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You searched for ‘Grand’, which matched 42 songs.
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A.M. 180  performed by Grandaddy
Recommended by cleanfun [profile]




Albatross  performed by Slowdive  1991
Recommended by Genza [profile]

Hell, I could have picked almost anything from the back catalogue of this band. Albatross is the stand-out track of an outstanding 4 track EP (entitled Holding our Breath) from early ’90s shoegazers Slowdive. Bemoaned, decried and hated by Britain’s Britpop-loving press, Slowdive’s beautiful multi-layered sound has latterly found a kindred spirit in much lauded post-rockers Sigur Ros. So maybe they were right after all…

Back to Reading – and there is no stronger example of the Thames Valley sound than Albatross. Layer upon layer of minor chords – almost symphonic in their beauty – Albatross swells to a powerful crescendo of highly processed guitars. Non-believers should check out double A-sides Catch the Breeze and Shine. The fourth track on the rather grand EP is a cover of Syd Barrett's (former lead singer of Pink Floyd) Golden Hair. Utterly remarkable.

from Holding our Breath EP (Creation CRE 112)



Ask Yourself Why  performed by Michel LeGrand  1969
Recommended by konsu [profile]

A really nice cinema-pop gem from the team that brought us The Windmills of your Mind. Sung by Sally Stevens, one of Hollywoods great voices. Such a charming little song. It's one of those things you instantly play again after the first time you hear it. It's more or less a song about freedom, with lyrics that still sound fresh today:"...Bullets fly like popcorn on the screen, recommended wholesome nice & clean, making love's the thing that can't be seen... Why?"

Found it on this sort of cash-in LP for LeGrand's UA soundtrack work from 1970. Originally from the soundtrack for "La Piscine", which is harder than hell to find on it's own. The LP is awsome for fans of LeGrand for it has 3 tunes from "The Thomas Crown Affair" , "La Piscine" , "The Young Girls Of Rochefort" & the jazz theme from "Play Dirty".

from The Windmills of your Mind (United Artists UAS 6715)


Blowfly’s Rap  performed by Blowfly  1980
Recommended by JoNZ [profile]

From the godfather of filthfy rap comes this FUNKY,slamming tune. It tells the story of trucker with a CB radio(timewarp) who is, in his mind anyway, the baddest bastard around. On his journey he picks up a transvestite hooker, masterbates, has a fight with the Grand Dragon of the klu klux klan, claims to be related to Mohammed Ali, and drinks a bottle of wine. The killer rhyme is "We got to the room, pulled off her clothes, and the funk from her p***y started f**king with my nose." If you don't mind that sort of talk, you'll love this cut.

from X-Rated Blofly's Party (Weird World lp-2034)



  delicado: I don't have this record, but must confess that I find Blowfly strangely compelling. The mix of toilet humour, offensiveness, and authentic funk sounds is very potent indeed.
Cash and Carry  performed by Michel LeGrand  1968
Recommended by konsu [profile]

My favorite cut from this amazing soundtrack. A mix of Alpert, Glockenspiel, and jazz scat... Unlike anything else recorded really.

from The Thomas Crown Affair, available on CD (United Artists)


Chinon / Eleanor’s Arrival  performed by John Barry  1968
Recommended by nighteye [profile]

I didn't know anything about 'The Lion In Winter' from 1968 until a few days ago. I had the TV on in the background when my attention was grabbed by one particular song in the movie. "That must be John Barry's work", I thought to my self. His use of strings and trumpets are unmisstakable -- and surely I was correct!

'Chinon / Eleanor's Arrival' has the same type of sound as Barry's later soundtracks such as 'Moonraker', 'High Road to China' and 'Out of Africa'. In fact, I first thought I was listening to a passage from 'Moonraker' when I heard this song the first time. The arrangement is brilliant, the lush rich strings, trumpet and female- male choir really makes this song stand out. It has a very majestic, grand feeling to it and it really fits the scene it is used for in the movie.

from The Lion In Winter
available on CD - The Lion In Winter OST (Silva)



Desiree  performed by The Left Banke  1968
Recommended by tempted [profile]

If romantic, dramatic, emotionally fragile and beautifully orchestrated baroque pop with woodwinds moves you then you're blessed... by me.


available on CD - Complete Recordings (Mercury)




  gaymod: is this a cover of the old doo wop standard ? which Zappa was involved in
  tempted: No, it's a Left Banke original.
  Swinging London: Haven't heard that for years! Nice to be reminded of it. My fave by them is 'Pretty Ballerina'. As far as I know, they never had a hit here in England.
Distortions  performed by Clinic
Recommended by nathanwoolls [profile]

It seems that I'm the only person to recommend Clinic (if I'm using this site properly). Anyway, Clinic are a band from Liverpool with 2 (I think) fantastic albums so far. I chose this song from their first album, Internal Wrangler, for no other reason than it's the first one that sprung to mind. Hard to describe what they sound like, but they remind me of the Velvet Underground, Beach Boys, Dick Dale. That's probably not a very good or accurate description. People in the UK might recognise another song from this album (The Second Line) from a Levi's ad a few years ago. Anyway, if you like Radiohead, Flaming Lips, Mercury Rev, Grandaddy, that kind of thing, find this album, you might like it.

from Internal Wrangle (Domino)


du courage  performed by la grande sophie
Recommended by morning belle [profile]




Elle a... elle a pas...  performed by Michel Legrand  1965
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A very cool and swinging jazzy pop vocal. Michel's range is quite remarkable, and there are some cool backing vocals too. About halfway through of the song, some completely over the top scat vocals kick in, and two different vocal Michels carry out a nonsensical scat 'conversation' until the end. Definitely an unusual way to complete a song, but it works fantastically.


available on CD - Le Meilleur de Michel Legrand (Philips France)



Grand Dark Feeling of Emptiness  performed by Bonnnie Prince Billy  1999
Recommended by umbrellasfollowrain [profile]

He's a psychobilly from the woods. His bearded figure foraged out to tell you what he saw, and he's pared his story down to the bare essentials so that his story is your story. "Over the hill, like always you know/ where Billy and Frankie and Henry and Joe/ they beat and broke me hard and slow/ to prove that I was nobody." His wound is your wound, and you follow the lyrics through as he wonders what gave him his redemption. And though you never thought of yourself as having found redemption per se, it seems like you must have. Essentially, Bonnie Prince Billy makes boys cry.

from Ease on Down the Road
available on CD - Ease On Down the Road


Guess Who I Saw Today?  performed by Eartha Kitt  1975
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

The fabulous Ms. Kitt pours out her heart on this track in a way not usually heard in her songs. She puts away the diva and brings out the tender and emotional woman within as she sings of witnessing a budding romance between two people only to reveal at the end that one of them is her man whom she saw with another woman.

from For Always (Stanyan Records SR 10040)


He’s Simple, He’s Dumb, He’s The Pilot.  performed by Grandaddy  2000
Recommended by pleasepleaseme [profile]

Weirdly wonderful electro-folk-rock number.
It reminds me of "space oddity" by Bowie but in a K-Hole.

from The Sophtware Slump, available on CD (V2)


Horse Pills  performed by the Dandy Warhols  2000
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Y'know...I really like the latest Dandy Warhols album, in spite of myself. I've never been able to stand them, as they are as about as close a thing to actual rock stars as we have here in Portland. As a result, there's just an awful lot of bitterness in the air. I think that I finally came to the realization that their particular brand of coke-sniffing antics are precisely what I want out of a rock & roll group. I want there to be rock stars on the grand 70s scale again. Somebody has got to inherit Mick Jagger's rightful place as the man to be. I'm not saying that Courtney Taylor should be that man, but at least he's on the right track. This song in particular...as strange as it sounds...it reminds me of the Offspring, but in a good way. And that's the way with a lot of this album. There are songs here that remind me a lot of Beck, ones that remind me a lot of Frank Black and of course the obvious Stones pastiches. In short, there's nothing earth-shatteringly original...but hasn't rock & roll always been about copying what's come before and trying to make it your own? I mean, where would the Beatles have been without Chuck Berry?

from Thirteen Tales from Urban Bohemia, available on CD (Capitol)




  doublebarrelledsou: um... "reminds me of the offspring, but in a good way" i bet you've been losing sleep on someone finding that comment for months, your day of reckoning has arrived master tinks! i had no idea you were harbouring love for the dw. guess what's on ym desk right now. a numark tt-100 baby!
I hung my head  performed by Johnny Cash  2002
Recommended by andrew76 [profile]

This is a cover of a song by Sting. I haven't heard Sting's version but I am not a fan of what I have heard. Anyway, Cash's version is stripped down to the bare essentials, acoustic guitar and piano with a little bit of keyboard in the background to add some depth, but the music is secondary to the great mans voice. He's in his seventies, and all the age an experience in his voice just makes the youth and experience of the lyrics all the more poignant. His voice reminds me of my grandfather (May he rest in peace). The whole Album (American Recordings IV - The Man Comes Around) is incredible and this song is a stand out track among many, both original and covered.

from American Recordings IV The Man Comes Around, available on CD


I Think I Love You  performed by The Partridge Family  1970
Recommended by geezer [profile]

To think there was a time when pops vision could be this grand and ambitious .This song originated from an American tv show "The Partridge Family" and was played out by pedigree session men and David Cassidy. its elements contain sunshine pop vocals ,harpsichord and a psuedo classical middle eight and an irrestible chorus,the song almost sounds like two songs alternating with each other and managing to resolve their differences at every chorus ,As good as pop ever got.

from Best of The Partridge Family and David Cassidy
available on CD - Best of


In Search of England  performed by Barclay James Harvest  1978
Recommended by Mike [profile]

One of the most appealing of the songs by Woolly Wolstenholme, the band's keyboard player until he left in 1979, and who sadly committed suicide on 13 December 2010.

Woolly's songs, the best-known of which are examples of the often grandiose style which has since become known as "symphonic prog", always stood out from those of his band-mates for their harmonic interest and textural subtlety.

from XII (Polydor)


La Bamba  performed by Edmundo Ros and Catarina valente  1966
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

Starts with a piano tinkling up and down the scale, and then the whole Latin Orchestra starts, ultimately Edmundo's raspy voice bellows out of the speakers sounding for all the world like Shaggy's drunken grandfather. Kind of Rhumba, very very danceable, surprisingly modern sounding with a terrific breakdown to the piano in the middle. Beware Edmundo ros has done another version of La Bamba which is terrible.

from Nothing But Aces (Decca PFS 41457)



lost on yer merry way  performed by grandaddy
Recommended by morning belle [profile]




Love Theme  performed by Vangelis  1982
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

A classic, congenial, groundbreaking electronica score to Ridley Scott's movie "Blade Runner". While the most significant cues like "Love Theme" and "Memories of Green" were included on numerous compilations before, it took 12 years for the soundtrack to get released officially. Since Vangelis "recompiled" the music for the soundtrack, adding new music, reworked cues and left out parts of it, it's the best sounding but far from complete version of the soundtrack. Due to this fact there have been a huge amount of unofficial bootleg releases over the years, mostly private releases put out in small quantities. Even after over 20 years since the soundtrack has been recorded it still sounds fresh and highly evocative as ever before. The feeling throughout the soundtrack is a neo-retro, future-noir mood with grand soundscapes created with a mass array of various analogue synths. Especially the wonderful use of the Yamaha CS-80, with it's somewhat organic, sweeping, harmonica-style polyphonic sound gives the music such a remarkable feel. On "Love Theme" though Vangelis prominently features pretty much the only "real" instrument on the whole soundtrack, a saxophone played by Dick Morrisey.

from Blade Runner, available on CD




  nighteye: This is one of the best instrumental synth soundtrack track ever made, Vangelis is a genius! The pads / strings and the saxophone are so incredibly relaxed it feels like you are floating in space. My other favourite song from the Blade Runner soundtrack is 'Blade Runner Blues', it's also amazing!
  nighteye: Forgot to mention there is a variation of this song on the Blade Runner Bootleg by Esper called 'Thinking of Rachel', which is a muffled warm analog synth piece.
Market Place  performed by Eden Ahbez  1960
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This exquisite instrumental really takes me to another place. The exotic instrumentation, with vibes and great percussion, gives it an incredible atmosphere. To quote the CD's liner notes, 'it's as if you've walked into a grandiose movie setting'. Perhaps this dates me, but in fact when I hear this I find myself picturing some of the desert scenes in the movie Star Wars. I highly recommend the album.

from Eden's Island, available on CD



Miner at the dial-a-view  performed by Grandaddy  2000
Recommended by karl [profile]

A sparse, gorgeous song: a batty sample, a vocal - with a cracked 'yeah' near the end to melt your heart - a chiming, New Order-ish bass, and not a whole lot else.

from The Sophtware Slump (v2)



Née dans un ice-cream  performed by Michel Polnareff  1971
Recommended by tempted [profile]

A key song from the French folk rock bohemian's ambitious concept album, Polnareff's. This could have been produced by David Axelrod but wasn't. Beautiful, aching pop song with grandeur and despair. And a rhythm section that's so groovy. Another example of how great the studio orchestras sounded in France back then. What an arrangement. As hip as it gets.

from Polnareff's, available on CD




  Sem Sinatra: Totally agree ... all Polnaref's early 70s albums have killer tunes backed up by orchestrations to die for
  jezandliz1: The orchestra backing on Polnareff's is excellent and was recorded in the UK using UK session musicians who also played on some of the best groovy uk library and soundtrack music of the late 60s. Try the three instrumentals on Polnareff's - so funky they're ridiculous!
Never Turn Your Back On Mother Earth  performed by Sparks  1974
Recommended by geezer [profile]

A grandiose harpsichord entrance gives way to almost choirboy melody regerding our lack of concern over this planet of ours , add to this a vaudeville waltz time middle eight sung through a megaphone and we are firmly in the land of strange though not just for the sake of it . Weirdly wonderful and a Top 10 hit as well

from Propoganda, available on CD


Nothing Left To Borrow  performed by The Jayhawks  1995
Recommended by MoeShinola [profile]

This songs stands in for "Sister Cry", "Settled Down Like Rain", "Clouds". "Two Angels", "Blue", and all the others from The Jayhawks' last two records with Mark Olsen, as well as on it's own. The harmonies are just the most raggedy and pure I've ever heard(sorry, King's X). I used to listen to this one over and over.

from Tomorrow The Green Grass (American)


November Rain  performed by Guns n’ Roses  1991
Recommended by izumi [profile]

Another song that needs no introduction. This is a classic rock ballad known to all, by one of the greatest bands ever. The music has this grand, anthemic feel to it which I really like. I don't think it's trying to be pretentious at all, as some people might think. It's a great ballad that uses orchestral music, with an amazing guitar running through it.

from Use Your Illusion Vol. 1 (Geffen GEFD24415)
available on CD - Greatest Hits (Geffen)


Once Upon a Summertime  performed by Blossom Dearie  1958
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

A very ethereal song that is perfect for the lilting girlish voice of Blossom Dearie. She is also an accomplished pianist and plays on every song she sings. She is backed by a standard jazz trio on this track and they play in a wonderfully subdued manor that allows her voice and the words to be the focal point of this song. Originally written by a french songwriter, Blossom Dearie heard the song while living and performing in France in the mid-1950's. Upon her return to the United States, she asked her friend, songwriter Johnny Mercer, to write english lyrics to the wonderful melody. The words he wrote tell a beautiful story of love lost, but fondly remembered thru a familiar smell or sound. A standout track from the marvelous LP of the same name. Give it a listen the next time you go to your local music store.

from Once Upon a Summertime, available on CD


Our Dying Brains  performed by Grandaddy
Recommended by mayers [profile]





Pyar Karne Wale  performed by Asha Bhosle  1980
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

A week ago I was in India, the holiday of a lifetime. As well as all the tourist stuff, like temples and museums, I always make sure that I get a slice of pop culture when I'm in a foreign country. So the night tended to conclude in the hotel with a bit of Indian TV.

Watched a fair bit of MTV India which, if anything, is even heavier on ads and blatent self-promotion that its British and American equivalents. I was cheered to see that most of the music they played was in Hindi and there was a limit on the American and European bands that got airplay (seemingly, strangely, limited to The Rasmus and Britney Spears).

But MTV is only watchable for a limited amount of time. Jet lag and excitement dictates that one spends more time awake than asleep and so I got to see a few late 70's Bollywood classics, among them 'Shaan' (translation: 'Pride'). This Asha Bhosle gem is from this movie. The film itself struk me as a fairly banal James Bond rip off although, not speaking Hindi, I grant that I'll have missed the more subtle aspects of plot construction.

This song stopped me in my tracks. I knew that Bollywood was an area that I enjoyed but was in a grand state of ignorance of, and I was looking forward to rectifying this. Pyar Karne Wale takes the prize for best Donna Summer rip off EVER. Stealing its barely-adjusted backing from 'I Feel Love', Bhosle wails and moans over the top, transforming Moroder's disco classic into something that simultanously establishes common ground between Indian and European disco while evoking its more subtle differences.

Myself and boyfriend came back with what seems like every Bollywood soundtrack produced between 1972 and 1980 including, of course, Shaan. I look forward to educating myself in this genre and finding more similar gems.

from Naseeb / Shaan, available on CD




  pleasepleaseme: Hi, I'm From N.Y.C. In the early 80's we had a show on cable, called "Cinema,Cinema, which showed numbers from the classic cinema. I lucked out on a few OST'S. Can highly recommend "Qurbani" & "Kasme Vaade" & "Sargam" & "Sawan Ko Aane Do" & "Loafer". Would love to know if you found any of those, or if you could recommend some of your finds.
  jeanette: Did indeed pick up Qurbani, which I have now listened to and would agree that its fab. That's the only one I have of those you mention. Got 30-odd CDs and most of them are double or triple headers, and I'm slowly ploughing my way through the pile. Favourite thus far is 'Zamaane Ko Dikhana Hai' which is another R.D. Burman stunner.
  olli: RD burman is, ahem, "da bomb". probably my favourite bollywood producer/composer. not that i'm an expert on indian 70's pop culture or anything.
Say Hello, Wave Goodbye  performed by Soft Cell  1981
Recommended by Mike [profile]

A pop song of epic grandeur. Marc Almond's rather out of tune singing doesn't ultimately detract from what is a great song and a very good recorded performance. The synth player of the duo, Dave Ball, appears to have been a somewhat underrated pop genius.

from Non-stop erotic cabaret, available on CD




  delicado: Yes, isn't this a brilliant, devastating track. I think the out-of-tune vocals are all part of the package! This shares some of the desolate and empty electronic feel of some of Joy Division's work, but puts it into a pop context.
step inside love  performed by cilla black  1967
Recommended by olli [profile]

great song. because it starts off in a relaxed easy listening mood, the big paul mccartney chorus caught me completely offguard on first listen. Hasn´t left my playlist since...the demo version is superb, too.






  Swinging London: Oh yes...a great, great song. Her best by far. I agree, her demo version is also good or am I thinking of the bossa style version she did?
Superfast Jellyfish  performed by Gorillaz feat. De La Soul & Gruff Rhys  2010
Recommended by claudiag [profile]

A fantastic song from Plastic Beach album by Gorillaz. It's funny electro-hip hop performed with grandmaster De La Soul, irresistible.

from Plastic Beach (Parlophone/Emi)


Sweet Talkin' Woman  performed by Electric Light Orchestra  1977
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

Try to remove this from all the boring "classic rock" trappings its acquired over the years. Appreciate what a fascinatingly strange combination of overheated pop, symphonic grandeur, and rock-ish muscle this is. So 1977, yet so timeless. Thank you.

from Out of the Blue, available on CD



The Message  performed by Grandmaster Flash
Recommended by inbloom44 [profile]

A hip hop classic...Pure and Simple.




The Moon and the Stars  performed by Mr. Wright  1998
Recommended by secularus [profile]

I was immediately captivated by the tropical beat that begins this 6 minute tune. The track simultaneously induces a melancholic yet inspired feeling. Kevin Wright's delicate voice, like many fine things in life, is an aquired taste. His mournful voice tells of ethereal objects"the moon..the stars..the milky way.."and his longing to be with the one he "holds dear."

from Star Time, available on CD


The Windmills of your mind  performed by Noel Harrison  1968
Recommended by Mike [profile]

I know it's almost unbelievably corny, but I've always had a soft spot for this classic cycle of 5ths based number, particularly in this, its original version.




Theme from "The Go-Between"  performed by Michel Legrand and the LSO  1969
Recommended by Mike [profile]

The minor key, pedal bass, double-dotted theme, and piano and orchestra scoring create an atmosphere which I find very enjoyable. I only have an edit of the original, which I think was available as them adn variations and various suites, and would like to hear the rest to see how/if Legrand develops the material.





  delicado: Just listening to what I assume is the same version of this (mine is on a cheapo Bell compilation from the early 70s). Fantastic track indeed!
Ticket To The Moon  performed by Electric Light Orchestra  1981
Recommended by Goldtransam [profile]

The song is somewhat reminiscent of their earlier output, featuring grand piano and more strings than their past few singles. Beautiful song by a brilliant band.

"I've got a ticket to the moon, but i'd rather see the sunshine in your eyes"

from Time (Jet Records & Columbia Records)



  Mike: Nice to see this recommendation! Simple song with a pretty post-Beatles melody. I've just dug out my LP of Time and have been playing side 1. It really sparkles!
  Mike: My favourite song on the album is "21st Century Man" on side 2, which I thing rates highly among their overall output and is maybe the last great song they produced. The weakest song on the album has to be the single "Hold on Tight" which sounds as though they were trying to compete with Shakin' Stevens!
Vim Da Bahia  performed by Quarteto Em Cy  1967
Recommended by sodapop650 [profile]

Quarteto Em Cy "Som Definitivo" was the first brazilian LP I purchased because I liked the cover. Before that I had only been familiar with Sergio Mendes and things like Les Baxter or Michel LeGrands excellent Rio LP. The darkness and power of Som Definitivo blew me away. Instead of the sacharine sweet vocals and ultra-clean arrangements of Sergio Mendes this sounded like 4 rowdy schoolgirls who got dragged into the studio off the street. The sound was much more throaty and the music by Tamba Trio is the primitive repetitious acoustic stuff that, personally, affects me the most. they do a lot of "call-and-response" type of arrangements. I always imagine the solitary life of people living in Bahia and the importance of the sea and the repetitious sound of the breaking waves in much of the music and the voices of the 4 girls like ghosts of the sea calling out to the fishermen. (I make up all kinds of stupid shit about the songs becasue I can't understand a word their saying anyway) Quarteto Em Cy also perfom on the classic Baden Powell/Vinicius De Moraes LP "Os Afro Sambas." In one of my earlier comments I mention that I have been told that Voodoo had a big influence on the people of Brazil and this LP is the best example of this influence.

from Som Definitivo, available on CD


We're Still Free  performed by Skeleton Crew  1983
Recommended by havadonut [profile]

The best political song ever written, "We're Still Free" concerns the famous tragedy of a Korean passenger jet shot down by fighter planes when it strayed into Soviet airspace. Yet in recounting this act of barbarism on the part of the Soviets, it also implicates the righteousness of the American side of the Cold War ("We're still free here in America"). The song sets up a chilling contrast in the singing of the two performers, with Frith crying out almost desperately against believing what the media tell us, while Tom Cora gently croons the part of the Soviet air controllers as they decide to destroy the plane. Skeleton Crew was a two-man band with both performers playing drums with their feet along with electronics and strings. Here they set a contrast between the grand, arcing lines of the cello and a homey picking of the violin that's almost shockingly sweet and funny. Critical of anti-democratic trends in the West, Skeleton Crew was criticized by fans in Eastern Europe for taking freedom for granted.

from Learn to Talk (Rift (US)/RecRec (Switz) Rift/RecRec 08/05)
available on CD - Learn to Talk/Country of Blinds (RecRec (ReCDec 512))


When the Wind Blows  performed by David Bowie  1986
Recommended by Mike [profile]

I discovered this work of absolute genius today - it was on a 3 disc Bowie compilation ("The Platinum Collection") which a colleague was playing at work.

The song starts with an echoey 80s drum sound with a repeated guitar riff, behind which we begin to hear a beautiful chord sequence played on the synth. The riff drops out and Bowie sings a fantastic melody over the chord sequence, which takes many subtle and grand turns. The song has a relatively complicated construction and instrumentation.




zebulon  performed by einstürtzende neubaten  199?
Recommended by olli [profile]

i like eistürtzende neubaten better after they started writing ballads. in my opinion, this is one of their finest pseudo-velvet underground moments. some nice metallic spring percussion, humming and subtle string backing. it plods along quite nicely and builds tension until it explodes into full industropop greatness at the end. i have no idea what the lyrics are about as i don´t speak german, but the music has quite an uplifting effect. a bit like playing around with controlled fire in science class or something.
(yes, i know, it's a stupid comparison).


available on CD - tabula rasa


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