70´s funky soundtrack sound. Dig it.


available on CD - Playtime


Time Operator  performed by Scott Walker  1970
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This song has a certain quality that really makes it stay with me. It's from 1970 - Til the band comes in. Clever use of the dialing tone to blend with the strings/orchestration. It's a slightly different blend from Scott's more revered work - slightly funky percussion and overtly croony vocals. Strings and a bit of trumpet. Wonderfully atmospheric stuff. Funny words

from Til the Band Comes In, available on CD


Tinseltown In The Rain  performed by The Blue Nile  1983
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

The Blue Nile must be one of the most enigmatic and fascinating bands of all time. Formed in Glasgow in 1981 they released just 4 albums in 23 years with 6 years between the debut "A Walk Across The Rooftops" (1983) and their sophomore effort "Hats" (1989), 7 years between this and their third album "Peace At Last" (1996) and an 8 year break until their latest record "High" was released in 2004. That sums up to a mere 33 album tracks in almost a quarter of a decade, but what they lack in quantity they make up in quality. While "Hats" is undoubtedly their masterpiece, "Tinseltown In The Rain" may be their strongest single track. Backed by a strong, funky bassline combined with jazz-like piano chords and incredibly lush strings the track shines with a wonderfully clear, sophisticated arrangement and production. Paul Buchanan delivers wonderfully emotional, heartfelt vocals to it that tinges the song in a melancholic and uplifting mood at the same time.

from A Walk Across The Rooftops, available on CD




  ronin: "Tinseltown in the Rain" brought BN to the DC airwaves, as also did "Stay." A band not based on 3 guitars, and I actually liked it! "Easter Parade," also on lp, is a very slow, detailed description of an event, loaded w/haunting atmospherics, coming to an understated climax. (To me "Hats" is their least exciting work.) "Peace at Last" and "A Walk Across.." are the most exhilarating... electronics/Linn drum machines aside, it's the magic of Paul Buchanan's incredibly moving voice. His heart's on his sleeve... a big sleeve. Emotion drips from every syllable. These get constant airplay at home.
Trop's  performed by Alberto Baldan Bembo  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A super cool instrumental track which for me is one of the highlights of the Italian 'Easy Tempo' series of film music compilations. A laid back funky beat drives the song forward. Strings seep in and out, twangy guitars play on. I guess if you're reading this you are getting the picture of the kind of stuff I like by now...


available on CD - Easy Tempo Volume 8 (Right Tempo)



Trzeba Wracać  performed by Novi Singers  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Listening again to a compilation I made almost four years ago, I heard this magical track, which really had a big effect on me. It's probably not for everyone. Meandering and rather wistful, it's not at all funky like some of their later work, but I find it utterly compelling.

As you might have heard, Novi Singers were an incredibly talented quartet of vocal singers recording in Poland in the late 60s and 70s. They did several amazing records. This is taken from what I think was their first, Bossa Nova. But rather than renderings of songs like 'One note samba' and 'Desafinado', the album consists of a delightful and varied collection of originals in a related mood. The result is like bossa nova from a parallel, slightly more melancholic universe.

The accompaniment is a slow, gentle bossa played by a small jazz group, with some rich strings dropping in and out, and the vocals (all wordless/scat) take centre stage. The chord sequence is staggeringly beautiful, and at times the vocalists take slightly extravagant scat solos.

It sounds strange to say it, but this is really one of those tracks that seems to tell an enormous, emotional story, in spite of the fact that it doesn't contain one word! It would make a fantastic soundtrack to a silent movie.

from Bossa Nova (Polskie Nagrania)
available on CD - Bossa Nova/Torpedo (Polskie Nagrania)



  delicado: just to reiterate, this IS the best song ever!
Twangy Brisba  performed by Berry Lipman  1970
Recommended by HoboTech [profile]

Space should only be this fun! Jazz-Funk surrounded by space age synths with a disco beat. Lipman is one of Germany's cheesiest composers, but when he gets it right people stand up and applaud. This album is some of the best sci-fi music ever.

from Star Maidens - The Girls From Space, available on CD


Twilight Zone  performed by The Spiders  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

For many years I've continued my life under the misapprehension that one version of the Twilight Theme (in my case, the original Marty Manning version) would do me just fine. But this tremendous Japanese group sounds version is unmissable. Lots of random sound effects with a heavy influence from The Ventures in Space. It kicks off at 1:08 where the drums stop and the sound effects just take over. Lots of random twanging and watery bits. Really cool sounding. Then at 1:40 the drums come in hard and funky. There are a few more little breakdowns and it ends in total chaos leaving you feeling the aliens definitely are coming!

Basically it's a very well executed recording.


available on CD - GS Box Set


uptown top ranking  performed by althea and donna  1978
Recommended by olli [profile]

the exellent title track from reggae ladies althea and donna's 1978 effort, uptown top ranking. don't know too much about them, except that this is a nigh-on perfect album. short and sweet (about 35 minutes), but without a single skippable track. great arrangements and vocals, though the lyrics seem to borderline between daft and genius in places. still, this is top class, and absolutely essential party music.

from uptown top ranking, available on CD


VJC  performed by Clifford Coulter  1972
Recommended by Festy [profile]

This is one of my all-time favourite tracks - most probably in my top-5 - and is a perfect example of what I understand "jazz-funk" to be. I came across it many years ago on a compilation put out by French label "Big Cheese Records". I hunted down the album it was from (not sure if it's been re-issued - or if it has, it hadn't been then) and was pleased to find that the whole album was strong with most songs carrying a similar vibe to VJC. Those that were different, were still great.

I'm not sure what VJC stands for. I wonder if it's the initials of someone close - his mother or another familiar member perhaps? Throughout many of the tracks, he seems to be playing a character with chatter between the tracks leading one into the other leaving.

from Do It Now - Worry About It Later (Impulse AS-9216)
available on CD - The Meltdown (Big Cheese Records)



Walk Away  performed by Kelly Clarkson  2006
Recommended by Izzy [profile]

I love this song because it is so catchy and is really funky, I reckon everyone would like it!

from Breakaway


Wantin’ Ain’t Gettin’  performed by The Association  1967
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

In putting together a mix CD tentatively called "Far Out Sixties", this song immediately came to mind. Anybody who knows the Association from "Windy" or "Along Comes Mary" is in for a rude awakening when hearing this tune. It's quite a funky little jam with laid back, almost scatting vocals and droning sitars. So groovy you could picture the guys wearing love beads and nehru jackets while performing it!

from Insight Out (Warner Bros.)



  konsu: Alright! I've compiled this one before too. I think the sitar/drum break at the top has been sampled more than a few times. The tune almost sounds like a tribute to Ravi Shankar & The Lovin' Spoonful simultaneously...Right On!
  deaser26: This was a song written by my father, Michael Deasy Sr - who played guitar on most of the Association's stuff. He did a couple of psychedelic albums, Friar Tuck and his Psychedelic Guitar and Tanyet - both cutting edge classics. This song was an interesting exploration for the Association guys.
Werewolves of London  performed by Warren Zevon  1977
Recommended by Groucho_75 [profile]

Although nothing to do with the film 'An American Werewolf In London' this song reminds me of it for fairly obvious reasons. I watched the film on video when I must have been about 10 and it scared the pants off me, so much so that I couldn't watch the end. Its a great track, a bit cheesy but generally quite a good rocky, funky sing-a-long number. No idea who Mr. Zevon is, but what a great name! By the way, also on the ridiculously named album is the theme from the Cantina in Star Wars!


available on CD - Super Hits of the 70's: Have a Nice Day, Vol. 21



  bloozshooz: You really should check out more Zevon, Groucho_75. One of America's greatest songwriters who sadly passed last year. Who else could write moving rock songs about topics as diverse as mercenaries in Africa (Roland the Headless Thompson Gunner), eternal Middle East tension (The Envoy), and toxic pollution by organic chemicals (Run Straight Down)?
Wunder Gibt Es Immer Wieder  performed by Katja Ebstein  1970
Recommended by BlueEyedYe-Ye [profile]

Who would have thought something with a groovy, funky loungey feeling like this could come straight out of the Eurovision Song Contest? Not only that but the girl is cute as a button, has a fantastic blue eyed soul voice and was a bit of a cunning linguist too, this song exists in the original German, French, Italian, Spanish, English and even Japanese! This really is killer lounge funk and ought to be comped, but i'm pretty sure it isn't... Worth checking out though.


available on CD - Wunder Gibt Es Immer Wieder (Ariola Extra)


You Fucked Up  performed by Ween
Recommended by Kilbey1 [profile]

A funny breakup song, done in a very juvenile style, but everything you ever want to scream to your ex right after they dumped you. Sung to a woman, but applicable in all such nasty situations - the feeling is still there. Even when I'm angry, this song has me laughing. Backed by a funky rhythm that just barely turns it into a melody.

from God Ween Satan, available on CD


Zazueira  performed by Astrud Gilberto & Stanley Turrentine  1971
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A very funky track from Astrud's final US album. Very bass-heavy and percussive, just an excellent song. Stanley Turrentine's tenor sax doesn't meld with Gilberto's voice nearly as well as Stan Getz' warmer tones did, but that's a minor flaw that doesn't detract from the overall song too much.

from Gilberto with Turrentine, available on CD


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