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search results for “spooky”
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List songs by Song title | Performer | Year

You searched for ‘spooky’, which matched 27 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
Bon-Jour  performed by Ed Lincoln  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

When I heard this album by the Brazilian organist Ed Lincoln, I really wasn't expecting a tune like this. It's a beautiful, tender vocal, sounding like something from a Francis Lai soundtrack, with lovely male-female alternating vocals and an exquisite Morricone style trumpet blending well with the guitar/organ/percussion instrumentation. An absolutely stunning track - playful but slightly sad at the same time, with some spooky laughter/sighing from the female singer towards the end.

from Ed Lincoln (Savoya Discos SV 8001), available on CD (Savoya Discos)




  n-jeff: Thats the thing with Lincoln, its not just the cheese, he played alongside the best Jazz musicians in Brazil. He could cut a pretty funk when the occasion demanded, and his "Seu piano eletrico" album ranges from african tinged stompers to mid sixties style vocal cuts. IMHO opinion underrated as a producer as well, he seems to have been active on the cutting edge of Brazilain music from the late fifties right through to the late seventies. I intended to use this track as the payoff for a compilation I did for a cd trading ring, but I don't think I had the space. He was in hospital just before Christmas (2003), not sure how he's doing now.
  delicado: I have to say, I'm pretty blown away by his work. I know you've been harping on about him for years, so I wish I had listened earlier!
  sodapop650: Ed Lincolns best work is the recordings he did with Orlann Divo becasue he is a little more low-key and the arrangements are just plain better. I love O Ganso cause its so damn crazy and his recordings under the name Claudio Marcelo are pretty good too. A rcord seller in Brazil actually got me his autograph as a present because I bought so many of Ed Lincolns LPs. But I gotta tell you, someone like Sergio Carvalho or Eumir Deodato are much more powerful on the Hammond and Ely Arcoverde, Juarez Sant'ana Ze Maria I think are all more mature organists. I put Ed Lincoln with Walter Wanderley a little heavy on the cheese.
cemetery shuffle  performed by Stretcher Case  2001
Recommended by Earl Grey [profile]

The recording may be raw, but this song reeks of pure insane genius. 60's-inspired organ-fueled sleaze. The band boasts the former organist of "The Voluptuous Horror of Karen Black". This is one of many instrumental numbers consisting of guitar, organ, shakers and what sounds like an old drum machine. Shamelessly derivitive, lo-fi and spooky. It's one part surf and equal parts garage and swing. Henry Mancini-meets-The Mummies-meets-The Stray Cats.


available on CD - cassette (no label)



  jwmoz: Dude, everyone knows "Cemetery Shuffle" is by The Isolators. Get your facts straight man. I mean really, people read these things you know.
  Kriswell: Actually, The Isolators used to go by the name Stretcher Case, before they broke. So, both of you are actually right. Good call though "Moz".
  jwmoz: Listen man, we can't "both be right". You seem to think we live in a magical happy-world with gum drop streets and candy cane lamposts. Last time I checked outside, I saw a bum peeing on the street, and it wasn't into a champagne river, if you know what I mean (and I think you do). So although we can't both be right, you and Earl can both be wrong, and I would venture to say that you are. Wrong. Utterly wrong.
  Kriswell: Listen here, Pal. I use to be friends with those guys. So, I think I know what I'm talking about. Granted they stopped talking to me after I began dressing like the old bass player and started walking around town in a grey wig, claiming to be him. The shit really hit the fan when I locked him in a bathroom and tried to get on stage with the band. He got a restraining order against me. Rumor has it that's why he left the band. I think he was flattered though. But I hear they have a new bass player and have actually changed their name back to Stretcher Case, so look out, I'm getting my wig out of the closet.
  jwmoz: I don't blame you dude... that guy had an ass like butter.
Charlotte Anne  performed by Julian Cope  1988
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I heard this again today for the first time in a while; I still think it's one of the best pop songs written in the 80s. The production is smooth and slightly spooky, and the repetitive tune which continues in the background throughout the song makes it even more catchy. The words are rather stirring, and Julian is as enchanting a vocalist as ever.

from My Nation Underground (Island)
available on CD - Floored Genius (Island)



Danger! She’s a Stranger  performed by The Five Stairsteps  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I fell in love with this song this evening. At this point it's hard to find many words to describe it; I'm just dazzled by how wonderful it is. It's a mournful and spooky-sounding soul song, opening with some percussion, and then some harmonized background vocals, drums, brass and piano. I guess the kicker for me are the shimmering strings in the arrangement, which come in with the main vocal. The vocals are fraught with emotion, and there is a very interesting use of vocal sounds as the song fades out.

Being a Five Stairsteps novice, I'd like to know if they recorded many other tracks like this. I gather that the record was produced by Curtis Mayfield, but I've never heard anything by him with quite such a delectable arrangement. Any advice would be appreciated!


available on CD - The First Family of Soul (Buddah)




  Arthur: The Five Stairsteps have a history going back to the mid sixties -they recorded for Curtis Mayfields 'Windy C' label and later for George Harrison's 'Dark Horse' label Group main man Kenni Burke is still active in the music business, having co penned the much copied and sampled "Rising To The Top" and has recently (last year) visited the UK where he performed a number of PA's and recorded at least one song. I have to confess I never heard "Danger! She's a Stranger" but will make it my mission to do so!
  tinks: oh my god, this is one of my all-time favorite songs! i can't believe i never thought to put it up. i love the backing vocals..."danger! stranger!"
  delicado: You have excellent taste! For the record, I was able to find one other Five Stairsteps track that has a similar moody feel to it. It's called 'Something's Missing', and is almost like a prototype version of 'Danger...'
  bobbyspacetroup: Sampled by Outkast incidentally (check out "Two Dope Boyz In A Cadillac").
  delicado: Yeah, I read about this and checked out the Outkast song. I have to say I wasn't that impressed. I think maybe the big beat over the piano and gentle shimmering strings killed it for me a bit!
  artlongjr: Fascinating to read the comments here...I didn't know Outkast had sampled this. I remember first hearing this song when I got their first album way back in 1981, and it is my favorite tune on there. It's a classic of Chicago soul. The strings, horns and Clarence Burke Jr.'s lead vocals and the group harmonies add up to a delightfully foreboding, almost sinister mood on this number. This came out in 1966, I also have "Something's Missing", which came out on Buddah in 1967. I keep telling everybody I know that the Stairsteps are easily the equals of the Jackson Five! They also did a terrific funk-psychedelic number in 1969 on Curtom called "Madame Mary"...I can't figure out the lyrics but it may be about marijuana!
  karen: If you like "Danger She's a Stranger", you will love "You've Waited Too Long". I remember the Five Stairsteps, and they were a lot more talented than the Jackson Five (and better looking). But unfortunately they were not on a major label like Motown, but they got a lot of respect and admiration in the Black community and plenty of airplay in DC, NY, Philly, etc. "Oooh Child" was a major hit...I wonder what they are doing now and how they look.
Eternal Journey  performed by Ramsey Lewis  1968
Recommended by konsu [profile]

The prolific and always entertaining Ramsey Lewis.This track is one of my favorite from his collaborations with the legendary fusionist,Charles Stepney.It has all the best elements from their work,lush orchestral textures,rock steady soul jazz,and the siren calls of Miss Minnie Riperton.It sounds like this recording was done during the same sessions as Minnie's incredible solo album,Come To My Garden.In fact,the record contains a version of "Les Fluer" that has the same istrumentation, except Ramsey plays the lead vocal melody in his typical style.

This piece is almost like some kind of lost soundtrack work,impressionistic in a spiritual way,like a cosmic gospel.Travelling the silver thread of consciousness back to the source...An Eternal Journey indeed,and a must for fans of spooky jazz and 60's soundtracks.

from Maiden Voyage (Cadet LPS 811)



  delicado: Nice track, and a great album, which is also available on a cheap CD, 'Maiden Voyage and more' (the 'more' consists of four tracks from his excellent 'Mother Nature's Son' LP, also produced by Stepney)
Hellhound on my trail  performed by Robert Johnson
Recommended by dwmjuk [profile]

The most eeire, scary and downright supernatural blues track ever recorded. Robert Johnson's vocal style sends shivers down anyone's back on the first, and repeat, hearings of this masterpiece.

Take time and notice the evidence of Hoodoo pratice in lyrics (hot foot powder) and a brief history of a failed relationship once believed to have been Robert Johnsons...




I Am the Walrus  performed by Spooky Tooth  1970
Recommended by schlick [profile]

The band transforms the classic Beatles hit song into a great, heavy, throbbing rocker.

from The Last Puff (A&M (US) / Island (UK))


It takes a thief  performed by John Schroeder  1971
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An unusual-sounding instrumental that mixes a 3/4 time signature with a light breakbeat. The song (incorrectly cited as 'the name of the game' on the record I have) is a spooky and groovy instrumental, with a continuous organ riff, great strings, and a big beat. A different interpretation of this song by another British arranger, John Gregory, appears on the excellent German compilation 'the mad mad world of soundtracks'.

from TV Vibrations (Polydor)



It’s For You  performed by Cilla Black  1964
Recommended by Zygny [profile]

Lots of Cilla's earlier material was top quality, this Lennon/McCartney song (never actually recorded by the Fabs) knocked me out when I first heard it on my cousin's Dansette in 1964. Spooky melody which almost strays into jazz territory in the instrumental break. Sophisticated pop of the highest order.




La Foresta Incantata  performed by Piero Umiliani  1970
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Although I'm very interested in the batch of cool Italian soundtracks from the 60s and 70s which have recently been reissued, I often feel pretty overwhelmed by the volume of stuff out there. So I was pleased to find a used copy of Piero Umiliani's 'Angeli Bianchi...Angeli Neri'. It really is an intoxicatingly brilliant record, and this track is one of the highlights. The musical setting moves around a lot over four minutes - the opening sounds almost like fairy tale music; this then fades out, and some spooky and very cool sounding wordless vocals come in, accompanied by a slick, hip easy listening-style sequence with strings, bass and drums. As this builds, the wordless vocals continue, backed by increasingly beautiful and unexpected chord changes. I'm not doing a great job of describing this record, but happily in this case you can hear the whole song (streamed, real audio) at the excellent 'atrecordings.com' site. Anyway, it's a wonderful track, up there with my absolute favorite soundtrack pieces.

from Angeli Bianchi...Angeli Neri, available on CD ()




  bobbyspacetroup: Magical track. It's can also be found on Easy Tempo, Vol. 9. Too bad atrecordings has shut down.
  leonthedog: Magical indeed! Morricone, Piccioni, Umiliani, and Trovaioli are like Sirens... I am sure there are others - God grant me the time and good fortune to find them!
Laura  performed by Julie London  1955
Recommended by delicado [profile]

'Laura' has long been my favorite standard. The tune is elegant and haunting, and completely devoid of some of the schmaltzy feel that plagues many popular standards.

Written as an instrumental for the 1944 film of the same name, this was composed as a piano-based number, and so Julie's version is perhaps not the most orthodox recording. However, it's incredibly powerful and atmospheric, and I *think* it's my favorite version.

The entire track lasts just 1 minute and 40 seconds. The first verse is sung as a solo voice without any accompaniment other than the spooky reverberation effect. When the music does come in, it's provided by a small jazz trio led by Barney Kessel. Kessel's delicate jazz chords and picking complement Julie's voice beautifully.

from Julie is her name, available on CD (Liberty)



Lavender Thursday  performed by Nanette Natal  196?
Recommended by konsu [profile]

A lost folk-jazz classic. I remember hearing this the first time and thinking that Portishead must have used this as a schematic for their live album.Spooky art-school-chick folkie lyrics with lush,velvety arrangements by an enigmatic Leon Salem. Jazzy and very passionate!



from Yesterday,Today,Tomorrow (Vangaurd VSD-6508 (OOP))



Mahahbalipuram  performed by Stu Phillips  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An exotic, atmospheric and unique masterpiece, this is taken from the portion of surfer flick 'Follow Me' in which the surfers visit India. The tune drifts along with some sitar and spooky vocals before exploding into life with a furiously catchy and groovy segment with piano and plucked strings.

from Follow Me (soundtrack) (Universal City 73056)




  chukelley: Great taste!
  bsgkr: Thank you "delicado" for your wonderful review of "Mahabalipuram." I'm only three years late in thanking you, so please forgive me. Stu Phillips
Moon Time  performed by Dudley Moore  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

The soundtrack to Bedazzled is remarkably good, one of a few much-hyped records floating around in my head that has actually lived up to my expectations. This instrumental is notable for its haunting mood and astonishingly beautiful chord sequence. The flute melody, lush strings and gentle latin percussion combine beautifully. Musically, it's one of those pieces that's so good you want to cry.

from Bedazzled OST, available on CD (London)




  standish: Hats off to Dudley for the whole soundtrack. Sparkling, serious and intelligent music - I totally agree about the goosebump chord sequence that reappears throughout the album. Haven't found any other stuff by him that's as good - maybe "Genuine Dud" if you're into piano trio jazz.
  Mike: What a gem! Very arresting, and good enough to listen to several times in a row, each time finding things to marvel at in the harmony, texture, overall structure, melody...well, pretty much everything.
Mundo Civilizado  performed by Arto Lindsay  1997
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A beautiful and really unique track which merges Brazil with electronica (Arto is Brazilian, and a guy called DJ spooky added some beats). It opens with a bare, spacey beat. Fragmented guitar, vocals and organ drift in and out until the song builds into a climax with a simply beautiful synth-string sound. The song manages to be uplifting while retaining a slightly spooky twin-peaks type of feel to it.

from Mundo Civilizado, available on CD




  secularus: Arto sings in such a sensual and soothing way. His most recent albums are well worth checking out.
  G400 Custom: Hmmm. I know he's Brazilian and everything, but I think Arto Lindsay's best stuff was done before he went all Latin on us. Listen to his guitar on the first Lounge Lizards album, when he manages to go 40 minutes without playing anything actually recognisable as a note.
Oh Well, I'll never learn  performed by Morrissey  1987
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Clocking in at around 2 minutes, this B-side is very simple, but beautiful. It was something of a 'holy grail' to me as a young Smiths fan, hidden as it was on the rare 'Suedehead' single (cassette and CD singles only!). I managed to procure a tape of it via my brother, and was instantly entranced. Morrissey has recorded many songs which are catchier and more intense than this, yet it has a unique power. The lyrics are entertaining - 'I found the fountain of youth and I fell in', and the accompaniment is delicate and sparse, with some great guitar playing from Vini Reilly. It ends with something rather lovely - it's nothing really, but it's one of those little details which when I was young, I used to pick on in songs - as Morrissey repeats 'I'll never learn', a spooky, echoey sound comes in and envelopes the entire song. Such little things used to please me...

from Suedehead (single) (HMV)
available on CD - My Early Burglary Years



  FlyingDutchman1971: I couldn't agree more! Having purchased the US 12 inch of 'suedehead' which didn't include this track, it was such a nice surprise in 1994 when I purchased the 13-cd british singles box set and found this track. Moz sings this song with such a great since of joyous naughtiness that you just want to tweak his delinquent little nose.
Romance  performed by Beth Gibbons and Rustin Man  2002
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

A great track from the excellent "solo" LP by the Portishead vocalist (actually it’s a collaboration with Paul Webb - one time member of sublime 1980's pop group Talk Talk - calling himself Rustin Man for some reason.) The arrangement suggests a low-key take on one of Bacharach/David's statelier ballads, (like say "Aprils Fools" or "Trains and Boats and Planes"), which develops a wonderfully sad groove on the chorus. There are lovely strings, a great, woozy horn solo, and some inspired use of subtle, dissonant electronic textures and spooky female background vocals (both very Ennio Morricone.) Meanwhile, Gibbons does her most stylized take on Billie Holiday at her most stylized - which really shouldn't work, but somehow ends up being just right. Strong song from a very strong album.

from Out of Season, available on CD



  bobbyspacetroup: Agreed. This track and "Drake" are my favorites from the album -- especially "Drake." Good recommendation.
Royal Blue  performed by Henry Mancini  1963
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A beautiful Mancini piece from one of his best-known soundtracks that I had somehow managed to neglect completely. The Pink Panther was never at the top of my wish-list, but after picking up the CD last week for a mere 50p, I was very impressed. The score utilizes the accordian slightly more than I would have liked, but has some fantastic textured tracks, such as this one.

The track opens with a 'Blues in the night' style riff on the piano. The lead is then taken by a blistering muted trumpet sound. I've always thought of Angelo Badalamenti's Twin Peaks work as being heavily Mancini-influenced, but that link has never been more clear to me than on this track, which has a similar moody tone to some of the best tracks on the Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me soundtrack. The classic Mancini string sound is also in evidence, as well as a gentle wordless chorus. About half-way through, legendary tenor saxophonist Plas Johnson takes up the melody. The dreaded accordian gets a brief look-in before the track concludes with some more riffing on the trumpet. Fantastic stuff; Mancini really was an inspirational arranger.

from The Pink Panther, available on CD




  Issie: I like Pink Panther so I bet I like this song!
Smoke Rings  performed by Les Paul and Mary Ford  1952
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I've been in love with this tune since I heard the superb instrumental version of it on 1990's 'Wild at Heart' soundtrack. I'm a big fan of Les Paul and Mary Ford's records - the combination of immaculate multitracked guitars and spooky, clear vocals is a real winner for me. I only found out about this recording quite recently. It really is stunning. It's slow, plodding along while Les's intricate but very cool guitar lines twinkle around over the top. This song makes me feel very nostalgic, although I'm not sure exactly what for. The lyrics really add something to the atmosphere - 'tell me where do they go/those smoke rings that blow each night'. Anyway, please ignore my inadequate description and listen to this exquisite, perfect recording.

from Bye Bye Blues (Capitol)
available on CD - Bye Bye Blues/Les & Mary (COLLECTABLES)



Splash (sung by Peter Bloom)  performed by Ennio Morricone  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This bizarre Morricone pop tune sounds as if it came from a parallel universe. With an instrumental mix of guitar, harpsichord, bass and drums, it achieves the same kind of spooky, melancholic atmosphere as 'Deep Down', another Morricone film song from the same year. But in contrast to Christy's passionate vocal in 'Deep Down', Peter Bloom's delivery is light-hearted and much more low-key. Both tracks feature classic Morricone wordless vocal effects and some truly ridiculous lyrics. I haven't seen Partner, but I'd be interested to see how this song fits in to the story:

"I want to be your dazzling white knight
I'll splash you sizzling cool with bright light

I'll kiss your cleanliness
...Your soft, silkiness
Oh what happiness:
It's biological...

SPLASH
DASH
FLASH"

Ridiculous words, but the arrangement makes the track genuinely powerful. Shame Ennio didn't bring this one out for the crowd at the Royal Albert Hall last year.

from Partner OST (Cam)
available on CD - Morricone a Go-Go




  bobbyspacetroup: I love this song! I haven't seen Partner either but have heard it's pretty awful.
  eftimihn: It's absolutely superb, that harpsicord sound is especially lovely and the lyrics are really weird throughout with Peter singing something with "my super-duper-baby/ we're goin' whoops-a-daisy" in the bridge part of the song...
  megaphonerecords: i can't beleive it!!!!!!!! i first heard this song while i was living in australia. it shot right into my being & resonated hard. since i've been back in the states i've been trying to find this song with no luck. it's been 5 years now & this is the first time i've seen a sign that this song really exists & wasn't just a magical dream i had. maybe i'll be fortunate enough to actually hear this song again before i die!
  dominb: I saw "Partner" at a revival at a cinema in Madrid and although Morricone does the whole s/track this song is the only pop number so it really stands out,the scene which accompanies it features the main character played by Pierre Clementi romping with his girlfriend in soap suds pouring out of a washing machine,he then jams her head in the washer's door and kills her!...Partner is a pretty pretentious film but it's odd enough to be enjoyable.When I saw it,this song was the high point for me,even though it only lasts a few mins....Where did you get this from?
  dominb: ah..."morricone a go go"...I'll look out for it,must be a million morricone compilations,finding new morricone music is a hobby of mine!
  delicado: To see the film clip with the music (dominb\'s description above is pretty accurate), visit http://youtu.be/ftueIAmdwBw
Spooky  performed by Chris Montez  1968
Recommended by konsu [profile]

If anyone could improve this Classics IV ditty, it's the adorable Mr. Montez!

Although the arrangement doesn't change much, (it didn't need to) Nick De Caro did add some nice little "effects" that really set the mood. Like a cool bit of "spooky" delay/filter effecting after the refrain...nice.

Montez's voice just seems to add to the story of the song. Like a guy like him could get spooked by a chick more than your average dude... he's sensitive.

Great Grusin-like organ solo too... That just nails it for me!

from Watch What Happens (A&M SP 4157)


spooky  performed by dusty springfield
Recommended by basil rathbone [profile]




Sunshower  performed by Dr. Buzzard’s Original Savannah Band  1976
Recommended by ambassador [profile]

This one fits well with with my previous reccomendation in the melancholy/eerie vein. I read somewhere that the song was in the African JuJu style, but discofied of course given its 1976 production. It was this song that proved to be the Dr. Buzzard . . . was not your average disco band. Cory Daye's vocals are beautiful and harken back to an earlier era of classic jazz vocals, like Ella and Billie. The children's backup vocals are what gives it the spooky quality, probably because the intrumentation is dark, like seeing those cute (but scary) kids come out of the corn fields in Children of the Corn. The last chorus just sends chills down my spine as Cory digs into the lyrics and dances around them as the everything sort or brightens up, like the sun coming out after a summer rain. This makes the title all make such perfect sense.

from Dr. Buzzard's Original Savannah Band, available on CD



  Festy: You know what makes the last chorus for me (or choruses from after the kids singing only accompanied by percussion)... as simple as it may sound... it's the handclaps. They add so much and I always look forward to them coming along. I became obsessed with this song about 6 months ago and bought the CD, which, as I expected, doesn't contain so many fantastic songs on it, but, still an enjoyable CD. I really enjoy your recommendations!
The Breeze and I  performed by Santo and Johnny  1962
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This recording is utter genius, and I have no idea why I didn't recommend it before. The track opens with some spooky ambient steel guitar sound effects, before some bongoes and vibes set the scene for the tune, which is picked out superbly twangily on the guitar. The great thing about the track is the spooky little effects and chromatic tunes that pop in and out in the background. Some of these are on the steel guitar, but the others could be vocal or vibraphone; it's hard to tell. It's all over in just over 2 minutes, but this really is a delightfully exotic recording.

from Encore (Canadian American JUMP 1023)
available on CD - Encore - the best of the rest (Jump-O-Rama)



  Tangento: Yes! This is an excellent song, and I would also like to recommend the version by Pianists Ferrante & Teicher, available on one of their 6,000 albums. ;) It has such a great musical flow and retro-feel. There are a few other versions I recently downloaded, but virus problems prevent me from getting the artists names for you. I shall return with them.
  Tangento: I have returned with the definitive list of artists who have recorded this magical song: http://www.spaceagepop.com/breeze.htm Enjoy!
The Life of the Party  performed by April March  2003
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Shock modern recommendation. The entire 'Triggers' album sounds great to me, with Bertrand Burgalat's production very prominent alongside April's vocals.

'The Life of the Party' has lots of interesting electronic and vocal sounds, including some excellent synths, and a cool and rather spooky chord sequence.

Big thanks to robert[o] for turning me on to the album.

from Triggers, available on CD




  olli: i really dig bertrand burgalat. 'specially sssound of music.
werewolf  performed by the frantics  1959
Recommended by olli [profile]

legendary primal surf track with werewolf noises. Talk about a guitar sound with authoroty! I really like the tribal drums and the kitchy spoken(or should that be spooky?)word intro. one of the coolest halloween compilation tracks around. The Cramps love it.




your hidden dreams  performed by white noise  1969
Recommended by olli [profile]

great electronic effects-laden psychedelia from their 1969 album "an electric storm". a spooky and beautiful track with lots of echo and spacy non-melodic digressions. oddly, it stays quite coherent despite all the insane stuff going on in the background. Female singer, beautyful breathy voice, kind of a "nico light-" thing going on.
the track "firebird" from the same album is also highly recommended.

by the way, im pretty sure each member of broadcast have their own copy of this album. The song "marooned" on wire's 1978 album "chairs missing" shares some melodic qualities with this track. would probably sound great if mixed together..

(if you're interested in aquiring the whole album, its pretty hard to come by, at least in vinyl form. i think it's been reissued on cd by some obscure label, but as i only have a cd-r copy, i'm not sure. side a is very good, but from what i heard they ran out of studio time, forcing them to make side b a bit more...shall we say, "experimental" in order to make it lp lenghth...)

from an electric storm




  standish: My dad's prog-rock friend brought this album over when my dad got his first proper stereo in 1972 and played us the scary side... These days, I love "Firebird" and "Here Come The Fleas". Quirky UK electronica by (BBC Radiophonic Workshop) Delia Derbyshire and David Vorhaus.

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