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search results for “gloomy”
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You searched for ‘gloomy’, which matched 11 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
"hotel room"  performed by richard hawley  2005
Recommended by kohl [profile]

his voice is almost gloomy, but in a striking and haunting way. it does fit the mood of the song--it sounds earnest and intense without being too singer-songwriter-y.


available on CD - coles corner


Always crashing in the same car  performed by David Bowie  1977
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I'm just reacquainting myself with the entire Low album after buying it on CD (my LP has been out of my reach for a few years). It really is utter genius. If they were in any other context, I don't imagine I would enjoy some of the guitar solos featured in this song. Here, they work brilliantly though. The musical basis of 'always crashing in the same car' is quite simple, but the superb musical performances and odd, otherworldly production give it an incredible richness. Bowie's vocal is mournful, and doesn't dominate the track.

from Low, available on CD (RCA)



  frmars: The sound on Low is so particuliar thanks to Brian Eno's collaboration. Same with Bowie's "Heroes" and "Lodger". 3 albums known as the Berlin trilogy. Listen to Brian Eno's solo stuff and shoot in stars...
Im 80 Stockwerk  performed by Hildegard Knef  1970
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A stunning piece of pop, one of a few great and really hip sounding tracks Hildegard Knef recorded around this time. This sounds like a Bacharach song made even cooler, stripped down to its essentials. Knef�s smoky, detached vocals add to the effect to make this a real winner.

from Knef (Decca)
available on CD - Get Easy vol 4 (Motor music)




  scrubbles: I've been digging this one a lot lately and even put it on my latest mix disc. Way funky - imagine what an enterprising drag queen could do with this!
  AndreasNystrom: Yes, very good song. Love it as well as her other song "dieser herren..."
  heimwehblues: A new version of this song was produced in 2001, CD "17 Millimeter", it's a marvellous modern song...
Repined bastard nation  performed by Satyricon  2002
Recommended by olli [profile]

Satanist surf rock! (or a reasonable facsimile of that would sound like, anyway.)
From the land of polar bears and fjords
comes this insanely massive-sounding piece of black metal with a heavy dose of Dick Dale influences. It's quite poppy for a black metal tune, if you can see past the growling. I have to admit I've never actually listened too closely to the lyrics, i'm sure they're very misantrophic and gloomy and all, but this song feels very uplifting to me somehow. same thing as with Primal Scream's Detroit and Ennio Morricone's Magic and Extacy, i guess.
the synth effects round it out nicely, the guitars are fast and furious, and you got to love that drumming.


(One of these days I'm gonna have to make a mixtape with the world's most glaringly insane shifts of tone from one song to the next. This will fit nicely in between Dean Martin and Jean Jaques Perrey...)

from Volcano



roses in the snow  performed by Nico  1969
Recommended by belphegor [profile]

wow, i mean: wow... i've been an avid nico lover for years, having acquired a deep appreciation of her via some claimed proto-goth associations. obscure subcultural praise and all that velvet underground hoop-la aside, her amazing "desertshore" was proof enough that nico was and is a uniquely powerful force in life and art. but this "roses in the snow" diddy just floored me on a first listen. the revolving, minimalist tune of her harmonium must be the loneliest, most disillusioned harmony ever played since "gloomy sunday," and the cryptically profound words the closest thing rock'n'roll ever got to the "book of job." what does this piece really mean to say? not sure really: but somehow, i think it might be something like re-reading a long-departed lover's suicide note on a warm, languid autumn day...

from the marble index, available on CD (elektra)


Seance on a Wet Afternoon  performed by John Barry  1964
Recommended by nighteye [profile]

I love John Barry's work, he always seam to be able to score anything with excellent results. This song is no exception, taken from the movie 'Seance on a Wet Afternoon' from 1964. Haven't seen the movie my self so I can't really say what the premise of it is, but IMDB says it's a crime-drama about a self-styled psychic in London. Groovy eh?

This song is however great, Barry relies heavily on haunting flutes and trombones to create a some what eeire feeling, and it really works. Just listening to this song makes me think of a rainy gloomy dark afternoon in London. Now if I only could get a hold of a copy of the movie...


available on CD - Ultra Lounge: Vol 16 - Mondo Hollywood



Shake And Crawl  performed by House Of Love  1990
Recommended by john_l [profile]

My favourite House Of Love song, it's a mid-paced typically guitar-drenched track with an insistent percussive backing and that low ostinato guitar riff with the little flourish in it. It has lots of minor chords which give it a rather gloomy feel (like many of my favourite songs). Actually their later song "Feel", which was one of the '90s best, could be "Shake And Crawl" slowed almost to a literal crawl ...

from The House Of Love (2), available on CD (Fontana)



  Genza: I liked the House of Love - and 'Christine' is a genre-defining classic. But like many of the other sub-Valentines clones (Chapterhouse, Boo Radleys, etc.), I thought some of their tunes suffered from being slow and uneventful. Like you, I love minor chords - but I think other bands did that multi-layered guitar sound better. But hey, it's just my opinion and all that.
  lobo: The House of Love were brilliant and way ahead of their time, not to mention sadly overlooked in the pages of pop music history. They were hardly "Sub-Valentine Clones" - the band's sound dates back to their origins in 1986. The members of My Bloody Valentine were struggling to define their sound at that point (they were still working through their goth phase!). Guy Chadwick was a masterful songwriter and Terry Bickers was the preeminent guitarist of his time. Nobody knew their way around a stack of effects pedals better than him. Best songs: Safe, Christine, Destroy the Heart, Loneliness Is A Gun... This band's music is nothing short of superb.
Stop Me June (Little Ego)  performed by KENT  2000
Recommended by Carrie [profile]

I've been called a little coward more than once,
It hurts when it's true.


I like this song - a lot.

from Hagnesta Hill (English edition), available on CD


Strength to Dream  performed by Propaganda  1985
Recommended by Mike [profile]

The final track from their superb album "A Secret Wish". Instrumental, apart from a spoken lyric at the end, this reworking of the opening track of the album uses both real strings and synths in combination with some catchy, moody chords to create real atmosphere.

from A Secret Wish (ZTT)


Talk Show Host  performed by Radiohead  1996
Recommended by penelope_66 [profile]

Super-dark-sexy...This song is an honest portrayal of the paradoxes involved with desire; happy/sad, pleasure/pain, love/hate...etc. I find it terribly gloomy yet wonderfully uplifting at the same time. Just beautiful.


available on CD - Street Spirit (Fade Out) EP


Up On The Hill  performed by Mark Burgess and the Sons of God  1994
Recommended by john_l [profile]

Ex-Chameleons leader Mark Burgess released this CD in '94, which was supposed to be demos, but his "demos" are superior to most acts' finished products. This particular song is very gloomy, in two parts, and the second half has ghostly backing vocals (very likely synthesized) which recall those in Terry Stafford's '64 hit "Suspicion". There is a cello snaking around throughout, not to mention a banjo (!), and the acoustic guitar backing sounds muted. The lyrics seem to be critical of religion ("Yes I'm a fool, A fool not a rat, I have no fear of the cat"), which makes it the kind of song one would wish to have played at one's funeral. Mark Burgess has more talent in his little finger than most phoney chart acts have in their entire persons!

And by the way, the Chameleons' "Strange Times" LP is awesome!


available on CD - Zima Junction (Pivot)


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