TRANSLATE THIS PAGE into GERMAN | SPANISH | FRENCH | ITALIAN | PORTUGUESE
 HOME |  REGISTER | FORGOTTEN PASSWORD | SEARCH or BROWSE | RECOMMEND | EDIT | LINKS | MOST RECENT
musical taste home
search results
search results for “angelic”
download an m3u playlist for all available clips for the search angelic

List songs by Song title | Performer | Year

You searched for ‘angelic’, which matched 10 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
Angelica  performed by Scott Walker  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A quintessential Scott track, recorded when he was at peak of his abilities. There doesn't seem to be much middle ground over Scott Walker - people seem to either love him or hate him. I don't really understand how anyone could not be charmed by Scott - sure, he's a crooner and the music backing him is often lush and is rarely 'hip'. But the voice! The words! I've never been really big on either vocalists or lyrics, but these really, really get to me. Angelica's verse is dark and melancholic, and the words speak of regret over a neglected lover. The chorus explodes with emotion, and at this point you should be able to figure out one way or the other whether you love Scott or not. n.b. I always thought this song was composed by Scott, but I was mistaken. As well as being a great songwriter, he had superb taste in other material.

from Scott, available on CD ()



angelica  performed by michel magne  1998
Recommended by tim [profile]




For All We Know  performed by Donny Hathaway  1972
Recommended by gthomas [profile]

The slightly gospel-inflected interpretation by Hathaway on his eponymously titled recording with Roberta Flack in 1972 (Atlantic Records) is simply transcendent. The string arrangements by Arif Mardin wondrous, flute accompaniment by Hubert Laws, as usual, fluid and moving. And the closing moments by Roberta Flack, angelic.

from Roberta Flack & Donny Hathaway (Atlantic 82794-2)
available on CD - same as album (same as album)


Here in heaven  performed by Sparks  1974
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Just unbelievably awesome stuff!

It's a song about a suicide pact gone wrong. Amazing falsetto (and non-falsetto) vocals. Great glam production. Fantastic guitar solo at 1:40.

It's hard to choose just one track to recommend by this group, but I've settled for this one for now. 'Thank God it isn't Christmas' was a close runner up.

(weirdly, there are a few tracks by them that I would really rather never hear again in my life. Like 'Get in the swing'. Have you heard this track? I have serious trouble with it!)

Anyway, 1974 - great year!

from Kimono My House (Island)




  Mike: Sparks have indeed produced some good and some extremely bad material. I may still own - somewhere - this LP, though the most-played track on it was always "This town ain't big enough..." 1974 - yes, an incredible year which also brought us such marvels as the Glitter Band's "Angel Face".
  geezer: only Sparks could be comfortable with such subject matter there is humour in everything they do like Tryouts for the Human Race a song for sperm everywhere
Rock Lobster  performed by The B-52’s  1979
Recommended by dsalmones [profile]

The B-52's were one of several late-'70s bands for which there was no real category. With their modified surf guitar sound, their thrift-shop fashion sense, and their jokey demeanor, they certainly weren't in the rock & roll mainstream, but they exhibited none of punk's sneering rebelliousness or musical aggression, either ó the only anarchy that seemed to interest the B-52's was of the sartorial variety. "Rock Lobster" was the first B-52's song to catch popular attention, and it's easy to see why. The minimalist guitar lick is like a beach-bum's rendition of the James Bond theme, the one-note organ ostinato complements it perfectly, and Fred Scheider's campy sprechgesang jumps out at you immediately. Yet despite the song's self-consciously weird texture and silly lyrics about earlobes falling off and communal towel coordination, there's a thread of darkness weaving through it. Make no mistake ó this is not a song with hidden meaning lurking below the surface. But its surface is a little more complicated than it seems to be at first. For one thing, it's almost seven minutes long, and it does start to drag toward the end. Right when it does, you notice the mood getting darker ó Schneider delivers lines about "having fun" and "baking in the sun" in a hoarse croak, and the guitar starts sounding repetitive in a slightly creepy way. Suddenly you realize that the whole song has been in a minor key, and as Schneider shouts and the guitar barks out its angular riff over and over, you start to wonder if maybe there's some kind of commentary going on here. But then Kate Pierson's angelic voice comes in with a surprisingly pretty falling harmony part that can only be described as a descant, which repeats several times, gradually paring itself down to a single phrase, and abruptly the song is over. The whole song ends up being a goofy party confection with a slightly crunchy center ó a pretty satisfying overall flavor combination.
(AMG)

from The B-52's, available on CD


Speeding Cars  performed by Imogen Heap
Recommended by melpomenex [profile]

This is such a beautiful song. Imogen Heap has an angelic voice, especially when she hits high notes.




The Next Step Youíll Take  performed by Club 8  2003
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Club 8, consisting of songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Johan Angergaard and vcalist Karolina Komstedt, started of in the mid 90s with a twee indie pop sound, with jangly guitars (Angergaard being a major Smiths fan) and simple instrumetation. With the release of their self- titled album in 2001 they added some electronica without losing the general tone of their music which is basically well crafted, melodic, gentle, airy, etheral, melancholic indie pop. Karolina Komstedt vocals are quite similar to early Nina Person of The Cardigans or Claudine Longet in their airy, angelic, dreamlike delivery. "The Next Step You'll Take" is a bossa nova influenced track, with gentle acoustic and electric guitars, some percussion and vibraphone. Nothing groundbreaking, but they combine well known elements in such a charming, delicate way i find them hard to resist.

from Strangely Beautiful, available on CD



Watch Out Girl  performed by the Okaysions  1970
Recommended by tinks [profile]

A stomping uptempo cut of blue-eyed soul, replete with slicing fuzz guitar, almost angelic harmonies and a brilliant call-and-response chorus. A league beyond the mainstream schmaltz of their earlier hit "Girl Watcher".

from the single Watch Out Girl (Cotillion)


Yesterday and Today  performed by YES  1968
Recommended by geezer [profile]

Sweet and simpler than this groups future output ,a piano,acoustic guitar ballad ,with angelic vocals and unusual chord progressions which make it sound less repetitive than it actually is .This was Yes,s first album and gave little sign of their future prog direction this track has more in common with The Beatles than than the wigged out fantasy jams that filled future albums .Short ,sweet and lovely

from YES!, available on CD


Yo Que No Vivo Sin Ti (You Donít Have to Say You Love Me)  performed by Luis Miguel  1987
Recommended by RCA76 [profile]

Yet another amazing Spanish version of an amazing song. Luis Miguel is a very suave latin crooner and this song especially demonstrates that. I love the late 80's instrumentation, it reminds me of late night in New Year City.

from Soy Como Quiero Ser, available on CD


   Try another search:

musical taste home

© zarmi 2000-2022
CONTACT | ABOUT