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You searched for ‘Bossa’, which matched 105 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
A view from her room  performed by Week end  1982
Recommended by whoops [profile]

After the split of the Young Marble Giants, Alison Statton dreamed herself as Helen Merill and ended up to be the most convincing Astrud Gilberto impersonator of the eighties. A view from her room begins as a bossa and ends in a blast of percussions.
One of the true masterpiece of the first half of this decade ans it's a shame that it is not currently available.

from La variété by Week end (Rough trade)



  delicado: By coincidence, I bought this record on Monday in a charity shop in England. I like it very much. Alison Statton and Spike toured England about 6 years ago and were excellent.
Ai Ai Ai  performed by Emma Sugimoto  1970
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

The "Softrock Drivin'" series is a terrifically compiled collection of japanese soft rock and bossa nova gems from the late 60s/early 70s. And it clearly shows that the japanese interest in all kinds of easy listening music wasn't solely influenced by contemporaries like Burt Bacharach but by native artists as well. This track by Emma Sugimoto is a delightfully light and fluffy piece of japanese pop and sounds like a blueprint for some kind of "Shibuya-Kei" track artists like Pizzicato Five could have produced. With shimmering strings, harpiscord embellishments, slightly funky electric guitar and a wonderful trumpet on top. With the clear, transparent production and fine arrangement it's a true standout track of the series.

from Softrock Drivin': Between Waves (Columbia COCA-13705), available on CD



Amori Finiti  performed by Giancarlo Gazzani  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

To me, this track is a perfect distillation of all that is wonderful about bossa nova and the various hybrids which it inspired. Bossa nova was taken up all over the world after its rise in the late 50s and early 60s, but Italian musicians seem to have done an especially good job of absorbing its charms.

A simple instrumental, this opens with a plucked guitar and simply builds up and down, adding piano and strings and then taking them out so beautifully that it makes you shiver. Alas, the rest of the compilation this is taken from suffers from poor sound quality. If anyone comes across the original Giancarlo Gazzani album, I'd be very keen to hear it, although I fear this track may be an isolated gem.

from Musica per commenti sonori
available on CD - Metti una bossa a cena (Schema)




  Swinging London: Really nice. Reminds me of a 1966 movie soundtrack. Now I've got to search for the song.
As tears go by  performed by Nancy Sinatra  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This song is an interesting case study into the question of 'why do I like this version of the song more than any other'. I have a half-baked theory that for me, I mostly just like the first version of any great song I hear, regardless of whether or not it is the original or 'best' version. But this track is so different to the Rolling Stones's version that I think it would probably divide people pretty clearly. Produced by Lee Hazlewood/Billy Strange, 'as tears go by' is here recast as a crisp pop bossa nova. They even change the chords slightly (adding a new chord as she sings 'by'). To me, this makes the song vastly superior to the original (or any other I've heard). But I'm not sure anyone has ever agreed with me yet on that one...

from Boots (Reprise), available on CD




  tinks: i had to go back and listen to this album after you mentioned it...and it is an incredible version, i really love that soft bossa sound that it's got going on. the rest of the lp is great, too!
  FlyingDutchman1971: i was lucky enough to find a vg++ copy of this LP at Goodwill several years back and this is definitely the best track on the album!! A great interpretation of the song!!
  n-jeff: I love this version, theres a cello or something under the introduction that adds a lovely melancholy feel. Quite a sophisticated sounding track. well removed from the bludgeoning innuendo I associate (and love) with Nancy and Lee. I had one of the few run-ins over musical policy with my old promoter over this track, he thought it far too downbeat.
  RCA76: I love this version of this song, infact I didn't know for a long time that this is a Rolling Stone's tune, but again because it's a version that is so original it really is incredible. Quite popular in Latin America (not so much w/ the Stone's version).
Autostrada per Los Angeles  performed by Bruno Nicolai  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

For me, this perhaps the absolute apex of the much-admired Italian 'Easy Tempo' series of compilations (it's on Volume 8). The formula is similar to other tracks I've recommended - a sexy wordless vocal, a light bossa beat, some strings. But that really doesn't tell the story! The chord sequence is extremely catchy and uplifting. This is a truly incredible three minutes.

from Femme Instabili, available on CD




  VataMcPortaltech: ohhhh that is nice the 60s were ruled style wise by scorpio (1958-1972)so its the sexiest musical period.
Bachianas Brasilieras #5  performed by Lalo Schifrin  1964
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Beautiful summery easy-bossa arrangement of this Villa-Lobos orchestral piece. The tempo floats along at a lazy pace, augmented by gorgeous piano and flute solos, then comes to an abrupt end with a very cool bass riff. Apparently, Schifrin recorded another version of this song in 1996 on the "Gillespiana" album, and that features Karlheinz Stockhausen's son Markus playing trumpet!

from New Fantasy (Verve V-8601)




  Swinging London: NICE...very nice!
Bicho do Mato  performed by Elis Regina
Recommended by PappaWheelie [profile]

Many may already be aware of this samba due to Walter Wanderly's space-age tinged organ instrumental version, but Elis's original vocal version is far more powerful with relentless horn blasts. It also demonstrates her range of emotions put into the performance as she goes from delicate to belting.


available on CD - Samba Soul '70! (Six Degrees)




  ambassador: I believe the original version (by anybody) is on Jorge Ben's "Ben e Samba Bom" on philips from the mid 60s.
Blue Glasses  performed by Smokey & Miho  2002
Recommended by aquila49 [profile]

Put some SPF-40 on your ears before listening to this unadultered mix of bossa-pop sunshine from the duo of Miho Hatori (Cibo Matto) and Beck session man Smokey Hormel.

An infectious guitar joined by percussion and horn slinks around and through Miho's precise, breathless vocal.

Four plus minutes of aural ecstasy. (You have to work awful hard to make something sound so easy.)

from Smokey & Miho (Afros Sambas 001)



Bossa for My Eet  performed by Andre Ceccarelli
Recommended by mr_klenster [profile]

This is part of the De Wolfe library collection. A good library collection has just been reissued in Japan that includes some of the better selections that this catalog has to offer. Now that most of the great music libraries have found snug homes, this CD is an easy way to avoid the price gouging and hassle of scoring a song you just want to listen to. I like this song because it has a unique cool and light tone, while being somewhere in between bossa and uptempo dancefloor jazz. Something to listen to in the shade at the beach. It only clocks in at 1:41, but you couldn't ask for more or less.




Bossa Nova Bessie  performed by Frank DeVol and the MGM Studio Orchestra  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This sounds like it should be a generic bossa nova cash-in film song, but instead, it's strangely haunting and gripping to my ears. While it's a sweetly orchestrated piece (a bossa nova guitar and beat, a flute melody, and a Stan Getz-esque tenor sax, backed by a subdued orchestra) I feel as if there's something menacing just beneath the surface. However, it's so subtle, this could be in my head. It's taken from the 'The Glass Bottom Boat'; maybe I have to see the movie and decide.


available on CD - Bachelor In Paradise - Cocktail Classics from MGM Films (EMI)



Bossa Rock Blues #1  performed by Manfredo Fest  1972
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Really suprised to see this one in a thrift store recently. I was taken back by the bad cover photo of some blue cheese in tin foil with saltines and a bottle of wine.(?) Anyway, the music is fantastic, much in the vein of Jobim's CTI work from the same period. This piece grooves almost more in a Deodato way, with a nice funky nocturnal jazz bite. Nice to see the gap close on the years between his Bossa Rio stint and the records he did for Discovery.

Strangely enough it was recorded in Minneapolis MN while he was living there. On the RCA subsidary Daybreak.

from After Hours (Daybreak DR 2012)


Captain Jack  performed by Ken & Beverly  1968
Recommended by konsu [profile]

One of the far too few originals on this great underrated LP.The duo has a familiar west coast pop-jazz sound,much like their labelmates Bud Shank & Joe Pass.Except where as those two have way too much generally lackluster output,this duo has tons of talent packed into one exciting session! Ken plays an icy alto & soprano not unlike Paul Desmond and Beverly sings with all the grace and soul of ladies like Lena Horne and Dinah Shore. In this track, one of the most energetic on the LP,the group swings in a brisk 5/4,with Ken blowing a soulful line and alternating into creshendos with Beverly paralelling in a sassy vocalese. Wonderfully breezy,and just the kind of peppy bossa-like lounge tune you'll listen to over & over & over...They also do great versions of"A Man & A Woman"(with Ken adding some tasteful vocals himself)and "Eleanor Rigby"! A tough record to find, and no compiled tracks are anywhere to be found.... sad.

from Watch What Happens (World Pacific WP-1862)



Carcara  performed by Nancy Ames  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A great track, sung in spanish by Nancy Ames. It opens with pulsating horns, a wall of strings and an insistent latin beat. Everything quietens down in the middle, and Nancy sings accapella before the song explodes into action again. The way the brass, strings, flute, bossa guitar and fiery pop vocals are all crammed into two minutes is pretty cool. The whole thing is extremely catchy and intoxicating.

In 2004 this album, along with Spiced with Brasil, finally made it onto CD.

from Latin Pulse (Epic)
available on CD - Latin Pulse/Spiced With Brasil (Collectables)



Cecil Beaton’s Scrapbook  performed by Would Be Goods  1985
Recommended by andyjl [profile]


The finest moment of a legendary 80s UK indie label which fused a post-punk spirit with the best elements of 60s pop style - bossa nova, light psychedelia, girl groups. And pre-empted the lounge/easy listening revival by about 10 years. The Would Be-Goods were two sisters, Jessica and Miranda, who couldn’t sing and did so beautifully. The él catalogue is being re-issued on CD by Cherry Red Records. Well worth checking out.


from The Camera Loves Me, available on CD


Chansons Francaises  performed by Notre Dame
Recommended by moondog [profile]

More godlike melody from monsieur Arnaud Fleurent -Didier. This one, the title track, taken from his tribute to the french singers and songs of his youth (serge, polnareff and son).A largely acoustic number with a bit bossanova, chansons, strings, a female voice and that extra magical melody chord that only Arnaud seems to be in possesion of. You need this man in your life, right now.

from Chansons Francaises, available on CD


Chavinha  performed by Orlann Divo
Recommended by sodapop650 [profile]

Off the LP "Orlan Divo" Orlan Divo's first release on the Musidisc label. A collaboration with Ed Lincoln, Waltel Branco and other Musidisc luminaries. This LP/CD is available as a reissue from whatmusic.com

A laid back bossa/balanco track. Nice easy vocals by Orlan Divo who has a great voice (although I don't speak a word of Portugese so I couldn't say what he's singing about) and some really sweet understated organ licks from the usually over-the-top Ed Lincoln especially durring the vibes break. It's a great track off an even greater LP. I think the only other consistently solid LP like this one is that comes to mind would be Eumir Deodato's "Tremendao" on the equipe label.




Chorou, Chorou  performed by João Donato  1973
Recommended by Festy [profile]

It has been argued that Joéo Donato was the first to play a bossa nova rhythm on a recording (playing the accordian on "Eu Quero Um Samba" with Os Namorados), but whilst his contemporaries from the early years of bossa, such as Gilberto and Jobim, were happy to expand on the traditional bossa sound in later years, Donato went a number of steps further. The first track "Chorou, Chorou", from a fabulous album titled "Quem é Quem" is not even the best track off the album, but the opening bars give an idea of what the whole album is about. It's playful in melody, often subtly funky in rhythm and over all, a great album. This particular album also contains my favourite interpretation of "A Rã" by Donato. I'll have to recommend more songs from this album at a later time, because it really is great.

from Quem é Quem (Odeon)
available on CD - Quem é Quem (Odeon/EMI)




  konsu: He was always revisiting his compositions. He did this one in the mid sixties as well. Also check out the mad versions on his "Bad Donato" LP he did for Blue Thumb in 70', his take on The Frog is amazing.
  Festy: I recall reading somewhere that "A Rã" was his most favourite track that he had written. I haven't heard a bad version of it by him or anyone else. The "Bad Donato" album never grabbed me either, for some reason. Lots of people love it. I think I need to have another listen to it. ;)
  ambassador: i had the pleasure of interviewing maestro donato a couple summers ago as he was celebrating his 70th birthday. I recently went through the interview again for a forthcoming article about the man and he admitted that "A Bad Donato" was his "noisiest" album. hard to disagree with that and I think that's why some people love it and others are turned off. Sometimes there is just too much going on with it and his later versions of some of these songs are much more refined and better in my opinion. regarding his regularly recording previous songs, he is a HUGE Stan Kenton fan and kenton also recorded his songs dozens of times. my two pennies.
Cinnamon and Clove  performed by Sergio Mendes and Brasil ’66  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A beautiful take on this tune, which sounds as if it were made for the group. The sound is typical of Sergio Mendes’s work - a strong driving bossa nova beat, a beautifully clean piano arrangement, and tasteful vocals.

from Sergio Mendes and Brasil 66 (A&M SP4122)



Conversazione  performed by Mina  1967
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Opposed to the dramatic Morricone interpretation of "Se telefonando", recommended elsewhere on Musicaltaste, Mina is in a beautifully light bossa mood here on "Conversazione". And the arrangement adequately reflects this with joyful flutes, gentle electric guitar and rather muted strings.


available on CD - Una Storia, Il Mito (Universal)



Coração de pedra  performed by Os Jovens  196?
Recommended by DJ Markinho [profile]

Os Jovens were a duo from Rio de Janeiro in the mid 60s. "Coração de pedra" (heart of stone) is an powerful sixties garage track. With an over-the-top organ sound, fuzz guitar and a tight beat, this song shows that Brazilian musical history has a lot more to offer then Samba, Bossa Nova and MPB. The Jovem Guarda scene, which was concentrated in Rio and São Paulo, hosted some great musicians like Roberto Carlos, Erasmo Carlos, Wanderlea, The Beat Boys and Brazilian Bitles.




Daybreak  performed by Best Of Friends  1970
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

Had it been released under different circumstances, this song might have been one of the enduring soft-rock classics of the early 70s. It's got a catchy, haunting melody and one can easily imagine it charting alongside Bread or Seals And Crofts or whoever.

Best Of Friends were essentially the East Coast-based songwriting/guitar duo of Bing Bingham and Joe Knowlton. I'm not sure how, but Eumir Deodato and legendary bossa nova producer Roberto Quartin took a shine to them and recorded this album for Brazilian release on Quartin's eponymous experimental label of the early 70s. The album even features Dom Um Romao on drums. It's actually a straight-forward pop-rock album of its era, with little to no Brazilian overtones. This same duo would later make an album on RCA as "Joe And Bing."

This title track was also covered by Astrud Gilberto on her 1972 "Now" LP, arranged by (coincidence?) Mr. Deodato himself....

from Daybreak (Quartin)


Diamond Bossa Nova  performed by Francesco De Masi  1967
Recommended by PappaWheelie [profile]

Italian film score Bossa Nova featuring lyric-less female vocal.

from The "Troppo per Vivere, Poco per Morire" soundtrack (Edizioni Beat Records/REIA)
available on CD - Easy Tempo (Eighteenth Street Lounge)



Do You Know The Way To San Jose?  performed by Bossa Rio  1969
Recommended by konsu [profile]

WOW! We all know how much the brazillians love Burt, well, this is a fine example of how well he was interpreted by the south.



They keep the original arrangement but spice it up a bit with snappy side-stick beat and pumped-up organ stabs ala' Wanderley.The singers are (I believe) Gracinha Leporace & Pery Ribeiro,and they harmonize beautifully as Manfredo Fest rythmically taps his organ paired with piano in a sumptuous unison.They carry the song along in gradually ascending stages of bliss,until they drop away only to build "Do-you -know-the-ways"in an rounded refrain to finsh it off...Absolutely gorgeous! Produced by Sergio Mendes in his imitable style!!!Also check out their version of "Up, Up, And Away", from the same LP.

from Bossa Rio, available on CD



Don’t Go Breaking My Heart  performed by Wilson Neves e Seu Conjunto  196?
Recommended by sodapop650 [profile]

This whole LP will make all you Ed Lincoln fans happy. It is a group led by Wilson Neves, the percussionist on a lot of major Bossa releases including all the Eumir Deodato LPs released on Equipe. This track is not the Elton John Kiki Dee version but the earlier Burt Bacharach version. The whole LP is loaded with great organ heavy instrumentals and dance-floor-burners performed by an extremely tight combo. Best of all its available on CD as part of the Odeon 100 Anos series. A lot of groups on the Parlophone label could crank out the cheesey sixties-organ sound and Bacharach covers but not many could match the rythms of Das Neves. How do they say it - ritmo calliente!

from Juventude 2000, available on CD



  delicado: Funny - I just compiled this track the other day. The album sounds great, but my copy is an extremely scratchy Colombian pressing; I'll have to pick up the CD.
Don't Go Breaking my Heart  performed by Roger Nichols and the Small Circle of Friends  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A beautifully gentle and textured version of this song, led by some great group harmony vocals. These are backed by a gentle bossa nova beat, electric harpsichord, and strings which sweep in and out. Gentle and addictive listening.

from Roger Nichols and the Small Circle of Friends (A&M)
available on CD - Complete (Polydor Japan)




  rum: Oh there’s certainly no denying it, this track has an irresistibly seductive melody but there’s no chance I’d be seduced. Oh rum, you’re just being silly, she’d say, “don’t make a mountain out of a grain of sand…” silly?! I caught you in bed with the Mayor of Pensacola, Florida… this is no grain of sand my dear! But rum, it was just one time, a silly mistake, “one drop of rain doesn’t make the sun run away”, does it? Are you mad? What kind of reasoning is that? 17, 18… eighty-seven drops of rain wouldn’t either. So what are you trying to tell me? Am I to hold out for a rainstorm of two-timing before getting in a huff? The summer of love ended last September. This is 1968, the year of revolution, of fighting in the streets, of… but then she’d put her finger on your lips, “DON’T… go breaking my heart…” and look up at you with the innocence of a wee lamb. Oh, you so want to forgive her. Maybe I’ll give her just one more chance, it is such a beautiful melody… “I’ll love you till the sky falls down, even then… you’ll remain in my heart” Ahh, no, no, I’m not falling for that. I’m not an idiot, that’s impossible. Now I know you’re having me on. I’m not getting caught in your web of lies you, you, you… Your melody maybe sweet but your argument stinks. Go on get out, strumpet! “…come to my arms, forever…” No, no, clear off. “…teach my heart how to smile?...” OUT!
Don't Go Breaking My Heart  performed by Burt Bacharach  1965
Recommended by m.ace [profile]

A super-sweet bossa-pop tune. From one of Burt's solo LPs, but actually sung by an unnamed female trio who do magical things with the hypnotically pretty melody line.

from Hit Maker! (Kapp)


Each and everyone  performed by Everything but the girl  1984
Recommended by whoops [profile]

Ben Watt and Tracey Thorn in the early eighties were recording the same Bossa oriented songs that made "Sade" famous, but with more talent. Eden was their first album, both had recorded songs before for Cherry Red (a UK label) but to be on a major label Gave them the opportunity to really arranged their songs. Each and everyone opens the album with magnificence.
As soon as the second album the magic was lost, EBTG was just another name on the Warner catalogue.

from Eden, available on CD



El Pacino  performed by Bang Data
Recommended by rockolito [profile]

Acoustic gritty melancholic guitar, bossanova with electro Rap..haunting melodic chorus

from Maldito Carnaval (Rockolito Music)


Eleanor Rigby  performed by Oscar Peterson  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Eleanor Rigby does not immediately seem like the kind of song which would sound good as a cover version, but this fantastic version by Oscar Peterson proves otherwise. It opens with a simply heavenly string sequence from Claus Ogerman. Then Peterson’s gentle and percussive piano comes in backed with an driving bossa nova guitar and a huge, rich string arrangement. The tempo then switches over to a more jazzy style with a walking bass.

from Motions and Emotions (MPS 21207137)




  n-jeff: For a version on another tack theres Enoch Lights' (I can't remember if its from Spaced Out or Brass Menagerie 73). But its a cracker. Driving bass, swinging horns and electric guitar taking it to a whole groovy level the Beatles wouldn't imagined for their ballad.
Eque  performed by Duke Ellington  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Taken from his exquisite Latin American Suite, this is an unusual sounding track to me. Mid-tempo, with an unrelenting bossa nova style beat, the action is shared between the piano and various horns and saxophones. I guess it's the strange discordant tones that take this track higher for me. They remind me of some chords I've heard in the more adventurous Brazilian pop music of the late 1960s - basically taking what is fundamentally a sweet sounding, warm chord, and overlaying notes that provide a darker, more forboding feel.

Adding to this, the punctuating horns and reeds give the whole thing a gently groovy feel that's reminiscent of quirky 60s soundtrack music. Really cool stuff, and I recommend the whole album.

from Latin American Suite, available on CD


Esta Noite Serenou  performed by Fernanda  1977
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

Just one of many gems on the wonderful "Simplesmente" LP. A fairly stripped-down arrangement and recording, but which still allows for the song's bright verse and chorus melodies to shine forth. The track is built from acoustic guitar, bass, drums and a hint of (what else?) percussion, which pulse gently along on the verses in a rhythm that reminds me of dancehall reggae somehow, while still being obviously a branch of the bossa nova tree. Fernanda's sweet croon and instinctive sense of swing navigate this terrain effortlessly. Who is Fernanda? Where has she gone? On the strength of this LP, she definitely had quite a bit to offer. But it was tough, back then, being Elis Regina's competition.......

from Simplesmente...Fernanda (Copacabana)



  n-jeff: Thats funny, I was talking only recently abou the similarity of the Baion rhythm to the pulse of the ragga beat. Along with "Its not unusual" having a Baion rhythm, its a neat way of tying up Tom Jones, Shabba and Marcos Valle.
Exaltacao e Lamento do ultimo rei  performed by José Mauro  1970
Recommended by moondog [profile]

The soundtrack to november. This or any other year. Brazilian Jose Mauro only made one album before the brazilian military or drugs (info anyone ?)pulled him in but me oh my how beautful that record is.
If there could be such a thing as bossanova-blues than Jose Mauros "obnoxius" is the blueprint. Joses songs which comes along like a blend of early milton nascimento with doses of Marcos Valle and Edu Lobo. The album was arranged by gaya and is filled with wonderful string arrangements. One modern reference would be another Jose,namely,the swedish indietroubadour Jose Gonzales. The highlight of the album comes at the end, Excaltacao e lamento..,which sends shivers down my spine everytime i hear it.

from Obnoxius, available on CD


Fantasia tragica  performed by Stelvio Cipriani  1971
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

This is one of these sensationally sensual, wonderful instrumental tracks only the italians could pull off in late sixties/early seventies. This is the title theme to "La morte cammina con i tacchi alti/Death walks on High Heels", one of the numerous gialli (thriller movies with that special italian touch) to come out of italy in heavy doses from the late sixties up to the mid seventies. Wonderful scores have been one of the constitutive elements of these films and while the scores that Ennio Morricone did for these movies (e.g. "L'ucello dalle piume di cristallo/Bird with the crystal plumage, "Cosa avete fatto a Solange/What have they done to Solange", Una lucertola con la pelle di donna/Lizard on a womans skin" or "Le foto proibite di una signora per bene/ Forbidden fotos of a lady above suspicion") have been long released, a lot of excellent music is still locked up in the vaults of CAM, Cinevox and other italian soundtrack labels. Thanks to the hard work of the guys at DigitMovies a lot of these scores now successively get a proper, remastered release (often for the first time ever), music otherwise would have been lost in oblivion forever. Stelvio Cipriani may not be remotely as well known as Morricone (who, naturally, overshines just every other italian composer), but he was very prolific in the heyday of italian cinema, scoring an equally wide range of different genres from westerns to gialli and from romantic movies to italain police (so called "poliziotteschi") and crime movies. This title track of "La morte cammina con i tacchi alti" doesn't have to hide behind the best of themes Morricone did, in fact the orchestration does sound very Morricone itself with an uptempo-ish bossa nova beat, lush strings, wonderful harpsicord and a female voice carrying the main melody with a bitterweet tone. The voice is delivered by Nora Orlandi, one of the very few female soundtrack composers and she could easily be mixed up with Edda Dell'Orso here. Wonderful stuff, recommended for anyone who enjoys the "Mondo Morricone" comps.

from La morte cammina con i tacchi alti, available on CD



Fome Total  performed by Zuco 103  1999
Recommended by Erik [profile]

Everyone is mixing breakbeats with bossa nova and lounge these days, but rarely as good as Zuco 103 on their album 'Outro Lado'. Probably because other bands don't have a singer as sensuous as Lilian Vieira. Surpisingly my favourite track of this record is the one without beats: it could be discribed as 'bass 'n' violins'. If you like Bebel Gilberto, listen to this song.

from Outro Lado (Ziriguiboom/Crammed Discs)


for no one  performed by caetano veloso
Recommended by olli [profile]

beautiful bossa nova-tinged version of the lennon/mccartney song.


available on CD - calquer coisa




  Mister C: Give Cilla Black's 1966 version a listen, its excellent. Its very tenderly sung with a beautiful arrangement.
Going out of My Head  performed by Sergio Mendes and Brasil ’66  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A wonderful version of “Going out of my head”, which was originally sung by Little Anthony and the Imperials. It's a great song anyway, with really nice words (well, nice for a Smiths fan like me, anyway: 'there's no reason why...my being shy...should keep us apart...'), but Sergio Mendes also adds an extra musical edge to the chorus, and this really adds a new dimension to the song. The instrumentation is classic Brasil 66: Percussive jazz piano, group vocals, and a driving bossa nova beat.

from Sergio Mendes and Brasil 66 (A&M SP4116)




  whoops: I totally agree with you. Their version of Caetalo Veloso's Lost in paradise is also quite wonderful.
Guitarras Em Fogo  performed by Waltel Branco  196?
Recommended by sodapop650 [profile]

Waltel Branco is the guitarist on a lot of classic early and mid-sixties Bossa LPs with outfits with Wilson Das Neves, Eumir Deodato and I think Ed Lincoln. There is also the classic and highly prized "Mancini Tamem e Samba" LP under his leadership that is available once again on the whatmusic label. Branco is like a Brazilian Les Paul but a little less quirky and a lot more hip. You can't help being more hip with that latin beat backing you up. Lots of deep lumbering compelling beats allow Branco to highlight his fretwork, thus the title - as far as I can translate becasue the cover is a picture of a flame - "Guitars on Fire." Similar to Heraldo Dos Monte "Batida Diferente".

from Guitarra Em Fogo (Musidisc HiFi 2.056)


guns of brixton  performed by nouvelle vague  2004
Recommended by olli [profile]

bossa nova version! superb cover of the clash classic. highly recommended.

from nouvelle vague (peacefrog)



  Ricard: Love this version... it's all slowed down, and it makes it sound so menacing!
Hammerhead’s apartment  performed by David Whitaker  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This is a beautiful bossa-tinged theme with a great blend of strings and brass. The flute/trombone melody is accompanied by an incredibly rich and airy string sound, which swells as the melody builds. The strings alone compel me to listen to this track repeatedly – their remarkably thick, drenched sound recalls some of my favorite Ennio Morricone pieces (particularly those on the fantastic ‘Mondo Morricone’ compilation). Musically, the entire ‘Hammerhead’ score seems to have been influenced by John Barry's Bond scores, and by the less goofy parts of Burt Bacharach's ‘Casino Royale’ score. As well as being a haunting movie theme, this track has elements of that classic loungey film score sound from the mid-sixties.

from Hammerhead OST (Colgems)




  nighteye: This song is excellent! Haven't seen the movie starring Peter Vaughan yet, but the bossa sound reminds me of the early John Barry pieces. I can't stop listening to it! Thank you Jonny!
How to open at will the most beautiful window  performed by Lalo Schifrin  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A beautiful, lush masterpiece with a bossa nova beat (hmm, is there a pattern to the songs I'm submitting?), 'how to open...' is one of my top tracks ever. It opens quietly with a slightly cheesy flute sound over a gentle guitar. A great wordless vocal then comes in coupled with strings. Superb. If you never listen to music like this, what I'm saying probably doesn't exactly make it sound cool. But it really is cool, very very cool indeed.

from There's a Whole Lalo Schifrin Goin' on (Dot)




  Sem Sinatra: A lot of Lalo Schifrin's music doesn't seem to adhere to a formula, and this is one of those ... I never get tired of hearing it
  Fox: This track is so quiet and peaceful. Lalo is a genious. We got in France, an electronic artist called Alex Gopher (I think he took his name from the soap opera "Love Boat", it's a sign!) that sampled the three first strings notes from that track. His album is called "You, my baby and I" but is more famous for the interpretation he made on "The child" based on a beautiful song from Billie Holliday "God bless the child". For those who want notice the fruits that have grown from the roots! Ennio Morricone made a concert recently in Paris, if Lalo could do the same soon...
Hurry to Me  performed by Roy Budd  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A superb recording of a really perfect song. Ennio Morricone's theme to the obscure movie 'metti, una cera a cena' (one night at dinner) is here performed in a classic crisp, clear version by Roy Budd. I'm not sure if I love this recording so much because it was the first version I heard, but I think it may even be better than the Morricone recording. Anyway, if you don't know this song, you will probably recognise it when you hear it. It features an infuriatingly catchy repetitive female wordless-vocal over a gentle bossa beat, with rich strings and piano. Every now and then everything goes quiet and all you hear are the vocals and a faint tremelo guitar. It is really amazingly beautiful. There is also a great italian version of this song by Milva, which sounds amazingly like the group Stereolab.

from Soldier Blue (Pye NSPL 18348)
available on CD - Sound Spectrum (Sequel)




  leonthedog: The Budd version is also available on "Rebirth of the Budd," for those (like myself) wanting an introduction to his work. The Sandpipers' version on "Canto Morricone Vol." is equally nice.
  DickieB: I just wanted to recommend ‘The Sound Spectrum’ which this is on. I’ve had a copy of years but have only just realised that it’s essential listening - if you like this sort of thing, probably drive you mad otherwise.
  delicado: Yes, it\'s a cracking compilation. It\'s so well done that if you listen to the tracks out of context (e.g. on the original LPs), they don\'t sound as thrilling as they do on this mix!
In The Garden  performed by Triste Janero
Recommended by mr_klenster [profile]

This whole album is really spectacular. My other favorites are "Today It's You" and "Rene De Marie". All capture this beautiful blend of psychy-pop, bossa rhythm, and folky soul. Great blends of patterns, instrumentation, and vocals, I really love this stuff.

from Meet Triste Janero


It’s A Lovely Game Louise  performed by The Cyrkle  1969
Recommended by konsu [profile]

I'm always suprised by this group. The freshness of this song is hardly questionable, mainly because the soundtrack is a hidden gem recently unearthed. And for Cyrkle fans like me, it's a dream come true. The song is a spare bossa-tinged affair, done as sort of a stripped down folky interlude. But the track stands on it's own amongst their better known tracks like "The Visit", of which it bears a resemblance. It sounds like Tom Dawes took the reigns on this project, arranging and producing the whole thing to make one of the more memorable and interesting soundtracks I have.

Fans of Elliot Smith should check this one.

from The Minx (Flying Dutchman Amsterdam AMS 12007)
available on CD - The MInx


It’s Impossible  performed by Aldemaro Romero And His Onda Nueva  1972
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

This is an uptempo, light bossa nova vocal interpretation of this song, very much in the vein of the classic Sergio Mendes & Brasil '66 sound. Very nicely arranged male/female vocal harmonies, superb electric harpsicord and swirling, lush strings really make this version quite outstanding and contrasting to the Perry Como version, who popularized this song a year earlier.

from Aldemaro Romero And His Onda Nueva (Columbia)
available on CD - Brisa Brasilera (CBS)



I’m Shadowing You  performed by The Singers Unlimited  1975
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Wonderful song (written by Blossom Dearie and Johnny Mercer), perfectly performed, produced and arranged. The Singers Unlimited recorded over a dozen albums between 1972/1981 for the acclaimed german MPS label. This track has an incredibly mellow, almost etheral sound with a breezy bossa rhythm, delicate instrumentation by the Pat Williams Orchestra and the Singers' magic voices on top of it.

from Feeling Free (MPS/Verve)
available on CD - Magic Voices (Motor Music)



Kim  performed by Bertrand Burgalat  2000
Recommended by dedismo [profile]

style: pop, downbeat. Smooth, easy, just the right amound of bossa, drums, synthesizers. Kim is just a great song all around and only 7 some minutes long. But you don't ever want it to end. Keeps your head nodding. Burgalat is the master of instrumentation as much as Sean O'Hagen is to the High Llamas. He can produce a mellow, warm, lush sound like no one else at the moment.

from The Genius of... (Bungalow bung 079)



  tempted: Ah, mon dieu! I hate comparisons in general but I must say to everyone who's just bought 10 000 Hz legend by Air: get rid of it and get hold of The Sssound of Mmmusic by Bertrand Burgalat instead. He's special.
  delicado: yeah, I must pick it up. I have 'the genius of' and I love most of it.
  autopilot: One of the best things that Burgalat has ever created, and considering his incredible body of work as producer/performer, is no mean feat! It's this tune that turned me on to the whole Tricatel sound that he singularly seems to be the master of.
L.O.V.E (Websters definition)  performed by Bob Dorough  1970
Recommended by mattias [profile]

A great, very represantive Easy Listening/Bossa Nova song. The lyrics is acctually Websters dictionary's description of love. I know this song has been recorded on some other Dorough album but this is the definitive version. It has a great female choire and a nice bossa groove. Really a must! The record containes a bunch of other grat songs like I'm hip, The stranger and oblai de oblai da.

from To communicate, available on CD


Latitudes  performed by Ollano  1996
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

This track is delicately built upon a sample from the first opening bars of "The End Of A Love Affair" by Julie London, a song i absolutely love (and was recommended by delicado somewhere else on this site). Further on Ollano add a gentle bossa nova rhythm to the track and light, breezy vocals (in french) by Helena Noguerra. Evokes a feeling of a mild, sunny day at a lovely seaside.

from Ollano, available on CD




  jeanette: Oooo, I've recently come to really admire this. I have it on a not-that-great Bungalow compilation, Atomium 3003; it's kind of hidden somewhere in the middle and I didn't pay much attention to it when I first bought the CD a few years ago. But thanks to the wonders of mp3 shuffle technology it came up on a playlist last week - I thought, "what is this?" - and played it several more times on the trot. Marvellous stuff.
Les Biches  performed by Flora Purim  1968
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

This record is a complete mystery to me even though I have every other Flora album. Dusty Springfield-style orquestrated pop that sounds like nothing you'd associate with her name. There the slightest hint of bossa, and the flipside (actually the A-side, but I find this B much more interesting) is a basic 60s pop ballad with a bit of a European flavor, produced by folk stalwart Milt Okun, interestingly enough. Both sides are meticulously arranged with washes of strings, horns and reverb. Fascinating! The copy I have is a promo copy, and I wonder if stock copies even exist, since it's in no discography I could find. Does anybody know anything about this?

from 7" (Tetragrammaton)



  andyjl: Jacques Brel recorded a song of the same title around the same time. Maybe it's a cover version of his original? Les Biches ('The Does',ie female deer) is also the title of a late 60s film by French director Claude Chabrol, though I don't think the Brel song is on the soundtack.
  gregcaz: Well, the record only lists the producer Tony Harris as the composer of the song, so I kind of doubt. There's also no apparent link between that title and the actual lyrics to the song.
Let’s Stay Inside  performed by Ivy  2000
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Sparsely instrumented, bossa nova-tinged ballad by New York-based Indie-Pop trio Ivy. Very breezy, airy sounding due to a delicate muted trumpet riff and Dominique Durand's charming, accented vocals (reminding me of the even more accented singing Claudine Longet).

from Long Distance, available on CD



Long Live the King  performed by Gary McFarland  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

It's hard to pick a particular Gary McFarland song to recommend: although I love almost all of them, there aren't that many that particularly stand out. Most have some of the same trademarks: whistling or wordless vocals, brass, guitar, and a gentle bossa nova beat. They're slightly wistful, and make me feel like it's summer whenever I hear them. McFarland also worked with some outstanding musicians, including Gabor Szabo and Kenny Burrell on guitar, Grady Tate on drums, and Willie Bobo on percussion.

Long live the king is actually slightly different - it's a simple, upbeat number with a rock beat, bacharach-style trumpet, and picked guitar; a boogaloo-style saxophone also makes an occasional appearance, as does a hammond organ. The German 'Latin Lounge' CD showcases his work on the Verve label, and it's all excellent.

from Scorpio and other signs (Verve V-8738)
available on CD - Latin Lounge (Motor)



  tinks: i'm glad to hear that mcfarland has finally been put on cd in some sort. i absolutely love him, just because he's so ridiculous. if you like this, you should check out the album he produced for cal tjader entitled "tjader sounds out burt bacharach".
  b. toklas: There actually is at least one album that´s standing out a bit. It´s called "Butterscotch Rum" (1971) and has a guy called Peter Smith accompanying Gary McFarland. He sings and wrote the lyrics and even illustrated the cover! I suppose he´s an Englishman, because his voice has a kind of Robert Wyatt-ish timbre. It´s a very good album with a slightly melancholic mood, and with that special laid-back and somewhat loose instrumentation that is characteristic for a lot of McFarlands later work. Very cool and heartwarming at the same time. Would like to have met him and have little chat sitting in rocking chairs. (Oh I forgot: some of the songs on "Butterscotch Rum" are Seventies Rock´n´Roll. They are not too bad, but usually I skip them.)
Lost In Paradise  performed by Sergio Mendes & Brasil 66’  1970
Recommended by konsu [profile]

This is not so much my favorite B-66' tune as my favorite Gracinha Leporace tune. She sang for Bossa Rio as well as Edu Lobo some rarer solo outings. It's a cover of a great Caetano Veloso tune from an earlier LP. Unfamiliar as I am with the original I can't compare the two, but as far as how out it is for Sergio is without saying. The whole thing sounds really compressed and blissed out, way more soulful than a lot of his earlier stuff, it just drives forward and backward undulating...

Just a beautiful vocal performance, totally solo with chorus overdubs just to fill it out... Gorgeous!

from Stillness, available on CD




  bobbyspacetroup: I'm in total agreement on this one. Stillness and Crystal Illusions are probably my favorite Mendes records, and this track is definitely a stand-out. Great recommendation.
Love Will Tear Us Apart  performed by Nouvelle Vague  2004
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Nouvelle Vague is the project of Marc Collin and Olivier Libaux, who basically took classic late 70s/early 80s new wave songs and transformed them into light, easy going, predominantly bossa tinged tracks, including heavily accented, whispery Longet-esque vocals. They claim these young vocalists never even heard the original songs. It works brilliantly for sure on "Love will tear us apart" where they manage to interpret the song as a melancholic, chilled stroll down a beach with sparse percussion, acoustic bass and guitar, vibraphone and some samples of waves rushing on the seaside. I'd like to think even Ian Curtis might smile down on this cover version...

from Nouvelle Vague, available on CD



Make It Easy On Yourself  performed by Connie Francis  1968
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Always loved this song by Burt Bacharach and this version sounds just heavenly. From the credits, it's easy to spot why: Claus Ogerman. He's in top form here, transforming the song into a gentle bossa nova with all the Ogerman magic of that time, very similar in sound and texture to his work on Antonio Carlos Jobim's "The Composer Of Desafinado Plays": Gentle basic rhythm section, subdued piano, airy flutes and trumpets and of course those impeccably arranged strings swirling in and out during the song.

from Connie Francis Sings Bacharach And David (MGM 4585)



maybe  performed by emma bunton  2005
Recommended by heinmukk [profile]

surprisingly super catchy song. i heard it first when emma performed the song at the eurovision song contest pre-show in german tv. it was pure coincidence that i zapped in when the song started. lucky me!
musically: a bit bossa beat, a lot of "aaah" and "uuuuh" and so on (loving it), the brass sounds a little bit too synthetic. refrain very stock/aitken/waterman-like. but i'm loving those guys too.
does anybody know how the album sounds like?

from free me


Menina Flor  performed by Stan Getz & Luiz Bonfa
Recommended by techniquekal [profile]

Bossa nova jazz. Excellent loungy-type tune with beautiful accompanying saxophone.




Não Adianta  performed by Leny Andrade  1975
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An absolutely storming upbeat funky Brazilan pop/bossa track. I've never found anything else in the same vein by Leny Andrade, but this one is truly incredible. From the very beginning, this song is quite relentlessly uplifting. It manages to be very hip and funky, yet emotional and warm at the same time. Far more percussive than most Brazilian stuff I've recommended, this is nevertheless one of my absolute favorites.


available on CD - Blue Brazil Vol 3 (EMI UK)



Non rimane piu nessuno  performed by Ennio Morricone  1970
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Another wonderful Morricone piece. Taken from the first Dario Argento movie "L'uccello dalle piume di cristallo ", this track has all the typical Morricone trademarks of that time. The first bars of the song would easily be mistaken for an early Jobim song, kicking off with a soft bossa nova style drum pattern and accoustic guitar, but when strings and melody joins in, with lyricless la-la-la female voices, this is definitively Morricone.

from L'uccello dalle piume di cristallo, available on CD



Novo Sabor  performed by Moacyr Marques  196?
Recommended by sodapop650 [profile]

Moacyr Marques puts the Beatles standards (circa about 1964) through the Bossa mill. Better than Os Sam Beatles (which is really Manfredo Fest) Because Marques gets busy on the old Hammond B-3. The whole LP is a winner with all your favorites (I want to hold your hand, Hard Days Night, If I Fell, and of course, Jicket to Ride - the spelling error is theirs). It must be filled with Musidisc allstars becasue the quality of the music elevates the recording above the obvious novelty value to make it a real "corker" - to use a Beatles era term). Whether or not you can ever find a copy of this I don't know - but if you do - grab it.

from Novo Sabor (Musidisc Hi-Fi 2147)



  sodapop650: Also - I don't know why, but if anybody out there speaks portugese and can translate the title, for some reason the cover of the album is a picture of a young couple on a vespa in front of the eifel tower and holding a loaf of french bread (where could they be?) but what any of it has to do with the Beatles I don't know.
  fjordlord: the title means New Taste
O Pato  performed by Natalia y La Forquetina  2004
Recommended by fiftyfootgirl [profile]

Dreamy, sweet, bossa nova track with a Mexican twist. This cover of the Juao Gilberto song runs during the opening credits for the Mexican film "Duck Season," which is equally charming...


available on CD - Casa (Sony (Mexico))


Our Day Will Come  performed by Eduardo Costa and the Hitmakers  196?
Recommended by sodapop650 [profile]

This Hillard and Garson song first recorded by the Romantics in 1963 gets a smoothe Bossa makeover on Eduardo Costa's LP "Eduardo Costa & Os Hitmakers." It has Hammond organ leads and 60's guitar and a mod sound similar to the many Parlophone/Odeon releases of the same period. Its a sweet melody and the LP has a fantastic cover with Eduardo standing at the Hammond in s shag-rugged recording studio wearing an outfit that would make Austin Powers jealous.

from Eduardo Costa & Os Hitmakers (United Artist LP 70.004)


Out of this World  performed by Buddy Merrill  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Ok, I feel kind of lame for recommending two tracks called 'out of this world' in one sitting, but as soon as I remembered this one, I felt compelled to recommend it. Before I became completely obsessed with the kind of smooth bossa-influenced stuff I've been recommending, my big thing in music was that it had to be twangy. This is quite twangy, but in a very tasteful way. An incredibly haunting song whoever it is performed by, 'out of this world' here gets its other-worldliness from Buddy's incredible multitracked guitars - the main tune is played on the slide guitar, while several other parts relentlessly pick out accompaniments. It's hard to categorize this track really - it's not remotely funky or particularly rocking, yet it's very catchy and undeniably compelling.

from Latin Festival (Accent)


Papaya  performed by Stelvio Cipriani  1978
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Very well arranged, fully orchestrated bossa nova piece by the otherwise rather obscure Stelvio Cipriani. Very warm, breezy,summery feeling on this one with it's light beat, lush and silky strings, great melody played on trumpet and harpsicord. It's very resembling of the Morricone sound of the late 60s/ early 70s, in fact you could easily fit this one onto the first "Mondo Morricone" compilation it's so good.

from Bossa Galore - Lounge At Cinevox, available on CD



Poxa (Pôxa)  performed by Evandro Marinho  2001
Recommended by RCA76 [profile]

I love this song, it reminds me why I love Brazilian music. Its very sexy, sultry and classically bossa nova. There about 50 versions, but this one I enjoy a lot. Any other recommendations?

from O Som Do Barzinho vol. 6, available on CD


Pra Manha  performed by Da Lata  2000
Recommended by roger_roger [profile]

Dreaming speedy bossa for the upcoming summer.
The album is cool for all you brazilian based heart.

from Songs from the tin
available on CD - Da Lata - Songs from the tin


Procissão  performed by Tamba Trio  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Tamba Trio were a Brazilian jazz group more commonly praised for their jazz instrumentals than for their vocals. Their vocals on this track are nice and simple, but it is the instrumentation and arrangement which really make the song. What does it sound like? I do honestly like other types of music, but here goes: jazzy piano, bossa beat, thick strings, group vocals. Really great track, and from what I've heard of other versions, they really transformed this song, which normally sounds very different.


available on CD - Tamba Trio Classics (Polygram Brasil)



Quando o carnaval chegar  performed by Quarteto em Cy  1972
Recommended by delicado [profile]

The opening track on the 1972 album 'Quarteto em Cy,' this is an interpretation of a Chico Buarque song, written for the film of the same name by Cacá Diegues. I find this recording very affecting. It helps that the spectrum of sound is that kind of superb blend of strings, piano, bossa nova guitars, and female vocals that I find so perfect. But I think it's also just the fragile, melancholic atmosphere of the song that gets me. After the introduction, featuring a flowing string arrangement that reminds me of the work Claus Ogerman did with Jobim, the song gets going, and the mood becomes a little lighter. This album has just been reissued on CD in Brazil, and is highly recommended.

from Quarteto em Cy, available on CD




  konsu: Yes! I've been hooked on their version of "Tudo Que Voce Podia Ser" lately, from the same 72' LP. That year was great for brazillian recordings in general. Also check out Marcos Valle's "Vento Sul".
Que Pena  performed by Gal Costa  1969
Recommended by PappaWheelie [profile]

Incredible Bossa Nova inspired Tropicalia duet with Caetano Veloso. Drenched in strings & flute, everything follows the enthusiastic guitar!

from Gal Costa [Mercury #1] (Mercury)




  delicado: A superb track. I think I've neglected Gal Costa so far.
  PappaWheelie: I was blown away when I heard this song too. I had heard other Gal songs prior to this, but it was 'Que Pena' that sealed the deal for me to become a fan of hers. Let me know if I'm recommending too many songs; I'm having a really good time here :-D
  brasilnut: Jorge Ben composed this song. The non-stop guitar is typical of his early style. A little clip from'allbrazilian music' about him.(great site) I can't praise him enough. 'Jorge Ben Jor’s music holds a unique role in the Brazilian scene, due to the merging of new elements in his swinging mix and to the way he plays the guitar, revealing his appreciation of soul music and north-American funk, yet incorporating the influence of African and Arabian music, legacy of his Ethiopian mother'
Roda  performed by Gilberto Gil  1967
Recommended by PappaWheelie [profile]

Post Bossa-Nova, Pre-Tropicalia, Brasilian Samba at it's finest!

from Louvação (PHILLIPS)
available on CD - Canta Brasil: Great Brazilian Songbook, # 1 (Verve)



Saiupa  performed by Bossa Rio  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A storming upbeat bossa on the A & M label, produced by Sergio Mendes. It's a short track which sounds essentially like Mendes's Brasil '66 only better. Walter Wanderley or someone who sounds very like him adds some great touches on the organ, and the singers steal a refrain from Bacharach's then-current 'Casino Royale' movie theme 'Bond Street' and work it into the chorus. Really great stuff, written by a genius: Jorge Ben.

from Bossa Rio, available on CD




  tinks: hey, bossa rio!! i have their "alegria!" lp on blue thumb, which was also produced by sergio mendes. really great covers of "spinning wheel", "blackbird", "girl talk", and a few more jorge ben tunes.
  tinks: ...including the ben song "zazueira", which, coincidentally, i have recommended astrud gilberto & stanley turrentine's version of!
  cambo: I was interested to note that the bass line from Jorge Ben's Saiupa as played by Bossa Rio (1969)(listen for break after long chorus) sounds remarkably like Gordon Gano's "Gone Daddy Gone" (1980). Is there any aknowledgement from GG on the Violent Femmes album?
Samba Blim  performed by Tamba 4  1968
Recommended by sambablim [profile]

This 1968 LP out on CTI/A&M records was a big leap fpr the group formerly known as Tamba Trio. It spawned big bossa hits like the title track Samba Blim, my absolute favorite for hip acid jazz(nu-jazz/ Rare Groove)dancefloors from London to Tokyo to even Phoenix,AZ. It's fusion of traditional Bossa Nova, Samba, and 60's Jazz melodies are delectibale to the ears. Nice songs that will get you groovin' are "Samba Blim", Reza", "Tristeza de no dois", and "Baiano". A big LP in my DJ box. A pretty heavy cost for a mint copy, but mine is only VG condition full of pops and crackles. I STILL LOVE IT!!!

from Samba Blim


Samba de mon coeur qui bat  performed by Coralie Clément  2001
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Lovely, mellow bossa nova track. Coralie Clement is the sister of Benjamin Biolay, who wrote almost all the songs on the album and produced, arranged and played a variety of instruments on it. There's a timeless quality about this song, certainly due to the fact the arrangement is simply impeccable and delicate and Coralies whispery, rather flat but warm, sensual voice sounds like a cross between Astrud Gilberto, Claudine Longet and Jane Birkin. The whole record is a quite a gem.

from Salle des pas perdus, available on CD



São Paulo  performed by Nelson Riddle  1970
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A superbly catchy mood music piece, with a gentle bossa rhythm and Claus Ogerman-arranged strings. Very cool, and from the same album which featured strongly on the superb 'Snowflakes' CD compilation of the best mood music from the German MPS label. This track arrived in my head after I woke up this morning and demanded to be played. Very sleek and cool.

from Colors (MPS/BASF)



Si Manda  performed by Jorge Ben  1967
Recommended by DJ Markinho [profile]

This song is on one of Jorge Bens best records: O Bidu (Silencio No Brooklin) from 1967. This Brooklin is a district in the city of São Paulo, not New Yorks neighbourhood. In this period of his career Jorge Ben had moved from Rio de Janeiro to São Paulo. He was the first to use the electric guitar in samba. His previous records were all recorded with a acoustic guitar and had a more classical Bossa Nova and Samba sound. "Si manda" is a great up-tempo Samba Rock track with a powerful beat and electric rhythm guitar. This record and this song in particluar must have had a big influence on the Tropicalia movement and a band like Os Mutantes.

from O Bidu (Silencio No Brooklin)


so in love  performed by Lori Carsillo
Recommended by Alexiathefox [profile]

Bossa Nova like jazz.




So Nice (Summer Samba)  performed by Howard Roberts  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I just heard this for the first time and was completely bowled over. Summer Samba, which in its famous Walter Wanderley organ version sounds like a not-particularly-hip roller-rink tune, is here given a funky treatment with organ and guitar. The guitar gets a little noodley, but in a cool way. Most of Howard Roberts's capitol albums have just been re-released as 2-on-1 CDs; I hope they are all as good as this one.

from Jaunty-Jolly! (Capitol ST-2716)
available on CD - Jaunty-Jolly!/Guilty!! (Euphoria/Sundazed)



So um amor  performed by Shorty Rogers and his Giants  1961
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A short, but astoundingly catchy instrumental in the bossa nova style. This is led by guitar and bass, with subtle stabs from the horn section. It's hard to put into words how clean, yet edgy and catchy the sound is. Somehow, in spite of all the instrumentation, there is a lot of space in the mix. This is from an LP on reprise called simply 'Bossa Nova', with a generic looking sleeve that is also used for a much less bossa-inspired Barney Kessell LP.

from Bossa Nova (Reprise R-6050)



Softly  performed by The Sandpipers  1968
Recommended by laughingmood [profile]

Ahhh...so many great Sandpipers songs to choose from. I'll recommend more later but for now I'll start with the title cut from their "Softly" LP. Superb production by the great Tommy Li Puma and arrangement by Nick De Caro. This track is a great example of what Li Puma added to bossa nova music. Primarily...lots of harpsichords. It's what I consider 'pop bossa nova" and is my favorite type. Once again, the Sandpipers vocals are peerless and this track just takes me away whenever I hear it. As do most of the Sandpipers material.

from Softly (A&M)


Solo Busanova  performed by Hugo Montenegro  1966
Recommended by nighteye [profile]

This theme is taken from the 1960s hit TV-series 'The Man From U.N.C.L.E.' starring Robert Vaughn and David McCallum. Although I don't recall ever hearing this version of the theme I know I've heard variations of it in the series. I particually remember a vibraphones only theme that was played in a store in one of the episodes from the first season.

This version is a laidback bossa song with trumpets, trombones, organs and vibraphones. I'm not sure if this theme was especially written for Vaughn's characher Napoleon Solo, but I guess you could call it his theme since it was often played during his scenes. This is a great song!

from More Music from the Man from Uncle, available on CD



Steppin’ Out  performed by Joe Jackson  1982
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

I grew up listening to Joe Jackson and i still find his venturing into all sorts of musical styles and the eclecticism surrounding his musical work very interesting. Starting as a post-punk, new wave singer/songwriter he released three great albums from 79-81 with his "Joe Jackson Band" before going solo with a string of fine albums in the 80s (musically ranging from jazz, R&B, rock to latin-tinged sophisticated pop) and later writing and arranging soundtracks and even doing classical music. He recently regrouped with his band, produced another album and toured with the original line-up consisting of Gary Sanford, Graham Maby and Dave Houghton and surprisingly it worked as good as in the beginning of his career. "Steppin' Out" was released on probably his best solo offering "Night & Day" in 1982, a highly evocative, melancholic, catchy pop song skillfully mixing a synth sequencer beat and keyboards with piano jazz harmonies and xylophones.

from Night & Day, available on CD




  komodo: I'll second your comments regarding Joe Jackson. I'm surprised that with classic albums such as "I'm the Man", "Look Sharp", "Body & Soul" and the aformentioned "Steppin' Out", Joe Jackson doesn't, in my opinion, recieve the credit he deserves. "Steppin' Out" is a great track, but my favourite version is actually from "Live 1980/86" where he takes a dramatic - perhaps even melodramatic - approach to the song. It shimmers then swells into this wonderful sound, evocative of a kind of fantasy 40's New York, but anchored by JJ's usual lyrical poignancy. Somewhat overblown? Perhaps, but wonderful stuff nonetheless, and definately one to check out if you've not heard it before.
Sugar In The Rain  performed by Sid Ramin  1969
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

An incredibly light and gentle bossa nova track with an impeccable, delicate arrangement. Originally released on the "Stiletto"-Soundtrack, it's due to compiler Toru Hashimoto's excellent work on the "Cafe Apres-Midi" series that this gem didn't fade into obscurity.

from Stiletto (Columbia)
available on CD - Cafe Apres-Midi - Rose (Sony)




  tapler: Sid Ramin was a phenomenally talented arranger and orchestrator. His old RCA LPs exhibit his imaginative approach to big band music.
Summer Sun  performed by Koop  2001
Recommended by PappaWheelie [profile]

The best sample-based, Nouveau Bossa Nova I've heard since Nicola Conte's album.

from Waltz for Koop, available on CD



Sweet Surprise  performed by Blossom Dearie  1970
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

This is a track of off Dearie's second Fontana album "That's Just The Way I Want To Be". An overlooked gem of a record, unusual sounding for Blossom, blending together jazz, bossa nova and folk with nicely arranged orchestration. "Sweet Surprise" has a dream-like, airy feel with it's jazzy waltz rhythm. The album is available on the japanese "Whisper for you" compilation. Unfortunately, her first Fontana album "Soon It's Gonna Rain" from 1967, featuring lots of Jobim and Bacharach songs, has yet to be released on CD.

from That's Just The Way I Want To Be (Fontana)
available on CD - Whisper For You




  FlyingDutchman1971: The album 'Thats Just the Way I Want To Be' is now available on CD. There is also a really good Japanese compilation CD of the Fontana and Verve years called 'For Cafe Apres-midi'. Several tracks from 'Soon Its Gonna Rain' are featured so those of us who love Blossom will have to savor these meager crumbs unless the evil music overlords open the vaults.
  eftimihn: You're right and i forgot to mention the "For Cafe Apres-midi" compilation, this one features all tracks of "That's Just The Way To Be" except one track (they left out the opening track, not a bad choice though since it's the weakest track on the album and not quite fitting to the rest of the songs). Unfortunately there are just 2 songs from "Soon It's Gonna Rain", Meditation and Dindi, on it. But these sound absolutely gorgeous, arranged with some very cool harp embellishments. Too bad the entire album hasn't been picked up by some japanese label yet.
  konsu: Great song, great album, great singer/composer. Why she's not completely worshipped in the USA I have no idea. I really have to disagree with eftimihn on the opening track, it's in my opinion one of the coolest things she ever did! Sure her jazzy renditions of evergreens and her more hip stuff are great, but to stretch out like she does on "That's Just the Way" is just sublime. What was she doing there? Some kind of CA inspired latin/folk/psyche-pop? Genius! True, it isn't like the rest of the album... Also her great take on Frishbergs "Long Daddy Green" is worth mentioning for it's uniqueness.
sweets for my sweet  performed by The Carnival  1969
Recommended by klatu [profile]

Another Brazil '66 knockoff band, maybe not as solid as the Mendes-endorsed Bossa Rio, but they did do a nice version of the Roger Nichols track "love so fine". More importantly, they did this, a cover of one of the Drifter's less memorable hits, done over with a very punchy, immediate arrangement. More aggressive than most of Sergio's stuff. Nice Peanuts, Guaraldi/Schroeder style piano intro! Recorded in L.A. with a few studio guns on board. (added later) Maybe I have velveeta pumping through my heart, but I do enjoy this whole album, even the pretty bad version of turn, turn, turn.

from The Carnival, available on CD


Take it easy my brother Charlie  performed by Astrud Gilberto  1972
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This entertaining track opens with Astrud talking over a groovy guitar and piano background. As she starts to sing the words, the percussion becomes more pronounced, producing a nice bossa/funk hybrid. The production is very different to a lot Astrud’s work, probably because this album was from an obscure label (Perception) with contributions from different personnel than on many of her Verve recordings (e.g. Airto Moreira, Maria Toledo and Eumir Deodato).

from Astrud Gilberto Now (Perception)



Tema de la Onda (Nicola Conte Remix)  performed by Aldemaro Romero & Onda Nueva, remixed by Nicola Conte  2003
Recommended by autopilot [profile]

Nujazz maestro extraordinaire has taken Alemaro Romero's "Tema de la Onda", a Sergio Mendes-style light vocal bossa number, and turned it into a jazzdance smasher.

Conte takes the female lallation-like vocals and a simple two note piano riff, adds his trademark samba/dance-skewed percussion work with a huge shaking piano breakdown, and creates a number that would have been as much a dancefloor filler in the 70s as it is today.

from Onda Nueva Remixed (Dejavu)


The Girl From Ipanema  performed by Antonio Carlos Jobim  1963
Recommended by heinmukk [profile]

hm, i wonder why this hasn't been added yet. if this isn't classic, then what is?
there are about a zillion different interpretations of this song by about a million different artists. there are compilations only with this song but by different artists. and i got two of them.
maybe it's mainstream and it's played too often but i love it nonetheless.
my favourite version is on the album "the composer of desafinado plays". of course arranged by claus ogerman. he did also the arrangement for "the wave" which is i think the best album by antonio carlos jobim. an album packed full with classics.
he made the strings sound so cool and you really get the feeling of what for a lifestyle bossa nova seems to have been those days. (as i think and hope it has been...)

from the composer of desafinado plays



  delicado: Totally digging those Ogerman strings. Ogerman is a genius arranger; I particularly like the work he did with Astrud Gilberto ('funny world' and 'non-stop to brazil' are two great ones) and Joao Gilberto.
  brasilnut: I always hear Claude Debussy's 'Claire de lune' in the phrase 'ah, but he watches so sadly'
The Lily  performed by Shelby Flint  196?
Recommended by konsu [profile]

This song is really nice.... Shelby's voice floats pillowy-soft above a lush, paced,jazz ensemble with vibraharp chiming chords alongside a heartbeat-like rhythym section.Her voice dipping down to touch it like a feather only to be lifted by the wind again... and again... A nice "Ode to a flower" almost in a hobbit rock mode, only without the schtik........

This is one of two that she wrote herself for (as far as I know) her only LP. The rest of the record is good, mind you. But the two songs she wrote are worth the price of the record. The other one is "Moonlight", which is an almost Stu Phillips-like bossa-nova...... Very pretty.

The Adrissi brothers look like they did some arranging, alongside Perry Botkin Jr., who did the two she wrote for the record. He's well known as an arranger and had done work with Harpers Bizarre, among others.

Good if you like A&M pop with folksy touches...

Claudine maybe?

from Cast Your fate to the wind (Valiant VLM-2/5003)
available on CD - S/T (Collectors Choice CCM 273-2 USA)


The Look Of Love  performed by Diana Krall  2001
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

For "The Look Of Love" Diana Krall managed to bring the legendary Claus Ogerman out of his retirement as an arranger (in fact, at that point, he didn't arrange for other people for 15 years or so). That was due to the fact that Krall's longtime producer, Tommy LiPuma (who did some marvelous production work for A&M in the late 60s e.g. for Claudine Longet or The Sandpipers) used to work with Ogerman in the past and so Claus got on board. While Krall's jazz followers found the result all too schmaltzy i just love it. The track is a very laid back, gentle, cool sounding version with a subtle bossa rhythm. And the arrangement and production is as immaculate as you might expect with Mrs. Krall giving a fine vocal performance, reminding me a lot of Julie London.

from The Look Of Love, available on CD




  konsu: It reminds me of some of Ogerman's work for Verve/CTI in the late 60's. Really the nicest version of this song in years.
The Minx  performed by Cyrkle  1967
Recommended by bobbyspacetroup [profile]

Cyrkle recorded the soundtrack to this X-rated adult film in 1967 -- only shortly after after their biggest hit, the Paul Simon-penned "Red Rubber Ball." The film didn't screen until 1969. Judging from the title track, it is a pretty cool score and maybe not what I would expect. Soft, almost bossa acoustic guitar and wordless ba-dum-dum vocals that could of come off of a Gary McFarland record. Supposedly, Cyrkle appear in the film as well.

from The Minx
available on CD - Cafe Apres-Midi - Marine



The Next Step You’ll Take  performed by Club 8  2003
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Club 8, consisting of songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Johan Angergaard and vcalist Karolina Komstedt, started of in the mid 90s with a twee indie pop sound, with jangly guitars (Angergaard being a major Smiths fan) and simple instrumetation. With the release of their self- titled album in 2001 they added some electronica without losing the general tone of their music which is basically well crafted, melodic, gentle, airy, etheral, melancholic indie pop. Karolina Komstedt vocals are quite similar to early Nina Person of The Cardigans or Claudine Longet in their airy, angelic, dreamlike delivery. "The Next Step You'll Take" is a bossa nova influenced track, with gentle acoustic and electric guitars, some percussion and vibraphone. Nothing groundbreaking, but they combine well known elements in such a charming, delicate way i find them hard to resist.

from Strangely Beautiful, available on CD



Tiao braço forte  performed by Marcos Valle  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A sophisticated and understated pop bossa. This song can breeze by the first time you hear it, but the unexpected hooks and chord changes make for addictive listening. There are strings, a gentle and high male vocal and a rhythmic piano. It really is heavenly. I should add that the CD compilation this appears on, 'the essential...volume 2', is really one of the very best single-artist compilations I've ever heard. The liner notes are not perfect though - this song is erroneously listed as 'Tiao branco forte'. Great compilation though, one which showed me that Marcos really is a genius.

from Viola Enluarada (Odeon)
available on CD - The Essential Marcos Valle, Vol 2 (Mr Bongo)



Travolti Da Un Insolito Destino Nell’Azzurro Mare D’Agosto  performed by Piero Piccioni  1975
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Mixing light bossa nova guitar, gentle strings, flutes, subdued piano and muted trumpet (or trombone, not sure) this is a very elegant, romantic sounding track by Piero Piccioni, evoking, as the title suggests, images of the blue sea glittering in the summer sun. Moodwise it's quite reminiscent of Jobim's "Tide" and "Triste".

from Travolti Da Un Insolito Destino Nell'Azzurro Mare D'Agosto (CBS)
available on CD - Swept Away (King)



Trejeitos  performed by Jun Miyake  2001
Recommended by stakadush [profile]

Beautiful bossa nova by the Japanese artist.
The whole album is sweet guitar & piano bossa nova.

from Innocent Bossa In The Mirror (Tropical Music tm068823)



Trzeba Wracać  performed by Novi Singers  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Listening again to a compilation I made almost four years ago, I heard this magical track, which really had a big effect on me. It's probably not for everyone. Meandering and rather wistful, it's not at all funky like some of their later work, but I find it utterly compelling.

As you might have heard, Novi Singers were an incredibly talented quartet of vocal singers recording in Poland in the late 60s and 70s. They did several amazing records. This is taken from what I think was their first, Bossa Nova. But rather than renderings of songs like 'One note samba' and 'Desafinado', the album consists of a delightful and varied collection of originals in a related mood. The result is like bossa nova from a parallel, slightly more melancholic universe.

The accompaniment is a slow, gentle bossa played by a small jazz group, with some rich strings dropping in and out, and the vocals (all wordless/scat) take centre stage. The chord sequence is staggeringly beautiful, and at times the vocalists take slightly extravagant scat solos.

It sounds strange to say it, but this is really one of those tracks that seems to tell an enormous, emotional story, in spite of the fact that it doesn't contain one word! It would make a fantastic soundtrack to a silent movie.

from Bossa Nova (Polskie Nagrania)
available on CD - Bossa Nova/Torpedo (Polskie Nagrania)



  delicado: just to reiterate, this IS the best song ever!
Una voce allo specchio  performed by Ennio Morricone  1968
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Well, i guess you just can't recommend too much Morricone. So, this is another track off the excellent "Mondo Morricone" trilogy (Note: With the completion of the trilogy with "Molto Mondo Morricone", the formerly out of print first two parts "Mondo Morricone" and "More Mondo Morricone" have been reissued with 2 bonus tracks each). This track has it all: Gentle bossa nova rhythm, subtle triangle, swirling, almost surreal sounding strings, harpsicord galore and on top of it magnificent vocals by the incomparable Edda Dell'Orso.

from La stagione dei sensi (Ariete)
available on CD - Mondo Morricone (Sony)



universo em desencanto  performed by tim maia  1974
Recommended by clmarcel [profile]

i think "delicato" will love this music, this is a mix of bossa nova and soul, from brazil.

from raional 1


Vermelho  performed by Claudette Soares  1970
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

Perky, pint-sized bossa chanteuse Claudette Soares scored big in the late 60s by following Wilson Simonal's stylistic lead into an irresistible mix of pop, samba, French ye-ye, boogaloo, soul and bossa. This is a perfect example of the strangely Isaac Hayes-influenced arrangements to be found on her 1969-70 "pop" LP trilogy, and another winner from the then-unstoppable Adolfo-Gaspar writing team.

from Claudette No. 3 (Philips)


What’s Baby Singin’  performed by Himiko Kikuchi  1980
Recommended by Festy [profile]

Sublime bossa from Japan's Himiko Kikuchi. The sound of a soprano sax causes many to reach for the "off" switch (thanks Kenny G!), but Himiko has made it not only acceptable again, but almost hip (almost!). The song starts off with baby noises, before wordless, female vocals come in and introduce the memorable melody. It then moves into a suitably paced bossa rhythm. I have been listening to this track for a few years now (courtesy of Compost Record's "Glücklich IV" compilation), and I just can't tire of it. It's one of my all time favourites.


available on CD - Glüklich IV (Compost Records)




  LadyS: I totaly agree with you! What´s baby singin´catch my ears since the first time i´ve listened to it on "Glücklich IV". This sax "a la Kenny G" could be avoided and a trombone would sound better, but even so this almost little slip is very well maked up by the great solo rhodes and the super cool female vocal singing a la Flora Purim the gorgeous melody, that grap in in your ears instantaneously. A lovely, sweet and beautiful song that won´t never stop to play at my playlist. Classic!
When Mac Was Swimming  performed by The Innocence Mission  2003
Recommended by JackStowage [profile]

Karen Peris shakes the blues of her previous recording and explores the hopeful possibilities of life and death.

Nobody knows, darling.
Nobody knows how they are loved.

With Don's usual shimmering guitar given a touch of lounge-y bossa nova.


available on CD - befriended (Badman Records)



Who needs forever  performed by Astrud Gilberto  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Quincy Jones is renowned more for his great arrangements than for his melodies, but I think this tune, from the soundtrack to 'the deadly affair' is really great. It's a slow bossa with a haunting lyric. Astrud sings in her trademark cool, detached style. I never grow tired of hearing this one. Astrud seems to have made a few impromptu appearances on film soundtracks, and I'm always on the lookout for more; one other great one was the Ennio Morricone score 'casse' (burglars), on which she sings two tracks.

from The Deadly Affair (Soundtrack)
available on CD - The Pawnbroker/The Deadly Affair



who needs forever  performed by astrud gilberto  1966
Recommended by coffman [profile]

This exceptionally haunting and lyrical song by Quincy Jones has received its definitive interpretion by Astrud Gilberto with arrangement and accompaniment by the Brazilian organist Walter Wanderley. The melancholy urgency of the piece resonates well with the dark/sad tonality that pervades so much of Bossa Nova music, though its character is also reminiscent of certain otherwise very different pieces from the bebop era, which had a formative influence on Quincy Jones' music. There is definitely the remote influence of Charlie Parker and especially Dizzy Gillespie. It's truly a completely unique piece. The drifting melody which seems to skirt over the chord changes has a beautiful inevitability. Only a very gifted and skilled musician could have contrived such a beautiful work. So Quincy Jones deserves especial credit for crafting this song from the film "The Deadly Affair."

Astrud's delivery, so typically limpid and restrained, only serves to heighten the intensity of this darkly passionate song. The subtle but somehow fierce organ playing of Walter Wanderley acheives a sizzling romanticism that perfectly complements the reading of Astrud's apparently detached fatalism.

In my opinion, this track is a true musical masterpiece. Its remarkable economy of means is a testament to the skill of the composer as well as the artistry of the performers. In fact, it's a nearly perfect combination of expressive means and poetic intent. The beautiful resolution, with Astrud's perfect striking of the high B-flat over the half-diminished F-minor seventh, is a moment of sublime dramatic intensity, though profoundly understated, as is typical of her finest artistic moments. One is reminded of Miles Davis. Her poetic skill is rooted in subtlety.

I have listened to this extraordinary track hundreds of times, and always experienced chills rising up on the back of my neck. How amazing that this incredible musical gem was omitted from the original album A Certain Smile, A Certain Sadness. Perhaps it was too intense, too heavy; whatever the case, it's a truly remarkable piece of music.

I'm truly grateful to have discovered this great albeit minor musical masterpiece. There's really nothing else quite like it! The sizzling but subtle sensitivity of the rhythm section (Claudio Slon on drums, possibly Joao Gilberto on guitar and Jose Marino on bass) adds an intensity to the piece which helps project the almost existential tone of the song.

I'm really swept away by this obscure and neglected work, which attains -- for me at least -- to a peak of poetic intensity really rare in music. As is usual with Astrud at her best, it accomplishes its artistic ends with what seems like the most minimal of means. But subtlety is always the avenue to the most profound of artistic experiences. I think this is a remarkable example -- one of the greatest -- of the wedding of popular music and high art. It is a truly perfect performance. In my opinion, its greatness increases rather than diminshes with repeated listenings. There is only one word for that -- it's magic!

from A Certain Smile, A Certain Sadness, available on CD



  rio: you must pick-up the quincy jones soundtrack (released with the score to "the pawnbroker") with astrud singing "who needs forever". The lush quincy jones score is hauntingly beautiful, and astrud never sounded better. This version is the real deal for me..
  rferus: Amazing guitar on this piece.
Why Does It Have To Rain On Sunday?  performed by Bob McGrath  197?
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Alright! This is just great, Bob from Sesame Street doing a cute little bossa-inflected ditty about rain. And unlike a lot of S.St. records, this one's got arrangements that are just terrific,thanks to Stuart Scharf,the man behind Spanky & Our Gang among others.Bob's gotta nice voice too,and handles the material with a simple sophistication.A children's chorus joins him on some tunes, sometimes with his "CTW-style" encouragement.There is another great song on here called "Groovin' In The Sunshine" that has the kids singing the whole thing,almost in a Langley School-ish kinda way. Cute.

from From Sesame Street (Affinity A-1001S)


Yesterday when I was young  performed by Blossom Dearie  1970
Recommended by mattias [profile]

This song is just one of the great songs from the Fontana album "Thats just the way I want to be". The song is written by Charles Aznavoir and this is the definitive version of it. Blossom is singing i front of a huge orchestra and her voice is clearer than ever as she sings this sad song to the happy bossa nova arrangements. Very nice!
See my website for more info: http://www.angelfire.com/jazz/blossomdearie/blossomdeariediscography.html

from That's just the way I want to be (Fontana)
available on CD - Whisper for you



  delicado: I love this version too, but oddly enough I once played it to someone I met on a plane who was a huge Aznavour fan. She felt that Blossom's version deprived the song of its drama. I agree with you that the contrast of the sad song and the light, happy bossa arrangement works very well.
Zazueira  performed by Astrud Gilberto & Stanley Turrentine  1971
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A very funky track from Astrud's final US album. Very bass-heavy and percussive, just an excellent song. Stanley Turrentine's tenor sax doesn't meld with Gilberto's voice nearly as well as Stan Getz' warmer tones did, but that's a minor flaw that doesn't detract from the overall song too much.

from Gilberto with Turrentine, available on CD


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