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search results for “Ambitious”
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You searched for ‘Ambitious’, which matched 7 songs.
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Big Time  performed by Peter Gabriel  1986
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

An even funkier hit single than "Sledgehammer" ? which had an epic groove but was too slow to actually dance to ? "Big Time" is a sardonic response to yuppie materialism with the funniest lyrics of Peter Gabriel's entire career. (The ending of the song, stopping just before the obvious punch line to all this discussion of how preternaturally huge everything in Gabriel's charmed life is, is a small moment of brilliance.) But the brilliance of the song is in the way it ties all that Gabriel had been learning about African percussion and Middle Eastern melodies ever since the days of his third solo album and ties them all into the service of a walloping great groove, making plain the connections between North Africa and Stax-Volt once and for all. The combination of talking drum and wah-wah guitar owes as much to Booker T and the MGs as it does to King Sunny Ade, which is both the key to "Big Time" and a clue as to why Gabriel's later, more explicitly world music focused albums just aren't as much fun.
(AMG)

from So (Geffen 24088-2), available on CD (Geffen)


Chelsea Girl  performed by Simple Minds  1979
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

Simple Mind's second single, "Chelsea Girl", was an apt follow-up to its predecessor "Life in a Day", an epic chant, a shimmering melody, and a sing-along chorus that paid spell-bound homage to Velvet Underground chanteuse Nico, in her role within Warhol’s movie of the same name.

Producer John Leckie gives "Chelsea Girl" a lovely delicate quality, especially across the long, tinkling keyboard intro, an aura that barely dissipates even when drummer Brian McGee and bassist Derek Forbes's kick in with their thumping rhythm. The band were proving to be masters at these juxtaposed styles, creating rock solid bases and overlaying them with much more fragile and elegant melodies and atmospheres. Here, those latter are close to effervescent and, as the band shift down into the long bass-driven, overlapping tag teamed vocal outro (a playful lift from Roxy Music’s ”Mother Of Pearl”, but no matter), absolutely crystalline.

On album and onstage, ”Chelsea Girl” remained fans' favorite, on 45 though, it inexplicably crashed and burned, and didn't even reach the UK chart.
(AMG)

from Life In A Day (Zoom), available on CD (Zoom)


Cirrus Minor  performed by Pink Floyd  1969
Recommended by Mike [profile]

Pink Floyd are heard at their best with this piece of film music, keeping it simple and atmospheric. I find so much of their output over-ambitious, but here I think they got it right - a short melodic vocal section followed by a very simple organ chord sequence repeated to a very slow fade. This manages to sound gently, atmospherically organic and hypnotic where so often Floyd sound ludicrously overblown.

from More (EMI)
available on CD - Relics (EMI)



  konsu: Indeed. The Floyd records that are best are the soundtrack material. Mainly because they had to adapt to a medium outside their own dreamy minds. This is my second favorite after "A Saucerful of Secrets" LP. But their "Obscured By Clouds" LP is also a soundtrack piece for an unreleased film that has the same fine qualities... I hate to get long-winded about the whole Floyd thing, but I have to mention Hubert Laws LP "Crying Song" (CTI 1002/6000) which features two compositions from "More".
Don't look down  performed by Divine Comedy  1996
Recommended by phil [profile]

An outrageously ambitious number by a 24-year old - an opening awash with horns, before a ridiculous set of lyrics in which Neil goes up in a big wheel with his girl, only to meet God at the top of the revolution, whereupon he tries to argue with him. Neil is on sparkling form, crying with disgust

and the couple in the car above
well I suppose they think that we're in love


Before continuing (his eye must ache with all this winking)...

Then without warning, as we approach the top
The wheel that turns us all comes to a sudden stop


This song also has the greatest cliffhanger ending in rock. Go and listen - you'd be crazy not to. THe rest of this album is brilliant too.

from Promenade (Setanta SETCD013)



Heaven Knows  performed by The Corrs  1995
Recommended by Mike [profile]

According to most educated musical minds, the Corrs are purveyors of irritating, unambitious, tasteless pop tinged with Irish folk. I'd tend to agree strongly, and this track starts off so as to suggest nothing better - twelve seconds of unimaginitive and poorly-recorded drum solo, which moreover reappears with just over 3 minutes on the clock, followed by a truly dreadfully contrived-sounding modulation to the supertonic à la Eurovision. And a horrible brassy backing at one point towards the end.

However, there is definitely something I really like about, even esteem in what occours between those two points. For one thing, there is the way the depressive lyrics are sung to an assertively forward-moving minor key backing. There is something about the rhythm of word-setting that grabs me. I like the chord sequences. The melody's quite good. I like the violin solo in the middle, and the use of the violin for the riff heard during the introduction. Even if it's just a cheap piece of pop, it sounds as though some intelligence and emotion went into its creation. And as i say, for some reason, something about it seems to click with me somehow.

from Forgiven, not forgotten, available on CD


I Think I Love You  performed by The Partridge Family  1970
Recommended by geezer [profile]

To think there was a time when pops vision could be this grand and ambitious .This song originated from an American tv show "The Partridge Family" and was played out by pedigree session men and David Cassidy. its elements contain sunshine pop vocals ,harpsichord and a psuedo classical middle eight and an irrestible chorus,the song almost sounds like two songs alternating with each other and managing to resolve their differences at every chorus ,As good as pop ever got.

from Best of The Partridge Family and David Cassidy
available on CD - Best of


Née dans un ice-cream  performed by Michel Polnareff  1971
Recommended by tempted [profile]

A key song from the French folk rock bohemian's ambitious concept album, Polnareff's. This could have been produced by David Axelrod but wasn't. Beautiful, aching pop song with grandeur and despair. And a rhythm section that's so groovy. Another example of how great the studio orchestras sounded in France back then. What an arrangement. As hip as it gets.

from Polnareff's, available on CD ()




  Sem Sinatra: Totally agree ... all Polnaref's early 70s albums have killer tunes backed up by orchestrations to die for
  jezandliz1: The orchestra backing on Polnareff's is excellent and was recorded in the UK using UK session musicians who also played on some of the best groovy uk library and soundtrack music of the late 60s. Try the three instrumentals on Polnareff's - so funky they're ridiculous!

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