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List songs by Song title | Performer | Year

You searched for ‘buzz’, which matched 17 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
Blues for Hari  performed by Dave Mackay & Vicky Hamilton  1969
Recommended by konsu [profile]

Groovy! groovy! This is one of the better versions of Tom Scott's indo-jazz swinger, and has been compiled a lot over the years. It has this great buzzy sitar played by Bill Plummer, and some sweet flute by Ira Schulman, who's presence on the album just sets the whole thing off! Dave Mackay's the blind pianist behind a lot of great west coast jazz like Don Ellis & Emil Richards, and his touch is just effortless. The two harmonize on the best tracks, like this one, sounding an awful lot like Jackie & Roy at times! Also, Vicky does a great Gismonti-inspired piece called "Moon Rider" and there's a version of Mackay's moody "Here" that's just sublime. A winner all the way, and must for J&R fans for sure.

from Dave Mackay & Vicky Hamilton (Impulse! AS 9184)


Bouncing Babies  performed by The Teardrop Explodes  1980
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Teardrop Explodes’ second single, "Bouncing Babies", was released in July 1979, following the departure of organist Paul Simpson and the arrival of his replacement Gerald Quinn. With those changes, the group's sound, too, would alter dramatically, as Quinn took the band into the crypt-like depths of proto-Goth; in true Phantom of the Opera style, his organ haunts the grooves, while Gary Dwyer pounds his drums like a man who’s just discovered he's been buried alive, and Michael Finkler reenacts the Texas Chainsaw Massacre with his buzzsaw guitar.

Ecstatic reviews greeted the single, but its lifespan was short – before long, ”Bouncing Babies” was so hard to find that the Freshies came close to scoring a hit simply by bemoaning that difficulty – their &"I Can't Get (Bouncing Babies by the Teardrop xplodes)" itself ranks alongside its namesake among the most memorable of the age.
(AMG)

from Kilimanjaro (Fontana 836897), available on CD (Fontana)


Cold Water  performed by Tom Waits  1999
Recommended by StAgGeR [profile]

This is a great song to listen to on days when nothing seems to be going right. In my case: when driving my blind sister around in a delapidated taxi, with broken windows, and a gas meter on empty. The best line in my opinion is: "Blind or crippled, Sharp or dull. I'm reading the Bible by a 40 watt bulb. What price freedom. Dirt is my rug.
Well I sleep like a baby with the snakes and the bugs". I love this track! Keith Richards played lead guitar and sings backing vox on this one. Their voices/styles mesh together very well. It's one of the more bluesy tracks on the record, but it's done very well...not like a lame neo-white boy blues revival thing. It's actually believable...after all, IT'S TOM WAITS FOR CHRIST SAKE! I think this is one of the more powerful songs on the record. Well...maybe a toss-up between this one and "Chocolate Jesus"...or "Hold on"...or "Get Behind the Mule" (you can't beat the lyric: "Punctuated birds on the power line. In a Studebaker with the Birdie Joe Joaks. I'm diggin all the way to China with a silver spoon, while the hangman fumbles with the noose..."). Hell...it's just a damn good record.

from Mule Variations (Epitaph Records)
available on CD - yes (yes)


Ever Fallen in Love?  performed by The Buzzcocks  1979
Recommended by xfanatic50 [profile]

This song is awesome. It's like an anti-love song. Everybody, I think, has fallen in love with someone they shouldn't have fallen in love with at some point in their life.

from Singles Going Steady (4 Men With)



Foxy Lady  performed by Jimi Hendrix  1965
Recommended by funky [profile]

The greatest most influential band or person ever.
Are you experienced is sort of the musical equivalent of the BIG BANG that scientists beleived oraiginated the Universe. Every generation love hendrix i don't think it will never turn the tables you dig.




Groovin With Mr. Bloe  performed by Mr. Bloe  1970
Recommended by tempted [profile]

With the likes of Buzzsaw by The Turtles and Dance With The Devil by Cozy Powell, Groovin' With Mr. Bloe is one of my favourite late 60's-early 70's groovy "novelty" pop instrumentals.
Beginning with a tight drum beat that carries on throughout the song and followed by one of the fattest basslines ever, this is a real dancefloor gem for hip crowds. Best of all is the harmonica lead by Mr. Bloe himself, a session musician by the name of Harry Pitch. Groovin'...became a surprise top ten hit but the best credit to the song is that it allegedly still enjoys club play by Richard Searling, the legendary northern soul deejay.

from Groovin' With Mr. Bloe (DJM)



  n-jeff: I take the opportunity to play it out whenever I can, it's a belter of a record, and still relatively easy to find in UK charity shops. Good choice!
Hope  performed by R.E.M.  1998
Recommended by dyfl [profile]

One of the stranger tracks on R.E.M.'s strangest album -- it borrows the melody from Leonard Cohen's "Suzanne" and sets it in a slowly building landscape of buzzing guitars and electronic beeps (it's a lot prettier than it sounds, believe me). "You want to go out Friday and you want to go forever" -- does he mean go out for a good time, or go out permanently? Stipe ain't saying...


available on CD - Up (Warner Brothers)



In The Year 2525  performed by Visage  1978
Recommended by geezer [profile]

This songs flower power origins always seemed at odds with its retro future predictions for mankind,so when it was re recorded amidst the static buzz of late seventies synths it suddenly made more sense ,a mildly treated vocal from Steve Strange still retains the melody but the backing track transports its sentiments to a more appropriate time line a gives a great song a bigger and better home .

from best of
available on CD - best of /Singles


Just Lust  performed by Buzzcocks  1978
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

"Just Lust" was the B-side to the Buzzcocks' highest-charting single, the Pete Shelley punk-pop classic "Ever Fallen in Love?," eventually reaching number 12 on the U.K. singles chart in September of 1978. The mysterious co-author " Dial" is, in fact, a pseudonym for the band's early manager, Richard Boon, who also shared songwriting credits on "What Ever Happened?," the B-side to the Buzzcocks' infamously banned first single "Orgasm Addict." However, the effect of his involvement in not apparent here, as the music is classic Buzzcocks — masters of the punk-fueled power pop nugget. The rhythm is springy, the track's nervous tension as wired as the melody is infectious. Punchy verses with quick-hit vocals are alternated with short dreamy sections of woozy flanged guitar and chopped up-tempo shifts, the band expertly maneuvering in tight spaces. Shelley follows the twists and turns with clipped phrases followed by drawn-out melodies in sync with the compact arrangement: "Your dream to possess/It hurts/It's so unjust/Just lust, just lust/If nothing mattered less/Then I wouldn't make a fuss/Just lust, just lust/I was slow to catch on and that just makes it worse/If passion is a fashion then emotion is just a curse." Though the track was also included on the Buzzcocks' second album, Love Bites, the group had yet to make an impact in the United States. Thankfully, this little gem was not left to languish in obscurity as it was included in the influential collected singles package Singles Going Steady, compiled as the band's introduction to American audiences and released in the states in 1979.
(AMG)

from Love Bites, available on CD (UA)


Laissez Faire  performed by Gichy Dan  1979
Recommended by PappaWheelie [profile]

An August Darnell penned song that rivals much of the prestigious 'Dr. Buzzard' catalog. Smooth, tropical, moderate-tempo late 70's Cosmopolitan-Disco tune with wordly lyrics...and Lordes Cotto on vocals!

from Gichy Dan's Beachwood #9 (RCA)



Letter From an Occupant  performed by the New Pornographers  2000
Recommended by mitchiavelli [profile]

OK, so the buzz around this song and band is a bit old and stale...I still can't get enough of them.

Neko Case puts her punk chops to work on this composition by Dan Bejar (also of Destroyer).

Great music, production, vocals and lyrics (check out Kurt Dahle behind the drum kit...the man has huge talent!) combine to create one of the great alt rock anthems of the last decade.

Rumour has it that the Pornographers will be back in the studio this fall!



from Mass Romantic, available on CD (Mint (Canada) Matador in Europe, and I don't kno)


Mile of Fence  performed by Pete Droge  1998
Recommended by understudy constantine [profile]

Originally a Tom Petty sound-alike, but on the Spacey and Shakin' album sounding a whole lot like he's finally found himself a niche, Droge delivers a collection of guitar-heavy songs that tip the wink to grunge, but without the buzz of overblown amps. This is one of the heaviest and best... check out the break.

from Spacey and Shakin (FiftySeven Records)


Mister Love  performed by Dr. Buzzard's Original Savannah Band  1978
Recommended by PappaWheelie [profile]

Cosmopolitan Disco with a warm orchestration igniting the perfect melody, Cory Daye's vocal performance can't go wrong. Dr. Buzzard's music is unlike any other music with the battered "Disco" tag. As with most of their discography, this is highly recommended! Also try "The Gigolo and I" and "Transistor Madness-Future DJ" from their wrongly criticized "Dr. Buzzard's Original Savannah Band Meets King Pennett" album.

from Dr. Buzzard's Original Savannah Band Meets King Penett (RCA)
available on CD - Very Best of Dr. Buzzard's Original Savannah Band (RCA)




  ryder0059: I JUST WANTED TO SAY MISS CORY DAYE VOICE IS ONE OF A KIND,IT IS ABSOLUTELY BREATHTAKING,SASSY WITTY,STYLISH.I WISH SOMEBODY WOULD GET HER BACK INTO THE STUDIO AS SOMEONE WOULD MAKE LOTS OF MONEY.I DONT GET IT AS HER CORY AND ME RECORD IS OUT OF PRINT BUT SELLS FOR THIRTY DOLLARS ON EBAY AND OTHER OUT OF THE COUNTRY SELLERS LIKE ROCK HOUSE MUSIC. I REALLY BELIEVE THAT IF THEY PLAYED SOME OF HER MUSIC ON THE RADIO NOW IT WOULD SELL LIKE GOLD COME ONE SOMEONE PLEASE GET HER BACK INTO THE STUDIO THANKS FOR YOUR TIME JOHN KARVASALES
  Lemluv: Thank you for posting this. I have been enchanted by the works of August Darnell, Stony Brower and Co. in all it's manifestations. Seductive yet sophisticated, concealing a rapier and wit all the time dressed to impress (from Tropical Gangsters to Zoot Suits, y mas). They were pegged as a "disco" group, but were much more. What gets me the most is how visual their music could be. Nostalgic, contemporary, and ahead of it's time simultaneously.
Sunshower  performed by Dr. Buzzard’s Original Savannah Band  1976
Recommended by ambassador [profile]

This one fits well with with my previous reccomendation in the melancholy/eerie vein. I read somewhere that the song was in the African JuJu style, but discofied of course given its 1976 production. It was this song that proved to be the Dr. Buzzard . . . was not your average disco band. Cory Daye's vocals are beautiful and harken back to an earlier era of classic jazz vocals, like Ella and Billie. The children's backup vocals are what gives it the spooky quality, probably because the intrumentation is dark, like seeing those cute (but scary) kids come out of the corn fields in Children of the Corn. The last chorus just sends chills down my spine as Cory digs into the lyrics and dances around them as the everything sort or brightens up, like the sun coming out after a summer rain. This makes the title all make such perfect sense.

from Dr. Buzzard's Original Savannah Band, available on CD



  Festy: You know what makes the last chorus for me (or choruses from after the kids singing only accompanied by percussion)... as simple as it may sound... it's the handclaps. They add so much and I always look forward to them coming along. I became obsessed with this song about 6 months ago and bought the CD, which, as I expected, doesn't contain so many fantastic songs on it, but, still an enjoyable CD. I really enjoy your recommendations!
Sunshower  performed by Dr. Buzzard’s Original Savannah Band  1976
Recommended by rasand [profile]

This song features a wonderfully simple instrumentation with strings and hawaiian guitar on a soft disco rhythm. Makes me long for some deserted island beach.


available on CD - Dr. Buzzard's Original Savannah Band



  Festy: I've commented on the other recommendation of this track, but I have to reiterate how great it is. Pseudo african rhythms, kids singing and happiness. It sounds like smiles. :)
The End of Life  performed by Gabor Szabo  1967
Recommended by konsu [profile]

I have to write about this song just to defend it. Because,among Szabo fans, this is considered crap...

But for a guy not known for his pop,this is a slammer! Most of this can be attributed to the singers on the session, who incidentally, are from The Love Generation. The Bahler brothers wrote this under the guise of "The California Dreamers", who also did a record the same year for Impulse with Tom Scott... And, whereas the Scott record has become a plunderphonic classic, Szabo's record goes unnoticed for it's lack of "breaks".....

This song is a great groovy stomper much in the tradition of all sunshine pop from the time period. Only with the added bonus of being performed by some of the best west coast session players of the time including Tom Scott himself, alongside Jimmy Gordon, Mike Melvoin, and Carol Kaye. And as with all Szabo's stuff,dark and sexy,with that eastern twist that he added to everything he did.... Bill Plummer added some buzzy sitar to this track too, which makes it a must for indo-pop fans!!

Did I mention the cover art?

from Wind Sky & Diamonds (Impulse! A-9151)



What Color Is Love  performed by Terry Callier  1972
Recommended by konsu [profile]

I know the buzz is burned on his return but I still need to give this song props. The first time I heard this album was indesribable. It sort of places you in a zone where so many sounds you love coexist in poingant harmony. This one, the title track, is a mix of torchy iceman elegance, and rootsy baroque impressionisim. And the mix of talents is undeniable. Charles Stepney and his incredible group of session men, and one, singular, unique songwriting talent. Done at a time when they could do no wrong...

It goes in and out of print, so snap it up if you can.

from What Color Is Love (Cadet MSM 37190)


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