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List songs by Song title | Performer | Year

You searched for ‘wistful’, which matched 28 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
ano zero  performed by egberto gismonti  1972
Recommended by 77lemming [profile]

astonishingly beautiful, early 70s brazilian masterpiece. a classical piece disguised as a pop song, with a simple piano playing a wistful melody punctuated by an amazing unexpected ascending chord hook. gismonti sings the original version, with a string section and morricone-like wordless vocal backing him. for the final minute the key changes and the vocals and accompaniment stop, and the solo piano veers off into satie territory, before resolving back into the refrain. gismonti re-recorded this a few times, after finding success in europe as an avant/classical composer. this song also inspired the guitar and mandolin trio agua e vinho, who cover it on their self-titled album along with a few other gismonti compositions.

from agua e vinho (EMI), available on CD


At Once You Fall In Love  performed by Birgit Lystager  1970
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

Birgit Lystager is incredible, a Danish cross between Astrud Gilberto and Karen Carpenter with really artily written and composed pop songs. It's hard to choose just one tune from this magnificent and scarce album, but I'm often unable to get that "Eyes and hair and legs, oh what a sight/She's a flash of light in darkest night...." chorus out of my head for days at a time. To the above two chanteuses I might also add a dash of Joni Mitchell because of the conversational lyrics and melodic savoir-faire (maybe I should also mention Francoise Hardy right about here as well!). The arrangement is lush and expansive with more than a hint of Bacharach (whose "Another Night" is covered spectacularly on the same album). All this is already more than enough, but lovely Birgit also opted to go the extra mile and pose stark naked on the gatefold LP cover, tastefully exhibiting her considerable assets. (Heh heh, he said "assets.") In any event, this song, and the album it comes from, would be completely brilliant no matter what she looked like. Extremely hard to find, but WELL worth the search. I recommend Soulseek.....

from Ready To Meet You (Artist)



  criz: Yes, we are talking about a real rare album, worth searching for. Filled with unexpected chords and abosutely anti-typical for that era of Danish popular-music, or should I state it: Compromise-lessness. Compared to Bacharach's music, I myself find the pieces on this album more sophisticated - not saying that Bacharach finds the "easy way out!" "I'm Waiting For A Bus", the opening tune of the album is truly my favourite. May I also recommand the Birgit-album "Love's Labyrinth", also worth a search. Here you will find Elton John's break-through "Your Song" in a version of international class, among other fine pieces. Arrangements made in the same style as Ready To Meet You. And yes, also with a nice-looking picture on the cover. Go look for it - but not in my house!
  tempted: You guys share my thoughts on this 100%. A friend of mine from Stockholm made me a copy of Ready To Meet You just at the doorstep of summer '01. That summer I barely spent a day without enjoying that record. I'd been a passionate fan of 60's soft pop and psych (and Bacharach) but had never heard anything like Birgit Lystager. The adventurousness of the compositions and the colour of Birgit's voice are what sets this record totally apart from other stuff from that era. It's great that you guys have found this, too!
  tempted: ...but please guys, if you have until know somehow managed not to get a glimpse of the cover of Ready To Meet You then don't. It will shatter every pretty thought that you may have about the chanteuse. It's totally rude. But this is just my opinion...!
  criz: Latest news...In Denmark a 7-CD-set has just arrived, with 76 Birgit Lystager-tunes, including the two English albums - and very fair priced. Have a look at www.lystamusic.com - and be guided to the places to buy it on the internet (link-page). Just a recommendation from one who knows!
Babaji  performed by Supertramp  1977
Recommended by Mike [profile]

I think this song is possibly Supertramp's best, though I think it could have been better too. The lilting first verse is particularly striking, although as the song builds, the shrillness of Roger Hodgson's voice becomes wearing and there is an excess of repetition. The instrumental breaks in particular show one of the band's more positive characteristics - a jazz-inspired rhythmic urgency, and the sax solos are as excellent as always.

from Even in the quietest moments, available on CD (A&M)


Borderline  performed by Jane  2003
Recommended by SimonB [profile]

Close Up And Reak is a lovely album but this is my favourite track. It's a bittersweet tale of a person's (possibly Jane's), gradual loss in humankind. The song opens with a wailing violin which then introduces a soft, acoustic blanket of intsrumentation topped with Jane's wistful vocals.

from Close Up And Real, available on CD (Tomboy Music Group)


Campground Daughter  performed by School for the Dead  2004
Recommended by catmarigold [profile]

Melancholy but hopeful. This is a gentle song, with acoustic and electric guitars, electric piano, bass, drums, and voice. Excellent lyrics, terrific mood.

There's a little story here, punctuated by flashes of images and moments.

The song is written by Henning Ohlenbusch who has worked with Chris Collingwood (Fountains of Wayne), Mark Mulcahy, and Lloyd Cole. If those names mean anything to you, then chances are you will enjoy this warm track.

from The New You, available on CD


Dream a little dream  performed by Billie Holiday
Recommended by inbloom44 [profile]

A beautiful,wistful and classic ballad sung by one of the greatest voices of all time.





  xfanatic50: Love, love, love this song... Billie Holiday has such an amazingly raw voice.
Drowse  performed by Queen  1976
Recommended by Ozmala [profile]

Not sure what to say about this one. It makes me feel sick. In a good way. It's very beautiful, especially when you listen to the lyrics, and … well, it just makes me feel like I've had too much candy, or like I'm bloated on wistfullness. His (Roger Taylor's) voice is very emotional. The slide guitar is lovely, too.

from A Day at the Races (Hollywood Records)


Footprints on the Moon  performed by Francis Lai  1973
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An incredibly perfect easy listening piece, this opens with an other-worldly, John-Barry-ish synth sound, and then leads into a groovy, lightly funky piano riff, with shimmering strings. Francis Lai's signature organ sound carries the tune as the song builds into a dramatic orchestral pop masterpiece. A standout track, with superb wistful, lazy, summer day feel, rather like some of the best tracks on the 'Sound Gallery' compilation of a few years ago.

from Plays the compositions of... (UA UA-LA095-F)




  scrubbles: Yow! That sound snippet alone is so cool.
  AndreasNystrom: I finally got the version by Francis Lai, and i think its better then Johnny Harris one. Splendid song!. I love the ending part of it.. cant get that part out of my head :)
  standish: I'd have to go for the Johnny Harris original over the Francis Lai version. It's colder and spookier with less obtrusive strings. "Movements" is available on CD (great sleeve - his expression suggests a combined photo shoot/visit to his proctologist) - but the mono single version (w/"Lulu's Theme") is all you need.
  leonthedog: Well, thanks to all of you I had to track down BOTH versions! Amazing what a difference an arrangement makes. I agree with scrubbles: the clip of Lai's version is the most infectious thing around!
Good Old Owl  performed by Niobe  2004
Recommended by respiro [profile]

With lightly strummed acoustic guitar, vaguely castanetish rhythm and Yvonne Cornelius filtered and far away singing, this wistful and melancholic song transcends the experimentation of the other songs on the album Voodooluba, with its straightforwardness while still keeping the air of mystery present in the other tracks.

from Voodooluba


Guitar in Orbit, PT. 37  performed by Deke Dickerson and the Ecco-Fonics  1998
Recommended by Solo [profile]

cool high speed clean guitar instrumental with a 1950s tonalizer sound. I feel like I'm watching Sputnik in orbit while hearing a jet break the sound barrier when I listen to this. Deke and the Ecco-Fonics are noted for a phenomenal period-style production on albums, retro but never wistfully nostalgic songwriting, and exceptional virtuosity at live performances. The rest of this CD is loaded with great vocals and hip tunes.

from Number One Hit Record! (HighTone (HMG) HMG 3005)


Hey Jude  performed by The Beatles  1967
Recommended by bunwhisper [profile]

I doubt I can say anything that hasn't been said already... but out of all the many, many Beatles songs I love, this is my favorite.

from Hey Jude (Beatles Again) (Apple Records)


In The Aeroplane Over The Sea  performed by Neutral Milk Hotel  1998
Recommended by pullmyhair [profile]

The song is wistful, whimisical, magical, beautiful, introspective, and youthful.


available on CD - In the Aeroplane over the Sea (Merge)



  n-jeff: Wow, how many times has this song been entered on here, now! http://www.psychedelicado.com/filter.php?performer=Neutral%20Milk%20Hotel Lots, thats how many. It must be a great song. Even if The capitalisation may Be a bit Tricky. ;Ž)
Last Summer  performed by Lostprophets  2004
Recommended by izumi [profile]

I love music that can make you visualize in your mind what the song is trying to convey. This is one of those songs that always makes me feel nostalgic and wistful whenever I hear it - nostalgic not because it's a song from my childhood but because it talks about happy times gone by. When I hear it, I can picture in my mind a group of friends driving in a car through their hometown with an orange sunset in the sky. This is a song about happy memories which is something that everybody can relate to.

The instrumentals are nice too. I like how the guitar flares up at the chorus, and the steady beat of the drum, and how the singer's voice seems to echo throughout the song even after he's sung a word. This song might not seem very special, but it's amazing to listen to!

from Start Something (Visible Noise TORMENT32)


Like to get to know you  performed by Spanky and our Gang  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This lovely late 60s pop track is wistful and atmospheric. The instrumentation is exquisite (vocal group with a delicately strummed/picked acoustic guitar, strings), and there is a cool false ending. The result is a very rich sound, evocative of lost summers. A sound which I'm very fond of...

from Like to get to know you (Mercury 61161)
available on CD - Spanky’s Greatest Hit(s)




  tempted: I just found the original album of the same name this song is on. It's beautiful with just the right kind of softly psychedelic artwork and some crazy, groovy spoken word passages on some tracks. "Like to Get to Know You" stands out as the definitive song and remains one of the most mesmerizing soft pop tunes in the world.
  gregcaz: It's also worth noting that the single version, found on the 1969 "Spanky's Greatest Hit(s)" album, is the definitive one, free as it is from the pickup-line chatter that obscures the intro on the original album, as well as featuring the gorgeous coda which is included separately on the "LTGTKY" LP.
  artlongjr: This is my favorite Spanky and Our Gang tune, a gorgeous and wistful number. I also have the original LP, which features a different version from the 45 as gregcaz mentioned. There is a video of the band performing this on Youtube that I think originally aired on the Smothers Brothers. I saw Spanky and the Gang a number of times on TV as a kid.
Long Live the King  performed by Gary McFarland  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

It's hard to pick a particular Gary McFarland song to recommend: although I love almost all of them, there aren't that many that particularly stand out. Most have some of the same trademarks: whistling or wordless vocals, brass, guitar, and a gentle bossa nova beat. They're slightly wistful, and make me feel like it's summer whenever I hear them. McFarland also worked with some outstanding musicians, including Gabor Szabo and Kenny Burrell on guitar, Grady Tate on drums, and Willie Bobo on percussion.

Long live the king is actually slightly different - it's a simple, upbeat number with a rock beat, bacharach-style trumpet, and picked guitar; a boogaloo-style saxophone also makes an occasional appearance, as does a hammond organ. The German 'Latin Lounge' CD showcases his work on the Verve label, and it's all excellent.

from Scorpio and other signs (Verve V-8738)
available on CD - Latin Lounge (Motor)



  tinks: i'm glad to hear that mcfarland has finally been put on cd in some sort. i absolutely love him, just because he's so ridiculous. if you like this, you should check out the album he produced for cal tjader entitled "tjader sounds out burt bacharach".
  b. toklas: There actually is at least one album thatīs standing out a bit. Itīs called "Butterscotch Rum" (1971) and has a guy called Peter Smith accompanying Gary McFarland. He sings and wrote the lyrics and even illustrated the cover! I suppose heīs an Englishman, because his voice has a kind of Robert Wyatt-ish timbre. Itīs a very good album with a slightly melancholic mood, and with that special laid-back and somewhat loose instrumentation that is characteristic for a lot of McFarlands later work. Very cool and heartwarming at the same time. Would like to have met him and have little chat sitting in rocking chairs. (Oh I forgot: some of the songs on "Butterscotch Rum" are Seventies RockīnīRoll. They are not too bad, but usually I skip them.)
Lover I Don’t Have to Love  performed by Bright Eyes
Recommended by 37piecesflair [profile]

Words can't express how much I love this song. I go through stages with it..sometimes it makes me cry, sometimes it makes me happy, sometimes it makes me wistful. Just an all-around favorite.




Natacha  performed by Czerkinsky
Recommended by avalyn [profile]

simply because it's gentle, chiming and so full of yearning. i'm a sucker for that.




Open Door  performed by Genesis  1980
Recommended by Mike [profile]

It is hard to imagine a more musically wistful verse than that of this song. The swelling chorus augments it perfectly and very dramatically. This B side from the "Duke" era is surely one of Mike Rutherford's best songs, and one of the highlights of the post-Gabriel Genesis for those who appreciate the band's slower numbers.


available on CD - Genesis Archive Vol 2



  makebusy7: Um, that song was a throwaway no matter how you slice it
  Mike: It's all about musical taste, really, although even if it was not to my taste, I would find it hard to put together an argument for it as a throwaway.
  mrtanner: I think this is an absolutely beautiful track!
  Mike: Oh yes, it's quite special...glad someone else appreciates it!
People and places  performed by Constantin Veis
Recommended by moondog [profile]

Of all the releases on spains siesta label i especially hold "Memory La" by Greece`s Constantin Veis closest to me. Constantin veis who along with his brother sang and wrote songs in 80´s group The Fantastic Something. A kind of Simon & Garfunkel for the the indie/twee generation. On Memory La he continues in the simon & garfunkel style but throws in a more singer songwriter vibe along with bits of jimmy and burt. Crystal clear acoustic guitars and a wistful melody dominates "people and places" that removes this listener looking out on the mediterrean sea with a glass of ouzo in your right hand.

from Memory-La (Siesta)


Sleeping In  performed by The Postal Service  2003
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

Just a very wistful, sort of wishing the world would change kind of a song. Makes me feel better when I listen to it. Don't ask me why.

from Give Up (Sub Pop)


Summer (The First Time)  performed by BOBBY GOLDSBORO  1973
Recommended by callgirlscene [profile]

This story-song uses an imposing repeating piano riff, 12 string guitar, a little tasteful organ, and dramatic wistful strings as it recounts someone's first, well, lay. On a hot June day/night the singer loses his virginity with a older Southern belle. The version on the Honey CD though isn't as good as the original Bobby Goldsboro vinyl- it seems too lavishly produced, and is from the Summer of '42 soundtrack.

from SUMMER (THE FIRST TIME) (UNITED ARTISTS LA-124)
available on CD - HONEY (REMEMBER)




  Arthur: Millie Jackson covered this song and takes all the saccharine out of it!
  pottymoon: 'Summer the first time' by Bobby G doesn't have an ounce of Saccharine, it is a powerfully evocative track taking me back to when I was 19 (and that's 32 years ago!)so completely that I can smell, taste and feel everything as if I'd dropped back into 1973 from a time machine! And if you think that I write with Saccharine, then hey,I get paid for it!
  commonsense: I am just listening to this tack as I am typing and it really is an excellent example for nostalgia. The way the song is constructed makes it easily slip into your mind and float downstream to past encounters...
Tales from the Riverbank  performed by The Jam  1981
Recommended by geezer [profile]

Released as a B-side in 1981 ,this group were so prolific at this time vast parts of their output never made it to albums ,turning up ,like this gem as b sides or outakes,This is late period Jam in a wistful jangly mood but with a darker undertone lurking behind the mellowness ,the song ,lyrically,mourns the passing of a way of life sacrificed to progress and declining morals.Has hints of British psychedelica at its most parochial ,The Kinks come to mind as do early Floyd.The almost pastoral feel of this was not out of step with Wellers writing at this time and his finest inspiration often came to fruition on calssic b-sides like this .

from Extras (Polydor)
available on CD - The Jam-Extras


Tear It All Away  performed by The Church  1981
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Following shortly on the heels of Of Skins and Heart, "Tear It All Away" still was the picture of a developing band, but one already more comfortable with the studio, able to use subtlety and quiet drama to inform its cool, soothing yet tense take on post-punk filtered through psychedelic touches. The familiar Byrds-derived guitar and Bowie-tinged lyrical regret and sighing crop up as they so often would in the earliest days, but there's a clean, blue tinge to the whole performance, something that feels inexpressively like an eighties recording rather than a sixties throwback. Call it the space in the mix, the gentle keyboards here and there, or the substituting of folk and country roots for something more urban and faster-paced. The lovely mid-song solos show the Marty Willson-Piper/ Peter Koppes team still well within its element, and the whole composition has a rich, lush feeling to it that's most attractive.
(AMG)

from Of Skins and Heart, available on CD


The Happiest Day Of My Life  performed by Queen Anne’s Lace  1968
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

Soft-rock magic. This song is breathy, light, and perversely sad-sounding. Maybe wistful is the word. The album is in the finest Free Design-sounding tradition, including covers of Beatles, Bacharach, Paul Simon, "Sally Go Round The Roses," and such top-shelf originals as this. Truly splendid.

from Queen Anne's Lace (Coral CRL 757509)



The Land / Rainy Sunday Evening  performed by Ramatam  1973
Recommended by john_l [profile]

Ramatam, who walked the earth in the early '70s, were an annoying '50s-influenced hard rock band who nevertheless managed to kick off their second LP with the mostly acoustic two-parter listed here. The first half is slow, slightly off-kilter and full of sharp harmonies, while the second part is the most wistfully resigned paean to lost love this side of the late John Phillips. The whole thing is string-drenched and utterly lovely.

from In April Came The Dawning Of The Red Suns (Atlantic)


The March of the Black Queen  performed by Queen  1974
Recommended by Ozmala [profile]

This is an amazing song. Even if you hate it, it's amazing. It sounds evil, and glorious, scary, and ecstatic, all so quickly and powerfully. I don't know how to describe how it sounds, other than a tad insane. And beautiful.

from Queen II (Hollywood Records)


Trampoline  performed by The Greenberry Woods  1994
Recommended by Yammer [profile]

Any label searching for the perfect pop cover to resurrect from the forgotten early-90s (as with "There She Goes") would do well to give several listens to this equally bustling-yet-melodic paean to the bittersweet tang of youthful somethingorothers. Jangling electric guitars, singalong choruses (it doesn't get any easier than "come and see/trampoline"), mumbling, presumably insightful scatting over the reprise, layered harmonies, and a throwback yowling guitar solo. Merely sneering, "I already have one Oasis album," does not excuse you from the obligation to hear and love this song!!!

from Rapple Dapple (Sire)
available on CD - Powertopia! Power Pop Classics of the '90s (Rhino)



  luvs23: Sugar by Stretch Princess IS VERY VERY VERRRRRY similar to There She Goes by the La's. A similar high-pitch vocal with an addictive hit chorus: "Sugar Sugar sticking me to my babe Sugar Sugar sticking me to my babe Sticking up to my babe sticking up to my babe sticking up to my babe" Beautifully sung, I can't stop listening to it.
Trzeba Wracać  performed by Novi Singers  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Listening again to a compilation I made almost four years ago, I heard this magical track, which really had a big effect on me. It's probably not for everyone. Meandering and rather wistful, it's not at all funky like some of their later work, but I find it utterly compelling.

As you might have heard, Novi Singers were an incredibly talented quartet of vocal singers recording in Poland in the late 60s and 70s. They did several amazing records. This is taken from what I think was their first, Bossa Nova. But rather than renderings of songs like 'One note samba' and 'Desafinado', the album consists of a delightful and varied collection of originals in a related mood. The result is like bossa nova from a parallel, slightly more melancholic universe.

The accompaniment is a slow, gentle bossa played by a small jazz group, with some rich strings dropping in and out, and the vocals (all wordless/scat) take centre stage. The chord sequence is staggeringly beautiful, and at times the vocalists take slightly extravagant scat solos.

It sounds strange to say it, but this is really one of those tracks that seems to tell an enormous, emotional story, in spite of the fact that it doesn't contain one word! It would make a fantastic soundtrack to a silent movie.

from Bossa Nova (Polskie Nagrania)
available on CD - Bossa Nova/Torpedo (Polskie Nagrania)



  delicado: just to reiterate, this IS the best song ever!

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