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search results for “playful”
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List songs by Song title | Performer | Year

You searched for ‘playful’, which matched 22 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
"So Shy"  performed by Sam Prekop  1999
Recommended by pleasepleaseme [profile]

Solo effort by Sam Prekop of The Sea And Cake. Love this album and the two LP's that follow,"Oui" & "One Bedroom". Sam manages to fuse Rock with Jazz and some nice electronics thrown in. Hints of Satie & Eno even!
Solid, as is everything this band does. Chicago really is the crossroads of America!

from "Sam Prekop", available on CD (Thrill Jockey)


Big Time  performed by Peter Gabriel  1986
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

An even funkier hit single than "Sledgehammer" ? which had an epic groove but was too slow to actually dance to ? "Big Time" is a sardonic response to yuppie materialism with the funniest lyrics of Peter Gabriel's entire career. (The ending of the song, stopping just before the obvious punch line to all this discussion of how preternaturally huge everything in Gabriel's charmed life is, is a small moment of brilliance.) But the brilliance of the song is in the way it ties all that Gabriel had been learning about African percussion and Middle Eastern melodies ever since the days of his third solo album and ties them all into the service of a walloping great groove, making plain the connections between North Africa and Stax-Volt once and for all. The combination of talking drum and wah-wah guitar owes as much to Booker T and the MGs as it does to King Sunny Ade, which is both the key to "Big Time" and a clue as to why Gabriel's later, more explicitly world music focused albums just aren't as much fun.
(AMG)

from So, available on CD (Geffen)


Bon-Jour  performed by Ed Lincoln  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

When I heard this album by the Brazilian organist Ed Lincoln, I really wasn't expecting a tune like this. It's a beautiful, tender vocal, sounding like something from a Francis Lai soundtrack, with lovely male-female alternating vocals and an exquisite Morricone style trumpet blending well with the guitar/organ/percussion instrumentation. An absolutely stunning track - playful but slightly sad at the same time, with some spooky laughter/sighing from the female singer towards the end.

from Ed Lincoln, available on CD (Savoya Discos)




  n-jeff: Thats the thing with Lincoln, its not just the cheese, he played alongside the best Jazz musicians in Brazil. He could cut a pretty funk when the occasion demanded, and his "Seu piano eletrico" album ranges from african tinged stompers to mid sixties style vocal cuts. IMHO opinion underrated as a producer as well, he seems to have been active on the cutting edge of Brazilain music from the late fifties right through to the late seventies. I intended to use this track as the payoff for a compilation I did for a cd trading ring, but I don't think I had the space. He was in hospital just before Christmas (2003), not sure how he's doing now.
  delicado: I have to say, I'm pretty blown away by his work. I know you've been harping on about him for years, so I wish I had listened earlier!
  sodapop650: Ed Lincolns best work is the recordings he did with Orlann Divo becasue he is a little more low-key and the arrangements are just plain better. I love O Ganso cause its so damn crazy and his recordings under the name Claudio Marcelo are pretty good too. A rcord seller in Brazil actually got me his autograph as a present because I bought so many of Ed Lincolns LPs. But I gotta tell you, someone like Sergio Carvalho or Eumir Deodato are much more powerful on the Hammond and Ely Arcoverde, Juarez Sant'ana Ze Maria I think are all more mature organists. I put Ed Lincoln with Walter Wanderley a little heavy on the cheese.
Chelsea Girl  performed by Simple Minds  1979
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Simple Mind's second single, "Chelsea Girl", was an apt follow-up to its predecessor "Life in a Day", an epic chant, a shimmering melody, and a sing-along chorus that paid spell-bound homage to Velvet Underground chanteuse Nico, in her role within Warhol’s movie of the same name.

Producer John Leckie gives "Chelsea Girl" a lovely delicate quality, especially across the long, tinkling keyboard intro, an aura that barely dissipates even when drummer Brian McGee and bassist Derek Forbes's kick in with their thumping rhythm. The band were proving to be masters at these juxtaposed styles, creating rock solid bases and overlaying them with much more fragile and elegant melodies and atmospheres. Here, those latter are close to effervescent and, as the band shift down into the long bass-driven, overlapping tag teamed vocal outro (a playful lift from Roxy Music’s ”Mother Of Pearl”, but no matter), absolutely crystalline.

On album and onstage, ”Chelsea Girl” remained fans' favorite, on 45 though, it inexplicably crashed and burned, and didn't even reach the UK chart.
(AMG)

from Life In A Day, available on CD (Zoom)


Chorou, Chorou  performed by João Donato  1973
Recommended by Festy [profile]

It has been argued that Joéo Donato was the first to play a bossa nova rhythm on a recording (playing the accordian on "Eu Quero Um Samba" with Os Namorados), but whilst his contemporaries from the early years of bossa, such as Gilberto and Jobim, were happy to expand on the traditional bossa sound in later years, Donato went a number of steps further. The first track "Chorou, Chorou", from a fabulous album titled "Quem é Quem" is not even the best track off the album, but the opening bars give an idea of what the whole album is about. It's playful in melody, often subtly funky in rhythm and over all, a great album. This particular album also contains my favourite interpretation of "A Rã" by Donato. I'll have to recommend more songs from this album at a later time, because it really is great.

from Quem é Quem (Odeon)
available on CD - Quem é Quem (Odeon/EMI)




  konsu: He was always revisiting his compositions. He did this one in the mid sixties as well. Also check out the mad versions on his "Bad Donato" LP he did for Blue Thumb in 70', his take on The Frog is amazing.
  Festy: I recall reading somewhere that "A Rã" was his most favourite track that he had written. I haven't heard a bad version of it by him or anyone else. The "Bad Donato" album never grabbed me either, for some reason. Lots of people love it. I think I need to have another listen to it. ;)
  ambassador: i had the pleasure of interviewing maestro donato a couple summers ago as he was celebrating his 70th birthday. I recently went through the interview again for a forthcoming article about the man and he admitted that "A Bad Donato" was his "noisiest" album. hard to disagree with that and I think that's why some people love it and others are turned off. Sometimes there is just too much going on with it and his later versions of some of these songs are much more refined and better in my opinion. regarding his regularly recording previous songs, he is a HUGE Stan Kenton fan and kenton also recorded his songs dozens of times. my two pennies.
Dying Crapshooter’s Blues  performed by Blind Willie McTell
Recommended by dwmjuk [profile]

Early urban blues from the master of all that is politically incorrect (listen to his lyrics on most tracks regarding women). Recorded as a tribute to a friend, full recording has a 3 minute rant by Blind Willie recounting the story of writing this, andsinging it at a friend's funeral. The finest early urban blues track - playful chord progression and a perfectly sophisticated urban take on his normal country blues output. Sharp lyrics are a joy to listen to.




Kites Are Fun  performed by The Free Design  1967
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Well, i guess musicaltaste is a rather safe place to recommend some Free Design without getting laughed at. It always strikes me they haven't been more popular back in the late sixties. "Kites Are Fun" is one of their more popular and one of their best tracks for sure. Uber-jolly, playfull, catchy with superb vocal harmonies, gentle guitar, flute, bass and drums and some keyboards.

from Kites Are Fun, available on CD (Project 3)




  nighteye: This is great song! Sunshine pop at its best, how can you not feel happy listening to this song? I like kites!
  Festy: I really dig "My Brother Woody" from the same album. Whoever the drummer is, he really cooks on this track.
  konsu: The drummer's name is Bill LaVorgna. He has an unmistakable touch on the drums. He's also on some of Pat Williams Verve LP's.
les sucettes  performed by serge gainsbourg
Recommended by olli [profile]

pure bubblegum psychedelic soft pop, with lyrics about sucking on "lollipops". the most familiar version of this song is probably the one written for france gall, but i prefer the version where serge himself (in a great faux-naïve manner)provides the vocals. the sugary strings of the original(?) are replaced by a great subdued wah wah guitar and organ backing on this version, and a lot of little touches wich help make the song a bit more bizarre and playful than the other version. nice for sunny picnics and bicycle rides in the countryside, eh?


available on CD - comic strip


Love For Sale  performed by Annie Ross  1964
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

This is such a great recording! Ms. Ross starts out as if she is going to whimper her way thru this sad little tale of a prostitute's life, then wham-bam (pardon the expression) she takes on the persona of Natalie Wood in 'Gypsy' and swings the song as if she is playfully strutting across the stage and smacking you gingerly with her long silky glove. She soon has you believing that she is going to drag you by the scruff of the neck back to her abode to give you a Russ Meyer-ish smackdown! Johnny Spence's orchestra provides her with just the right weaponry to bring you to your submissive knees all at no additional charge.

from Annie Ross Sings a Handful of Songs (Globe/Ember (Japanese pressing} SMJ 7175)
available on CD - Annie Ross Sings a Handful of Songs / Club Verboten (Box Set) (DCC-626 / DZS(4)-135)


Love’s Secert Domain  performed by Coil  1993
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

A moment of silence, (and/or eardrum-shredding noise), please folks, for the memory of the late, great Mr. John Balance of Coil who passed earlier this month. This track is one of my favorite “songs” by this organization, the title track from their sardonic exploration of club culture in the early 1990’s. Coil were never an “industrial” band – though they could create tracks of brutal, grinding sound. They were always too musical, too playful, too smart. On this tune – and there is a really catchy tune here – Balance does his best Christopher Lee impression, growling/singing of love as sickness, mixing quotes from William Blake and Roy Orbison, over a backing track that sounds like H. P. Lovercaft does Esquivel. Brilliant stuff from a brilliant man, who will be missed.

from Love's Secert Domain


ma quale idea  performed by pino d´angie  1983
Recommended by moondog [profile]

Italian disco-rap-pop from the early eighties that instantantly puts a smile on your face and a spring in your step. Anybody know more of mr pino or of tracks in the same genre ?


available on CD - back to mine - röyksoup




  texjernigan: I don't know, but it shure is hip right now: check out ed banger records, specifically Justice's D.A.N.C.E.
  moondog: ah thanks for that, yes i´ve heard that. So i guess they have sampled it then. But what do you call the genre, italy disco, italy hits, i think i have heard something somewhere
Not Waving But Drowning  performed by Julian Cope  1991
Recommended by Stian______ [profile]

Julian Cope was a leader in the post-punk band Teardrop Explodes . This tune is from his finest solo album :Peggy Suicide. The production is very sleek and crystal clear .
The mood of this song is somewhat a mix of mystic and playful-its theatrical and druggy.Its pretty much dragging along in the same tempo from beginning to end , but it never gets close to boring.

from Peggy Suicide, available on CD (Island)



Now There’s That Fear Again  performed by Múm  2002
Recommended by pleasepleaseme [profile]

This track begins with the sounds of a bong being puffed and the clicking of a metal lighter being flicked. This album is a winner, from start to finish. If you are a fan of the Cocteau Twins, Eno, Cluster, or Bjork, give this one a try! Perfect! Ambient Rock at its best. And very warm Electronica too! So good, you may hit the repeat button on your player more then once.

from Finally We Are No One, available on CD


Pleasures  performed by Cubismo Grafico  2000
Recommended by bobbyspacetroup [profile]

Cubismo Grafico -- aka Gakuji Matsuda -- has quickly become my favorite J-Pop act, and this here is one of my favorite tracks. My impression of J-Pop has been that it is either too overtly dancy or sickeningly cute for my tastes. (To be fair, my bias is based on a relatively small cross-section of music.) Anyway, this track is neither. This is an extremely well-constructed selection that strikes me as both very modern and very "easy" in a way that sounds good to my ears. On this track, Gakuki Matsuda is credited with guitar, steel pan, rhodes piano, mc-303, turntable, and voice. So, yeah, he seems like a talented guy. The music is structured around a child's narration of an amusement park attraction (found on the fascinating "Sounds For Little Ones" compilation of a few years back). The sample lends a fun, playful atmosphere. Delicado thinks he has spotted two of the musical samples used here (or at least the compositions used), and I'm pretty sure he is right. They're both very well known, and, much to the credit of this song, I'm amazed I didn't spot them myself. I'll give you a hint: one of them is one of Burt Bacharach's biggest hits.


available on CD - Mini (Escalator Records (Japan))



Ride The Wind (live)  performed by The Youngbloods  1969
Recommended by opl3003 [profile]

This live recording of "Ride The Wind" is a wonderful nine minute take on the six minute studio version available on The Youngbloods 1969 "Elephant Mountain" album.

Recorded live in NYC as a trio, The Youngbloods never sounded better. Jesse Colin Young is on bass. Banana plays guitar and keyboards, and Joe Bauer on drums. Sparse, almost scatted vocals mixed with improvisational instrumentaion help this song lightly float along. The bass solo gives me goosebumps, and accents the playfulness of the improv style the Youngbloods exhibit on this song.

I really like this song because it sounds so mellow and free. One of the best ways you can spend almost 10 minutes of your life. Give it a listen, you won't be sorry.

from Ride The Wind (Raccoon / Warner Bros. Raccoon #4)



  DRMUSE: I went to a concert in longmont Colorado on a June Night in 1970 in the Full Moon Light, where I heard Ride the Wind and Sunlight and On Sir Francis Drake, and Banana's Fender Rhodes with the picture of Elephant Mountain painted on the front could be seen for miles. The CD i recently found these treasures on is One Way # OW 34535, available through Amazon, GET IT ! It has some of the most amazing music you ever heard if you are a Youngbloods fan. It is also demarcated BMG Specialty Products DRC11575. Whatever your music is, people, enjoy it , sometimes it is all you have. And everybody learn to play. Maybe we could have a battle of the guitars instead of the guns!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Rock Lobster  performed by The B-52’s  1979
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

The B-52's were one of several late-'70s bands for which there was no real category. With their modified surf guitar sound, their thrift-shop fashion sense, and their jokey demeanor, they certainly weren't in the rock & roll mainstream, but they exhibited none of punk's sneering rebelliousness or musical aggression, either — the only anarchy that seemed to interest the B-52's was of the sartorial variety. "Rock Lobster" was the first B-52's song to catch popular attention, and it's easy to see why. The minimalist guitar lick is like a beach-bum's rendition of the James Bond theme, the one-note organ ostinato complements it perfectly, and Fred Scheider's campy sprechgesang jumps out at you immediately. Yet despite the song's self-consciously weird texture and silly lyrics about earlobes falling off and communal towel coordination, there's a thread of darkness weaving through it. Make no mistake — this is not a song with hidden meaning lurking below the surface. But its surface is a little more complicated than it seems to be at first. For one thing, it's almost seven minutes long, and it does start to drag toward the end. Right when it does, you notice the mood getting darker — Schneider delivers lines about "having fun" and "baking in the sun" in a hoarse croak, and the guitar starts sounding repetitive in a slightly creepy way. Suddenly you realize that the whole song has been in a minor key, and as Schneider shouts and the guitar barks out its angular riff over and over, you start to wonder if maybe there's some kind of commentary going on here. But then Kate Pierson's angelic voice comes in with a surprisingly pretty falling harmony part that can only be described as a descant, which repeats several times, gradually paring itself down to a single phrase, and abruptly the song is over. The whole song ends up being a goofy party confection with a slightly crunchy center — a pretty satisfying overall flavor combination.
(AMG)

from The B-52's, available on CD


Round the Bend  performed by The Beta Band  1998
Recommended by sunexplodes [profile]

this is just a ridiculously upbeat song about social ineptitude, more or less. has a very creative, brian wilson-ish sound to it, and is very playful.

"i can't even go to the supermarket, let alone go to egypt, to see my favorite pyramid."

from The Beta Band


Serenade For Missy  performed by The Residents  1982
Recommended by Tangento [profile]

This is my first recommendation, so I will go easy on all of you. The following description is from my website. (it is the only way to do the song justice):

This can only be compared to something like "Retro-60's Upside-down Elevator Muzak".
(although it certainly draws from 20's/ 30's Big Band escapism)
The thing is, if this actually were playing in an elevator, the people there would certainly perform an odd ritual of alternately:
a. Merrily tapping their foot, and then
b. Looking up at the speaker, frowning and befuddled.
This is a song, which back in my partying days, we would use as a soundtrack for the following activity:
We would put our tiny baby Alligator Lizard, Festus
(who was an inch long, head to tail, and smaller around than a pencil)
...we would put him on this cheap little multi-colored fiber-optic "fountain" and put the clear cube back over it.
We would then watch as this "fountain" would very slowly spin around, Festus aboard, with this completely absurd (but oddly beautiful) music playing.
This produced near-catastrophic laughter because he would be looking up at you with this little tiny frown, as if to say;
"what the hell is wrong with you people?"
To this day, I cannot properly answer that question.
R.I.P., Festus.

Additional info:
The sax is not my favorite instrument, but it is perfectly utilized here. It wavers between slightly obnoxious and smooth as silk.
What really make the track sweet, however are the unique guitar stylings of Snakefinger.

from The Tunes of Two Cities, available on CD


Te Caliente  performed by Patsy Gallant  197?
Recommended by [email protected] [profile]

Brilliant wordless vocal/scat Latin jazz-pop from the mid-70's!

from Patsy! (Attic LAT 1051)



  Festy: This track never really stood out for me the first few times I heard it. It wasn't that I didn't like it, but, for the life of me, I can't work out how I overlooked it for so long. It is absolutely brilliant. You can't help but feel the pleasure of the song, which, from start to finish, is a relentless celebration for the ears. Recent, cheap imitation cover versions do it little justice.
The Owls Go  performed by Architecture in Helsinki  2004
Recommended by nicegeoff [profile]

A shizo-minimalist arrangement that goes back and forth between synths, horns, bubbles, and shouts of children. For fans of this type of music.

from Fingers Crossed



The Stumble  performed by Freddie King
Recommended by dwmjuk [profile]

Classic blues-progression, considered one of the first and finest Blues-rock intrumentals. Please ingore the indulgent Gary Moore version.




Yesterday Is Here  performed by Tom Waits  1987
Recommended by Fig Alert [profile]

When I think of my favorite stuff by Tom Waits, I always look back to the time when the writing and arranging of his songs were more playful, avant pop exercises, colored by a range of intense and deep emotional swatches, yet always with humor. My favorite stretch in his catalog of work is from Swordfishtrombones to Franks Wild Years (Marc Ribot?). Songs were always off-kilter, tenuous, unpredictable...far-away organs played against a punchy latin rhumba beat...oh, here comes the circus, jolted by a bended-note/feedback guitar part. Wha?

I heard a lot more characters in his voice, too. The sideshow barker, the Ironweed hobo, the cocky but sensitive playboy, or the frustrated, suburbia-warped freespirit looking to make a break.

This track off Franks Wild Years feels like an old, worn out, spaghetti western-inspired guitar shuffle. Its whispered from the lips of a grizzled shopkeeper in a soon-to-be ghosttown, telling his concerned companion the need to reach for where your dreams dwell: "out where your enemies lie." There's little consolation against what most likely will be an exercise in futility, but necessary nonetheless, to carve out some sort of happiness. Get used to it.

Somehow it seems to fit these times very well...

from Franks Wild Years (Island 7 90572-2)



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