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You searched for ‘Reflective’, which matched 26 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
Amelia  performed by Joni Mitchell  1976
Recommended by pleasepleaseme [profile]

Joni Joni Joni. Great poetess of the north! A wonderful merging of folk & jazz here. Some of the most beautiful poetry by this already prolific artist. Also a standout on this record is the bass playing of Mr. Jaco Pastorius. From the poet who said "we are stardust,we are golden,we are billion year old carbon,and we've come to find our way back to the garden. Joni Mitchell "Woodstock"

from Hejira, available on CD (Elektra / Asylum)



  joe o: i was going to recommend this one. It really is beautiful.
Being Boring  performed by Pet Shop Boys  1990
Recommended by Genza [profile]

Surprised to see nothing by the Pet Shop Boys on Musical Taste. Now the only remaining intelligent British pop act, the Pet Shop Boys have consistently mixed dramtic chord changes with pathos-loaded lyrics. Being Boring is possibly their finest moment - reflective, sad and beautiful.

from Behaviour



  Mike: Totally agree re the worth of the PSBs output and the dramatic and very distinctive use of harmony therein. Several of their songs would be in my all-time favourites list if I ever made one.
Bill Drummond Said  performed by Julian Cope  1984
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

A key track from Julian Cope's fragmentary second solo album, 1984's Fried, "Bill Drummond Said" is the only song on the album that resembles the swirling psych-pop of his old band the Teardrop Explodes. This is no doubt intentional, as the lyrics take aim at the group's former manager, Bill Drummond (later half of the Timelords, the KLF, and the JAMS), albeit in a typically vague way. The lyrics are skeletal enough that several interpretations might be brought to them, but they seem to recount a dream in which Cope witnesses his former manager in the act of strangling an unidentified woman to death. In contrast to the vaguely unpleasant lyrics, this is by far the catchiest and sweetest tune on Fried, with a dreamy folk-rock sound to its ringing 12-string guitar riffs and breathy harmonies. Coming between more disjointed and edgy tracks like the bizarre fairy tale "Reynard the Fox" and the Syd Barrett-like ramble "Laughing Boy," "Bill Drummond Said" sounds downright bubblegummy. Unsurprisingly, the always combative Drummond got in the last word with his answer song, "Julian Cope Is Dead," a sarcastically folky acoustic tune from his odd 1986 solo album The Man in which Drummond claims that in the waning days of the Teardrop Explodes, he had suggested that Cope commit suicide to make the band famous and laments that the singer didn't take him up on it.
(AMG)

from Fried, available on CD


Britney  performed by Bebo Norman  2009
Recommended by hopefully86 [profile]

This is a christian singer telling a story about Britney Spears, but it's about everyone who gets lost in the lights of fame and fortune. It's kinda an apology song, slow and sweet but it flows nicely. This song will make you feel a bit sorry for the girl we love to hate.




Daybreak  performed by Best Of Friends  1970
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

Had it been released under different circumstances, this song might have been one of the enduring soft-rock classics of the early 70s. It's got a catchy, haunting melody and one can easily imagine it charting alongside Bread or Seals And Crofts or whoever.

Best Of Friends were essentially the East Coast-based songwriting/guitar duo of Bing Bingham and Joe Knowlton. I'm not sure how, but Eumir Deodato and legendary bossa nova producer Roberto Quartin took a shine to them and recorded this album for Brazilian release on Quartin's eponymous experimental label of the early 70s. The album even features Dom Um Romao on drums. It's actually a straight-forward pop-rock album of its era, with little to no Brazilian overtones. This same duo would later make an album on RCA as "Joe And Bing."

This title track was also covered by Astrud Gilberto on her 1972 "Now" LP, arranged by (coincidence?) Mr. Deodato himself....

from Daybreak (Quartin)


first sleep  performed by cliff martinez  2001
Recommended by olli [profile]

deceptivly simple, eerie melancholic electronic piece from the soundtrack to the (frankly disappointing) soderbergh remake of "solaris".
half clinical, half emotional. pretty good stuff.
sounds a bit like something off radiohead's kid a, only more reflective and less pretentious.


available on CD - solaris original soundtrack



  frmars: The piece is not "simple". For minimalist music lovers, this is a pure gem. The whole soundtrack is a mesmerizing variation around the same notes. And I was frankly NOT disappointed by the remake of Solaris. It is an "ambient"' movie, that made me think of Brian eno's solo music (music for airports for ex). Very elegant, very slow, very subtle.
  olli: well, in my opinion the soundtrack was the best thing about the film. though I like and deeply respect soderbergh as a director( I'm intrigued by "the limey" for the same reasons you appreciated solaris), i feel his vision for solaris was too rushed compared to the soviet original(wich admittedly is a bit TOO slow in places), and I felt it didn't give enough of a fresh angle on the subject to warrant a remake. (yeah, i know they thought of it more as an adaptation of the book rather than a remake of the film, but people just aren't going to get that) Still, the word dissappointment was used a bit relatively here, as it WAS one of the better studio films out that year..it's just that the original has a special value to me. (hmm.just realized that this might not be the ideal forum for discussing films, what with the lack of the word "movie" in the domain name and all. So I'll leave it here.) Still, I agree that i phrased my description of the piece a bit ackwardly, it really should have said simple. There, fixed it.
Floods  performed by Pantera  1996
Recommended by King Charles [profile]

Starting off with the haunting echoing of steel string suspended minor chords, and quickly moving into the feeling of darkness, Floods reigns as one of the greatest metal balladry songs of all time. With a time of 6:59 (minutes and seconds), Floods deals with the internal struggle, elements of corruption, and dissolution of troubles (wash away man/ take him with the floods), that is not dismissed or watered down into a three-minute wad of sound. Pantera's pervasive composing abilities are seen not only in the length of this track, but it its bridges and structured solo set ups. Phil Anselmo delivers this song on the back of Dimebag Darrell's mighty 'steel' guitar effect, and of course the trademark bass drums and top-hat kicks of Vinnie Paul that have made Pantera so famous. The bridge perhaps extracts the greatest meaning from the song; it epitomizes itself on the power chord riff solos and Anselmo's godly muttering of "floods" (in which we can picture a Goliath or force of destruction coming in to obliterate all existence), which echoes throughout the solo. A rather dark song, Floods is characterized by its catchy guitar work (which contains a spectrum of minor and suspended shapes), and staircase wit/reflective backdrop mumbling vocals about the cold, harsh realities of life. Recommended to anyone who doubts this band's ability to do other than scream and wax metallic, Floods will not be a disappointing track. The bleak acceptance of moving onto new horizons or ways of life, leaving the old and dead behind and walking on down the road, is embodied in the ending solo, with the subtle sound of rainfall calming the listener in the end. 5 out of 5 stars for its genre.

from The Great Southern Trendkill



Gone...Like the Swallows  performed by And Also The Trees  1986
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

The exquisite standout of the Virus Meadow album and easily And Also the Trees's best song from its early years, "Gone…Like the Swallows" steers away from the sometimes frenetic vocal intensity found elsewhere on the record it comes from for a more reflective but still passionate approach. Simon Jones delivers his lyric with all the deep-voiced intensity of a student of Wordsworth and Shelley reciting on the hillside to nature (which in some respects is pretty much the point of the song). But Jones isn't explicitly anti-modern — consider the mention of the aeroplane in the sky at various points — while the music is equally ancient and up-to-date in feel. Digital delay on the guitars turns them into rolling, darkly chiming flows and waves of sound, dramatically crashing behind the steady rhythm section and Jones' increasingly intense words. Bass and drums alone wrap everything up on a brief, spare note.
(AMG)

from Virus Meadow, available on CD


Hobart Paving  performed by St Etienne  1993
Recommended by geezer [profile]

A lesson in how to make despair sound appealing and seductive. An under played female vocal relays the vision of an unhappy soul to surreal lyrics and lush orchestration and all distilled and inspired into the name of a building firm seen on the side of a van "Hobart Paving" ,a real building firm still in existence .
Reminiscent of Brian Wilson and The Zombies at their most reflective and a french horn solo that will give you a lump in the throat .

from the single Hobart Paving
available on CD - Smash The System



  delicado: Alright geezer? Yes - a really lovely track. It took me several years to be converted to the band but I'm hooked now.
  psansom: Hi - I have been seeking the Hobart Paving track, specifically as you mention, the one with the lovely french horn solo. I bought the St Etienne \"So Tough\" CD but the version of Hobart Paving on that has a different solo, a really wishy washy harmonica type event. Are you able to let me know please on what specific St Etienne CD is that best version of Hobart Paving with that french horn solo? Many thanks - Peter (email: [email protected])
I’m Not Alone  performed by Calvin Harris  2009
Recommended by geezer [profile]

This sounds like the sun going down on 15 years of dance culture ,the raver sounding older and wiser on this Ibizan sun kissed "dance ballad" ?
A reflective intro gives way to a keyboard break chorus and back again but building in layers to a celebratory pitch ,both chilled and euphoric in equal measure ,a grown up dance track for the Brit Pop generation

from the single I’m Not Alone
available on CD - I,m Not Alone c.d single


India  performed by The Psychedelic Furs  1980
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

The leadoff track of the Psychedelic Furs' 1980 self-titled debut LP takes the lead of Brian Eno's influential work with David Bowie and his own Roxy Music and merges it with the energy, attitude, and bombast of punk rock. After a stark and sublimely beautiful synthesizer-soundscape introduction, Vince Ely's drums abruptly pound in with echoing tom toms. The rest of the band launches into a one- or two-chord assault that gives little indication of the poppier direction the group would take on later records. But the power demonstrated here on "India" remained as an undercurrent of almost all of the band's later work, even if only implied at times. And if one listens closely, there is even a bit of melody amidst the Fall-like (and by extension, Stooges and Can-like) rhythmic pummeling. Producer Steve Lillywhite was already enjoying an early peak in his recording career with this album and U2's 1980 debut, Boy, forging a sound that bridged late-'70s punk with 1980s shine and texture.
(AMG)

from The Psychedelic Furs, available on CD


Jesusland  performed by Ben Folds  2005
Recommended by gopeeinafridge [profile]

This song starts with lush orchestration and a pretty melody, followed by Ben Folds' sweet and wonderful voice, and then the bouncy piano line kicks in and the whole effect is sublime. I really like this song, and I'm not usually much of a Ben Folds fan, even.

from Songs For Silverman (Epic 5170122)


Last Night  performed by Vitamin C  2003
Recommended by unathanthium [profile]

I used to be such a boy,but I have seen the terror of my ways.The Strokes have cornered a few hooks and terrorized them into submission,using them to tantalize testosterone top-heavy lads,making them dance like innocents caught in American/Iraqi crossfire;but I'm past that age where testosterone tampers with my thought processes.

Vitamin C,real name Colleen Fitzpatrick,ex-singer of Eve's Plum,has made Last Night,by blending it with Blondie's Heart of Glass,into the pop song it always wanted to be.Gone is the nasal whine of the original replaced by cool clear vocals that caress rather than puncture the ears.

On the 12" you get three versions.If you want a good dance work out you'll pick the A side.I favour track two,not so hurried I think it's slightly more reflective tenor illuminates where other versions obfuscate.





  gaymod: oh come on unathanthium, I iike your style, Last Nite, is a great song but it is a very obvious sub motown parody...and Dr. Feelgood- She Does It Right does it a milllion times better
  unathanthium: Sub motown,I love sub motown.Parody,I love that too.And if Dr.Feelgood do it better,congratulations to them.A million times better,though,hm,that's an awful lot of noughts.And I don't think we need a pub rock revival.
Lights In The Sky  performed by Nine Inch Nails  2008
Recommended by SamHall [profile]

You can't go wrong with NIN, and you certainly can't go wrong with NIN and a piano.

The soft piano element and Trent Reznor's voice make for a beautiful combination, underscoring a melancholy contemplation of self. The song, like much of the album, is a very reflective examination of Reznor in his older years. I think it's powerful stuff, especially when the song trails off into the rhythmless void of "Corona Radiata."

from The Slip, available on CD


Meaning of Love  performed by Karin Krog  1974
Recommended by mr_klenster [profile]

What a strange and beautiful song! Cool-toned organ melodies played against a thick, warm, bass vein running through the entire song, complex drum backing, and the oddly distant, yet personally reflective lyrics of Karin Krog, combine to create a dream-like sound.






  Pal: Excellent song! Written by Steve Kuhn an american jazz musician/composer/arranger who I think lived in scandinavia in the late sixties. Besides Karin Krogh he has also worked with Monica Zetterlund. The best version of this song he has recorded himself though. Featuring Gary Mcfarland, Airto, Ron Carter & Billy Cobham!!
Middle Of The Road  performed by The Pretenders  1984
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Who could forget the rousing "woo-hooa-a-hooas" that helped define the Pretenders' 1984 smash hit "Middle of the Road"? In a decade that saw synthesizer-oriented pop music arriving on U.S. soil from England, singer/guitarist Chrissie Hynde and bandmates tear it up on this classic example of pure, unadulterated rock music. The Pretenders' offering successfully maintains a formulaic rock pattern, with drums that beat on at a driving frenetic 4/4 pace and guitar riffs that induce foot stomping by the most conservative crowd. By the time the harmonica solo kicks in toward the track's end, "Middle of the Road" has worked itself up into such a musical romp that it challenges anyone to remain sitting down. There is no technical or instrumental trickery to be found here, no "secret sauce"; the song is very much in your face. Its rollicking music and lyrics that paint a picture of a journey make anyone want to hop into the car and take off for the open road. "Middle of the road, is trying to find me/ I'm standing in the middle of life with my plans behind me." You'd be hard-pressed to find anyone who didn't identify with that sentiment. The Pretenders zeroed in on one of humankind's most basic, secret desire — to get up and go — and backed it with an equally driven musical arrangement. And that's what makes this recording a timeless classic.
(AMG)

from Learning To Crawl, available on CD


Northern Sky  performed by Nick Drake  1970
Recommended by genebean [profile]

Nick Drake's style is probably catagorized under British folk rock. This song is smooth with the happy keys jumping around and the organ in the background. Best if played while driving with the windows down on a cool morning.

from Bryter Layter, available on CD



  eftimihn: A song of plain, pure beauty. It's emotionally moving, especially when he sings "Would you love me through the winter/Would you love me 'til I'm dead"
Reading is Sexy  performed by Stone Avenue Musical Endeavors  2008
Recommended by StoneAvenue [profile]

Hi my name is Bradley Barnes, and I front a small folk-rock band in Florida called Stone Avenue. I have a song I'd like you to listen to.

It's called: Reading is Sexy.

It is streaming on our MYSPACE page.

www.myspace.com/stoneavenue


Take a listen, see what you think! Thanks a bunch!

from Live in Nashville


Shake it out  performed by Manchester Orchestra  2009
Recommended by bhahn16 [profile]

Indie rock style song, introspective lyrics, and when the song changes pace and breaks it down, I get chills every time. One of my favorite songs of '09.


available on CD - Mean everything to nothing


Sixth Station  performed by Joe Hisaishi
Recommended by unacceptable [profile]

soundtrack for "Spirited Away", a beautiful Japanese animated film for all ages.
I love this song as a piano piece as well as in full orchestra form.
Joe Hisaishi is my hero.




Tear It All Away  performed by The Church  1981
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Following shortly on the heels of Of Skins and Heart, "Tear It All Away" still was the picture of a developing band, but one already more comfortable with the studio, able to use subtlety and quiet drama to inform its cool, soothing yet tense take on post-punk filtered through psychedelic touches. The familiar Byrds-derived guitar and Bowie-tinged lyrical regret and sighing crop up as they so often would in the earliest days, but there's a clean, blue tinge to the whole performance, something that feels inexpressively like an eighties recording rather than a sixties throwback. Call it the space in the mix, the gentle keyboards here and there, or the substituting of folk and country roots for something more urban and faster-paced. The lovely mid-song solos show the Marty Willson-Piper/ Peter Koppes team still well within its element, and the whole composition has a rich, lush feeling to it that's most attractive.
(AMG)

from Of Skins and Heart, available on CD


The Unguarded Moment  performed by The Church  1981
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

That the Church's initial breakthrough song would yet become a millstone around its neck might not have been clear at the time, but one understands pretty easily why the band was anxious to escape its shadow after subsequent efforts clearly showed the tune as the building block it was. But "The Unguarded Moment" isn't a disaster at all - indeed, for a young band to come up with such a great effort early on and get some airplay and attention for it was as clear a sign as any that something really special could yet result. Marty Willson-Piper's flat out lovely introductory guitar and the sinewy blend of his and Peter Koppes' instrument on the main melody sets the tone, while the stripped down verses and quiet rhythm changes throughout give a great taste of the band's incipient ambitions and tweaking of an established formula. Steve Kilbey's quietly rueful but still clear and strong lead vocal adds a nice air of calm melancholia, while coming up with some fun lyrical images here and there ("Tell those friends with cameras for eyes…").
(AMG)

from Of Skins And Heart, available on CD


Trees   performed by Paul Weller  2010
Recommended by geezer [profile]

A legend, not so much reborn as rejuvinated ,his relentless vision has endured for 33 years through one guise or another,this reflective and odd piece of psychedelia sounds old ,new ,retro and contemporary all at the same time if you have never arrived at the door of Wellers quiet genius now is the time,this track pulls you in then threatens to lose you before you realise you are in the place to be.

from Wake up the Nation, available on CD


Triste  performed by Pizzicato Five  1995
Recommended by johannp [profile]

This song has a simple but effective instrumentation; piano, drums and bass for the most part, and brass here and there. It manages to be catchy and interesting because of the melody and chords in my opinion. It's hard to point at something specific, yet the song in its entirety just has a certain, very definitive appeal, especially the ending where it almost has an improvised feel.

This song is from what one could think of as the 'middle period' of Pizzicato Five; they had acquired Maki Nomiya as a singer, and not yet ventured into the experimental things they did in the late 90's. Another, shorter version of it is on "Big Hits & Jet Lags '94-'97'", and that's about the only difference between the two.

from Romantique '96, available on CD


Until I Believe in my Soul  performed by Dexys Midnight Runners  1982
Recommended by geezer [profile]

All the elements that made Dexys so interesting are distilled into this spritual eoic,passion ,commitment and the awkward genius of Kevin Rowland from the album that gave the world "Come on Eileen" this is ifve minutes of beauty,sweat and belief.Commencing with a pastoral flute and quickly growing into that familiar dexys blend of brass and strings ,a rousing chorus and a lonely whistled finale .Not immediately accesible but if you're a "bit" interested you could be converted for ever.

from Too Rye Ay, available on CD


When I Was a Young Girl  performed by Feist
Recommended by ThisNameIsTaken [profile]

inspired by traditional American Folk Music 'When I Was a Young Girl' contains beautiful vocals, haunting lyrics and a great beat.

Leslie Feist is an incredible artist and i would highly recomend the entire album 'Let It Die' (preferably the 2004 re-release).

from Let It Die, available on CD



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