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search results for “Eerie”
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You searched for ‘Eerie’, which matched 21 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
Boys of Summer  performed by Don Henley  1982
Recommended by StAgGeR [profile]

OK, OK, OK........I know that many of you hipster types out there are probably wincing at this recommendation, but...deal with it. I'm sure that most people are all too aware of this track, and probably avoid it at all cost, but in my humble opinion, this is one of the best pop radio songs ever recorded. I think I heard it first when I was about 12 or 13 while on summer break from school. I was immediately drawn to the eerie, repetitious, heavy delayed intro guitar line. Granted, it has some cheezy lyrics, and a fairly melodramatic tone overall, but this song will forever hold a special place in my heart....awe.


available on CD - yes




  callgirlscene: Yeah, this is an absolutely great song, a classic to my mind, yearning for that perfect love, that perfect moment, and the chance to prove ones self. And this comes from an Eagle, who weren't bad but have been way overplayed these last years on radio.
  konsu: I agree, Don nailed it with this one.It's eerie simplicity is what was great about the Eagles better tunes. It is too bad about overplay, at least in the USA. FM radio is like a Coke machine in a vegatable garden...
  Archipelago71: This is one of those few 80's songs that is still valid today. Instead of being about the excesses of the period, it's a very haunting song about missing something. Or is it about not looking back and having no regrets? You could probably argue for both sides of it. It's a true classic.
Dark On You Now  performed by The Ashes  1967
Recommended by artlongjr [profile]

This song is a classic of the psychedelic era, by a group that later became known as the Peanut Butter Conspiracy. I first discovered it years ago on a 1967 compilation album called "West Coast Love-In" which featured about four of the Ashes' songs. It was "Dark on You Now" that really wigged me out-it is an awesome, slow-paced, moody number that features the spine-tingling vocals of Sandi Robison and the prominent 12-string guitar of John Merrill. The song is incredibly atmospheric and reminds me of a combination of the Byrds and Jefferson Airplane when both of those groups were in their prime. It is also at four minutes plus quite long for the era. I listed this as being recorded in 1967 but it may have been waxed in 1966...at any rate it is surely one of the great songs of the early psychedelic era.

I have the first Peanut Butter Conspiracy album which contains a re-recorded version of this song, harder rocking and not nearly as good. The original Ashes version was recorded as a 45 for the Vault label (which also issued "West Coast Love-In").


from Spreading from the Ashes (Big Beat)
available on CD - Spreading From the Ashes (Big Beat)



  n-jeff: I'm sure I have this on one of the pebbles "Highs of the mid sixties" series ("volume 3 Hollywood a go-go" IIRC) although I believe they credit it as "Follow the sun", I'm sure. Great summer song.
  artlongjr: That is a cover version by a band called the Love Exchange..."Swallow the Sun" is a key lyric in this song, but I really don't know what it means!
Dodo  performed by David Bowie  1974
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

A fascinating out-take from the "Diamond Dogs" sessions, “Dodo” can be seen as the starting point of Lady Stardust’s shift from glitter space-boy to paranoid, plastic soul stylist. Like almost everything on D. Dogs, the lyrics are inspired by Orwell’s “1984”, but the music seems to be profoundly damaged by sleek, eerie production style of Willie Mitchell.
Thus the song plays like Al Green in Hell, w/a great groove and deeply creepy feel. The Thin White Duke starts here.

from Diamond Dogs (out-take) (RCA)
available on CD - Diamond Dogs (30th Anniversary edition) (EMI)


Dressed In Black  performed by The Shangri-Las  1966
Recommended by m.ace [profile]

"Dressed in black, he walks alone, a shadow in the night." The Shangri-Las death trip reached a powerful climax in this eerie song of loss and lingering. Funereal piano chords balanced by surging choruses and a closing spoken section that leaves you as weak as the sadly wounded narrator. If this one doesn't get to you, you ain't got a heart.

from the single Dressed In Black (Red Bird)
available on CD - The Best Of The Shangri-Las (Mercury)



first sleep  performed by cliff martinez  2001
Recommended by olli [profile]

deceptivly simple, eerie melancholic electronic piece from the soundtrack to the (frankly disappointing) soderbergh remake of "solaris".
half clinical, half emotional. pretty good stuff.
sounds a bit like something off radiohead's kid a, only more reflective and less pretentious.


available on CD - solaris original soundtrack



  frmars: The piece is not "simple". For minimalist music lovers, this is a pure gem. The whole soundtrack is a mesmerizing variation around the same notes. And I was frankly NOT disappointed by the remake of Solaris. It is an "ambient"' movie, that made me think of Brian eno's solo music (music for airports for ex). Very elegant, very slow, very subtle.
  olli: well, in my opinion the soundtrack was the best thing about the film. though I like and deeply respect soderbergh as a director( I'm intrigued by "the limey" for the same reasons you appreciated solaris), i feel his vision for solaris was too rushed compared to the soviet original(wich admittedly is a bit TOO slow in places), and I felt it didn't give enough of a fresh angle on the subject to warrant a remake. (yeah, i know they thought of it more as an adaptation of the book rather than a remake of the film, but people just aren't going to get that) Still, the word dissappointment was used a bit relatively here, as it WAS one of the better studio films out that year..it's just that the original has a special value to me. (hmm.just realized that this might not be the ideal forum for discussing films, what with the lack of the word "movie" in the domain name and all. So I'll leave it here.) Still, I agree that i phrased my description of the piece a bit ackwardly, it really should have said simple. There, fixed it.
green grass of tunnel  performed by mum
Recommended by licoricewhipped [profile]

eerie & beautiful.




Holes  performed by Mercury Rev  1998
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An intense and beautiful epic, this track is the opener on the band's superb 1998 album, 'Deserters Songs'. I'm quite fickle, and usually prefer two to three-minute songs, but this track is so brilliant that it seems short at 6 minutes. It builds up beautifully, starting with just an echoey string aura, with vocals, synth (a Supertramp-like wurlitzer sound) and guitar coming in one by one. The music finally explodes after a couple of minutes, with full drums and eerie oscillating noises. It's incredibly beautiful and dense, and the song has a melancholy air that is very affecting. Mercury Rev have a habit of putting incredible tracks at the beginning of their albums. I'm glad they are now getting more of the attention they deserve.

from Deserter's Songs, available on CD


Mark Rae’s Medicine (Kraak & Smaak Remix)  performed by Kraak & Smaak  2007
Recommended by iPodChick [profile]

The multi-talented Dutch artists Kraak & Smaak shine in their unprecedented, soul-shaking compilation, “The Remix Sessions” due out May 29th. Named by IDJ as "one of the most incendiary live outfits," Kraak & Smaak take that crackling energy and infuse classic jams with their signature style. Music lovers everywhere will rejoice as hard-to-find tracks, many of which were only released on vinyl, join each other in this boogie-licious showcase.

From banging dance floor "Mimezine – Can't get Enough (Kraak & Smaak Remix)," to funky, midtempo "Jamiroquai – Electric Mistress (Kraak & Smaak Remix)" to eerie, internationally-infused "Skeewiff – Man of Constant Sorrow (Kraak & Smaak Remix)," Kraak & Smaak reveals their astounding vision for the possibilities of electronica. This beat-driven assembly is an invaluable resource for re-tracing the various pathways of this modern musical expression.

from The Remix Sessions (Quango Records)



  aquila49: Recommendation is by a recording industry shill. You can find the exact some wording at ubl.com and Indie911.com—straight from a press release. Ugghh.
New York New York  performed by Nina Hagen  1983
Recommended by Yammer [profile]

The DIY ethos of punk served to liberate performers from the obligation to have a great deal of technical ability. The unfortunate corollary was that any display of already-acquired virtuousity instantly marked one as part of the Uncool Wankerage, forcing nascent guitar gods like Andy Summers to play as though suddenly arthritic. Possibly the first artist to successfully bridge Old World training and New World raucousness was Nina Hagen. "New York New York" is the East German-trained singer's signature tune. Over a clipped, dry Morodor techno-dystopia background, the verses present Hagen recounting her then-current regimen of glamourous excess in a harsh, metallic raven's shriek. Then, as though descending from the heavens at the end of a Wagnerian opera, comes the chorus -- a meltingly warm (yet uncomfortable) wave of minor chords, then a soaring, yearning, superbly modulated mezzo-soprano...which, after a jolt of realization, is understood to also belong to Nina Hagen. And so on.

from Fearless (CBS)


Open Your Eyes  performed by The Lords Of The New Church  1982
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Opening with a brat beating bass and melody that is scarily reminiscent of some late 70s euro disco pathos, it’s only when Brian James’ raunchy guitar kicks in that you know you’re well away from the lights of that dance floor and in the grips of a very different master. A hedonistic web of Bators’ beloved conspiracy theorizing, the logical successor to the Wanderers’ paranoia-packed repertoire, ”Open Your Eyes” previewed a closet of horrors that embraced organized religion, the impending World Tour of Pope John Paul II, Bolshevik plots and Ronald Reagan’s apparent rush towards nuclear Armageddon. With session man Matt Black’s synthesizers giving the whole thing a classic rock feel that merged edgily with the band’s own punkish sensibilities, it was, as always, Bators’ viperous lyrics that brought the whole thing into the twilight zone of pre-Internet intrigue. The 80s politicking of Margaret Thatcher’s Britain and Reagan’s cold war America pretty much ensured that both sides were far happier not having to open their eyes. A gleeful Bators was there, though, to make sure they did.
(AMG)

from The Lords of the New Church, available on CD


Out of this World  performed by Tony Hatch  1962
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A superb twangy, bongo-ridden theme from Tony Hatch. It's hard to believe this is the same man who wrote the themes for soap operas like 'Crossroads' and 'Neighbours', but it is... Overall this sounds kind of how I once expected/hoped John Barry's early 60s work might sound - harpsichord, twangy guitar etc. It opens with some eerie effects, bongoes and spare harpsichord sound before breaking into a fully fledged shadows/spy theme style masterpiece, stopping abruptly after just over two minutes. Since I heard this on a compilation, I have no idea as to its origin, which is a shame, as I would love to track down any similar work Tony Hatch may have done. I did some research, and it seems that the session guitarist on this track was none other than Big Jim Sullivan, who cut a couple of sitar LPs on Mercury in the 60s.
n.b. this is not the same tune as the much recorded and superb Harold Arlen/Johnny Mercer 'out of this world'.

from the single Out of this World
available on CD - Easy Project II: House of Loungecore (Sequel)




  n-jeff: For some reason my parents acquired 2 mint copies of this on 7. Needless to say they didn't keep 'em long, heh, heh. Its a nice enough track, don't I remember some flute in there. but Tony was also the composer of some great early 60's pop, he did a number of LP's with Petula Clark, including the hits 'Downtown' and 'Don't sleep in the Subway' written with Jackie Trent (I think- Oh names, names, names). So to only remember him for Neighbours is cruel (and don't forget one variant of the Crossroads theme was recorded by paul Macartney and Wings, bet that isn't on the greates hits LP).
  delicado: totally; I think Tony's a genius; don't get me wrong! 'I know a place' and 'I couldn't live without your love' are two other great pop songs he was responsible for...
Real Pain  performed by Kraak & Smaak  2007
Recommended by iPodChick [profile]

The multi-talented Dutch artists Kraak & Smaak shine in their unprecedented, soul-shaking compilation, “The Remix Sessions” due out May 29th. Named by IDJ as "one of the most incendiary live outfits," Kraak & Smaak take that crackling energy and infuse classic jams with their signature style. Music lovers everywhere will rejoice as hard-to-find tracks, many of which were only released on vinyl, join each other in this boogie-licious showcase.

From banging dance floor "Mimezine – Can't get Enough (Kraak & Smaak Remix)," to funky, midtempo "Jamiroquai – Electric Mistress (Kraak & Smaak Remix)" to eerie, internationally-infused "Skeewiff – Man of Constant Sorrow (Kraak & Smaak Remix)," Kraak & Smaak reveals their astounding vision for the possibilities of electronica. This beat-driven assembly is an invaluable resource for re-tracing the various pathways of this modern musical expression.

from The Remix Sessions (Quango Records)



  aquila49: If this recommendation sounds like an ad, it's because it is one! I found the exact same wording on another site—indie911.com. iPodChick works for the recording industry. Is that acceptable to Musical Taste members? It isn't to me. By the way, I like Kraak and Smaak—but I am not coming here anymore if shills like "iPodChick" are going to be posting "recommendations."
  delicado: Hi aquila49 - thanks for your comment. yeah, I figured this was probably an 'inside' recommendation although I didn't do the follow-up googling! I don't mind say people recommending their own band so long as it's one song and they're pretty straight up about it, but obviously this isn't the same thing. I guess I should set out some guidelines somewhere. If anyone else has any feelings about this feel free to chime in!
  n-jeff: I agree with aquila49 - off with their heads! I hardly buy music papers because too much is regurgitated verbatim from press releases. I must admit when I read the initial recommendation my mind glazed over halfway through the first phrase, so I couldn't actually read it. Send them back to MYSPACE!
  aquila49: I guess "ipodchick" doesn't have anything to say about this—or anything else. Good riddance.
  liveinpeace: I think the music speaks for itself, however it may have come to our awareness. I do not criticize ipodchick or anyone else for not posting more here. You have made people feel so "welcomed" to join in the discussion. Just keep on living in peace, love, and music.
Summetime  performed by Nina Simone
Recommended by kaptnunderpnts [profile]

instrumentally, it's extremely simple. it seems to have nothing more than simple percussion and a haunting, eerie piano. and then comes the voice that makes this song just so thick. it's my favorite version of the song. the version i have is live and actually sounds pretty lo-fi. look for that one. i got it off the internet and have no information for it.




Sunshower  performed by Dr. Buzzard’s Original Savannah Band  1976
Recommended by ambassador [profile]

This one fits well with with my previous reccomendation in the melancholy/eerie vein. I read somewhere that the song was in the African JuJu style, but discofied of course given its 1976 production. It was this song that proved to be the Dr. Buzzard . . . was not your average disco band. Cory Daye's vocals are beautiful and harken back to an earlier era of classic jazz vocals, like Ella and Billie. The children's backup vocals are what gives it the spooky quality, probably because the intrumentation is dark, like seeing those cute (but scary) kids come out of the corn fields in Children of the Corn. The last chorus just sends chills down my spine as Cory digs into the lyrics and dances around them as the everything sort or brightens up, like the sun coming out after a summer rain. This makes the title all make such perfect sense.

from Dr. Buzzard's Original Savannah Band, available on CD



  Festy: You know what makes the last chorus for me (or choruses from after the kids singing only accompanied by percussion)... as simple as it may sound... it's the handclaps. They add so much and I always look forward to them coming along. I became obsessed with this song about 6 months ago and bought the CD, which, as I expected, doesn't contain so many fantastic songs on it, but, still an enjoyable CD. I really enjoy your recommendations!
Suzanne  performed by Leonard Cohen  1968
Recommended by eve [profile]

I loved this song the moment I heard it. The melody is really nice, and Leonard Cohen does his standby trick of singing slowly and hauntingly about mysterious women wearing "rags and feathers from Salvation Army counters." Very romantic in a seventies way. if you like Bob Dylan's voice, you'll probably like Leonard Cohen, although the content is different.

from Songs of Leonard Cohen



  n-jeff: I find too much Leonard Cohen can be a little on the bleak side, but this song is a real gem, A shiny, strangely uplifting jewel. I also have a version by Jack Jones, and I'm pleased that Jack Jones covered this song, in many ways its braver for him to have covered such un mainstream material than, say, Johnny Cash. My Girlfriend, however, finds Jack Jones' version very disturbing.
The Days of Anger  performed by Leroy Holmes  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This is taken from an album of spaghetti western themes that came out on United Artists records in the late 1960s. It has a similar sound to other releases of the era on that label, probably because Leroy Holmes was a staff arranger. I can definitely hear Al Caiola's guitar playing.

To my ears, the arrangement also has a hint of Quincy Jones's work on 'The Italian Job'. It's an upbeat, jerky track with a bassline so percussive that it almost sounds like part of the beat. The melody is carried by guitar, horns, and also some nice wordless vocals (right near the end there's an incredible descending vocal swell that's really something).

Overall, this has a slightly menacing, very hip sound. It might even work on the dancefloor!

from Once Upon a Time in the West (United Artists UAS 6710)



The Rip  performed by Portishead  2008
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

Damn, the new Portishead LP is good!
This song mixes eerie theremin tones, acoustic and surf guitars, Kraftwerk-esque keyboards and a swell kraut-rock drumbeat.
Meanwhile Beth Gibbons drifts in from above, doing her best "Sandy Denny sings the Nico Songbook" impersonation.
Outstanding!


available on CD - Third


This Isn't Maybe  performed by Waldeck  2001
Recommended by secularus [profile]

The driving force of this trip hop/nu jazz oriented song is the Chet Baker sample, "this isn't sometimes, this is always, this isn't maybe this is always," that exquisitedly weaves its way through the various waves and troughs of the rhythm underscoring the track. For those who have never heard Chet Baker sing, think of Chris Montez, who like Chet epitomizes the he/she question - is it a she or he singing? The sultry and relaxed vocals have endeared me to this song. This track was released in late Feb 2001 on 12" but is believed to be on Waldeck's forthcoming lp, The Night Garden, scheduled for release in late May 2001 on Emagine Music in the US.





Tive Razao  performed by Seu Jorge  2004
Recommended by ambassador [profile]

So anyone who's seen The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou or City of God will recognize Seu Jorge as the handsome, dark-skinned actor with the gravelly voice. In Life Aquatic he plays Pele, the Brazilian safety officer on board Zissou's boat and the bard that plays Portuguese language covers of David Bowie songs. Although this is changing, even in Brazil he's better known as an actor than a musician. His second solo album (he used to be in a band called Farofa Carioca), Cru, was released last fall in France and was impossibly hard to find until recently. Tive Razao was the first release from this album and is fairly representative and is the shining peak as well. Based around an acoustic guitar riff and Seu Jorge's multi-tracked vocals, the song just floats in this melancholy haze like some of the best Chico Buarqu de Hollanda ballads. The production on this song (and the album) is much more sparse than the previous album, but much more original as well. Jorge even uses what I think is a theremin to add a slight spookiness to the preceedings. The lyrics mean something like, "I had an excuse" or "I had a reason."

from Cru, available on CD



  ambassador: I since found out that the title means "You were right." makes a bit more sense that way.
You Go To My Head  performed by Bryan Ferry  1975
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

Lounge lizards rarely get more reptilian than this. Another brilliant example of Ferry’s cover mad, song-stylist solo work outside of Roxy Music in the early to mid 1970’s – totally rethinking some well-known standard, yet grasping something intrinsic about the song’s core. Here he gives the tune just the hint of a Philly-soul groove, and keeps the production/arrangement as open/eerie as an empty parking garage. Very sexy, and more a little creepy – its like being hit on by the ghost of Bela Lugosi in the toilet of a disco in 1975.

from Let's Stick Together, available on CD


You remain an Angel  performed by Danny Wilson  1987
Recommended by geezer [profile]

An eighties incarnation of the epic sadness and yearning that the Walker Brothers did so well with the songs of Jaques Brel and Bob Gaudio(Sun aint gonna shine Anymore).This band was a rare thing at this point ,they had aspirations to write great timeless songs when drum machines ruled the world.On this ,they suceeded ,the songs heartbreaking climax could make a man cry,awash with brave brass and orchestral tears leaving a man broken in two and drowning in his own tears by the time the song fades into an eerie percussive silence .

from Meet Danny Wilson, available on CD


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