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10 tracks on Pye have been recommended.
Order by - songtitle - year - performer - date recommended
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I Know You  performed by Angela & The Fans  1966
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Think bouncy, 60's brit-girl classic. Makes me tingle all over with happiness. This was on the flip on a Man From UNCLE novelty, Love Ya Illya, and is actually by that queen of opulence Alma Cogan in disguise.

from the single I Know You (Pye 7N.17108)
available on CD - Here Come The Girls 6 (Sequel)



Stop  performed by Julie Grant  1965
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

A powerful, emotional, sophisticated song, the kind that Brit-girl Julie does the best. Without resorting to mawkish affectation, the sheer hush and force of her voice can make tears well up. This was her final single for the Pye label, and a fitting tribute to one of the most consistantly good careers of all the 60's UK female singers.

from the single Stop (Pye 7N.15884)
available on CD - Count On Me! (RPM)



Waterloo Sunset  performed by The Kinks  1967
Recommended by shakeahand [profile]

For me, simply the most perfect, most luscious piece of pop of its era. I just have to hear the opening downward guitar riff and I'm wrapped up in every note of the song, virtually holding my breath until the premature fade. Wow!

from Something Else (Pye)



  07 Feb 05 ·stupidwall: village green is one of my favorite albums of all time
  07 Feb 05 ·bonzoboots: ray davies rarely put a foot wrong in that golden era : 66/68, and the three lps from then are filled with perfect gems- "lazy old sun", "rainy day in june", "animal farm" to name just three...but it could have been another three!
  19 Mar 06 ·b. toklas: There is one more album which was recorded between "The village green ..." and "Arthur" but not released before 1973, I think on Reprise, called "The great lost Kinks album". To say it´s even better than those officially released in the Sixties may be a little annoying, but ... well, give it a try! Anyway´: the Kinks are the Kinks are the Kinks.
Girl Don’t Come  performed by Sandie Shaw  1964
Recommended by golden [profile]

From the minor key trombone intro to the teenage angst of the lyrics, this is a classic song of the 60's that totally encapulates the innocent era of the UK beat boom. Sandie Shaw was probably the best selling UK female singer from 64 to 69, slightly outselling her contemporaries Dusty, Cilla and Lulu and although she possessed a weaker voice than the others, what she lacked in volume she made up in style and interpretation. Sweet and slightly soulful with a quasi tuneless ache to her voice which epitomised a teenager stood up by some beatnik no hoper, she was only 17 and showed the ways of a woman several years older. In the UK it was the follow up to the massive UK No 1 ''Always Something There To Remind Me'' and was a massive Top 3 hit that should have gone all the way to the top.
I love this record - it sums up an era, it is the beginning of a suit of girl singers who changed then style of singing, from 50's twee to 60's ''dolly bird'' and it remains a classic pop single from a girl who held the record for the most No 1 hits for a ssolo female for 19 years

from n/a (Pye)



  03 Feb 06 ·shakeahand: Quite agree. One of my first LPs as a teen was a greatest hits - and for me she summed up the 60s female vocal. For big, brassy and emotion-laden power pop, see also Long Walk Home.
  03 Feb 06 ·Swinging London: It was initially released as the 'B' side of the much weaker: 'I'd Be Far Better Off Without You'. Someone, probably a DJ, flipped it over. I love the arrangement on this. It's full of atmosphere. It seems to completely capture the time. Another of her songs that has a similar effect is 'You've Not Changed', which wasn't as big a hit and seems to have been forgotten and is often excluded from Greatest Hits Comps.
Black Coffee  performed by Petula Clark  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Regular visitors to this site will know I'm partial to this song and to the era of this recording. But nothing could have prepared me for the mind-blowing grooviness this Petula Clark version from 1968. It has a 'slightly too slow to dance to' funkiness, kind of like the tastiest version of 'Watermelon man' you ever heard. The arrangement has piano, bouncy drums, peppy brass, flutes, and to top it all, some beautiful strings adding some complexity to what is basically a simple bluesy composition.

Isn't it great when you come across a track and just think 'this is the best thing ever'?

The entire CD is great - 28 of Petula's grooviest tracks. I recommend it!

from The Other Man's Grass (Is Always Greener) (Pye NSPL 18211)
available on CD - Feelin' Groovy (Sanctuary)




  22 Mar 06 ·FlyingDutchman1971: Ah, Ms. Pet! She is one of my favorites too. I've managed to get my hands on most of her 60's catalog, including the original album this song comes from. Thanks for mentioning her! k.d. Lang also does a beautiful rendition of this great torch song on her album "Shadowland".
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