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search results for “Surf”
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List songs by Song title | Performer | Year

You searched for ‘Surf’, which matched 41 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
"not me"  performed by this mortal coil  1984
Recommended by kohl [profile]

the song that made me rediscover them. the intro begins and shifts into something else. the lyrics are delivered carefully, almost in hesitation, while the music itself is more forceful. i'm not sure what else i could add.

it may be as you say
i'll admit
but you don't sound convinced
between the surface you and the surface me
you didn't touch me
it may be as well that
i didn't see the point
you didn't touch me
you didn't touch me
you didn't touch me
you didn't touch me

i suppose it's just hollow
no idea--no spark
when i thought that in order to survive
you need to touch me
all of the mes
it may be as well that
i didn't see the point
you didn't touch me
you didn't touch me
you didn't touch me
you didn't touch me
you didn't touch me
you didn't touch me
you didn't touch me
you didn't touch me


available on CD - it'll end in tears


*any*  performed by jack johnson
Recommended by mellocello [profile]

ok, go out and get whatever jack johnson you can get your hands on now! I first fell in love w/ his first album back before anyone knew him. I will admit though, that my little bro and I came up with some pretty hilarious alternate lyrics for his first big song on the radio. It took me a good while to get used to his second album, now I probably listen to that more, and then again with his third album, again, it took me a while. but he is truly great.
he started out filming pro surfing videos, and you can see where he is coming from. really chill, folksy music. good stuff





  rum: does that mean i'm allowed to recommend any (or every) song by richard harris?
Apple Of My Eye  performed by Ed Harcourt
Recommended by LawrenceM [profile]

Ed Harcourt has now committed this song to tape three times in three years. Firstly on the excellent debut mini-LP "Maplewood" in 2000. It was fleshed out and re-recorded for his full-length debut LP, "Here Be Monsters", in 2001, and now surfaces again in 2002 as the a-side of his most recent single. This time it's even better still, and comes accompanied with a great video. This is classic, piano led pop which could have been recorded at any time in the last 30 years. Comparisons to Randy Newman, Nick Drake andTom Waits have been forthcoming, and not unjustified. A great song which just gets better with each trip to the studio.

from Here Be Monsters, available on CD (Heavenly)



Azure Blue  performed by Laika and the Cosmonauts  1995
Recommended by delicado [profile]

My obsession with this band continues. From a CD that failed to sell on ebay for 50 cents comes this amazing cut - a beautiful instrumental with prominent guitar and organ. While it's surf influenced, it goes beyond that. I'm kind of lost for words, but it's one of those 'This is the best track ever' tracks. You know what I mean?

from The Amazing Colossal band, available on CD



blonde on blonde  performed by nada surf
Recommended by morning belle [profile]




Bossa Nova Bessie  performed by Frank DeVol and the MGM Studio Orchestra  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This sounds like it should be a generic bossa nova cash-in film song, but instead, it's strangely haunting and gripping to my ears. While it's a sweetly orchestrated piece (a bossa nova guitar and beat, a flute melody, and a Stan Getz-esque tenor sax, backed by a subdued orchestra) I feel as if there's something menacing just beneath the surface. However, it's so subtle, this could be in my head. It's taken from the 'The Glass Bottom Boat'; maybe I have to see the movie and decide.


available on CD - Bachelor In Paradise - Cocktail Classics from MGM Films (EMI)



cemetery shuffle  performed by Stretcher Case  2001
Recommended by Earl Grey [profile]

The recording may be raw, but this song reeks of pure insane genius. 60's-inspired organ-fueled sleaze. The band boasts the former organist of "The Voluptuous Horror of Karen Black". This is one of many instrumental numbers consisting of guitar, organ, shakers and what sounds like an old drum machine. Shamelessly derivitive, lo-fi and spooky. It's one part surf and equal parts garage and swing. Henry Mancini-meets-The Mummies-meets-The Stray Cats.


available on CD - cassette (no label)



  jwmoz: Dude, everyone knows "Cemetery Shuffle" is by The Isolators. Get your facts straight man. I mean really, people read these things you know.
  Kriswell: Actually, The Isolators used to go by the name Stretcher Case, before they broke. So, both of you are actually right. Good call though "Moz".
  jwmoz: Listen man, we can't "both be right". You seem to think we live in a magical happy-world with gum drop streets and candy cane lamposts. Last time I checked outside, I saw a bum peeing on the street, and it wasn't into a champagne river, if you know what I mean (and I think you do). So although we can't both be right, you and Earl can both be wrong, and I would venture to say that you are. Wrong. Utterly wrong.
  Kriswell: Listen here, Pal. I use to be friends with those guys. So, I think I know what I'm talking about. Granted they stopped talking to me after I began dressing like the old bass player and started walking around town in a grey wig, claiming to be him. The shit really hit the fan when I locked him in a bathroom and tried to get on stage with the band. He got a restraining order against me. Rumor has it that's why he left the band. I think he was flattered though. But I hear they have a new bass player and have actually changed their name back to Stretcher Case, so look out, I'm getting my wig out of the closet.
  jwmoz: I don't blame you dude... that guy had an ass like butter.
Daydream  performed by Wallace Collection  1968
Recommended by Trijnie [profile]

Yes!!!! Found it!
I live in England (nearly 20 years, but am originally from Holland. Saw twice a new commercial the last 2 days on tv here (can't remember what it was for), but regonised the song that was played in it (although it wasn't the original version). I knew it was a hit in the sixties. And always liked it. But hadn't heard it for years! My partner ,who's english, knows and does remember a hell of a lot about (popular)music and whenever a song is played HAS to announce WHO, WHAT and IN WHICH YEAR IT WAS A HIT! Get's a bit annoying at times.
He said he knew it from a "chill"-album, but I told him I was certain that it had been a hit in the sixties.
After surfing the web for an hour orso tonight, and not even quite sure if the title was "Daydream" and not knowing at all what the bands name was. At some point I found out that it could be Wallace Collection, but eventually after finding your website, and you were the only one I was able to hear that song, I got it right!
Thank you so much. The song brought back so many memories! I will keep your website in my favorites list. It was a great help.
Thanks again, Trijnie





  delicado: Yes, I think Ron, who recommended the original version, did us and the Wallace Collection a great service! The song is well known here in the UK via a remixed version by a band called 'I-Monster', who sampled and rejigged a version by the Gunter Kallemann singers (available on a common charity shop record here in the UK, 'Easy Listening' - 2LP set on Polydor). Further 'daydream' trivia fact: the melody for the middle section is lefted from a famous Tchaikovsky piece. There's a version by the 'Baker Street Philhamonic' that's also kind of cool.
Dive  performed by HEAVEN 17  1996
Recommended by beautifulmutant [profile]

Not since the mid-eighties have Heaven 17 nailed a song so beautifully. "Let Me Go" eschews icy synthetic, new wave romance gone wrong. "Dive" updates it for a newer generation. Beautiful music and a sound which makes you wonder where the hell they've been hiding for umpteen years. Sadly, heaven 17 disappeared again after 1996 and have yet to resurface... The album "Bigger Than America" I consider to be their best.

from Bigger Than America


Exodus  performed by Tielman Brothers  1965
Recommended by eleki-san [profile]

Vocal version of the classic 'Exodus' Theme. Reverberated deep 60s stereophonic sound, Andy Tielman's voice, the powerful background choir and the reverberated guitars make this version a true masterpiece.
(there's an incredible story on the listener reviews at Amazon about this band)




Fadeaway  performed by Laika and the Cosmonauts  1990
Recommended by delicado [profile]

No one talks about this band much. Not in my experience, anyway. It's all instrumental, so I guess they're not for people who are lost without vocals and lyrics. But have a listen - to me they really seem utterly superb. I would love to see them live.

I only have a couple of albums, but they're great. This one was released in 1996 (shit - that was 9 years ago!), but recorded in 1990. Really beautiful twangy surf-pop that fits in perfectly with the whole David Lynch mood that I find so appealing. The album is an intoxicating mix of energetic surf tracks and slower, more atmospheric ones like this. Their recent 'Local Warming' album is great too. Can anyone recommend me any more of their tracks?

from Zero Gravity, available on CD



  olli: Yeah, they're certainly one of the better neo-surf acts out there. See Laika! Se Laika run! Go laika, go!
Fire and Rain  performed by John Gregory  1972
Recommended by delicado [profile]

In my experience John Gregory is one of the most consistently superb British arrangers of the 60s and 70s. I've never really heard anything I didn't like by him, although I understand that he was very prolific and that I've barely scratched the surface so far.

His arrangements have simultaneously a bite and a beauty that few others were able to match. Although not much of his work is available on CD, there's one excellent disc, 'Mission Impossible and other themes', that compiles most of his 'big band crime jazz' work, dating from the early 1960s to the mid 1970s. The disc isn't very excitingly packaged and can be had very cheaply, but it's full of outstanding tracks.

'Fire and Rain' is from a 70s album (I have it on a Philips sampler from the early 70s), and is a sumptuously arranged instrumental in the vein of some of the work of other British arrangers of the era, such as Johnny Harris and John Schroeder.

Of course, the song was written and originally recorded by James Taylor. His track is quite nice, but maybe it helped that I came to this version 'fresh', without having heard the original. This happens to me a lot, and Gregory's full arrangement and jazzy touches definitely elevate the track for me.

The melody is carried by a beautifully played trumpet, and later by the strings. There's a strong beat throughout, and a particularly groovy break towards the end with some great brass.

from Gregory Conducts... (Philips)



Get UR Freak On  performed by Shawn Lee,s Ping Pong Orchestra  2008
Recommended by geezer [profile]

Working on the premise that if you are going to cover a song then do something with it .then Shawn Lee wears the crown .Missy Elliots ground breaking hip hop giant has been turned into a dark surf twangy guitar driven celebration of Tarntino-esque proportions .the relentless plink plonk riff of the original is replaced by a mammoth guitar line which builds to a Mexiacana brass bound climax.There is a whole album of contemporary covers in this vein all of which need to be heard .

from Shawn Lee Hits the Hits
available on CD - Hits the Hits


Golden Lights  performed by Twinkle  1965
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This is a simple but rather bitter pop song, although on the surface it sounds quite sweet. If I recall correctly, it was written about the singer that Twinkle was seeing at the time. The gentle arrangement features acoustic guitar and some brass. It's not hard to hear why Morrissey liked this song enough to cover it with The Smiths.

Twinkle has a lovely clear voice, and much as I respect Moz, this version towers above the one done by The Smiths, which suffers from a strange mix of production styles. That said, I have a strange mix of emotions on hearing the song, since I heard the Smiths version at 14, but only got into this one in the last few years.

from the single Golden Lights
available on CD - Twinkle (RPM)



Goodnight Moon  performed by Shivaree  2002
Recommended by Lubi [profile]

A blend of Mexican, a sprinkling of country and a dose of Southern soul "Goodnight Moon" is a track off the album "I Ought to Give You a Shot in the Head for Making Me Live in This Dump" : classy!

When a song hits me - I will play it like it's going out of fashion, or in this case, coming into fashion!

Until four days ago I knew nothing about this band - I happened to be surfing around looking for inspiration and accidently came upon this song, the singer whom I now know as Ambrosia Paisley has a sultry, quirky voice and given to this song makes it feel like It should be played acoustic in some smoky bar with swing doors, and a bar man called Hank offering neat JD's.

Although that's probably not too far from reality it is being played world wide thanks to Mr Tarrantino who has used this track in his movie soundtrack - Kill Bill 2 - which kind of makes sense to me granted that my original search on Google four days ago started with Nancy Sinatra, which I also found out "Bang Bang my baby shot me down" (another recommendation should I add!) was lent to the Kill Bill 1 soundtrack.

Regressing, I do not know if any other tunes on this album are worthy but Goodnight Moon now firmly has a place in the soundtrack to my life.

from I Ought to Give You a Shot in the Head for Making Me Live in This Dump, available on CD


I Got Plenty o' Nuttin'  performed by We Five  1966
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Kinda surfy bouncy arrangement of this old Gershwin number, with five-part harmonies! Free Design ain't got nothin' on these cats!

from You Were On My Mind (A&M)
available on CD - You Were On My Mind/Make Someone Happy (Collectors' Choice)




  konsu: These people were just great. So many great versions of cool songs, done in some unexpected yet refreshing ways! "Love me not tomorrow" is such a moody stunner, and I love their bossa-folk version of "Make someone happy"! For fans of 60's folk-pop that takes chances, and consistently amazes.
  bullitthead: they kept me alive and well through Viet Nam
I Hate You  performed by The Monks  1966
Recommended by tinks [profile]

"Don't you know that my hate is everlasting, baby?" The story of the Monks is the story of rock & roll...in an alternate reality, perhaps. Take a bunch of bored US servicemen stationed in Germany about to be discharged, put them in a band, and have them decide to freak out the establishment by dressing in black capes, shaving their heads into monk's tonsures and wearing nooses as neckties. Perhaps not so shocking in these days after punk rock, but this was 1965. Oh, and don't forget the electric banjo. What began as a fairly standard surf/beat combo called the Torquays mutated into this band, churning out some of the most nihilistic music you've ever heard, even by German standards.

from Black Monk Time, available on CD




  PappaWheelie: Over-Beat is Punk Rock! Glad to meet another convert.
la pour ca  performed by nada surf
Recommended by morning belle [profile]





  anakinskywalker: someone gave me the nada surf cd "the weight is a gift". you should let me know if there's anything good on there.
Lay It On Me  performed by Heatwave  1976
Recommended by ambassador [profile]

Heatwave's first two albums can almost be seen as prototypes for Michael Jackson's breakthrough album "Off the Wall." With Rod Temperton, future Quincy Jones and MJ collaborator, driving this album the sound is both funky and catchy, sophisticated and accessible. "Lay It On Me" is an overlooked album track that bubbles and gurgles under the surface of the groove until the chorus arrives with strings soaring for the ectasy of Johnnie Wilder's sweet vocals, "lay it on me, lay your sweet love on me!" Beautifully arranged and excellently executed and just one of many classics of their debut album.

from Too Hot to Handle, available on CD


Let's Talk About Cars  performed by Butthole Surfers
Recommended by LOWTONES22 [profile]

If ever there was an excuse to learn to speak French, this is it. Mesmerisizng guitar work, the back beat is so.....right. Just what the hell are they talking about?

from Electriclarryland, available on CD




  Stian______: Yes this is a favourite Butthole tune of mine also , its timing and atmoshphere is great , i wonder what they talk about too , but i think i really dont want to know , more exotic when u dont eh :)
Lovely, But Dangerous  performed by Bruno Nicolai  196?
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A song that lives up to it's name. On the surface, a very easy-going trumpet, harpsichord and xylophone flutter about over a very tense rythm that hints as something sinister. An excellent use of contrasting elements to set a particular filmic mood.

from Agente Speciale LK, available on CD



Mahahbalipuram  performed by Stu Phillips  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An exotic, atmospheric and unique masterpiece, this is taken from the portion of surfer flick 'Follow Me' in which the surfers visit India. The tune drifts along with some sitar and spooky vocals before exploding into life with a furiously catchy and groovy segment with piano and plucked strings.

from Follow Me (soundtrack) (Universal City 73056)




  chukelley: Great taste!
  bsgkr: Thank you "delicado" for your wonderful review of "Mahabalipuram." I'm only three years late in thanking you, so please forgive me. Stu Phillips
Maigret  performed by Tony Hatch  1962
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This is one of those mindblowing tracks that occasionally turns up when you least expect it. I bought a generic looking 'Top TV Themes' EP on the Pye Golden Guinea label, mainly because it had a version of the 'Out of this World' theme, which I've recommended elsewhere on this site. But I was disappointed - it turned out that this 'Out of this World' was exactly the same Tony Hatch version that I already had (the EP does not list any track credits).

I listened on, not expecting much, particularly from 'Maigret', a nice enough theme by Ron Grainer, but one that is a kind of accordian waltz!

Imagine my surprise when this turned out to be some kind of trashy, twangy, swampy surf pop masterpiece! It sounds like one of the very best Joe Meek produced instrumentals from the early 60s.

I'm inferring that this is Tony Hatch, since he did the 'Out of this World' and was a staff arranger at Pye in the early 60s. But if anyone else can shed a different light on this recording, I'd be pleased to hear about it!

from Top TV Themes (Pye Golden Guinea W03)




  olli: Funny how anything can be transformed into a masterpiece with the right arrangement, isn't it?
Nitro  performed by Dick Dale  1993
Recommended by nuthings [profile]

Killer surf guitar from the undisputed King of the Surf Guitar.


available on CD - Tribal Thunder (Hightone)


Pepper  performed by Butthole Surfers
Recommended by inbloom44 [profile]

Great lyrics. I think I hear a sitar.




Pepper  performed by Butthole Surfers
Recommended by Shes lost control [profile]




Repined bastard nation  performed by Satyricon  2002
Recommended by olli [profile]

Satanist surf rock! (or a reasonable facsimile of that would sound like, anyway.)
From the land of polar bears and fjords
comes this insanely massive-sounding piece of black metal with a heavy dose of Dick Dale influences. It's quite poppy for a black metal tune, if you can see past the growling. I have to admit I've never actually listened too closely to the lyrics, i'm sure they're very misantrophic and gloomy and all, but this song feels very uplifting to me somehow. same thing as with Primal Scream's Detroit and Ennio Morricone's Magic and Extacy, i guess.
the synth effects round it out nicely, the guitars are fast and furious, and you got to love that drumming.


(One of these days I'm gonna have to make a mixtape with the world's most glaringly insane shifts of tone from one song to the next. This will fit nicely in between Dean Martin and Jean Jaques Perrey...)

from Volcano



Rock Lobster  performed by The B-52’s  1979
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

The B-52's were one of several late-'70s bands for which there was no real category. With their modified surf guitar sound, their thrift-shop fashion sense, and their jokey demeanor, they certainly weren't in the rock & roll mainstream, but they exhibited none of punk's sneering rebelliousness or musical aggression, either the only anarchy that seemed to interest the B-52's was of the sartorial variety. "Rock Lobster" was the first B-52's song to catch popular attention, and it's easy to see why. The minimalist guitar lick is like a beach-bum's rendition of the James Bond theme, the one-note organ ostinato complements it perfectly, and Fred Scheider's campy sprechgesang jumps out at you immediately. Yet despite the song's self-consciously weird texture and silly lyrics about earlobes falling off and communal towel coordination, there's a thread of darkness weaving through it. Make no mistake this is not a song with hidden meaning lurking below the surface. But its surface is a little more complicated than it seems to be at first. For one thing, it's almost seven minutes long, and it does start to drag toward the end. Right when it does, you notice the mood getting darker Schneider delivers lines about "having fun" and "baking in the sun" in a hoarse croak, and the guitar starts sounding repetitive in a slightly creepy way. Suddenly you realize that the whole song has been in a minor key, and as Schneider shouts and the guitar barks out its angular riff over and over, you start to wonder if maybe there's some kind of commentary going on here. But then Kate Pierson's angelic voice comes in with a surprisingly pretty falling harmony part that can only be described as a descant, which repeats several times, gradually paring itself down to a single phrase, and abruptly the song is over. The whole song ends up being a goofy party confection with a slightly crunchy center a pretty satisfying overall flavor combination.
(AMG)

from The B-52's, available on CD


Season of the Shark  performed by Yo la tengo  2003
Recommended by megara [profile]

Due to the constant everyday trippings, one learns to walk looking down, watching the cracks, watching the steps, watching the pebbles. That's how I found this track. I took a dive recently and came back to the surface with this song.
One little tune, one refrence and one image, these three combined make a lonely humming of this indie tune almost orchestral, de description of the saddest episodes or maybe just the most difficult ones, the unexplainable feeling, translated into a postcard of the big ocean, the clouds, the sun, the isolation, the danger, the sharks down by the surface surrounding your tiny boat, a breeze, a guitar, however you dive, always assured that seasons come and go.

from Summer Sun, available on CD


Space Race  performed by Apemen  1995
Recommended by eleki-san [profile]

not just another Space/Surf Instrumental, but a true space hymn with a sweeping 'theremin' sound above all.

from Surfvival of the Onbeschofste, available on CD


Steps in the sand  performed by Karel Duba and Big Band
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I came across this on what's probably quite an obscure compilation called Surfbeat Behind the Iron Curtain Vol 2. I know very little about it. It's kind of like classic surf, but with some overtly 50s big band influences thrown in. The production sounds very odd - I'd guess this was recorded maybe in the early 1970s but I could be way off. Lots of nice horns and reverb-laden guitar and some weird radio-interference type effects.

from Surfbeat Behind the Iron Curtain Vol 2.


Stingray  performed by Claus Ogerman  196?
Recommended by konsu [profile]

A great kind of euro-surf discoteque tune. Trobbing percussion and a cool snakey guitar. Claus did a lot of these "Brass-ploitation" LP's for RCA in the mid sixtes. Some surf, latin , and a really cool soul one that i've been trying to track down. Very solid stuff from one of the best arrangers ever!

from Watusi Trumpets (RCA SPRS 6115)


Surfin' Bird  performed by The Trashmen  1963
Recommended by m.ace [profile]

"Pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa ooma mow mow papa oom mow ma mow..." The Trashmen's crazed co-mingling of The Rivingtons' "Papa Oom-Mow-Mow" and "The Bird's The Word" may be the most perfect rock 'n' roll song of them all. Meaningless / beyond meaning. An atomic audio monolith. Pure drive with no purpose. A divine visitation that lives outside logic.

from the single Surfin' Bird
available on CD - Tube City! The Best of The Trashmen (Sundazed)




  Goes Up To 11: A true "garage" classic! If you were in your early teens in 1963, sweating like a pig at a dance in a school gymnasium with the local cover band up on stage wailing away, this was a song you wanted to hear over and over. Even more mindless than the ultra-classic "Louie Louie" but also even more fun!
Surfs Up  performed by The Beach Boys  1966
Recommended by Ganesha [profile]

Possibly the most beautiful and complex pop song ever written. This is the apex of Brians foray into modular music. Loved by Bernstein and McCartney. This song will take you years to sink in. Perfect. I have heard some amazing versions he has done of this equally as powerful.

from Surfs Up


The Conductor  performed by the faint  2001
Recommended by elvisneedsboats [profile]

arguably one of my favorite faint songs. but they're all good. the faint is all about the eighties synth-pop aesthetic, but they reach out of that style enough to keep it interesting. a lot of their stuff, this song in particular, shows this keen sense of being able to combine the dark("macabre" even, if you will.) synth/drum machine sound and equally dark lyrics with catchy riffs in a way that keeps the pessimistic, shadowy side bubbling at the surface. kinda reminds me of joy division, not so much in the style (even though there are some points where the two sound similar) but in the general tone. 'the conductor' is all about the atmospheric key board drones and 'plunk' sounds, plus the vocoder thing they use on the vocals.

from danse macabre, available on CD



The Party  performed by Georges Delerue  1967
Recommended by bobbyspacetroup [profile]

A rockin' one and a half minute long instrumental unlike any other Delerue work I've come across. If you know of any other Delerue work like this, please let me know. The arrangement includes really heavy bass, wailing brass, surf guitar, organ, and drums. Maybe it's a little generic, but I like it.

from Our Mother's House OST (MGM)



The Rip  performed by Portishead  2008
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

Damn, the new Portishead LP is good!
This song mixes eerie theremin tones, acoustic and surf guitars, Kraftwerk-esque keyboards and a swell kraut-rock drumbeat.
Meanwhile Beth Gibbons drifts in from above, doing her best "Sandy Denny sings the Nico Songbook" impersonation.
Outstanding!


available on CD - Third


The Scientist  performed by Coldplay  2002
Recommended by cryofthecelt [profile]

I've been a huge fan of the UK-based "wuss-rock" band Coldplay since their debut album "Parachutes." One night, as I was watching a much-anticipated episode of my favorite TV show, "Smallville" - an episode called "Rosetta" guest-starring Christopher Reeve - I heart the heart-rendering chords of lead singer Christ Martin's piano and thought aloud "Hey, that's Coldplay!" I hadn't yet heard that song, so I surfed onto a "Smallville" fansite to check the title and found that it was called "The Scientist" from Coldplay's most recent album "A Rush of Blood to the Head."
"The Scientist" is a song that will remind you of being in love - more likely, of being in love with someone who doesn't love you back or with someone whom you pissed off and doesn't want to be around you anymore. It's basically the most perfect song about unrequieted love. It is beautiful and haunting, as many of Coldplay's songs are. Give it a listen. You won't regret it.

from A Rush of Blood to the Head, available on CD


treading water  performed by nada surf
Recommended by morning belle [profile]




Warmth of the Sun  performed by The Beach Boys  1964
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Another of my favorite Beach Boys tracks, 'warmth of the sun' is a haunting ballad, sung astoundingly beautifully (Carl Wilson does the lead vocals) over a twangy picked electric guitar. From the astounding album 'Shut down vol. 2' which also gave us 'Don't Worry Baby'! 6 years ago I thought that the Beach Boys were pretty much 'Surfin' USA and other surfer hits'. I'm glad I was able to get beyond this - there's so much to discover!

from Shut Down Vol. 2 (Capitol)
available on CD - Surfer Girl/Shut Down Vol. 2 (Capitol/EMI)



werewolf  performed by the frantics  1959
Recommended by olli [profile]

legendary primal surf track with werewolf noises. Talk about a guitar sound with authoroty! I really like the tribal drums and the kitchy spoken(or should that be spooky?)word intro. one of the coolest halloween compilation tracks around. The Cramps love it.




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