TRANSLATE THIS PAGE into GERMAN | SPANISH | FRENCH | ITALIAN | PORTUGUESE
 HOME |  REGISTER | FORGOTTEN PASSWORD | SEARCH or BROWSE | RECOMMEND | EDIT | LINKS | MOST RECENT
musical taste home
search results
search results for “mighty”
download an m3u playlist for all available clips for the search mighty

List songs by Song title | Performer | Year

You searched for ‘mighty’, which matched 20 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
14:31 (Ob-selon mi-nos)  performed by Global Communication  1994
Recommended by Genza [profile]

I saw Global Communication play live in a church and they were, err, heavenly. This song probably showcases their celestial sound best. Weighing in at a mighty 14-plus minutes, it certainly takes time to get going. But that's the beauty. Like current darlings of the ambient music scene Boards of Canada and geniuses of the past such as Bowie and Eno, the wonder of the sound is in its slow-building intensity. Orchestral-like chords and heavy bass make this song an ambient must-have. But the whole album is a winner. Sell the fridge and let your food rot to own this one.

from 76:14 (Dedicated DED CD013)



Agitated  performed by Die Electric Eels  1974
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

One of the greatest rock songs ever recorded. Loud, distorted, strangely tuneful and tuneless at the same time. An exhilerating rush of pure energy without being remotely fast.


The superior single version also has the mighty Nick Knox on drums. And I don't think is on the cd. But it is on the LP.

from Its a 7 inch single (Rough Trade)
available on CD - The eyeball of hell (scat)


Crab Apple Jam  performed by David Snell  1975
Recommended by joanzaya [profile]

David Snell is an amazing harpist. This track was originally released in 1975 and is from the "On the Side of Angels" album. Since then, it has been found on a variety of compilations; The Mighty Mellow, Cinemaphonic 2: Soul Punch and many others. A great jazz track.

from On the Side of Angels (Programme)


Cruel Sister  performed by Pentangle  1970
Recommended by rum [profile]

A bewitching song about a young woman who, to win the hand of a handsome knight, does her rival sister in. The dead girl then comes back to haunt the “black-haired bride” as a harp fashioned from her breast bone and three locks of her hair. ‘Cruel’ may seem too kindly a description of a girl who when her sister pleads, “Oh Sister, Sister, let me live, and all that’s mine I’ll surely give” says, “It’s your own true love I have and more, but thou shalt never come ashore” before abandoning her body to the rough North Sea. Cruel? Should the sister therefore be scalded for her little… transgression? She’s an evil and monstrous sister, surely? But then this is centuries past, a time when sibling murder and human harps were commonplace. I am not likely to understand in this more civilised 21st century. Which may be why the kids don’t really dig British folk music anymore, or the mighty Pentangle. And it’s a crying shame because this is a stunning track, hauntingly sung by Jacqui McShee. I hesitate to use the term ‘masterpiece’ in case that great oracle of musicaltaste.com, fmars, overhears and tells me that I’m wrong.

from Cruel Sister



  konsu: Alright.In your own special way you've convinced me rum. I've been told for years to pick up some Pentangle by certain freinds (the ones who hear me playing Steeleye Span). Surely I must be missing out on something... I will consult the great one.
  rum: Heh-heh, thank you. I’m certain you’ll appreciate these, you’ve got eclectic taste, you’re not gonna be out for my blood (unlike all those that have begged and borrowed, stolen from their dying grandmothers, to buy Manowar CDs). And they’re no way as folk folk as the Span, they spin out an equally eclectic mix of folk, jazz, blues, rock and Elizabethan dances. It’s time people stopped harping on how great it was that the Velvets, the Stooges, punk etc made you wanna go out and form a band. So simple they sounded. Pentangle are so incredibly talented, so learned, so jazz, but still so unassuming and cool, they make you want pack up the band, trash the guitar, and burn down your house. Or is that Jet? I don’t know now. Well anyway the ‘Sweet Child’ album is the one.
England 2 Columbia 0  performed by Kirsty MacColl  2000
Recommended by komodo [profile]

A superb tale of wronged love and wounded pride performed with a mighty swagger, drenched in latin rhythms and horns, but with that bittersweet humour and English setting that have been hallmark's of Kirsty's whole career.

There are so many songs from Kirsty that I love in so many musical styles, but the "Tropical Brainstorm" album is really the best thing she ever did. She has absorbed the influences from her travels in Latin America, but the album is no pastiche, it is pure MacColl. Whilst occasionally missing its mark, it has so many fine, joyful and wryly funny moments, and, to me, all the signs of an artist entering a new, fiercely creative and joyful stage of her career.

Sadly we will never know where Kirsty's musical journey would have taken her.

from Tropical Brainstorm, available on CD


Floods  performed by Pantera  1996
Recommended by King Charles [profile]

Starting off with the haunting echoing of steel string suspended minor chords, and quickly moving into the feeling of darkness, Floods reigns as one of the greatest metal balladry songs of all time. With a time of 6:59 (minutes and seconds), Floods deals with the internal struggle, elements of corruption, and dissolution of troubles (wash away man/ take him with the floods), that is not dismissed or watered down into a three-minute wad of sound. Pantera's pervasive composing abilities are seen not only in the length of this track, but it its bridges and structured solo set ups. Phil Anselmo delivers this song on the back of Dimebag Darrell's mighty 'steel' guitar effect, and of course the trademark bass drums and top-hat kicks of Vinnie Paul that have made Pantera so famous. The bridge perhaps extracts the greatest meaning from the song; it epitomizes itself on the power chord riff solos and Anselmo's godly muttering of "floods" (in which we can picture a Goliath or force of destruction coming in to obliterate all existence), which echoes throughout the solo. A rather dark song, Floods is characterized by its catchy guitar work (which contains a spectrum of minor and suspended shapes), and staircase wit/reflective backdrop mumbling vocals about the cold, harsh realities of life. Recommended to anyone who doubts this band's ability to do other than scream and wax metallic, Floods will not be a disappointing track. The bleak acceptance of moving onto new horizons or ways of life, leaving the old and dead behind and walking on down the road, is embodied in the ending solo, with the subtle sound of rainfall calming the listener in the end. 5 out of 5 stars for its genre.

from The Great Southern Trendkill



I Promise to Wait My Love  performed by Martha Reeves & the Vandellas  1968
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

'60s Motown rarely strayed from that classic sound, but this one attempts an earthier, Muscle Shoals/Stax-like sound -- with brilliant results. Martha's voice could even be mistaken for Aretha here. An underrated, mighty danceable single with killer rhythmic guitars, tambourines and a bubbling bassline.

from Ridin' High (Gordy)
available on CD - Ridin' High/Sugar and Spice (Motown)


I want to kiss the Bangles  performed by The Saw Doctors  199?
Recommended by mattypenny [profile]

Great Lost Punk Single #1

...well actually part of an E.P. called, I think, Wake Up Sleeping. I totally take on board what some other guy says about not just typing in the lyrics to songs, but these are too funny. It's a noisy, good humoured racket, 'though not very pc.

I wouldn't kiss Liam O'Maonlai,Guns & Roses or Muddy Waters.
I wouldn't kiss Brian WilsonOr his lovely yankee daughters.
And Shane McGowan is not my type Because his teeth are green and mangled
But Jesus Christ Almighty, I'd love to kiss the Bangles.

from Wake Up Sleeping EP, available on CD


I've Been A Bad, Bad Boy  performed by Paul Jones  1967
Recommended by Swinging London [profile]

This is another great, great pop song from the 1966-68 era, that made it to the top of the charts and has since been more or less forgotten.

Absolutely superb arrangement by Mike Leander.

Tremendous and mighty orchestral backing creating a great wall of sound.

It was Paul Jones second (& last) big hit after leaving Manfred Mann in 1966.

It was also part of the soundtrack to the film 'Privilege' (1967).

This is another great British pop song that never made it in the USA.

I never get bored of it & I've known it all my life.

Great, great pop music.





Ice Pick Mike  performed by Lalo Schifrin  1968
Recommended by heinmukk [profile]

first of all: great soundtrack!
this track begins slowly with some percussions. and then the almighty horn section starts. i love them loud and dramatic. the way they are here. the rest of the track is also nice but looping 0:58 to 1:36 the whole day would do it for me...

from OST Bullit


Insight  performed by Joy Division  1979
Recommended by Genza [profile]

Prior to Ian Curtis' death and the infamous but less interesting second album Closer, Joy Division released a whole bunch of fantastic songs. Atmosphere, She's Lost Control and Transmission (recently superbly covered by US minimalists Low) are all rightly loved - but the fragile wonder of Insight is almost always forgotten.

The song starts with sound of a lift going down - and the overall feel is lonely, desolate and claustrophobic. Insight stirs the soul and breaks your heart my friend. Mighty powerful stuff.

from Unknown Pleasures (Factory)




  delicado: It's an incredibly intense and affecting track, one of my favorites, alongside 'disorder' and 'decades'. And 'no love lost', obviously.
karma sitar  performed by 101 strings  1969
Recommended by olli [profile]

The standout track on the otherwise pretty dull lp "the exotic sounds of love". The title says it all really, it`s a mighty fine psychsploitation/middle east -style track. Love the swirling strings.

from the exotic sounds of love (astor)
available on CD - astro sounds from beyond the year 2000 (scamp)


O Verona (Reprise)  performed by unknown  1996
Recommended by cryofthecelt [profile]

After the prologue of Baz Luhrmann's controversial, modern retelling of William Shakespeare's tragedy "Romeo and Juliet," the audience is blasted away by a hoard of harmonious voices chanting a loud, haunting song to the beat of an angry drum. This song, in which a narrator begins "Two households, both alike in dignity...", is called "O Verona," the song which Baz Luhrmann himself calls "an almighty orchestral chord." Its sister song, "O Verona (Reprise)" is uninterrupted by the narrator, and the listener is able to appreciate its musical quality in a fuller fashion. Personally, I couldn't decide whether to recommend "O Verona" or "O Verona (Reprise)" to you. They are both extraordinary recordings on what is, I believe, one of the greatest musical scores to a motion picture ever produced.

from William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet Volume 2, available on CD


Out of my hands  performed by Richard x Heyman  1998
Recommended by moondog [profile]

Music for pussies producer Steve Albini once answered when he shared his thoughts about the genre powerpop. So, perhaps that makes me one then but anyone who likes melodies got to admit that the genre has produced some gems over the years. Richard x Heyman is one of the standouts in the genre. When he doesn´t tune his rickenbacker in his tabbey road studio in new york he goes out searching for homeless cats. So, maybe now i got you all concvinced that the man differs a bit from the average powerpopper. Out of my hands is taken from the mighty fine cornerstone and is overflowing with hooks,hooks my friends which is exactly what i need right now.

from cornerstone


Paint A Vulgar Picture  performed by the Smiths  1987
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Morrissey, ever the angry young vegan, sings a beautiful tribute to a music idol who has recently died and then proceeds to lash out at the big record companies that repackage and reissue the work of the artist all in the name of the almighty dollar. Sadly the very same thing would happen to the Smiths' catalogue just a few years later. Define 'irony'. Of course I sit here at this computer just 14 feet away from a record shelf that is stuffed with the reissues and repackages of the above named catalogue but I just couldn't resist those cute little 10-inch limited edition vinyl LPs that Warner UK put out in the early 1990s including the very album this song appears on...

from Strangeways Here We Come, available on CD



  jmurray: Am I the only one who thinks this song is about Ian Curtis and Factory Records? Think about it. Morrissey would have certainly gone to JD shows in the late 70's. Reportedly, he was at the 4 June 1976 Pistols show at Lesser Free Trade Hall. Clearly, Moz and the Smiths rejected Factory Records when their time came about to find a label. Maybe, Moz was not only disgusted with Factory's obsession with repackageing JD material into new releases, but perhaps Moz had a romantic eye for Curtis. Perhaps, they touched "at the soundcheck." And though somewhat morbid, he sang about never tainting his love for Curtis because Curtis was "on their hands a dead star."
  n-jeff: I wouldn't have thought it was the case, it must have been 20 years before factory compiled Joy Divisions stuff. When he died they bought out the scheduled releases: "love will tear us apart", "Closer" and then I think it was a few years before "Still" appeared. They got on pretty quickly with developing new Order IIRC, it couldn't have been that long before "ceremony" appeared.
I'm not Tony Wilsons biggest fan, but I think Factory did a pretty good job of handling Curtis' suicide. And they weren't really that popular anyway, at that time.
Now, the frenzy that marked John Lennons death. That was something else.

  jmurray: Paint a Vulgar Picture was 1987, long after Factory, and the remainder of JD had moved on to New Order. By that time, NO had released numerous 12" singles and LP's all the way through FAC 150, Brotherhood. For the record, FAC 37 was a video release called Here Are The Young Men of JD in Aug '82, FAC 40 is the JD compilation Still released in Oct '81, and NO's first release Ceremony is FAC 33 in Jan '81. There are also many JD appearances on various Factory Records compilations, both LP and video. All of this, of course, going on long before Moz, Marr, Rourke, and Joyce ever were together as the Smiths. One final thought, and please excuse the macabre, listen very closely to the last line of lyric in Vulgar, there is a distinct, but obvious choking sound just after the last word. If Moz hadn't made a career of singing about the "romantic" side of death, suicide, et. al. I would dismiss it as just a gutteral noise, but...
  n-jeff: I bow to your superior research.
And wince to your final thought!

  lasinge: I just tonight thought for the first time about who the song might be about (bizarre, since it's one of my favorite songs) and the first person I came up with was Ian Curtis. This story is old (I know) but it goes on...
  FlyingDutchman1971: The new Smiths bootleg "Unreleased Demos and B-sides" has a great rendition of this song with slightly different lyrics. Grab a copy of you have the chance.
  delicado: It has literally never occurred to me that this could be who it's about. I guess it's possible but it just seems wrong to me somehow. And I don't remember any tacky badges on Factory releases (unless I missed them). Interesting bootleg for sure...
Pata Pata  performed by Augusto Alguerro  1968
Recommended by n-jeff [profile]

This is the sound of summer in the sixties as I remember it from my childhood. Sunny, light, breezy. Its from one of Augusto Alguerro's 2 Polydor releases, and while not as funky or bizarre as some of the other tracks, in terms of shear fun pop its a total star. Starting with a nice little trombone riff, its quite fast with wordless vocals, flute and light brass. It has the very good production that you always seem to get with 60's polydor LP's. I wonder if the Ragovoy that wrote it is Jerry Ragovoy who I know better as a soul writer, penning Lorraine Ellisons mighty 'Stay with me baby' amongst others.

from Sounds Spectacular (Polydor)




  delicado: Horst Jankowski's version of this is excellent also! I would love to check out the Alguero, but it seems to be very hard to find his LPs. I have 'Laugh Laugh'; that's it...
  RCA76: This artist is totally worth looking for. He's arranged, composed and played pretty much Spain's most important music of the 50's and 60's. Spanish (and now international) vocalists like Rocio Durcal, Sara Montiel, Karina and Marisol recorded countless impressive hits of Algueró and Antonio Guijarro (his long-time writing partner). They are the Rodgers and Hammerstein of Spanish cinema.
  mike33436: If anyone is interested, this CD set includes some nice tunes. Michele ps: Am looking for some Andre Brasseur,Ted Heath, Edmundo Ros and a few more.
peace  performed by plastics  1981
Recommended by olli [profile]

lovely feelgood song from the borderline brilliant japanese new wave band plastics. a break from their often minimalistic intrumentation. oddball lyrics, nice guitar, harmonica and extremely enthusiastic singing.
i love the way the male vocalist seems to be holding his nose while singing in the beginning of the song.


waiting for the taxi
standing in the snow white
newspapers falling on the ground
it's cold and cold and cold

new york is frozen steak
teddy bear and kitty cat
fireplace and candles
all you need is weapon

this is peace
this is funny fairy tale

green green green peace
high high high heel
inside is outside
world is nonsense

dream of the tide wave
my peace is your peace
peace by the people
peace for the peace

this is peace
this is funny fairy tale

all i see is green green
grave yard of lily white
sleeping beauty laying there
with dots and symbols

marmalade evening
fur coats and venus
venus and mighty dragon said
all you need is weapon

this is peace
this is funny fairy tale

from welcome back plastics (island)



shortboard city  performed by The T yde  2003
Recommended by norfy [profile]

i love this band-sure they have ripped of the almighty 'felt' but what the hell-this track chugs and grooves along like loaded era-'velvets',the aforementioned 'felt', 'television' and a thousand perfect pop songs-the rest of the album is a killer and i urge you to purchase this immediately-features the godlike ric menck on drums and i beleive thay share members with'beechwood sparks'-a reason for being-a reason to keep believing.

from Twice, available on CD


The Story Of The Blues pts. 1 & 2  performed by The Mighty Wah!  1981
Recommended by LawrenceM [profile]

A fantastic 8 minute epic from Pete Wylie's overlooked Wah! As part of the crucial three (along with Julian Cope and Ian McCulloch) Wylie deserved to be a superstar, but, alas, fate conspired agaist him. This is the best song in a strong back catalogue, the final four minutes containing some of the most inspiring lyrics in pop history.

from The Maverick Years
available on CD - The Maverick Years ... and then some! (Sanctuary Records Group)



  john_l: It is a great song, although I much prefer the sung first half, which has a lovely melody, to the spoken second half. He does have a wonderfully smooth and soulful voice.
Unas the Slayer of the Gods  performed by Nile  2002
Recommended by King Charles [profile]

If you are looking for an epic, detailed, scriptured text, infused with the basal roots of death metal, this song is it. Standing at a whopping 11:43 (minutes and seconds), this is one of the longest songs I've ever heard, apart from Dream Theater. Listen to the lyrics here, we don't have a bunch of nihilistic meatheads preaching about death and lost love, it rather contains text from the Pyramid of Unas (known as the Pyramid Texts). These texts are dated in Unas's reign, who was the last ruler of the 5th dynasty- most agree he was alive from 2375 to 2345 B.C., but as is seen on elyrics.net, some date him back to 5330 B.C. This date, combined with it's deific juggernaut of sound (perpetrated in the beginning with an echoed 'vena' intro compimented by an all mighty gong, and again in the bridge which sounds like the intro to the Dark Army from LOTR: Return of the King, with it's French horns and marcato kettle drum foundation), make for a truly musical masterpiece. This is the first death metal band I encountered whose lyrics had real meaning, origin, and context (much like DJ Cheb i Sabah's portrayal of texts from the Upanishads and the Bhagavad Gita). Listen to this the whole way through, the instrumentation is incredible, with a massive orchestrated sound about as subtle as a tidal wave. The bass drums constantly set up the rhythm for the entire work (hold the beginning, and about 8:20 through, as well as the conclusion), and the instinctive deep-throat, albeit gut lyrics add for the dark yet impressive overtone of this piece. I believe I can hear sitar, vena, and even 12-string guitar in this piece. Also, it is critical to acknowledge the chorus in the background- this really highlights the sovereign, godly quality of the song's tone. The arrangement is tight, constantly in rhythm, never behind, and well meshed together, indicating well thought-out composing. Great to listen to before a game of hockey, going to the gym, or if you are feeling weak and helpless- this piece will give you power. Enjoy it for what it is- a new, comforting taste in death metal. Listen to this piece, buy the album, and do research on Unas himself- you'll find a quite interesting history behind this ancient Egyptian ruler, which is the embodiment of Nile- their obsession with the ancient kingdom. 5 out of 5 starts for its genre.

from In Their Darkened Shrines



   Try another search:

musical taste home

© zarmi 2000-2022
CONTACT | ABOUT