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search results for “Intense”
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You searched for ‘Intense’, which matched 47 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
"flowers"  performed by rozz williams & gitane demone  1995
Recommended by kohl [profile]

excellent mood. simple music that slowly builds up as the lyrics become more intense.
"this is my favorite sad story,
forget me not or i'll forget myself
i've got quite a few things that i'm afraid of
sometimes i just won't face myself"


available on CD - dream home heartache



  lauramun: I have just registered and only to say that Flowers is an amazing song.Rozz was amazing...I had forgotten...
"hotel room"  performed by richard hawley  2005
Recommended by kohl [profile]

his voice is almost gloomy, but in a striking and haunting way. it does fit the mood of the song--it sounds earnest and intense without being too singer-songwriter-y.


available on CD - coles corner


Always  performed by Pet Shop Boys  2003
Recommended by Mike [profile]

For me the best song produced by the Pet Shop Boys for a few years, this mid-tempo number fuses a philosophical yet uplifting lyric with a typically intense, harmonically interesting PSB synth backing. The melody is beautiful and the song and arrangement are considerably more musically daring than much of the contents of their rather disappointing album "Release", which, in its standard single disc form, inexplicably omits this song.

"Always" is available on US limited edition two disc sets of "Release" and on disc one of the "Home and Dry" CD singles.


available on CD - Home and Dry CD1


Barnacles  performed by Ugly Casanova
Recommended by Reina [profile]

Lead singer of Modest Mouse...haunting, intense...

"we clung on like barnacles on a boat...even though the ship sinks, you know you can't let go"




Biosfear  performed by Circus Maximus
Recommended by Darke Soul [profile]

If you like progressive instrumentals, I urge you to give this song a listen. One of the best, most intense and melodically well-crafted instrumentals I've ever heard. Off their first album, "The 1st Chapter".

from The 1st Chapter, available on CD


Birds And Bees  performed by Warm Sounds  1967
Recommended by BlueEyedYe-Ye [profile]

A brilliant psychedelic dance record mixing over-the-top orchestration and brilliant harmonized vocals. Plus the kind of innocent-meets-intense vocal that I find immensely attractive in pop. Pity it's not officially available on CD, but that could change...





  artlongjr: Never heard "Birds and Bees", it sounds interesting. I have a 45 by Warm Sounds that I may do a write-up on, it's called "Night Is A-Comin'/Smeta Murgaty", from 1968 on Deram Records. The reason I mention it is because it is one of the most totally "out-there" psychedelic numbers I've ever come across. Features the wonderful lyric "In my head the Grateful Dead are peering through the bars!" Unfortunately I don't think it's on CD either.
  Sadman: it's amazing! heard it from "A Walk in Alice's Garden" compilation.
Bittersweet  performed by Lewis Taylor  1996
Recommended by Latimer [profile]

Lewis Taylor is a major musical talent, and his first album stands as a landmark among modern soul / R&B productions. Imagine Prince on a roll, with the Beach Boys on backing vocals and Jeff Beck adding psychedelic guitar. He does it all. Sweet falsetto vocals, funny lyrics and a worldwide groove. You'll want more.

from Lewis Taylor, available on CD (Island)


Brilliant Trees  performed by David Sylvian  1984
Recommended by Mike [profile]

Beautiful and atmospheric music, superbly recorded. Intensely poetic lyrics. What an incredible advance this represents from his work with the band Japan! Superb synth voices from longtime collaborator Ruichi Sakamoto sound a searching chord sequence over which a gorgeous, heavily treated trumpet solo comes in and out. Sylvian's voice is richly expressive.

from Brilliant Trees, available on CD




  ronin: Bought album of same name due to tracks "Red Guitar" and "Pulling Punches" getting major airplay on DC radio at time. Was not disappointed! Moody and nice bass lines! Sylvian's voice is ... unusual.
C.A.T cat mane billi  performed by kishore kumar  195x
Recommended by olli [profile]

50's bollywood song with sort of a tin pan alley vibe.
Kind of intense, really swingin'. Dig the sassy-sounding deliveries beween Kumar and his female vocal partner, and the typically bollywood insane-yet-non-obtrusive bridges.

cat mane MIAOW!

i really want to mix this with "trick me" by kelis.


available on CD - the prodigy



Come Rain or Come Shine  performed by Judy Garland  1963
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

For those of you out there who are still perplexed by the cult of Judy, may I suggest hardily this amazing DVD? Culled from her now legendary CBS TV series in the early 1960’s, this collection features a selection of solo performances, and “Come Rain or Come Shine” sums up things here perfectly. It is a frenzied, riveting, almost frightening reading of the song. Nick Cave or Polly Harvey wish they were this intense – or perhaps (wisely) they don’t. Judy at this point is a woman ravaged by both her life - alcohol, pills, suicide attempts, catastrophic illness and innumerable career failures and comebacks - and to a certain extent her own astonishing, almost vampryric talent. To see this frail little creature – she was in her early 40’s, but looks about 60 – totter onto this empty stage and become possessed by a song - her voice soaring, her talent surging through her like high voltage electricity - is almost too much to watch. But one has to watch her – even if only to see whether see she spontaneously combusts during the performance. (And those old time Judy-queens still amongst us – God bless them – swear this footage only hints at what it was like to see her live.) Must be seen/heard to be believed.

from The Judy Garland Show: Just Judy DVD (Pioneer Artists PA-11577)


Dance and Shake Your Tambourine  performed by Universal Robot Band
Recommended by mr_klenster [profile]

Find this song! It is by far one of the funkiest things I've ever heard, it absolutely screams party. The lyrics repeat "dance and shake your tambourine, your funky tambourine, tambourine, tambourine". The instrumentation may get a bit repetitive for some, but the sheer funkiness and humor of this song will put a smile on your face while you're dancing the night away, without a care in the world. I especially get a kick out of the background voices, that seem to approve the shake that this song has. It sounds like it was recorded at a party and a time that you could only dream about experiencing. I like to play this song with the pitch up to about +4, which makes the experience all the more intense.





Desire Lines  performed by Lush  1994
Recommended by parlop [profile]

So beautiful and quietly emotional as a lot of shoegazing is. One of their longest songs... it starts out with the wailing guitar melody that's repeated throughout and accented by Miki Berenyi's calm and melancholy vocals, but the instrumental parts are really the most prominent parts of the song. The best part is at around 3:53 when the guitars go crazy. the whole thing seems very representative of sadness and getting to that point where you just can't hold it in anymore and you start weeping hardcore. it's a good song... the only one that can make me cry over and over again.

from Split (4AD)


Doomsday  performed by Murray Gold
Recommended by Nori [profile]

This theme is not techno, which is something I always associated with the Doctor, and so amazing. It is a heartbreaking theme for the last Billie Tyler appearance. Although Rose and the Tenth Doctor had a romantic relationship, this theme could have been applied to other intense relationships that had been ended, such as the death of a child. You definitely do not have to have seen the episode to know that the parting was not voluntary. Another great Doctor Who track, beyond the theme, is 'Bad Wolf Theme'.


available on CD - Doctor Who Original Television Soundtrack


Exchanging Glances  performed by Unknown
Recommended by bobbyspacetroup [profile]

A strange instrumental which borrows the melody from the first line or two of "Strangers In The Night" and repeats it obsessively without really getting past the "wond'ring in the night" part. The intense, driving arrangement along with the incomplete melody give this track a creepy, tragic feeling which I find really enthralling.


This is from an odd bootleg-ish compilation with no real track information given. The first volume of this series was okay but sounded like it was mastered directly from the audio track of old adult films. The sound quality and selection on this volume is much better. My best guess is that these are sound library recordings that may or may not have actually appeared in adult films. Anyone know the real artist or source of this track?

from Inside Deep Note: Music of 1970s Adult Cinema, available on CD



Fatal Tragedy  performed by Dream Theater
Recommended by Darke Soul [profile]

This is my favorite song of all time. I think it epitomizes Dream Theater's amazing style and musical prowess. If you listen to this song and it doesn't move you, then you may want to check your pulse because you might be dead.

from Metropolis 2: Scenes From A Memory, available on CD


Glósóli  performed by Sigur Rós  2005
Recommended by SUtR [profile]

If you don't know this song, there is a large void in your life (that you somehow think is filled by the Pet Shop Boys). With a beat that pounds like a jackhammer, Glósóli will grab you, smack you around and leave you wanting more.

from Takk...


Gone...Like the Swallows  performed by And Also The Trees  1986
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

The exquisite standout of the Virus Meadow album and easily And Also the Trees's best song from its early years, "Gone…Like the Swallows" steers away from the sometimes frenetic vocal intensity found elsewhere on the record it comes from for a more reflective but still passionate approach. Simon Jones delivers his lyric with all the deep-voiced intensity of a student of Wordsworth and Shelley reciting on the hillside to nature (which in some respects is pretty much the point of the song). But Jones isn't explicitly anti-modern — consider the mention of the aeroplane in the sky at various points — while the music is equally ancient and up-to-date in feel. Digital delay on the guitars turns them into rolling, darkly chiming flows and waves of sound, dramatically crashing behind the steady rhythm section and Jones' increasingly intense words. Bass and drums alone wrap everything up on a brief, spare note.
(AMG)

from Virus Meadow, available on CD


granite state destroyer  performed by scissorfight  1999
Recommended by angelica [profile]

scissorfight are probably the heaviest band i've ever seen... their songs are incredibly intense, with deep, grinding bass lines, slow, thundering drums and aggressive vocals. granite state destroyer could be their theme song - it embodies both their musical aesthetic and their lyrical philosophy...

"weed, guns and axes / we don't pay our taxes / 'cause we don't exist / on any government list / ... / our battle cry / live free or die"

this is the song that hooked me on the band, and every time i hear the heavy yet pared-down opening riffs my tailbone starts shakin' and i can't stop.

from New Hampshire, available on CD


Holes  performed by Mercury Rev  1998
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An intense and beautiful epic, this track is the opener on the band's superb 1998 album, 'Deserters Songs'. I'm quite fickle, and usually prefer two to three-minute songs, but this track is so brilliant that it seems short at 6 minutes. It builds up beautifully, starting with just an echoey string aura, with vocals, synth (a Supertramp-like wurlitzer sound) and guitar coming in one by one. The music finally explodes after a couple of minutes, with full drums and eerie oscillating noises. It's incredibly beautiful and dense, and the song has a melancholy air that is very affecting. Mercury Rev have a habit of putting incredible tracks at the beginning of their albums. I'm glad they are now getting more of the attention they deserve.

from Deserter's Songs, available on CD


Houdini’s Box  performed by Jill Sobule  1995
Recommended by malpt [profile]

I intensely adore this song. It's delicately executed, yet the lyrics are so bold that it's somewhat jarring.

Also, I think Jill Sobule is tragically underrated. She's astonishingly talented, intelligent and humorous. I say, listen to her work, you won't regret it.

from Jill Sobule (Atlantic)
available on CD - I Never Learned to Swim: Jill Sobule 1990-2000 (Beyond Records)


Intensify  performed by !!!  2000
Recommended by pandaexplosion [profile]

One of the highlights off of their 200 self-titled album, !!!'s "Intensify" delivers upon the promise of its title by being really, well, intense. The band stick pretty close to their typical dancepunk sound, but there's a kick-ass breakdown halfway through where all the music drops out to make way for a chorus of people clapping and shouting "can u feel it intensify!"

Hott.

from !!! (GSL)



  Open Book: I'm glad other people are digging this band also. I love their debut album in its entirety, and their latest ep is also pretty freakin' amazing. I can't wait until their new album drops!
It's My Life  performed by Talk Talk  1984
Recommended by Mike [profile]

This song is one I remember enjoying greatly as soon as I heard it shortly after its release as a single. To me it encapsulated perfectly the angst and frustration I often felt at that time. It did this as much through its sophisticated musical content and texture as through the lyrics. Listening to it now, it's as good an example as any of how different synth sounds go in and out of fashion. Hollis gives a typically intense vocal performance, and there are subtle hints in some of the instrumental lines of the more jazzy direction the band would later take. Highly recommended - don't miss this one. Oh, sorry - wrong site. Thought I saw the word Ebay somewhere.

from It's My Life (EMI)


Just for a moment  performed by Aqualung  2002
Recommended by Mike [profile]

Beautiful and intense song, musically and lyrically. The breathy and sometimes nasal vocal sound won't suit everyone, but the melody itself is of undoubted beauty, and the arpeggiated piano backing (shades of Bach and Chopin at times) contains a good dose of this writer's usual harmonic subtlety.

from Aqualung, available on CD


La Lucertola  performed by Ennio Morricone  1970
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This is an extremely atmospheric soundtrack piece, with a wordless vocal melody from Edda Del Orso. Strings, electric harpsichord and some subtle electronic effects set the scene. There are also some beautiful Bacharach-style twists with brass. Overall it's a deadly serious and delicate number, incredibly intense, while still sounding very 'cool' (whatever that means...).

from La Lucertola (Soundtrack)
available on CD - Mondo Morricone (Coliseum)




  eftimihn: Perfect description, delicado. This track is firmly in my Morricone Top 10, though it would be impossible for me to actually write down a top 10, maybe top 20, no, a top 50 would be possible...maybe...damn, one man - so many terrific tunes!
  dominb: I got the first Mondo Morricone cd on its original release nearly 10 years ago now,I was familiar with Morricone's stuff but when I heard this it totally changed me.I became a Morricone devotee and this first track along with "Metti..." blew me away.The version on Mondo is actually about a minute shorter than the original version,so is "Metti" and some of the other "Mondo" tracks,they've abridged them no doubt to fit the cd...I found this out gradually from hearing the complete versions,they're not different versions,they've just been cut down....This is one of Ennio's all time great themes.
Love's theme (Saint Etienne Mix)  performed by Pizzicato Five  1998
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A great track that comes in two parts. The first is a sweet repetitive pop tune with electronic piano, synthesized strings, pleasant guitar chords, and wordless 'ba ba' vocals. Just before the three minute mark, it begins to mutate gradually, until it turns into a glorious early New Order-style sound, with a piercing, punky guitar sound and a loud bassline. The vocal elements from early in the track then come back in. A great fusion of different styles.

from Happy End Of You (Remix), available on CD


Martys Tardis  performed by Venetian Snares
Recommended by sinferno [profile]

A great venetian snares track, i recommend this whole album and every other venetian snares album to anyone that can handle crazy intense dnb. One of my all time favorite musicians.

from Chocolate Wheelchair


Oblivion  performed by Mastodon  2009
Recommended by Darke Soul [profile]

I've never been much impressed with Mastodon's music, but this song is fantastic. Off the new cd, "Crack The Skye." The rest of the album is decent, but Oblivion is the gem.

from Crack The Skye, available on CD


Oh Well, I'll never learn  performed by Morrissey  1987
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Clocking in at around 2 minutes, this B-side is very simple, but beautiful. It was something of a 'holy grail' to me as a young Smiths fan, hidden as it was on the rare 'Suedehead' single (cassette and CD singles only!). I managed to procure a tape of it via my brother, and was instantly entranced. Morrissey has recorded many songs which are catchier and more intense than this, yet it has a unique power. The lyrics are entertaining - 'I found the fountain of youth and I fell in', and the accompaniment is delicate and sparse, with some great guitar playing from Vini Reilly. It ends with something rather lovely - it's nothing really, but it's one of those little details which when I was young, I used to pick on in songs - as Morrissey repeats 'I'll never learn', a spooky, echoey sound comes in and envelopes the entire song. Such little things used to please me...

from Suedehead (single) (HMV)
available on CD - My Early Burglary Years



  FlyingDutchman1971: I couldn't agree more! Having purchased the US 12 inch of 'suedehead' which didn't include this track, it was such a nice surprise in 1994 when I purchased the 13-cd british singles box set and found this track. Moz sings this song with such a great since of joyous naughtiness that you just want to tweak his delinquent little nose.
Paranoid Android  performed by Radiohead  1997
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

This song is one of my all time favourites. It contains my favourite guitar solo ever.I love it because it has all these different sections to it which each evoke a different feeling, so it's sort of a whirlwind to listen to. And it's so unique-sounding, there really is nothing quite like it. Thom Yorke's voice really stands out and is just so lilting and angry. It's heaven to listen to, especially towards the end when he starts to overlap himself. Just a beautiful, intensely paranoid and bewitching song.

from Paranoid Android (EMI)


Pavane for a Dead Princess  performed by Eumir Deodato  1973
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This stunning instrumental is a reasonably straight version of a classical piece by Maurice Ravel, originally written in 1899. Eumir plays piano over a dense string background, adding a tiny bit of jazz phrasing. The texture of the layered strings and piano is remarkably intense and beautiful, and the piece is quite exquisite. I expect this recording would offend classical purists, but I must admit that having heard this version first, I still like it the best. Perhaps this is down to the sheer richness of the string recording, which may be endowed by studio wizardry rarely used in classical recordings. Either way, it's really quite incredible, and I urge you to check it out.

from Deodato 2, available on CD




  Mike: While I find Deodato to be a stimulating and interesting artist (and am far from being a "classical purist" of any sort), I can't really muster any great enthusiasm for this recording. Too close to being a kind of synthesis of Ravel's original for solo piano (1899) and version for full orchestra (1910), I find Deodato's funky adaptations of Stauss's "Also Sprach Zarathustra" and, particularly Debussy's "Prelude to the afternoon of a faun" somewhat more worthwhile. Maybe I should listen again to the Ravel adaptation, but in the past I have found its blandness a little irritating...
  G400 Custom: What I like about this track is the fact that it's a very black, funky take on a piece with questionable Aryan overtones. It can be heard to great affect in Hal Ashby's 'Being There', which I think was Peter Sellers' last film.
  G400 Custom: Re the above comment: I was talking about 'Also Sprach Zarathrustra', not the Ravel piece. Sorry for any confusion.
  G400 Custom: As far as the Ravel adaptation goes, I find it pleasant if a little bit chocolate-boxey, reminiscent of the 60s soundtracks of Francis Lai. I can't argue with Delicado's comments about the string sound though, which is astonishing.
  sodapop650: Bore - Ring! If you are going to listen to Deodato. Listen to the early Equipe LPs. When his sound was so hip, hipper than hip, the bastard brazilian son of Henry Mancini hip. Get a copy of "Tremendao" grab a beer and try to find a nice warm spot of sunshine.
  delicado: Well, you have to remember that I'm someone who is obsessed with string sounds. I listen fanatically to late 50s and 60s mood music records, and am a fan of both Percy Faith and Jackie Gleason's records. Yes, I love Brazilian music, and enjoy all of Deodato's 60s Equipe LPs, but I also have a very real and intense love of what my pal G400 defines as 'chocolate-boxy' easy listening music. Deodato's 1972 LP 'Percepcao' (recently reissued on CD in Brazil) also falls into this category, and I adore it!
  [email protected]: One of the purist fusion jazz artists of his time. Listen to the music, don't try to interpret it or rationalize it. Your missing the point. Eumir is unmistakeably one of the pioneers in this gendre.
Presidential Suite  performed by Super Furry Animals  2001
Recommended by delicado [profile]

To be honest, I have little idea of what this song is about, but it certainly sets an intoxicating mood - rather intense and dramatic, but very cool. It's a sprawling, majestic pop song, opening gently with a faint trumpet solo and a picked guitar, and then building up nicely with strings soon after the vocals come in. The chorus is simple and catchy, and the orchestration is lush and beautiful, and the vocals are tender. There is a nice cinematic instrumental section in the middle, with some nods to Burt Bacharach. I don't get the impression this is the most coherent song ever, but there are poignant moments lyrically, such as 'You know that when we met, there were fireworks in the sky...sparkling like dragonflies', set against the moody chorus. It feels kind of nice to be really enjoying a new, 2001 song for once. The new album is really quite good. There are some duff songs, but overall I'd say it deserved better reviews than it received.

Update, ok, I've now figured out this is about the Clinton/Lewinsky furore. I guess I'm just not primarily a lyrics person...

from Rings around the World, available on CD



Red Sleeping Beauty  performed by McCarthy  1986
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Another of my favorite indie tracks in my youth. Can I say 'indie' anymore? Ten years ago the term had meaning, but I get the impression this has faded. I'm talking about bands who recorded for small independent labels, obviously. Anyway, I have a special fondness for McCarthy, since they played at the first live show I ever attended. It was on March 3rd 1990 at the Bowen West Theatre in Bedford, England. Were you there? I know at least one member of this site was (how's it going, Phil?).

Anyway, this is another superbly evocative track for me, with layers of nicely picked guitars, and some intense drumming. The vocals are heartfelt in a way that unkind people might call 'weedy'; I think they're brilliant, needless to say. McCarthy were a superb indie band with jangly Wedding Present-style guitars and a political edge. Tim Gane later went on to form Stereolab, who I also like a lot, but in a very different way.

from the single Red Sleeping Beauty (Pink Label PINKY 12)
available on CD - That's All Very Well But (Cherry Red)



Requiem pour un con  performed by serge gainsbourg
Recommended by olli [profile]

unbelievably cool track, one of my top ten gainsbourg compositions. great jazzy sex beat, smooth vocals.
it's one of his more agressive songs, similar to the also recommended "un poison violent c'est l'amour".
there seems to be a bit of a bit of a prog vibe going on (in lack of better words, i'm not exactly an expert in the technicalities of music).
nice guitar hook. though the track is pretty repetitive, it's by no means boring. the repetition only helps to make it more intense and interesting.
taken from the film le pacha. i think a lot of gainsbourg's soundtrack work is pretty interesting stuff, though some of it often seems a bit rushed or too similar to other cool compositions from the same era (hey, i'm a sucker for plagiarism...)
the soundtrack to cannabis comes especially recommended.


available on CD - le ciinéma de serge gainsbourg, initials b.b and a bunch of othe



  n-jeff: There is an instrumental version on a twelve inch I have that sounds remarkably prescient of Metal Box era PiL: heavy repetetive bass, odd guitar noises and something about the drums, too. Great track, vocal or no.
  olli: oh, that´s awesome, n-jeff! i always wondered if there was an instrumental version...one of the funkiest white tracks ever
Sierra Leone  performed by Mt Eden Dubstep
Recommended by Nathan1623 [profile]

Pretty sweet song. It is simple and intense but really relaxing.




Sly  performed by Herbie Hancock  1974
Recommended by charlesives [profile]

This 1974, 12-minute electric-jazz masterpiece starts with an attractively sexy, slinky soprano melody and sneakily mutates into blistering solo sections played at a blinding tempo. Recorded before the word "fusion" became a tag for a tired genre this track comes from the seminal album, Headhunters. If you have ears for Hancock's cool Fender-Rhodes shadings and the Headhunter's blazing rhythmic kinetics this could be the very strongest music of this period. Harvey Mason drums brilliantly, forging new rhythms that are peculiarly unique to this recording. I don't know where he comes up with this shit; brilliantly inventive, his energy is unflagging set amidst ascending levels of white hot, mercurial tempo. Paul Jackson plays electric bass with concentrate funk phrasing, his coolly repeated ostinato line is a satisfying compliment to the hyperactivity of the chattering drums and clavinet. The track builds and as it sheds its skins each level is slightly more intense. This is a great record, ignore all the amateur web critics and get this track now!
Note: Many people seem to prefer the sequel album THRUST with the decent Mike Clark on drums. I wish it was as good or better than HEADHUNTERS but it is not.

from Headhunters, available on CD


Strange Fruit  performed by Billie Holiday & Her Orchestra  1939
Recommended by tinks [profile]

"Strange fruit hanging/from the poplar tree"...one of the most haunting songs ever written. Holiday recorded this song about a lynching several times throughout her career, but this original version features a performance so intense that it is impossible to beat.


available on CD - 1939-40 (Classics)



  Swinging London: Nina Simone's version of this is also very beautiful.
  space: An extremely important and agonizingly beautiful song.
Strength to Dream  performed by Propaganda  1985
Recommended by Mike [profile]

The final track from their superb album "A Secret Wish". Instrumental, apart from a spoken lyric at the end, this reworking of the opening track of the album uses both real strings and synths in combination with some catchy, moody chords to create real atmosphere.

from A Secret Wish (ZTT)


suspiria  performed by I Goblin  1976
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

I don't care much for the rest of the soundtrack, but the title theme for this dario Argento horror film is top rate. Underpinnig the whole thing is a continuous ominous rhythm played on what sounds like a hammered dulcimer, on top of this there doesn't appear to be much actually going on. Apart from the sound effects. Screams, bells. All very, very intense. I have a vinyl version of teh OST (plus a 7 of the theme from Il Giaguaro magazine [quick brag]), but the cd looks good with a couple of extra versions.

from Suspiria (Dagored)
available on CD - suspiria



  eftimihn: Oh yeah, this is one of the creepiest tracks ever recorded with it's hypnotically repetitive style building up slowly in the first half and then turning into a faster paced prog-rockish second half with a kind of gothic sounding, massive organ and furious synths.
  n-jeff: I also forgot the chanting. And theres some kind of bassy dijeridoo thing going on in there too.
Tereza and Tomas  performed by Bright Eyes  1998
Recommended by two-headed boy [profile]

'Bright Eyes' O'Connor Oberst is a gifted lyricist and probably the best for his age (19 at record release). With his literary references and unconventional recording, listening to Bright Eyes is quite an experience. In this instance we meet the protagonists of the novel, 'The Unberable Lightness of Being,' and find in their weightlessness the desire to escape. Slow acoustic struming by O'Conner steady his intense vocals and between the chimes and reverberating forte piano we experience a disjointing storm used to great effect. The song has us drifting at sea with a delicate melody until we are at last erased like a skeleton in chalk. Bright Eyes sings - 'Let's sail away disappearing in a mist. Let's sail away with a whisper and a kiss. Or vanish from a road somewhere, like Tereza and Tomas, suspended in this bliss.' We feel his expressive words and sound pass through us, and late in the day we find it echoing softly in our heads. Quite an accomplishment for someone who couldn't drink yet, I look forward to following his career.

from Letting Off the Happiness (Saddle Creek Records lbj - 23)



The Cutter  performed by Echo & The Bunnymen  1983
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

On ”The Cutter” fellow Liverpool natives, Echo and The Bunnymen successfully wed the Eastern influenced psychedelic sounds made famous by hometown heroes, The Beatles. Crafting Eastern influences into a new post-punk hybrid that was sweeping England in the Early 80’s. It was songs like ”The Cutter” that would help define the newly coined Neo-psychedelic sub-genre, practiced by such group’s of the period as The Chameleons U.K., Psychedelic Furs and Simple Minds amongst others. The track opens with a keyboard approximation of Indian strings, whirring briefly before the band kicks into a percolating groove of popping bass, driving straight drums and chinking guitar accents. Ian McCulloch adds another layer of ’60 nostalgia, employing his expressive, slack-jawed vocal delivery that conjures aural images of the late Jim Morrison as he unfurls lines that drip with apprehension “Who’s on the seventh floor? / Brewing alternatives / What’s in the bottom drawer? / Waiting for things to give”. The Eastern strings re-enter at strategic points, filling in space between verses and McCulloch’s esoteric pleas to “spare us the cutter!”, which sounds like a good idea in any case. The arrangement also veers into epic territory quite unexpectedly in the second half, signaled by a sweeping wave of keyboard and McCulloch’s more subdued delivery as poses a string of rhetorically poignant questions, “Am I the happy loss? / Will I still recoil? / When the skin is lost / Am I the worthy cross? / Will I still be soiled? / When the dirt is off” -as the music swell behind him. Like any good single, the track never looses steam, cruising through each section with power and grace. A nod is in order for Ian Broudie, who’s smooth production helped The Cutter become Echo and The Bunnymen’s first top ten single in Britain and a linchpin track for the Neo-psychedelic movement.
(AMG)

from Porcupine, available on CD


The Disturbing Presence of Chachi  performed by Western Civ  2008
Recommended by wendyloohoo [profile]

This is a song on their new album Shower the People You Love with Gold. I think you can at least listen to it for free on www.westerncivrock.com.

Anyway, it it is really rocking with a lot of crescendos and decrescendos.

from Shower the People You Love with Gold, available on CD


Trzeba Wracać  performed by Novi Singers  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Listening again to a compilation I made almost four years ago, I heard this magical track, which really had a big effect on me. It's probably not for everyone. Meandering and rather wistful, it's not at all funky like some of their later work, but I find it utterly compelling.

As you might have heard, Novi Singers were an incredibly talented quartet of vocal singers recording in Poland in the late 60s and 70s. They did several amazing records. This is taken from what I think was their first, Bossa Nova. But rather than renderings of songs like 'One note samba' and 'Desafinado', the album consists of a delightful and varied collection of originals in a related mood. The result is like bossa nova from a parallel, slightly more melancholic universe.

The accompaniment is a slow, gentle bossa played by a small jazz group, with some rich strings dropping in and out, and the vocals (all wordless/scat) take centre stage. The chord sequence is staggeringly beautiful, and at times the vocalists take slightly extravagant scat solos.

It sounds strange to say it, but this is really one of those tracks that seems to tell an enormous, emotional story, in spite of the fact that it doesn't contain one word! It would make a fantastic soundtrack to a silent movie.

from Bossa Nova (Polskie Nagrania)
available on CD - Bossa Nova/Torpedo (Polskie Nagrania)



  delicado: just to reiterate, this IS the best song ever!
Turning of the Tide  performed by Steve Wynn & The Miracle 3  2006
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Songwriter Steve Wynn, the former Dream Syndicate frontman, has been on a tear since 1996 when he offered Melting in the Dark. Since then, his records have featured howling, wailing rock & roll and deep, dark acoustic reflections — all of them bearing his trademark noir-ish lyrics that offer the shadowy side of life, love, and violence. He's employed a variety of musicians, and they've always sounded like hired guns. On ...Tick...Tick...Tick he's got himself a real band. They're all younger than he is, and they have the hunger it takes to really execute Wynn's unique songs. Start with drummer Linda Pitmon, who acts as co-producer (along with Wynn and Craig Schumacher) on these sides. Add to this the fact that the entire band (including Dave DeCastro on bass and guitarist Jason Victor) plots the arrangements.

"Turning of the Tide," is the mirror image, with the refrain stating "Don't be afraid/It's just the turning of the tide." Here again, guitars climb astride one another and begin ringing, jangling in heated dialogue to underscore the words as Pitmon's in-the-pocket drumming urges them forward.
(AMG)

from ...Tick...Tick...Tick, available on CD


Two-Headed Boy  performed by Neutral Milk Hotel  1998
Recommended by ispoketofoxes [profile]

Displaying the most scary and imaginitive lyrics of Neutral Milk Hotel's, Two-Headed Boy is played with so much force it is practically undescribable. Both Jeff Mangum's singing and strumming is so intense that when one listens to it, he/she is instantly moved. Jeff is a little off key but still it is felt.
I'm sure everyone reading this has probably heard it. If not, do so. NOW!!!

from In The Aeroplane Over The Sea (Merge)


who needs forever  performed by astrud gilberto  1966
Recommended by coffman [profile]

This exceptionally haunting and lyrical song by Quincy Jones has received its definitive interpretion by Astrud Gilberto with arrangement and accompaniment by the Brazilian organist Walter Wanderley. The melancholy urgency of the piece resonates well with the dark/sad tonality that pervades so much of Bossa Nova music, though its character is also reminiscent of certain otherwise very different pieces from the bebop era, which had a formative influence on Quincy Jones' music. There is definitely the remote influence of Charlie Parker and especially Dizzy Gillespie. It's truly a completely unique piece. The drifting melody which seems to skirt over the chord changes has a beautiful inevitability. Only a very gifted and skilled musician could have contrived such a beautiful work. So Quincy Jones deserves especial credit for crafting this song from the film "The Deadly Affair."

Astrud's delivery, so typically limpid and restrained, only serves to heighten the intensity of this darkly passionate song. The subtle but somehow fierce organ playing of Walter Wanderley acheives a sizzling romanticism that perfectly complements the reading of Astrud's apparently detached fatalism.

In my opinion, this track is a true musical masterpiece. Its remarkable economy of means is a testament to the skill of the composer as well as the artistry of the performers. In fact, it's a nearly perfect combination of expressive means and poetic intent. The beautiful resolution, with Astrud's perfect striking of the high B-flat over the half-diminished F-minor seventh, is a moment of sublime dramatic intensity, though profoundly understated, as is typical of her finest artistic moments. One is reminded of Miles Davis. Her poetic skill is rooted in subtlety.

I have listened to this extraordinary track hundreds of times, and always experienced chills rising up on the back of my neck. How amazing that this incredible musical gem was omitted from the original album A Certain Smile, A Certain Sadness. Perhaps it was too intense, too heavy; whatever the case, it's a truly remarkable piece of music.

I'm truly grateful to have discovered this great albeit minor musical masterpiece. There's really nothing else quite like it! The sizzling but subtle sensitivity of the rhythm section (Claudio Slon on drums, possibly Joao Gilberto on guitar and Jose Marino on bass) adds an intensity to the piece which helps project the almost existential tone of the song.

I'm really swept away by this obscure and neglected work, which attains -- for me at least -- to a peak of poetic intensity really rare in music. As is usual with Astrud at her best, it accomplishes its artistic ends with what seems like the most minimal of means. But subtlety is always the avenue to the most profound of artistic experiences. I think this is a remarkable example -- one of the greatest -- of the wedding of popular music and high art. It is a truly perfect performance. In my opinion, its greatness increases rather than diminshes with repeated listenings. There is only one word for that -- it's magic!

from A Certain Smile, A Certain Sadness, available on CD



  rio: you must pick-up the quincy jones soundtrack (released with the score to "the pawnbroker") with astrud singing "who needs forever". The lush quincy jones score is hauntingly beautiful, and astrud never sounded better. This version is the real deal for me..
  rferus: Amazing guitar on this piece.
Yesterday Is Here  performed by Tom Waits  1987
Recommended by Fig Alert [profile]

When I think of my favorite stuff by Tom Waits, I always look back to the time when the writing and arranging of his songs were more playful, avant pop exercises, colored by a range of intense and deep emotional swatches, yet always with humor. My favorite stretch in his catalog of work is from Swordfishtrombones to Franks Wild Years (Marc Ribot?). Songs were always off-kilter, tenuous, unpredictable...far-away organs played against a punchy latin rhumba beat...oh, here comes the circus, jolted by a bended-note/feedback guitar part. Wha?

I heard a lot more characters in his voice, too. The sideshow barker, the Ironweed hobo, the cocky but sensitive playboy, or the frustrated, suburbia-warped freespirit looking to make a break.

This track off Franks Wild Years feels like an old, worn out, spaghetti western-inspired guitar shuffle. Its whispered from the lips of a grizzled shopkeeper in a soon-to-be ghosttown, telling his concerned companion the need to reach for where your dreams dwell: "out where your enemies lie." There's little consolation against what most likely will be an exercise in futility, but necessary nonetheless, to carve out some sort of happiness. Get used to it.

Somehow it seems to fit these times very well...

from Franks Wild Years (Island 7 90572-2)



Your Guardian Angel  performed by The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus
Recommended by bluewatafrog342 [profile]

Acoustic/Punk Rock, I absolutely love this song because of the way it is starts so smooth and slow and then gradually erupts into an amazing finish. It also has great lyrics and a story to it.

from Don't You Fake It


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