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3 tracks on WEA have been recommended.
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Heaven Knows I’m miserable now  performed by The Smiths  1985
Recommended by delicado [profile]

I love this much-derided song. People quote it as proof that the Smiths made morose music for morose people, but if you actually listen, it’s an amazingly uplifting song. Johnny Marr’s guitar is heavenly sounding; it all reminds me that no one else really made pop like the Smiths. What I've just said really completely fails to do the song justice. Ah well...





from Hatful of Hollow (Rough Trade), available on CD (WEA)




  19 Apr 01 ·schlemmsy: I quite agree. And this is not due to my love of uplifting house.
  01 Sep 02 ·john_l: Yup, this is the one that made me sit up and take notice ...
  09 Aug 04 ·raumfahrer1rolf: I love this song too. How is a person "miserable" when singing or hearing this song? It shows quite a bit of Morrissey here - he's "miserable" but it all sounds sublime, with a wistful tongue-in-cheekness to it. It's really pretty actually. If this is "misery" then please give me more of it, I'll get along quite nicely!
  11 Jan 11 ·daniela_por: This song will never be forgotten. It's simply great :)
Just A Touch Away  performed by Echo & The Bunnymen  1997
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

This song was to be a key moment in the reformation of Echo & the Bunnymen. Ian McCulloch originally wrote "Just a Touch Away" back in the mid-Nineties, in the midst of the Electrafixion era, but felt it inappropriate for that band. Over time, the singer found himself shelving more and more songs, as it became ever more evident that Electrafixion's days were numbered. Eventually McCulloch played a demo of the song for Will Sergeant, who was decidedly impressed; soon after, the pair turned out the lights on Elektrafixion, re-united with Les Pattison, reformed Echo & the Bunnymen, and began work on their new album, 1997's Evergreen. "Just a Touch Away" would take pride of place within, its evocative atmospheres and haunting lyrics creating an eloquent showcase of the band's new styles and sounds. Today, the song is Sergeant's favorite track from the set, proving McCulloch was right to have so much faith in it all along.

from Evergreen (WEA 3213), available on CD


The Cutter  performed by Echo & The Bunnymen  1983
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

On ”The Cutter” fellow Liverpool natives, Echo and The Bunnymen successfully wed the Eastern influenced psychedelic sounds made famous by hometown heroes, The Beatles. Crafting Eastern influences into a new post-punk hybrid that was sweeping England in the Early 80’s. It was songs like ”The Cutter” that would help define the newly coined Neo-psychedelic sub-genre, practiced by such group’s of the period as The Chameleons U.K., Psychedelic Furs and Simple Minds amongst others. The track opens with a keyboard approximation of Indian strings, whirring briefly before the band kicks into a percolating groove of popping bass, driving straight drums and chinking guitar accents. Ian McCulloch adds another layer of ’60 nostalgia, employing his expressive, slack-jawed vocal delivery that conjures aural images of the late Jim Morrison as he unfurls lines that drip with apprehension “Who’s on the seventh floor? / Brewing alternatives / What’s in the bottom drawer? / Waiting for things to give”. The Eastern strings re-enter at strategic points, filling in space between verses and McCulloch’s esoteric pleas to “spare us the cutter!”, which sounds like a good idea in any case. The arrangement also veers into epic territory quite unexpectedly in the second half, signaled by a sweeping wave of keyboard and McCulloch’s more subdued delivery as poses a string of rhetorically poignant questions, “Am I the happy loss? / Will I still recoil? / When the skin is lost / Am I the worthy cross? / Will I still be soiled? / When the dirt is off” -as the music swell behind him. Like any good single, the track never looses steam, cruising through each section with power and grace. A nod is in order for Ian Broudie, who’s smooth production helped The Cutter become Echo and The Bunnymen’s first top ten single in Britain and a linchpin track for the Neo-psychedelic movement.
(AMG)

from Porcupine (Sire 2-23770), available on CD


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